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The Islander Apr 8, 1916

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Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VII., No. 2      THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, APRIL  8. 1916.      Subscription price, $1.50 per year
SACRED EASTER CANTATA
A treat of the first order is in
store for lovers of music who
will have an opportunity toJlisten
to the choir of St. George's Presbyterian Church assisted by the
members otthe choirs of the city
churches on Tuesday, April I8th.
at 8 o'clock.
The depth of feeling as depicted by part one in; Gethsemane,
will bring you into touch with
the true spirit of this sacred piece
The second part leads us on to
Calvary and, the fullness and
expression of the various leaders
and parts taken will arouse your
true nature to a greater realization of the whole meaning of
this magnificent piece. Last we
have the Resurrection and Ascension and the complete fullness
of the world's joy is rendered in
this part.
The whole cantata is a masterpiece, and every solo, chorus and
part leads step by step the whole
path of the Savioui of men. The
leaders and members who take
part in this Cantata have willingly devoted many nights of hard
practice to bring the rendering
of it up to a high standard, and
the result already in sight assures success.
The price of admission; has
been placed at the nominal sum
of twenty-five cents, owing to
the condition of things existing
at present, that it may be within
the reach of all to participate in
this musical production.
Mr. C. Edwards, the conductor, Mr. Parnham, organist, Mr.
McMillan, violinist. This will be
about the last occasion you will
have of listening to Mr. McMillan on the violin and he is at his
best in a piece of this nature.
Women's Patriotic Society.
A Red Cross Tea will be held
on Tuesday, April 18th, at Mrs.
Piket's house. Selections will be
played by the Band of the lOnd
Battalion, and during the afternoon home-made candy will be
on sale.
ILO ILO ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Res
cue."
Episode No. Twenty-two--"An American
Queen,"
See the "Run-Away-Wife,"
four part Broadway drama,, at
Ilo Ilo Monday.
Mr. Alexander Somerville and
family wish to thank their many
friends for their sympathy and
beautiful floral tributes received
during their late bereavement.
PREPAREDNESS."
From San Francisco Chronicle.
The City Council.
The City Council held their
regular meeting in the Council
Chambers on Monday evening,
His Worship Mayor Parnham in
the chair. Pesent: Aldermen
Banks, Brown, Bate, Carey,
Henderson, and Macdonald.
The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and adopted.
The following accounts were
referred to the finance committee
fr r payment:
Canadian Collieries $ 11.00
B.C. Gazette...      5.00
Electric Lighting Co    54.08
Simon Leiser & Co    10.00
B.C. Telephone...      6.00
B. Crawford     52.20
B.C. Garage      4.00
Total   .- $142.28
A communication was read
from the Northwest Mounted
Police at Blairmore, Alberta, concerning men who had left town
in search of work and allowing
their families to remain here as
a charge on the city.
WilliamMcLellan's account was
referred to the party indebted for
collection.
It was decided to order the
owners of the Edwards, Short
Estate and Kilpatrick buildings
on Dunsmuir Avenue, which collapsed during the heavy fall of
snow, to either remove the rubbish or put the buildings in repair, as at present they are nothing but a fire trap.
The city police are ordered to
notify all parties to clean up their
premises during the next two
weeks.
The City Clerk was instructed
to write the commanding officer
of the 102nd Battalion at Comox
to s md military police when
soldiers were on leave and visiting this city.
The question of the new lighting system came up for consideration and was again  laid over
i until the next regular meeting,
I Aid. Bate suggested placing a 350
j candle power light outside the
! City Hall as a trial lamp to enable the Council to form some
! idea of the new lighting system
to be installed.
MILITARY CONCERT & DANCE
A grand military concert and
dance will be held in the Ilo Ho
Theatre on Wednesday, April 19th
in aid of the 102nd Battalion
C. E. F. Band Fund. The concert will consist of band selections
moving pictures, orchestra, vocal
and other items. Dance in the
Ilo. Ilo dance hall. Admission,
concert 25 cents, dance 75 cts.
Ladies free. Refreshments will
be served at the Star Restaurant,
and Waverley Hotel for \vhich
there will be an extra charge.
It is estimated that 300 troops,
will receive permission to attend
the concert and dance and for
their transportation the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., have
generously granted a special train
from Royston to Cumberland,
returning after the dance. AD'
those in possession of concert
tickets will be allowed to travel
free. Tickets are now on sale at
Peacey's Drug store,
Obituary.
Mrs. Mary Somerville, wife of
Alexander Somerville died at her
home. Minto, near Cumberland
on Monday, the 3rd, of April, after an illness of four months.
The deceased lady came to reside
in this city on September, 1893,
and moved to Minto in 1909. Her
retiring nature led her to hide
her 'best qualities from public
gaze, but they were revealed to
those who enjoyed her acquaintance yet it was at her home that
her true worth was most con-'
spicuous and her devotion to the
family circle had no limit. Life
will never he quite the same to
those who knew her, while those
who were nearest to her will
long for her with an unutterable
longings, long for a mother's
council and advice and a wife's
gentle and loving sympathy. She
was a strong Christian character, patient, loving and self sacrificing. She leaves to mourn
her loss a husband, two daughters
and six sons. The funeral took
place on Thursday. The following were the floral offerings:
Two wreaths from the family;
wreath, Mr. and Mrs. T. Ben-
nett; spray, Mrs. G. Robinson;
spray, Mr, and Mrs. Thomson;
spray, Mr. and Mrs. D. Walker;
spray, Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Walker; spray. Mr. and Mrs. Alex.
Cameron; wreath, Mrs. Bertha
Crawford.
In the Honor's List published
last week, Division IV, should,
have read. Div. IV. — Hugh
Strachan, Frank Potter, Mary
Bardissona, Robert Strachan^
Christena MacKinnon. wo
THE1SLANDWK.   CUMBERLAND, B. (J.
Ec OF G000 CKEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
5ty? Jatetttor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, APRIL 8th, 1916.
The Red Cross .Society
The activity of the Canadian
Red Cross in England and at the
front is closely connected with
the prosperity of the Society in
Canada. Any diminution of Red
Cross enterprise on this side of
the water would mean inevitably
an increase in the suffering of
the wounded.
The Red Cross movement in
Canada, however, is advancing
like a great tidal wave. Almost
every branch each month reports
new high records in goods and
monev. The total of supplies
passing through the shipping
departments in Toronto, St. John
and Halifax is constantly increasing.
In consequence of this the Canadian Red Cross abroad is able to
report a steady expansion of the
scope of its activity. It is now
supplying comforts to Canadian
wounded in 71 hospitals in the
'Shorncliffe area. From its Boulogne warehouse it issues supplies to four Canadian General
hospitals, four Canadian Field
Ambulances and five Canadian
•Stationary hospitals in France.
In addition, there is a Canadian
Red Cross hospital, to which five
motor ambulances are attached
at St. Cloud near Paris. This is
supplied by a Canadian Red
•Cross warehouse in Paris which
has also made reciprocity arrangements with the French Military
Hospitals. Further, the three
Canadian Hospitals in the Mediterranean are not lost sight of,
and these are supplied from Alexandria.
The Prisoners of War Department has now on its list 1400
prisoners of war in Germany. To
these, fortnightly shipments of
.   ■■■■in   in i  • rrni— i rmrw ~n n— • r-.^-.-.
Spring and Summer
Styles and Fabrics
of
Individual Ladies' Tailoring Co.
Are now on Exhibit.
Tailor-Made
Suits, Coats, Skirts
To Your Measure.
All Garments are Guaranteed For
Fit      Quality
food have been sent, and they
have been well supplied with
blankets, overcoats, underclothes
and other winter clothing, which
has been very acceptable owing
to the severity of the season in
Germany.
The Parcels Department sends
out a monthly average of over
4000 parcels of food and clothing.
At Xmas 3,500 lbs of turkey and
3000 pounds of plum pudding
were distributed to the Canadian
sick and wounded in England and
France.
Universities Battalion
A Western Universities Battal-
is now being organized for overseas service. British Columbia
will furnish one company. The
headquarters of the BritishColum
bia Company is at the University
of British Colunbia, cor. 10th
Avenue and Laurel Street,
Vancouver. A military camp is
being erected on the grounds to
furnish sleeping and mess quarters; offices, lecture rooms, reading room, and other facilities will
be provided in the University
Buildings. An excellent parade
ground lies just across the street,
—the King Edward High School
grounds,—which have been courteously placed at the disposal of
the Company for drill purposes.
Suitable ground for field operations lies within a few minutes
march of the camp.
Recruiting for the British Columbia Company has only just
commenced, but the organizaion
and preliminary training of the
companies in the Prairie provinces
are well advanced.
The training of the battalion
will probably be given at Camp
Hughes, Sewell, Manitoba, the
finest military camp in Canada,
where the companies will be
assembled as soon as it is opened
this spring.
How lucky it is that the man
in the moon is blind.
A well known minister who
had been preaching a begging
sermon concluded it as follows:
"I don't want any to contribute
who have not paid their subscirp-
tion to the home paper, for the
country papers need money a
great deal more than do the
heathen." That minister knew
what he was talking about. In DER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
4
RESCUES SWEETHEART
Girl Drags Drowning Lover From
Water and Thereby Mends
Breach.
By WALTER JAMES DELANEY.
"I wouldn't go out tonight, Elizabeth, if I were you," spoke querulous,
rheumatic old Grandma Danby.
"I must, grandma," was the reply,
firm yet pained, and the old woman
glanced keenly at the young face
wearing care and sorrow, and
sighed, and then was silent, gazing
sadly, dreamily Into the flickering
grate.
"Dear child," crooned the old
woman, as Elizabeth threw a cape
across her shoulders and flitted from
the room. "Dear, poor child—I
know!   I knowi"
Tea, indeed, the old dame knew, for
when the fires of youth were hers she
had loved and lost. There was rude
comfort at tbe little cottage, a pension
and enough to make her grandchild
Independent,- but love that had cheered the lonely life of the fair young
girl had seared her heart with a cruel
blow, and had left her what she was—
• cheerless, solitary being, living only
tn one fond memory of the past.
That past, how golden It had been—
and only a year agone! Just a year
this very night, not chill and sere, although September-like now, but a
star-spangled evening of sweet
sounds, a stroll along the whispering
sands, and troth plighted under the
great, stately elm that had shaded
the old brook for over a century.
Those strange, sinuous whispering
sands, ever moving, ever singing a
siren-like dirge—but on that night of
nights they had seemed to weave a
sweet melody of hope, and promise,
and love. Then under the great elm
where each had promised, no matter
bow widely parted, no matter what
might happen, to return there upon
each anniversary as to a shrine devoted
to a love undying, eternal.
"It was all my fault," moaned Elizabeth, as slowly, Badly she started
Her Pulses   itlirsd   at   a   Cry   of
Alarm.
down tha edge of ths sand reach, a
watery moon casting dim, weird shadows aoross her path. "Oh, why was I
Jealous, why wu I so impulsive and
cruell"
Bhe recalled tbe May day festival
Wt the village where she had been so
proud of her lover, Randal Grey, and
then so Irrationally jealous of him.
in a fit of pique, incited by a false
friend, a scheming girl companion,
she had tried to punish her lover, entirely innocent of any real purpose to
pain her, and she had lost him.
For he had gone away from Merton
and she had heard of him among newer scenes, the gayest of the gay. He
had forgotten her long since, her aching heart told her.
"And I can never forget!" she wailed to the sighing night winds, and
pursued her lonely path on a pilgrimage of sorrow and penitence.
She faltered as she came in sight of
the old elm. Its nodding branches
seemed to beckon and then repel. She
covered her face with her hands and
swayed where she stood.
"I thought it would comfort me to
come,"- she moaned, "but lt is breaking my heart!"
For with a tide-like rush the sweet
past was now more vividly recurrent
than ever. Every bush, every rock,
every turn of the path renewed some
fond, sweet word he had spoken—the
loved and lost one.
At last she reached the old trysting
place. She sank like a wearied child
to the moss-covered trunk and cried
her heart out. Then dull, drear retrospect intervened, and accepting the
burden her own folly had brought
about, she sat mutely submissive to
the fate that showed no brightness
ahead.
Hark!
Her pulses stirred at a cry pf alarm.
It was vague, distant, but echoing.
It was a call for help.
Elizabeth started to bar feat and
bent her ear. A new fear came
Into her face as she traced the
call—across the sloping expanse of
stunted oak to where the brook ran
and the whispering sands were tbe
most treacherous.
There were danger signs in tbe vicinity, but a stranger would scarcely
notice them after nightfall, she realised.
Tha humane instinct was too intensely developed in Elisabeth to need
urging, even when her mind was immersed in her own individual troubles. She was a true daughter of the
woodland, and she sped like a sprite
along the upper ledges overlook'lit
the brook.
"Help!"
It was closer now, tbat cry, though
not so distant. There was a toktm or
weakness in the utterance, a forlorn
intonation telling of exhausted efforc
and strength.
Her own feet, swift as they w«re,
barely evaded one or two dangerous spots'in her rapid flight. Than
as she neared what was familiar!/
known to the-denizens of the vieiuity
as "The Pits," her heart stood still
and she chilled with a shock.
A human form was visible ln the
swirling mass of quicksands, appealing wildly for help, with arm* oat-
stretched, sinking deeper and deeper
each succeeding moment.
In an Instant Elizabeth forgot self,
peril, all save that a precious human
life was ln the balance.
She ran to where the ruined old
bridge lay. It had spanned a narrow brook, but long in disuse. She
knew fully the last possible resource
for assisting tbe num engulfed in
the quicksands. How she managed
to drag one of the great rough logs,
the size of a railroad tie in thickness,
fully >0 feet, she never knew.
Superhuman strength seemed infused. Her hands were torn and bleeding, her breath came ln gasps. Sbe
managed to tilt the end of the heavy
timber across the ledge of rock and
let it drop.
The log narrowly grazed the head
of the man now struggling waist deep
ln the shifting mass. Both ends, however, were safely anchored. Elizabeth
crept out on the log.
"Grasp the log firmly with one
hand—give me the other—"
Then her voice died away and her
soul seemed to go with it, for the man
she had saved was—Randel Orey.
He was pretty well exhausted, but
he smiled up into her eyes with
grateful energy, as slowly, with difficulty he was extricated from his fearful dilemma.
It was like a hideous dream with a
golden awakening, as both reached the
soft ground and sank upon a grassy
plat exhausted, their eyes met, and
then their hands.
"You have saved my life!" ho
breathed. "I owe it to you—Eliza-.
beth!"
How sweetly, how fervently he v. j-
nounced her name, tbe ring of a yu-ur
ago in it!
"I am glad," she said simply, and
shrank back away in very contrite-
ness and sense of unworthinces.
"If you had not been near," he began, and then asked; "How came you
to be?"
Her eyes drooped and she arose to
her feet. He caught sight of h«r poor,
bleeding hands and grasped them and
kissed tbem.
"It was just a year ago—the old
elm—do you remember?"
She bent her head, and he guessed
the truth.
"Its call was strong upon me—I bad
not forgotten," he said in a low, eager
tone. "Elizabeth, say it was all a mistake your cold, bitter letter to me."
"It was more—it was cruel, wicked,
and I have been punished. Ob, Randal, my heart is breaking!"
He'caught her swaying form ln his
arms. He clasped her close, leading
thi? way past peril into peace, past
the weird whispering sands to the
soft shadow of the great elm, its
swaying boughs seeming to welcome
so much youth and loveliness and
Joy.
(Copyright, 19U, by W. G. Chapman.)
Personal
ALCAZAR GARDENS OF SPAIN
Yeacher:  "What comes alter 'tt'?'*'
Small Boy: "Dunno."
Teacher: "What have I on each sida
of my nose?"
Small Boy:  "Freckles."
Sympathy For Audience.
Scene: Soldiers' concert at which
no alcoholic liquors are being sup
plied, the men being served with
mineral waters by young lady helpers.
Soldier (to young   lady   helper):
"Do you see that the man who is.
singing has got his eyes half shut?"
Young Lady: "So he has. - "Whatfe
he doing that for?"
Soldier: "He can't bear to look at
ua   He knows wot we're oufferln"^
Famous "Whens"
Cottages  Here  Have Special Advantage for Lovers Who Begin Courting Early in Morning.
The best of the Alcazar is the Alcazar gardens. But I would not ignore
the homelike charm of the vast court,
says W. D. Howell in Harper's Magazine. It Is planted casually about rather shabby orange trees that children
were playing under, and was decorated with the week's wash of the low,
simple dwellings which may be hired
at a rental moderate even for Seville,
where a handsome and commodious
bouse ln a good quarter rents for $60
a year. One of those two-story cottages, as we should call them, in the
ante-court of the Alcazar had for the
student of Spanish life the special advantage of a lover close to a ground
floor window dropping tender nothings down through the slats of the
shutter to some maiden lurking within. The nothings were so tender that
you could not hear them drop, and besides, they were Spanish nothings, and
lt would not have served any purpose
for the stranger to listen for them.
Once afterward we saw the national
courtship going on at another casement, but that was at night, and here
the precious flrst sight of lt was offered at 10 o'clock in the morning.
Nobody seemed to mind th*1 lover stationed outside the shutter with which
the iron bars forbade him the closest
contact; and it is only fair to say that
be minded nobody; he was there
iwhen we went ln and there when we
came out, and lt appears that when it
Is a question of love-making time Is
no more an object ln Spain thau in
Ibe United States. The scene would
have been better by moonlight, but
jyou cannot always bave lt moonlight,
land the sun did very well; at least,
the lover did not seem to miss the
moon.
ttctobar
ofnuswAlK,
sDotti flare up UXt & torch
Skovefoff the sfadt yoxtvseit—
?adt lt oil hi 5 porcK.
No Care For Riches
Fred: "There are times when I
care nothing for riches—when I would,
not so much as put forth a hand to
receive millions."
Kittle: "Indeed! That must be
when you are tired of the world and.
its struggles and vanities—when your
soul yearns for higher and nobler
things.   Is it not?'
"N—no, you are wrong."
"Then when is it?"
"When I'm sleeping."
An  Important Exception
Papa: "Yes, my son, if you want
to learn anything well, you must be-
gin at the bottom."
Bobby: "How about Swimming?" FOLK
TH   ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Aged Mariner Called  To Rest.
Capt. Joshua Freeman, a pioneer mariner who was known in
many Pacific Coast ports, died on
Sunday at the residence of his
daughter, Mrs. Frank Little, at
1636 Rockland 'Avenue. While
he was 81 years of age and had
been failing in health for some
time, his death will be learned by
his many friends with sad surprise. It was only a little more
than a week ago that he accompanied Capt. Porter on a voyage
to Union Bay on the steam yacht
Dolaura. He was of remarkably
hardy constitution and he maintained much of his old time vigor
to the last.
Capt. Freeman was born in
1835 8t Cape Cod. It was only
natural that, being born in a
maritime countrv community
among sea-faring folk, he chose
to go to sea. In 1.356 he received
his first command, when, at the
age of 21 years, he was placed
in charge of the clipper Christopher Hall. He later became master of the Goldhunter, but he was
for the longest period with the
historic Glory of the Seas, which
only recently was converted into
a floating cannery, after having
had a remarkable career on the
high seas. The vessel was laid
down in Boston by Donald McKay, and Capt. Freeman was
ever wont to tell of his adventures in command of her.
He came to Victoria some fifteen years ago, taking a post offered him by Messrs. R. Dunsmuir & Son. He acted as shore
captain during the greater part
of his connection with this firm,
and was in- service until the very
end, although during the past
three years, owing to his advanced age, he was forced to live
a more or less inactive life.
During his many years at sea,
and while at his post on shore,
Captain Freeman made many
friends who will feel his death
as a personal loss. Among his
old acquaintances is Capt. Porter
of the Dolaura, who met the aged
skipper as long ago as 1873, when
in command of the Goldhunter.
On all his voyages Captain
Freeman was accompanied by
his wife. Like her husband Mrs.
Freeman was born at Cape Cod,
and the two went to school there
together, being married in their
native village sixty years ago.
Both were descendants of old
Cape Cod families, Captain Freeman's father being a well known
shipowner.
Besides his widow, Captain
Freeman is survived by a daugh-
tei, Mrs. Frank Little, with
whom he had made his home for
the past fifteen yiars, and a son,
Mr. .1. Eugene Freeman, a resi-1
dent of San Francisco.
The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock,
from the Rockland Avenue residence. Ross Bay Cemetery will
be the place of interment. - Colonist, April 4th., 1916.
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I LO ILO THEATRE
PRO. CHANGED MOD., TUES, THIIRS. * 8»T.
TONIGHT    21ST. EPISODE
! 'The Broken Coin"
Mw
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MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN
ii
EVERY TUESDAY, One Number j
- of the - J
"BLACK BOX" !
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
Notice is hereby given that on the 29th
day of April next application will be made
to the Superintendent of Provincial for the
transfer of the license for the sale of liquor
by retail in and upon the premises known
as the Heriot Bay Hotel, situate at Heriot
Bay, British Columbia, from Albert Ross
to H, A. Bull, of British Columbia.
A. ROSS, Holder of License.
H. A, BULL, Applicant for Transfer.
Dated this 30th day of March, 1916.
BROADWAY FEATURES j
Every Thursday. |
><JD«
MM
MM
mm
MM
MD
OIK
MM
MM
00(«
'NOTHING DOING."
■Kirby, in New York World.
What Your Telephone
Represents.
Did you ever realize that having a telephone places
at your disposal the resources of an $8,000,000 investment?
Not only are you always in instant communication
with your friends, but also with all parts of the province.
There is also the advantage, too, of being able to
telephone to all parts of the Pacific Coast, and even to
Toronto, Montreal, Chicago and eastern American cities.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
95 L.
Royston Sawmill Co.
Ltd.
CORPORATION  OF  THE  CITY
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
OF
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of
the Court of Revision for tha purpose of
hearing and deciding complaints against
the assessment as made for the year 1916
will be held in the City Council Chambers
on Monday, Aprit 24th, at 7.30 P.M.
Any person desiring to make complaint
against tb; said assessment must give
notice to the assesso* in writing at least
ten days prior to the sitting of said Court
of Revision.
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 22nd
day of March, 1916.
A. MACKINNON,
City Clerk. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
r
FIRE   INSURANCE
Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford.
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE
£ or
NKMOOOOCMKWOI
OFFICE:  THE  ISLANDER  BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.. Cumberland
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice. Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Passion Sunday:
11 a.m., Litany and Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service  of   intercession    on
Thursday at 7.45 p.m.
Litany on Friday at 11 a.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
8. C. WHITE
White
LEGHORNS
(Finest
Heather  Strain
Winter Layers)
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$2.00 per 15 $9.00 per 100
A few laying pullets for sale at
$1.50 and $2.00 each.
H. LEIGHTON,   ROYS ROAD.
Box 64. Cumberland,
Girl Guides.
The Girl Guides meet every
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie* Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.   ■
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
For Sale Now
SOLID OAK MISSION DINING
FURNITURE, PIANO, PICTURES, CARPETS, 2 BUREAUS,
DOUBLE BEDSTEAD, CHINA,
AND KITCHENWARE.
Mrs. E. Allen,
Happy Valley.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE  SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmuir Ave.,
Cumberland, B.C.
We have just received a consignment of
60 Watt Nitros
the lamps which consume % less
current and give a prettier, whiter
light than the ordinary Tungstens.
Try One in Your Parlour.
Every  One  Guaranteed.
PRICES:
60 Watt Clear Nitros, -   $1.10
100    "      "      " -   1.25
200    "     >      "       -     2.10
Add 10% for Frosting.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophories
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T.E.BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P.O. Box279 Phone 31
i
,' SIX
FHE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
When I Come   o
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;   my   business   s
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
i     Bakery
il   A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
Nofgames of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C
Phone 67
Agent fnr the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex He(lersoii, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI B EOS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orden Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing aSpeewdty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations]
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
fortes and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term.
of twenty-one years at mi annua) rental of
flan acre. Not more than 2,500acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must, be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agsnt of the district in which the righta
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or lotral subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaiit himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of f 5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall,
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for tbe full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, suoh returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the ooal mining
righta only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for tbe working of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorized publication of this-
advertuement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Pri,
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35     3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.qo-
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;%
A.M,
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10     3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:K
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:06
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3,55
8.55     2.55
(f) Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Read
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8;00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only. i
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
ES* THUJ   ib'LANDEK,  CUJVItf^KLAIN)
SEvm
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, 113,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   .Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by tbe survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J.:BURNSIDE, Manager.
His   Medal
A military inspection was in progress, according to Frank Colliarin,
and a critic was surveying a picturesque collection of raw 'uns. One exhibit provided a notable contrast in
the line by reason of being several
inches taller than six feet. The lanky
tone was hollow-chested and knock-
kneed and paraded some other frills
like freckles and warts. The conspicuous part of him, however, was a
gold medal that covered his left lung.
The Inspector paused. "I was about
to rule you out," he said, "until I
noticed your decoration. Possibly you
have to your credit some great deed
of daring—some memorable service to
humanity."
"No," answered the recruit, "this
here medal was won at the county
fair by our cow."
I-
Wa Una nAV ttlJBeauty may be onlyjskin deep;
▼? aiipafJCi o;. but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
price
DUNSMUIR AVBNUB
CUMBERLAND, «. C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
Queen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
COI«M.0*Ti'
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion.    It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousand
of ardent advocates of real temperance.   Drink beer
and be temperate.    Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURS.ERIES,
VICTORIA B.C.
Headquartereffor Choioe Nursery Stock—alflhome grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[MTABLMIIKD 24 YEARS.]
"Say, Pa, are you growing taller?"
"No, my son;  why do you ask?"
" 'Cause the top of your head ll
loming through your hair!"
Taken at His Word
Among the   American    Presidents
about whom many stories were told
was Grover Cleveland.   One which he
enjoyed very much himself was that
one time when he was out hunting
he was overtaken by darkness, and,
coming to a fisherman's hut, knocked
at the door.   The family had retired,
but after repeated knocking^ a man
put his head out   the   window and
asked:"
"Who's there?"
"I am—Grover Cleveland."
"Well, what do you want?"
"I want to stay here all night."
"All right, stay there."
Gent (engaging a new groom, who
has a blaek eye): "Are you married?"
Groom: "No, sir; it isn't that I
was   thrown off a horse on to my
face!"
	
The Archbishop's Wit
The Archbishop of Canterbury is
extremely fond of chess, a fact which
once caused him to make a very witty
remark. At the opening of a chess
congress he said, "Although I am not
a brilliant player I can claim to represent all the pieces excep- he pawn.
I have had a great deal to do with
kings and queens, I have 'ived in two
castles, and I am probably the only
man living who is both a knight and
% bishop."
Buglers on  Parade
During camp parade of the buglers
an Irish corporal was in charge. He
was asked by the CO. if all the buglers were present, when he replied:—
"No, sorr; one man absent."
"Well, then," said the CO., "go and
find him and ask what he has to say
for himself."
A few minutes later Pat came running back, and shouted:—
"Shure, sorr, and weren't we a pair
of duffers not to know it? It wor
meself. Bedad, sorr, Oi forgot to call
me own name, entolrely, sorr!"
Spoke With Conviction
Good Man: "Ah. my ptor fellow,
I feel sorry for you! Why don't you
work? When I was young, for ten
years I was never in bed after five—
an hour's work before breakfast, then
five hours' work, then dinner, then
four hours' more work, then supper,
then bed, then up again at five the
next morning "
Loafer: "Where did ye serve your
time?"
NIGHT FIGHTING IS BEST
Darkness   and   Silence   Essential   te
Most Important Movements
Owing to the havoc caused by modern artillery, commanders are now carrying out a considerable number ot
their most important movements under the protective cover of darkness.
The night attack is a form of tactics
which is becoming increasingly popular, and night fighting has developed
Into quite a science. All maaner of
ingenious ruses are practiced to enable large bodies of troops silently
to advance across country and launch
an unexpected attack on the enemy.
The success of such tactics depends
very largely on the silence with which
they are carried out. During night
operations troops ure strictly forbidden to carry their rifles at the "slope,"
which is to say, across their shoulder.
This Is to prevent the muzzle of the
rifle glittering in the moonlight above
the undergrowth. The men have to
carry their arms ln the right hand,
but never with the left, the reason
being that the bayonet is slung on
the left side, and the weapon would
continually rattle against the rifle, and
cause a sound which could be hoard
for a long distance, especially if
several hundred soldiers' bayonets and
rifles clashed. To cut noise down to
a minimum troops during a night attack never march in step. The steady
rhythmic tramp of several hundred
men would be heard for miles.
Hard roads • are avoided, and the
soldiers march ln broken step each
side of the road, on the grass, if possible, two columns of men occupying
each side of the highway, this formation being the usual marching forma-
ation of "fours" cut in two. Should
an alarm be sounded the troops can
quickly conceal themselves each side
of a road, if they are marching at
the side of it, and thfey are far more
likely to escape detection than if they
had to scamper noisily from the thoroughfare Itself. When advancing
over country at night, troops, whenever possible, choose the direction of
their attack, so that they march wltb
the moon behind them.
t
0 EIGHT
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN   TOPICS
Lost—A gold brooch set, with
pearls and amethyst. Finder
will please return to the British
Columbia Telephone office,
Cumberland B.C.
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held, in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 26th.
Wesely Willard left for Victoria on Monday and returned on
Thursday.
P. S. Fleming, provincial relief officer was here on Sunday.
FOR SALE- Palmer Piano, cost
1450 four years ago. Will sacrifice. Apply Box 430, Cumberland, B. C.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collier
ies Dunsmuir Ltd., returned
from a visil to Victoria and Ladysmith on Saturday.
W, Marchant of Victoria inspector of customs arrived on Tuesday on his usual tour of inspection
At a meeting of the Pythian
Sisters held in theK. of P. Hall
'  Mrs. Elliott, of Bevan, held the
winning ticket for baby's bonnet.
David Stephenson, provincial
cheif constable of this district
with headquarters at Nanaimo,
arrived at Courtenay on Thursday
Henry Devlin, Inspector of
Mines, arrived on Tuesday on his
usual tour of inspection.
Rev. James Hood left for Victoria on Monday and is expected
to return this evening.
John Orr, sr.,and John Orr, jr.
left on Monday in search of work.
California fuel oil caused them to
do so.
The British Columbia Gazette
of Thursday contains the following appointment: "John H. Macmillan, of Cumberland, to be an
inspector of mines and of metalliferous mines."
Carpenters are rebuilding the
verandad at the Union Hotel
which was destroyed by the heavy
fall of snow two months ago.
A number of men are busy
clearing the grounds just below
the railway station for the new
tennis courts.
Cyril Baker left on Friday for
Victoria and Vancouver and expects to return on Sunday. He
is not expected to return alone.
Corporal T. Moor£ of Victoria,
recruiting officer of the 11th
C. M. R. is now at the Waverley
Hotel and will remain in this city
for a few days seeking recruits.
Frank Jaynes, overman of No.
7 mine has been appointed manager of No 5 and 6 mines of the
Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir
Ltd., to fill the vacancy caused
by the resignation of J. H. Macmillan, who has been appointed
inspector of mines with headquarters at Prince Rupert. John
Dando, fireman of No. 4 mine
has been appointed overman of
No. 7 mine and to take the posi-l
tion vacated by Frank Jaynes.    i
THE   BIG   STORE
Model 446. Medium Figure,
High Bust. A model of ease and
style, controls the figure and
produces the most stylish effects.
It is rare that such results can be
obtained at a medium price.
Made of English Contil, with six
hose supporters.   Price $1.95 pr.
- La Diva Corsets
SPIRAL SUPER BONE-or Spring Wire
Boned Corsets, have been sold by canvassers direct to the consumers, at exhorbitant
prices, for almost ten years. The Spring
Wire Bone is the greatest success that has
ever been known in the Corset field. Wire-
boned corsets are worn^ known, and wanted
in every section and corner of Canada,
down to the smallest village. Our first
consignment arrived a few days ago. Here
is a cut of the newest model. The spiral
boning is guaranteed to wear one year, and
the price of this model is $4.95 per pair.
Our next best Spiral-boned Corsets are
$3.50 pair.    Prove our claims for them.
D. & A. Corsets.
Model 540. The
incomparable Reducer which without
double soraps by the
only aid of scientifically laid pieces will
give the ideal front
effect, and reduce
abdomen, hips and
back. Made of splendid quality, English
Coutil, with six hose
supporters. Price
$2.50 pair.
D. & A. CORSETS
Lead the Way.
OUR LEADER-
Model 154, is a
splendid corset, and
the price is only 95c.
a pair.
Oiir Special: Model 232, has all the characteristics of a high grade corset, while the price
will meet the purse of all.   Special Price $1.25 pr.
Northway Coats and Suits
are now on view
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8

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