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The Islander Sep 20, 1913

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Array m
HE ISLANDER
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. IV., No. 25 ®*fj*s>
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, SEPT. 20, 1913
Subscription price, $1.50 per year
A REPLY TO THE
MAYOR'S LETTER
The Mayor Neglects to Exercise
hit Influence for Good when
it is Needed.
We have been expecting His
Worship the Mayor to come forth
with a loud tone in defence of the
U. M. W. of A., knowing that he
has been closely associated with
the officials of that organization
during the past twelve months,
We thought he might have selected our esteemed contemporary,
The News, for the publicity of
eloquence, as he considers The
Islander too insignificant. But
instead of that he sends a lengthy
communication to the Nanaimo
Free Press, and we presume that
pape- considers it appropriate for
its editorial columns as it appeared on Sept. 2nd. In his opening
sentence he states:—
"Sir,—During the past few
weeks there have been so many
conflicting reports regarding industrial conditions in this vicinity,
that I feel called upon—although
with reluctance because of the
official position I occupy as mayor
of this town—to give what
appears to me an accurate account
of the more important features
of the miners' strike as it has
affected the peace of this city."
In reply to this we contend
that the Mayor is absolutely unable to make an accurate statement concerning the peace of this
city during the last twelve
months as he has never been
known to be around where the
trouble was. After the law has
been broken he has heard the side
of the U, M. W. of A. only, the
people who elected him to the
office of mayor and whom he has
served to the best of his ability.
No citizen of Cumberland with
ordinary intelligence questions
this, and we are agreed he is
nothing else but the tool of the
officials of the local U.M.W. of A.
or what remains of it, The Mayor
himself knows this and he has
not got the sand in him to get up
and say to this U. M. W. of A.:
'Although you elected me and
gave me a majority, I am also
mayor of the minority.' The
minority at that time constituted
the assets of Cumberland. The
only time we have seen Mayor
Campbell near the scene of any
trouble was on that terrible night
of July 19th, then we saw him
standing bare-headed in the
middle of Dunsmuir avenue opposite his own place of bnsiness
conversing with Police commis
sioner coe. At the same time
only a few yards distant the
provincial police were unable to
hold the angry mob at bay. Lawbreakers were arrested by the
police and released by the mob.
We saw him gazing at this unlawful assembly. And this same
mob were some of the people who
gave him his majority. With the
influence he might have had over
these people at this particular
time, if he had requested them
they might have dispersed and
gone to their homes. We have
heard several citizens remark if
Mayor Campbell, the bosom
friend of the U. M. W. of A., had
GRAND CONCERT.
The concert held in the cumber-
land Hall on Thursday evening
under the auspices of the conser-
vativeAssociation of this city was
a great success. The talent of the
artistes was of a very high order
and was a pleasing surprise to
the large and select audience
assembled. Cumberland can look
forward to possessing a musical
aggregation that would be a credit
to any large city.
Robert Henderson acted as
chairman in his usual able manner and the following programme
was rendered:
1 Song Mr A Odgers
"Down the Vale"
2 Song  MrRKirkum sr
"The Wolf"
3 Song Miss M Bate
"Love, I have won you"
4Song ..Miss L Bickle
"Good Bye" (Toste)
5 Violin Solo...Mr J H McMillan
"con Amore"
6 Song  Mr J Taylor
"I think he needs a doctor"
7 Song Mr J Spiers
"Asleep in the deep"
8 Song Miss M McKenzie
"My ain folk"
9 Reading.Selected.MrF Ramsay
10 Song.- -Mr T Purvis
"When other lips"
Interval
11 Song Miss M Bate
"carissima"
12 Song.- Mr J Taylor
When father papered the parlor'
13 Song.. -Mr A Odger
"Geniveive"
14 Song -Miss M McKenzie
"The Homeland"
15 Violin Solo..Mr J H McMillan
"Fantasa on Scottish Airs"
16 Song Mr R Kirkum sr
"When Jack comes home"
17 Reading Selected MrF Ramsay
18 Song '. Miss L Bickle
"Thora"
19 Song.-Selected-Mr J Speirs
Mr Charles Parnham accompanied
assisted by Miss Frame, Miss M
McKensie and Mr R Kirkum jr.
Whilst the audience were assembling and during the interval
the management of the crown
thea'.re exhibited special pictures.
After the concert the hall was
cleared for dancing, in which
over one hundred couples took
part. Refreshments were served
by the ladies of the members of
the conservative Association. The
committee in charge wishes to
thank those who took part and
helped to make it a huge success,
FARRINGTON VISITS HERE.
Frank Farrington and Robert
Foster, of the U.MW. of A., made
a hurried visit to Cumberland on
Sunday, leaving by auto early
Monday morning. An executive
meeting was held on Sunday
afternoon and a meeting of the
faithful was held in the evening.
Farrington told his audience that
South Wellington would recognise
the U. M. w. of A. inside of two
weeks. They would settle things
down below in a few days, then
come back and bring the officials
of the Canadian collieries to their
knees. The above will be pleasing news to the few members of
the U M. w. of A. who are left
in Cumberland. There are some
men who will allow themselves
to be fooled for all time to come.
IMPERIAL
Legislation has been Prepared
Providing for System of Uniform Naturalizations.
Owing to the efforts of Premier
Borden and Hon. c. J. Doherty
the Government has come to a
satisfactory agreement with the
British Government over the
question of Imperial naturalization which has been a subject of
long negot'ation between the two
countries, and the bonds with the
motherland are to be drawn still
closer.
As matters stand at present
the Naturalization Act of Great
Britain is much more rigid than
that of Canada. Great Britain
requires five years residence
before naturalization is granted,
while Canada has required only
three. The United Kingdom as
a result has refused to recognize
the Canadian naturalization laws.
By the new agreement the British
law will require five years residence in the British Empire only
the last year to be spent in Great
Britain.
Legislation to this effect will
likely be passed at the next
session of the British House and
Canada will pass concurrent legislation. The Canadian law will
require also Ave years residence
in the Empire, the last to be
spent in Canada. The practical
effect will be that Great Britain
will recognize the Canadian law
and Canada will recognize the
British law, and the anomalous
situation which has so long existed of a man being a British subject in Canada and not in Great
Britain will be done away with.
THE COAL SUPPLY.
San Francisco. Sept. 15.—The
steamer "Stanley Dollar" is now
discharging a cargo of Puget
Sound coal at the Western Fuel
Company's bunkers. The steamer "Aroline" is due tomorrow
with a cargo from the same port.
Vancouver, September 17.— The
shortage of fuel in California,
Oregon and British Columbia,
owing to the strike at the Vancouver Island mines, has resulted
in the chartering of a large number of vessels to bring coal over
from Australia and Japan to make
up the deficiency. There are
usually a number of lumber carriers fixed to bring back coal from
Australia to SanFrancisco instead
of returning in ballast, but the
number this year has been more
than doubled and rates are higher
for vessels bound this way.
California gets a great quantity
of coal from Vancouver Island,
and while the State of Washington produces a lot of coal, it also
imports a large quantity from
British Columbia. To fill these
shortages and to help out the
British Columbia consumption
vessels have been chartered.
gone in among these riotous miners on the night in question the
fury would have subsided.
P. P. Harrison, barrister, left
by auto on Sunday for Victoria
and returned Thursday.
CITY COUNCIL
The  City Council  held their
regular session on Monday evening, the full board being present
with the exception of Aid. Coe.
The following communications
were received from the Attorney
General's Department.
Victoria, B.C„
18th, August, 1913.
City Clerk,
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir,—I beg to inform you
that I have appointed Mr. J. Mait-
land-Dougall   to act as  Police
Magistrate for the City of Cumberland for the present without
salary, and he has relieved Mr. J.
Abrams.    You will therefore be
guided by this official notice.
Yours truly,
W. J. Bowser,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B. C,
27th, August, 1913.
Mr. A. McKinnon,
City Clerk,
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir,—I beg to acknowledge
receipt of your letter of the 7th
August in reference to the collection of certain fines by the Provincial Polic-__LCumberland.
I do not see that there is very
much cause for complaint by the
civic authorities, as our provincial
authorities are entitled to certain
costs in connection with certain
prosecutions and it is only a
matter of which is the most expeditious way of recovering the
costs whether they should be paid
to the treasury first and then ask
the municipal treasury for a refund, or whether they keep them
out of the fines in the first instance and pay the balance to the
municipal authorities.
So far as Section 437 providing
that the clerk of the municipality
shall be the clerk of the police
court is concerned, that of course
is only in reference to municipal
matters and is a matter of practice. The magistrate may appoint
any clerk if he likes to assist him
in connection with his work and
in fact often employs stenographers.
Of cour__wf he wishes under a
section of the Municipal Act he
can force the municipal clerk to
be police court clerk, but I do not
imagine that the municipal clerk
in any municipality is anxious to
become police court clerk unless
he is there to take charge of the
fines for which he is responsible.
Yours truly,
W. J. Bowler,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B. C,
Sept. 6th, 1913.
A. McKinnon, Esq.,
City Clerk,
Cumberland, B. C.
Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the
receipt of your letter of August
15th which should have been
answered long ago but was overlooked. The Attorney-General has
considered the contents of your
letter and thinks that perhaps it
is not fair that thc City of Cum
berland should be asked to pay
the expenses of inquests in the
cases referred to in your letter.
The men upon whose bodies inquests were held were injured
GEO* PETTIGREW
IS
Well Known Official of United
Mine Workers is Committed
i
for Trial for Intimidation
Geo. Pettigrew and Walter Nelson were charged at Nanaimo
before Magistrate Simpson on
Tuesday morning with intimidation against John Weeks on the
morning of August 11th. Mr. A.
Leighton appeared for the accused, while Mr. Shoebotham appeared for the Crown.
A Murdock was the first witness called for the prosecution.
He stated he was doing police
duty at No. 1 Shaft on the morning of August 11th. There was a
big crowd. He saw Jno. Weeks
coming from his work. When
Weeks reached Fry street some
women spoke roughly to him, a
large portion of the crowd followed Weeks right home. The crowd
was hostile and there was some
loud talking. He saw Pettigrew
and Nelson with the crowd on
Milton street.
Other evidence was given.
Geo. Pettigrew took the stand
in his own defence. He stated
that he left home about 6-15 on
the morning of the 11th, with the
object of finding out the few men
who were going to work. There
were 100 to 150 men present.
After Weeks left he waited fully
ten minutes and then left for
home. He met a man who told
him that quite a crowd had escorted weeks home. He saw nothing
of the procession which had been
described in evidence. He pleaded ignorance of the whole thing.
Accused were sent up for trial.
After the adjournment of the
court Pettigrew and Nelson ap.
peared before His Honor Judge
Barker and elected for speedy
trial.
outside the municipal limits and
I presume they wero taken to
your hospital by the Provincial
police. Under the circumstances
no demand for refund will be
made in these cases or in any
similar cases if the facts are
properly brought to the attention
of this department at tba proper
time.
I have the honour to be, sir,
Bour obedient servant,
J. P. McLkod.
Deputy Attorney-General
City Constable Gray handed in
the following monthly report:
Scavenger $76.75
Hall rent  40.00
Road Tax     2.00
Scavenger bucket . _	
Total $119.35
Police court fines for July $77.50
Expenses    57.
Balance paid to city $19.70
Accounts received amounted to
$149.50 which were referred to
the Finance Committee for pay
ment.
Aid. Beveridge introduced i
Tax Sale By Law, and was given
a first and second reading.
LOCAL NEWS
Mr. William C'ornwell and Miss
Marion Petrie, of No. 8 Townsite,
were united in marriage on the
15th inst. by the Rev. Jas. Hood.
The hotel bars at Courtenay
and Comox were re-opened on
Thursday last. Table licences
were gran'ed the Cumberland
hotels.
Next Sunday will be Harvest
Thanksgiving at Grace Methodist
church with display of flowers
and fruit, also special music.
Mr. and Mrs. W.T. White were
passengers by Thursday evening's
train, returning from a ten days'
vacation to Vancouver and the
Sound Cities.
The amount collected by the
members of the Ladies Auxiliary
on Saturday last amounted to
$230.00. We understand this is
an increase over last year, or
previous to the holiday, yet the
agitator says " Strike on, boys."
The Rev. Lamb and Captain
Oliver, of the Methodist Mission
Steamer "Thos. Crosby," will be
the speakers in the Methodist
Church tomorrow at the special
harvest anniversary services.
A post office has been established at Bevan, commonly known as
No. 7, and is now open for business with W. E. Lawrence as
postmaster. This will supply a
long felt want. Mail leaves Cumberland for Bevan every morning
except Sunday at 9-30 and
returns at noon.
Andrew McKnight, formerly
master mechanic at the local
collieries but now of Brittania
Mines, arrived on Thursday evening's train, and will return to
Howe Sound today, while here
he visited the hydro-electric plant
and No. 8 Mine.
The output for the week ending Friday, September 19th totals
10,763. The decreased output is
accounted for by the changing of
the various hoisting plants from
steam to electric, which caused
No. 4, 5, and 7 Mines to be shut
down for a day and a half. The
Comox Mines are now hoisting
coal by electric power supplied
by the new hydro-electric plant
The comox Agricultural and
Industrial Exhibition was held at
courtenay on Thursday antl Friday. The display of flowers,
fancy work, vegetable and live
stock was greater than last year.
Thc beautiful weather brought
crowds from all parts of the district, 250 visitors arrived by
special train from Headquarters,
and all the courtenay and Cumberland automobiles were in commission carrying passengers from
CumberUwd to the fair. Various
sports, including horse racing on
the newly-made _t_ck, were held
on Friday afternoon.
Evening classes in Stenography
three times a week. For particulars and terms apply to Miss
Muriel Bate, P. O. Box, 279,
Cumberland.
Seabrook Young, a progressive
Victoria merchant, is visiting
this district and is showing fine
samplesof garments that fashionable women will wear this sea-
season. This should save many a
woman a trip to the capital city.
For particulars see our advertising columns, THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
MM
HMM
Constipation
Vanishes Forever
Prompt Relief— Permanent Car*
CARTER'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS neva-
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but gently on
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Stop alter
dinner
dislrcsi—,
cute in-li-'
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the eyes, Small Pill, Small Dost, Small Price.
Genuine _ti_.tb___ Signature
SCIENTIFIC RAIN
C                                                                  -    --
WM
mmsa
IVATeRPHOOF   COLLARS   AND   CUt-FS
-totneiHInt.   bettor   t!._ii   linen  at.,   no
Ifltftuliy   bills.       Wash   It   with   H"n;>  nud
water.     All stores or direct, star.- style
■ n.l   si/f*.       Por  -'<('.   WO   Will   mall   you.
THE   Al!Li;._.."ON    CO.    OF   CANADA,
Limited
63  Fr.r.er Avenue,  Toronto, Ontario
When buying your  Piano insist on havintr an
"OTTO   HIGEL"
Piano Action
THC NEW FRENCH REMEDY. N.l. N.5 N.3.
THERAPION
•reatsucccn, cores cii
« VIM, KIOMvV. ..LAI.-'
PILES, ClTlin. NO, DRt
VOt OKRAKi.tn. Ill V.K..A
TORONTO. WRITE FOR .
Sll!D.CO,ilAVKRaTOCRH
THERAPiON
Used in l*'n
Hospitals with
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■i BI.OOI) POISON,
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RKofLYMAH ui">S
to nn. Le cm.ho
ii», LONDON- BttOi
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Persona tu work for us
in sprtic time nt home. No experience
required With our NEW ART COLORING PROCESS Easy and fascinating
work, Good pay. No canvassing. Write
for Instruct I oris (free).
COMMERCIAL   ART  STUDIO,
815 College Street. Toronto,'Canada.
R£ST AND HEALTH TO MOTHER AND CHILD.
Mrs. Wikslow's Booth inq svrup lias bees
tied for over SIXTY YBAKSby MiU.mN.i of
MOTHERS for their CHILDREN WUILK
T-ttttTHlNG, witli PRRFRCT SUCCESS. It
BOOTUBB Hit; CHILI), SOFTENS tlie GUMS.
ALLAYS all PAIN ; CURKS WIND CUL1C, and
is Uie best remedy for DIARRHOEA, It is ab-
tolUtetv harmless.1 Be sure ami ask for "Mn,
v/iusiow'i. soothing Syrup," and take ao other
ltind.   '.twenty-litre cents a bottle.
QUICK-or YOUR
HORSE WILL DIE
Suppose one of yottrhorsci
dropped down wi'.li Colic ?
What would you do? WW
could a Veterinary do after
you cilt him ? Colic often
kills in an hour—30 minutes
delay meant a valuable
horse lo*t.
The thing to dj U to haven
bottle of
f-w   International
S  Colic Cure
in ten m.nttt.. -.nn,-
moili- Colic, tiaa Coli-.
Kidney Co'.ir. IJIrtat. Acute Indigo-llon. Grain
Founder. It neutralizes tlie acids in tlio
stomRch—expels tr..*-. from tlie Intestines—
instantly reduces bloating- stops the spasms of
pain—and render, til. _toma.li and boivct. clean
and antiseptic.
Absolutely guaranteed to cv.te every case of.
Colic or money refunded.
Sold by Dealer-. Everywhere.
60c. and $1.00 |-.-r bottle.
INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO.
TORONTO ..i ONTARIO
Thf. 0:dest Trees
Not.-, ot the famous British oaks,
I.  j.,.i  in'.y are, comes
anywhere near holding the record as
the oldest tree In the world.     The|
Soma cypress, in Lombard;-, Is known
to have existed forly years before, tlie
birth of Christ, nml Ceylon boasts a
sacred   tree   which   is  -aid  to havo
sprung from a branch ot ono under j
wiiien  Buddha reclined ln the sixth j
century   B.C.   Acpording   tr.   Dean
Stanley, too, there nre still eight of
tho original olives standing In Qetli-
Bomnne.     Straying Into Ilio realm of
legend,  one can  (Ind n  Irco sprung
from  Cain's staff In Palestine.—Tlio
London Chronicle.
Fare, please, lady, says the oonduc*.
tor on tlie Btreet car. Tills way,]
lady, please, cays the floor-walker In
the store. And so lt goes everywhere. Would 11 not be much belter
If our conductors and shop-walkers
nnd clerks and officials ot all kinds
wero to adopt tho much more euphonious Madam us the form of salutation.
Methods Adopted by  Advanced Agrl.
c!-L:..r__|.*jr» for Growing Rainless
Wheat
The population ot ths earth Is lair, astng faster than its productive ca-
I paeity   is   being   developed.    II  that
should continue indefinitely we would
I find ourselves ln a situation as des*
I perate as that ia which the suppositious Inhabitants of Mars are represented to bo at present.
I    Plant life is as essentia! to us as
I tho  atmosphere  itself.    We  cannot!
.exist without lt.    No matter how far
wo may develop tlie otlier forms of
human  industry   wo   must  fall  back!
on fanning—agriculture—as the basis!
and Bustainer of all.
The present tendency  ln all civilized countries is away from the land.
The cities grow like gourds aud the)
country Is deserted and despised, except as affording a place for recrea-t
tiou, rest and development ol luxurious ways of enjoyment.    Because of j
I this   continually    growing   tendency \
\ every effort to Increase iho product-
lvlly ot tlie soil and tho extent ot it
under cultivation is of lntmenso Importance and interest to every human
ILilng.
lSveryl ody knows something of the
almost  miraculous  effects  that have
I been pltnlned ln the western part of
Amor ea in utilizing   and   rendering
fertile vast expanses  of  land which
havo hitherto contributed nothing to
tlie support of man.
1    Irrigation, draining   and   scientific
management of the sol! and ot fertilizers have, In many places, produced
a real revolution.    And, best of all.
I litis movement has Inspired a spreading interest In agriculture as an occu-
■ paiioa not only lucrative but honor-
i able, and  capable  of  exercising the
I finest qualities of human Intelligence.
, Many a farmer's son has quitted tlio
[ land aud plunged into the seductions
jot tlie city only because tiie country
began to weary him on account of its
. monotony,     nnprogrcssiveness     aud
j small demand upon his Intelligence.
I Tills   will  nil  be  changed  when   he
see3 that the cultivation of the soil
calls forth the  exercise of ao much
Ingenuity and scientific knowledge as
manufacture or the pursuits of trade
! and commerce.
i    Some  of. iho most   Interesting examples of tlie   progress   now   being
made In rendering the earth more capable of supporting tlie  demands of
its fast    growing    population—which
has now reached a total ot about two
thousand millions—are    afforded    by
j tho Sout.lt   African    experiments   ln
; growing wheat    without    rain   from
i seeding to harvest.
This must seem a true miracle in
tlie eyes of many an old-time farmer
who has been accustomed to regard
llie signs of Ihe sky with anxious solicitude, believing that, only the bounty
of nature could aid hlni. and that
I plenty of rain is essential to Hie
growth of crops. But scienco has
achieved ii!
I It was found that ln some places —
; in arid regions where but littlo rain
fell In tlie courso of the year—a deep
uniform subsoil existed in which the
moisture was stored up and protected
from evaporation by a blanket of surface soil. Acting upon this Indication the soil was everywhere, where
crops were desired, ploughed aud harrowed until a very deep uniform subsoil was produced protected by a superficial blanket.
By lids method it lias been found
possible to bottle up lit the deep undersoil Ibe scattered rainfall for threo
lor four years. In tho second year a
' crop of wheat can be produced from
the first year's rainfall: In the third
year one from llie second year's rain,
in the fourth year a crop from the
third year's rain, and so on. The
cultivators are thus rendered Independent ot the vagaries of the rain-
Ifall. Somo Is bound to came In the
course of every year, nnd even though
It amounts to only 20 Inches for the
entire 12 months, by tlie system of
bottling up In the soil it can bo rendered available when wanted.
Dr. Maedonald of the South African
Union Department of Agriculture,
says: We In South Africa have grown
a rainless wheat. Wo havo grown
wheat without a single drop of rain
falling on lt from seed-time until
harvest.
The wheat used Is a durum wheat
called Apulia, Imported from Ihe dry
belt of Italy. Before this dry farming was Introduced the Soullr African
farmers hugged the Irrigation water
furrows and believed that, only In
their presence was wheat growing
possible. Thero were a tew Irrigated
patches and tho rest of the country
was a desert. Now, tho bottling system lias changed and all that,
and thousands of acres supposed to
he valueless aro yielding abundant
crops.
Such is tlie march of tho true world-
Minneapolis Tribune.
TH« COUNTRY PAIR
Money Spent In Attending Fein li
Wall Invested
Fair time Is again upon ua. It Is
the annual holiday handed dowa by
our forefathers who tilled the soil and
gathered to discover which hnd been
able to wrest the fairest fruit* from
their labor. It Is a time ot healthy
competition and relaxation that every
member ot the family .hould be allowed to enjoy. Both farmers and
city cousins should attend. Even the
most Insulated city dweller Is but a
generation or so away from toll tilling as men all tilled the soil or grazed
their herd, at one lime. Those who
can have gotton back to the soil after
drifting Into the unnatural hothouse
city llfo, There Is something for
everybody at the fair, whether lt be
merely a country pumpkin show pr
tlio more enlarged and classified exhibition aud ourself, espcciulty if you
tako nu ac'l.c part In entering your
best farm produce or help ln managing or superintending lt. The local
fair, like the country newspaper, the
country sclioolliouse and the country
church, is a success or failure Just
to that extent that home folk, take
active part. Its power for good Is
also much greater than ordinarily
conceded. Many a big breeder ot
purebred live stock got his Inspiration
from the local two-by-twice country
fair wheu ids -cow, pig or colt won
th. red rlbbo'a from the neighbors.
That victory or defeat may have
aroused friendly competition which
started one of moro plain farmers to
breeding pure Iveds to show neighbors Jones and Smith that they could
not beat the products of the rival
neighbor's farm. Attend at least two
fairs the coming season—tlie Lome
pumpkin affair, if you wish to so designate it, und the big fair that will
be advertised anc talked about In your
section. See what your neighbors
aro doing and then see what the best
herds, flocks and fields In tho Dominion nro doing.—Exchange.
An Oil of Merit —Dr Thomas' Ec-
lectric Oil is not a jumble ot medicinal substances thrown together and
pushed by advertising, but tho result
o! the careful Investigation ot the curative qualities ot certain oils as applied to tlie human body. It Is a
rare combination and it won and kept
public favor from the first. A trial
of it will carry conviction to any one
who doubt its power to repair and
heal.
Grant's Joke at Vlcksburg
Fifty years ago, when Grant was be-
seiging Vlcksburg, the C'ontederale
newspaper of that city, which ln the
desperate conditions was printed on
Ihe reverse side ot wall paper, editorially referred to a rumor that Grant
had claimed that lie would be in possession of tho city ou the Fourth ot
July.
Tho editor gayly reminded the Union
commander of the old recipe for cooking rabbits, beginning: First, catch
your rabbit.
Vicksburg was surrendered to Crant
on the Fourth of July, and one of tho
first acts of tlie grim conqueror was
to print, a second edition of the Confederate newspaper, with this note
added to the bantering edilorinl.
P.S.—July 4. The rabbit has been
caught.
DftDlTS'V
60c. a box or six boxes for $2.50,
■t all dealers, or The Dodds, Medl-
-clne  Company,  United,    Toronto,
Cannd.i.	
conquerors!'
A Famous Cafe
Tho passing of the Cafe Anglais In
Pari, awakens many recollections,
amongst the older Londoners who used
to visit Paris .a dozen times In tho
yenr. Forly years ago tho restaurant was famous for Its food and frequenters, who Included nearly every
cotebrlty iu Europe. It was then
King Edward's favorite restaurant ln
' Paris, always faultlessly conducted
although strongly dashed with Bo-
li.inlaiiism. All that W.-.3 best ln
tlie social and artistic world was to be
found there. It was ono of tho few
restaurants which kept open through
tiie selge, and thero was ground for
belief in the story that it never remembered  afterwards  to   reduce  its
prices. 	
■ '
Pat and Jim wero trudging along
the dusty road when a big touring
car passed thent with a whiz liko a
roar ot a gigantic rocket dtsappearlug
In a cloud of dust.
Gorry! exclaimed Pat,   thim   chug
wagons  must cost  a nape ot cash.
Tho rich In this    country   Is   fairly
burning money.
lndado  thin,   replied   Jim,   bo  the
i smell of lt lt must be that tainted
money '.ve do be hearing so much
about.
VV.  N.  U. 061
Darling, do you love nie for myself alone?
Why, certainly Charles. But you
really have that $_.0,000, haven't you.'
Minard's Liniment Cures Colds, Etc.
Path of the Sun
Tlie sun's palh is called the ecliptic.
It is a great circle ot the celestial
sphere, cutting the celestial equator
(at two points 180 degrees npart and
making with It an angle if 23>i degrees known as tho obliquity of tlie
ecliptic. The crossing poinls are
called tlie equinoxes, because the days
and nights arc then equal, and the
points midway between the equinoxes
are the BOlstlces, because the sun then
seems to stai 1 still for a few days.
Tho ecliptic Is so called because
eclipses occur only when the moon is
crossing lt or Is near it, for the
moon's libit cuts tlie ecliptic ln two
points, called nodes or knots, and at
otlier times is above or below lt. If
ths moon when In either node, Is In
line with tho sun and tho earth we
have an eclipse, either total or annular. It sl.o 1. near her node we have
a ,iartial eclipse.
The moon's nodes are not. statlon-
nrv, but move backward on the moon's
orbit, completing a revolution in
about nineteen yoars, when Iho eclipses of the period recur ln tho same
order nnd at nbout the same Intervals
as before. This period of eighteen
years and eleven days Is called the
saros. It was known to tha Chaldeans and tho Greeks nnd gave them
their data for computing eclipses.
Auy Intelligent person can traco thc
sun's palh in the heavens. If the
sun rises exactly In Iho east and sets
In Iho west It Is flic timo ot Ilio equinoxes, If Iho sunrise and Biinsot
points are fatthest south and the sun
Is very low In tho ! avens at noonday
ll is the timo of tho winter t-isllce.
Wished He Was a Comet
I wish I was n star, tho dude sigh-
od. smiling at his own poetic fancy.
I would rather you wero a comet,
sho said dreamily.
Ills heart beat tumultuously.
And why? be asked, tenderly, at
tbe same time taking her unresisting
littlo hand in Ms own. And why?
he repeated Imperiously.
Oh, sho said, with a brooding earnestness that fell freezing upon his
soul, became then you would como
around only once in fifteen years.
And he took his hat and went out
Into tho -diiu-merlng moonlight.
The young minister lost his manuscript ono Sunday morning, so he
spoke out thus:
I am very sorry Indeed to have to
inform you that I have—er—somehow
or other, mislaid my sermon for this
morning. I must—er— therefore,
trust to Providence for Inspiration.
To-night I will come better prepared.
He Got On j
Mlllyuns—When   I   married   yourj
mother I was earning ten dollars a
wcii;—two years later I bought out
my employer.
Daughter—And put In a cash regto*
ter!
A WARLIKE PRINCE
The Kaiser's Son Startled Berlin With
Hie Bosk
Something like a sensation waa
caused la Berlin by the publication
by the German Crown Prince of a
book called 'Germany ln Arms.' The
book, which la most reverently dedicated to the German E.nperor and the
Prussian King, contains ths following
motto: The world does not rest more
safely on the shoulders of Atlas than
does Germany ou her army ar.d navy.
The Imperial editor asserts that
Germany, more than any oth r land,
has to trust to its armaments, and
that as Its geographical position la
unfavorable, and as all nations do not
regard Germany with affection, the
country has tho sacred duty Imposed
on lt always to maintain Its army and
navy la a stnto ot readiness. Only
in this way, relying on our good sword
enn we maintain that place lu tho sun
which Is ours, but which will not bo
voluntarily conceded to us.
The Crown Prince goes on to say
that diplomacy may delay the conflict
for a season, but those In responsible
positions mint know that onco a gigantic conflagration Is lighted lt is not
so easy to extinguish.
Speaking of tho delight of riding
to an attack, the Prince says there
is one delight still greater—namely,
that of meeting the enemy at the end
of the gallop aud the fight for life and
death.
Mlnard'a   Liniment  Curta   Diphtheria
Paris Police Use Hand Cai non
The Paris policy department Is
equipped with what'ls considered an
effective weapon for use in dislodging criminals who barricaded themselves in houses and defy capture,
which Is a habit the Paris Apgches
have developed qulle extensively. The
weapon Is a hand cann..i, designed
particularly for throwluj bombs,
which when tliey explode will fill a
building or room with suffocating gases sufficiently powerful to overcome
tha occupants. The cannon, which
Is used behind a portable shield,
which completely protects the user
from bullets, looks like a piece ot iron
pipe, and may be carried in tlie hands
or slung over the shoulder like a riflo.
It can also bo used as a lire extinguisher, for throwing life lines Into
the upper windows of burning buildings, forcing doors open by hurling
heavy projectiles anl throwing grenades ln war time.
"Repeater" 1
Smokeless Powder Shells I
For a high grade sue** at a reasonable price,
the Winchester Loaded "Repeater" has the
call among sportsmen who have tried all
makes.   Although moderate priced, the
"Repeater" is loaded with the best quality
■ of powder and shot.   The list of loads furnished
in  this shell  cover most  shooters'  requirements,
and all of them  give  a full  measure of shooting
satisfaction.   Look for the W on the box.   They are
HIGH INQUaAZITY MODERATE IN PRICE
One or the Other
One kid slory leads to another.
A Cleveland school teacher—one who
has at several periods in the sweet
scented past favored us with anecdotes about ller pupils—sends ns an
account of a quiz conducted in her
geography class only a day or two
ago, <:ays the Cleveland Plain Dealer.
In ..-hat zone do wa live? asked
this teacher.
Tho Tetnp'i'ut Zone! chanted the
well drilled class.
-tight. And what do we mean hy
temperate?     Willie, you may answer.
emp'rut Is where It's freezing cold
halt the time and roasting hot the
other half of the time.
If Willie wasn't sent to the head of
the clr..« for that It wasn't because
ho didn't deserve the honor.
Intervals
First Child—Does your father scold
every minute he's in the house?
Sajond Child—No, not when ho Is
beating us.
A Grand Affair
A Pennsylvania man tried to cut
tho rattler of a live snake. The
funeral next day was ono ot the
hirjrest ever seen ln tha neighborhood.
John had been very disobedient and
Ills mother, with a sad face, called to
hlni to como and receive tho punishment that followed an infringement
of that particular rule.
Just one minute, Mother, begged
John. Ho knelt down beside his
bed mul ln n very earnest voice said:
Oh, Lord, you've often promised to
help 11= when wu needed it. Now's
your clianoj.
The Speed of Light'
Ths flrst astronomer to satisfactorily demonstrate the speed of light
was Ole Roomer, a Scandinavian scientist, who read his immortal paper
on this subject before the Academy at
Paris 238 years ago. lloemer's calculations and conclusions havo Blood
tho test of time and subsequent Investigations on all important points.
Knowledge as to tiie velocity of light
was of tremendous importance to astronomical science, Bince it enabled
astronomers to accurately estimate
the enormous distances with which
their science deals. lloemer found
that light travelled at the rate of
18-.-00 miles in a second. The sun,
being distant from tlio earth 92,000,000
miles, flashes light to us In eight minutes and fourteen seconds. Yet the
sun is a near neighbour compared with
the so-called fixed stars which In reality move with inconceivable velocity,
although the most powerful telescopes
will not 6how that velocity as anything but rest. Beyond tha outskirts ot our insignificant solar system ore other systems, and beyond
them still others, bo far as the sight
of man, aided by Instruments, may
bridge the ghastly chasm of tlie Infinite. Dlstat.ces beside which the
immense line stretching from earth to
sun Is an invisible point aro now
measured by means of Roomer's epochal discovery as to th. velocity of
light.
HI8 OWN DETECTIVE
When Asthma Conies do not despair. Turn at once to the help effective—Dr. J. D. Kellogg'a Aslhma
Itemedv. This wonderful remedy
will givo you the aid you need so
sorely. Choking ceases, breathing
becomes natural and without effort.
Others, thousands of thom, have suffered ns you Buffer but havo wisely
turned to this famous remedy and
ceased lo suffer. Get a package this
very day.
Would r    -ilse, But—
Wouldn't  you  promise  to  obey   a
man of whom you thought enough to
marry'
I might, replied JIlss Cayenne. But
I should undounledly havo a few
things to Bay if lie were ever so im-
poli'.o as to tom'rd mo ot my promise.
Reciprocity
Here some crazy scientist says
that geese honk like human beings.
Well don't some human beings
cackle like geese?
Jeweller Disguised Himself and Suo*
ceeded In Tracing Stolen Pearls
Charles Gys, a Paris jewel.er, wit*
was swindled out of three pearl neck,
laces by a man named Braun, by till
own exertions succeeded ln finding the
thief and recovering the pearls.
Braun pretended to Gys that he had
a customer for the necklace, but d*
camped when they were entrusted to
him, ostensibly abandoning his wife
and chlldre.i, Mme. Braun exhibit*
ed greet grief at being deserted, but
::. Gys had a suspicion that she waa
aware ot her husband's whereabout!,
so ho had his hair dyed, donned ■
false heard and ragged garments ant
completely disguised as a typical Par.
isian mendicant, posted himself outside her residence and shadowed her
when Bhe went out.
Three days passed and then, with
her children Bhe went to the railway
station aud took the express for Vienna. M. Gys was in the same, train,
and on reaching the Austrian capital
h> saw Braun awaiting his fr.mily oa
the platform. He followed ths party,
and learning lhat besidest* being a
swindler, Braun was a deserter from
the Austrian army, easily Induced tha
authorities to issue a warrant for hit
arrest.
Captured after ft vain endeavor t0
use a revol/er, Braun confessed that
ho had pledged the necklace for
$4,900 to three Parisian moneylenders.
Continuing his researches, M. Gjn
found tho bank ln which Braun had
deposited this money, secured evW
lend, to show that the three moneylenders were Braun's accomplices, and
hud them arrested, end eventually
traced tho pearls.
Accomplishments
It Isn't the pull that you have, mea
respect,
Or tlu help that your many frienda
give.
It's the effort you make all yourseU
to collect
The price of the life that you live.
It Is fine to be helped, but it's finer
by far,
In tho battle for glory or pelf,
To strive for hill tops, though dlstai-t
they are,
And to gain them at last by yourself.
He Knew
Oh,"Willie, you must put yow
drum away.   This Is Sunday.
But mother, I was going to pla»
some sacred music.
Circumnavigating the Globe t
The Interest in circumnavigating!
the globe ln tho shortest possible
space of time, periodically revives.
Tlio record has been, successively,
in 1903 by Henry Frederick; 3!) days
in 1911. by Andre Jaeger-Schmidt.
Now a New York 'F.venlng Sun' reporter, J. II. Mears, Is trying to mako
a new record. llo left Now Y'ork
July 2 and hopes to complete his
Journey ln 35 daya.
Tlie club voted to go to the aviation
meet.
I suppose the resolution was adopted by a rising vote.
As the temperance lecturer finished
good old Deacon Miles arose aud said
impressively:
Every time I see a young man cone.
ing out of a saloon I want to ft
right up to that young man and say!
Turn round young man; you are f»
ing the wrong way.
Jennie, have you discovered tha
bomb?
Yes,  dear.
Have you mailed the Infernal machine?
Yes, my angel.
Then, powder your nose and we_
go to Mrs. Stlmson's tea.
CANADAPorttand CEMENT
SOME men ask for so many bags of
"cement"—
Others, more careful say they want
4' Portland Cement "—
But the man who does the
best work insists upon getting "Canada" Portland
Cement—
And he looks to
JA see that every k
bag, bears this
L label'
Vv ::-C--i-d.C.i..(a«
Intormatien Bureau, Montreal, (ot a free copy ol
"What the Fame! Caa
Do With ConcreU."
Then b a Canada
Cement dealer in your
naghboitiood. II you do
nol bow him, wot* (at
his name
wmmm THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
\$
I An Insult
Avenged
: A Story For (he Fourth  ::
of July
By MARIAN WILSON
■t»H-l-l-H-l**H-l-.-l-H-I*l*l-l*'M 1-I-14
"Orandpa, tell us a story for the
fourth of July."
".oit'll have to go to some one younger tVan 1 for a story about celebrat-
tttm the fourth ot July, but If you want
«M about wlutt we celebrate I cau give
II to yon."
•What do you mean by that."
•The Fourth of July Is celebrated
la commemorate our becoming a nn-
des and not a colony of Ureal Britain.
Oar Independence was achieved by the
■evolutionary war. 1 will tell you of
aa Incident of thnt war,
"One evening during the period of the
Aa-erlinn Revolution a young British
■fleer rode up to n house In northern
Hew Jersey and, dismounting, went to
tke door uud knocked. In tbat duy tbe
••Ionics, or (be eastern states, were
Ike rural England. Mnny of tbe most
■_is.ori.itle families of New York lived
ta country homes within, say, fifty
■lies of the city, antl lt was at one
*t these houses thut tbe young oflicer
•topped.
•fills summons wns nnswered by a
negro servant, whom lie directed to ask
Ma mistress If be could huve some supper. The negro illsnppeared, nnd pres-
•ally I lie re wns a rustle of skirts on
Ibe winding staircase, and a tall girl
"on, niuvESs, i iiati kimcd nm r
•f dlgnlllwl mien appeared before the
itrangoi'. lie duffed his hat to her with
•II the bearing of a young marquis and
■aid:
"'I nm on my wny to Join our forces
■t Monmouth. I have had nothing to
•at all day and would be very thankful for something Ihut will slay uiy
fcunger.1
"'i'he girl, with no less grace thnn his,
tnvllcd hlin Into ihe living room nnd
lold him Hint If he would wait a few
■dilutes she would bave something
prepared for hltn. Presently tbe cellared servant reappeared und Invited
kltn Into (lie dining room, Thero at
the tabic behind n silver urn snt thu
(Irl who bud admitted hlin, while before ber were tbo dishes that constituted Ilio supper.
"'Ileally,' Ibe ollicer said, 'tills klud-
less overwhelms me.'
" 'Yuu are an enemy,' sbe said, 'but
pou lire hungry, nnd 1 wonld not deny
pon merit nnd drink. And, giving you
Hub, I treat you for the timo being aa
I guest.   Will you hnvo coffee'/'
"'Thanks, Mistress'—
"•I am Dorothy Halo.'
"Tlicro was something high bred
■bout Hie girl to excite the admiration
If the young scion of a noble house In
England, lint the English nobleman
•f that daj: was not overscrupulous lu
kls deallii
Bicn, and us
ailles from court he hnd no cousclcnco
•rhntcver. Indeed, the courtliness of
Mistress Dorothy Halo was but nn In-
tentlvc lo n compiest. Having finished Id* repast, he nrosc and, laying
lown his napkin, said:
•".Mistress llnle, I feel myself ro-
Urlcled from offering you payment for
the delicious repaBt you have given
ano, lint I cannot go away without In
aome way showing my appreciation of
your kindness.' With thnt bo stepped
ip lo hor, put bis arms about ber und
kissed her.
"When he snw the red flush be had
•ailed to tier cheek, the flash of fire
b her eye, he knew ho had mndo a
Mistake, no stammered a few words
•f apology, to which sho made no reply, and, hacking himself out of the
room, wout to whero be bad left bla
korso ond rode nwny.
"He had gone perhaps a mile when
lie beard behind him the sound of a
galloping horse. It occurred to bim
that the rider was coming with some
Message connected with the Insult he
kad offered his benefactress and Judged that lie might be called to account
tit what he had done. But he was not
■•ward aud was ready to pay tor tha
tM Iii IMS Mem la any eo-_ii_i»1re_
Bo, Instead ot pushing aa, ke dre»
rain and waited tor tba approacbln|
koneman, who, when ha came un
proved to ba a negro boy.
" 'Missy Dorothy tole me to gib y-
dat.' he said, banding tba young mat
a bit of folded paper on which were a
few words, as follows:
"Sir—Tou have Insulted a eefenaelees woman who save you meat and drink. My
brother will be at borne this evening anj
will expect eatlsfsctlort ln the wood bacH
(of tbe bouse at sunrise tomorrow morn,
l-l.
" Tell your mistress," said the officer,
•that I must doubtless give the rebel
General Washington satisfaction tomoo
row or soon after, and If I am sparcil
to return to her I will do ao as soon
as I can get a leave of absence. Bul
tell her I would rather meet her friend
or ber lover than her brother, fer 1
would not Injure her for King George'*
dominions.'
"With that be turned his horse's hend
tn the direction he bad been going, and
the boy went back to bla mistress.
"Within a few days General Wash.
Ingtou attacked General Howe, who
was marching from Philadelphia tl
New York, Washington hoping to pre
vent him from reochlng his destine,
tion. But General Charles tee, wbo, II
had recently been discovered, had turn.
ed traitor to the American cause, (11*
obeyed orders and rendered Washing*
ton's plan fruitless.
"A couple of weeks after the battli
Mistress Dorothy Bole was sitting on
the porch of her father's house when
a redcoat camo riding along the road
and drew rein before the gate.
"'Mistress Hale,' he said, 'I bavi
come to give you satisfaction throng.
your champion, whoever he may be,
but I beg yon to spare me a meeting
wilh your own brother.'
"lie wns nbout to dismount nnd come
up to Join ber, but sbe arose and stood
looking down upon him as a figure oi
Justice regarding a criminal and forbade his entrance. Then she noticed
that he was very pale.
" 'You do not look ln condition to
(Ight for your life. Go away aud come
agaiu when you are stronger.'
" '1 am strong enotrgh to fight yout
brother,' he said, 'for I shall stand only
on the defensive'
"Tbe girl remalued silent a moment
then added: 'I presume you have been
wounded ln tbe recent battle. An
apology will be accepted.'
" 'One holding tho king's commission
canuot apologize In face of a challenge.'
"'Very well.' Bald the girl; 'go to tba
wood behind tbe house, und my brother will Join you there.'
" 'Does your brother remain nt home
tn these times? Ono would suppose
thnt a man capable of championing his
sister would be fighting on ono side or
the oilier.'
" 'He wns wounded, though slightly,
In the battle. He Is now quite recovered nnd Is to rejoin his regiment to-
morraw—that Is, If you do not prevent
bis doing so.'
"The oflicer reluctantly tethered his
horse to n post hefore the gate nnd
walked around tho bouso to the wood
In rear. There he waited half an hour
when he snw n man coming in the uniform of n Continental soldier.
" 'My sister tells me, sir,' said young
Hale, 'lhat you asked her for supper,
sbe gave lt to you with her own hands
snd you returned her kindness by un
Insult'
"'Hns not your sister,' said tbe Englishman, 'some one else than you to
champion her? Should I kill you I
should fancy tbat I killed ber, so marked Is the likeness between you.'
"'Wo nie twins,' sold young Hale.
'But enough of talk.   Defend yourself.'
"There wero no weapons except a
sword Hole had brought with hlni from
tbe house and the sword tbe oflicer
woro hy his side.
" 'One moment,' said the latter.
'Should you kill me lt will be well for
you to know who I am. I am Lieutenant Itlchard Trevelynn of the —th British foot second sou of the Earl of An-
gleton.'
" 'In case you fall your remains shall
be scut to England.'
"'Halher send them to the colonel
ot my regiment Were lt not that I
bnve but little strength I would uot
think of taking these precautious
agalust a beardless boy. Now, sir, I
am ready.'
"It was not a spirited contest on
either side. Hale did not appear to relish lt nny moro than Trevelyan. The
latter seemed to fenr killing bis opponent, while tbe former grew paler
and paler, bis thrusts at the same time
growing weaker.   At last Hale, while
parrying a thrust of his enemy, ran the
with his own country wu* i p0,nt of *.,, Bwor(1 *nt0 w, opponent's
fot* one who lived 3,000   -„at   n,,..., f0rt0,,.„,|. nnii fl. .„„,, „,
coat Blood followed, and as soon as
be saw it Halo throw away his sword
ond, clasping his bauds ou bis breast,
exclaimed:
" 'Oh, heavens, I have killed hlral'
"Trevelynn looked at him ln astonishment Then, throwing away bis
■word, he said:
"'You aro not a mnn. You ore a
woman.   You are Miss Dorothy Hale.'
"'Have I killed you?'
"'Killed me! No. You bave but
broken tbe skin.'
"He threw open his coat nnd display*
ed a wound a fow lucbes long and half
au Inch deep.
" 'Come,' said Dorothy. . am
avenged.'
"Trovclyan kneeled before her nnd
begged her forgiveness for bis conduct,
then went with her to the house, whet*
tbe dressed the wound she had given
him.
"When tho war was over and the Independence of tho United Slates established Trovclyan's regiment wns withdrawn to England. Before leaving he
made Dorothy Hale more ample amends
than tbe scratch sho had Inflicted upon
bim by marrying her ond taking her
t-omo to England wltb hia."
OmOH. IK CAHOTX.
Only Twelve Per Cent, et OansfiV-
Wcrkmen  Organized.
Borne Interesting (acts re-pectlnn
labor and Its organizations ln Canada
ara contained in the annual special
report on the subject by the Department ef Labor. The union membership ln the last calendar year incren.*
■d from 133,13a to 160,120 at the end
of 1912.   The report lays in p.irt:
"It is now well understood by
those interested ln the subject that'
the great majority ol units ol organized labor in Canada are affiliated with
International organizations having
their headquarters ln tha United
States. The mass ol membership is
ln all these cases south of the kne,
the Canadian memberships receiving
generally Its proportion ol officials.
This syst-m ol internationalism in
labor organization ln Canada is apparently confined to no particular
class of workers, and extendi
throughout practically all industries;
In some cases, however, the worker.
have (avorcd a form of unionism independent of the international bodies
and have proceeded on non-international lines."
International union, in North America number 1.3, and 93 have aCliated
locals ln Canada. Or the latter 82 are
ln affiliation with the American Federation ol Labor. The Canadian memberships c( this federation is about
(3,000, or one-twentieth ol the whole.
Ths tables submitted show that ths
138,389 workers ln Canada who aro
members of International organizations are contained ln 1,033 local
branches,* this la an increase ol 107
locals and 16,974 members over ths
figures reported for 1911.
Of Canadian organizations .h_r»
are £17 local branches wilh a total
membership ol 15,616, a slight increase for the year; and in addition
there are 28 independent bodies, ol
which 16 report a memliershipTn t?. 11 r>.
thus bringing to the figure of 160,123
the total membership repcrtej in the.
1,883 local branches and independent
trade union organizations ol all type.
In Canada at tho close ol the year
1912. The total membership report?!
lor 1911 was 1.33,132. contained in 1,711
local and independent bodic*.
The total number ol wnge-earners
ot Canada may be fairly estimated for
the current year at 1,300,000.
With regard to the large majority
o( wage-earners who' remain thus
apparently untouched by organization
and representing 88 per cent, ol the
whole, organization is cliielly lacking
In the case of unskilled labor. Farm
labor nnd the class nl workers described generally in the census and
other official returns as "laborers,"
that is men without teelniicnl instruction of nny kind, nlone comprise
about one-fourth o[ thc total male,
wage-earners, antl these nro practically unorganized. Female workers, too,
are but littlo organized In Canada.
The minib<>r ol women workers"in 1909
was placed at 184,042, nnd may be
(again allowing an increase ol forty
per cent.) placed at 260.000 at the end
d 1912. The extent of organization
among women workers in Canada is
not easily ascertained, hut the information to hand shows there is little
to report. Organization on (he part
ol female workers is found chiefly ill
the manufacturing group, in such callings, for instance, as garment workers, cigarmakers, bookbinders, etc.
The trades union membership
throughout the world aggregates 11.-
435,593. Germany is first, Great Britain second, United States third. Ths
report gives a complete list nf all unions in Canada and tlieir officers.   .
THE TOBACCO KING.
To Help Grenfell.
A plan to set on foot the formation
of a better organization to support
the work of Dr. T. Wilfred Grenlell
among the fishermen ol Ihe Labrador
is being actively pushed forward.
The prime mover Is W. I.. Sterling,
one of the greatest enthusiasts over
the Grenlell Medical Mission. Ilo he-
came so interested last year that he
chartered tlie supply ship Clewett and
took a party of friends lo the Labrador coast, whero he delivered supplies
at tho various posts ol the Mission.
He had many pathelic stories to tell
of what he saw among the natives ol
the barren coast.
"Thc Isolation of the people on the
coast of Labrador, their lack of education, their lack ol facilities to get
supplies or to get any distance (ram
Iheir own small homes, excepting at
the expense of much lime and labor;
it seemed to me, put these people it)
a class by themselves," _ays Mr
Sterling.
A Locomotive as a Fire Engine.
It Is not often thnt one hears of
such novel use being made cf a railway locomotive as to extinguish a
Ure In a burning building, hut a locomotive was not long ago -o employed
on the outskirts ol a western town.
About thirty-live feet from Ihe railway tracl.-s stood a structure constructed principally of wood. This caught
lire, ami, ns it would have been impracticable to await the coming of
the town lire company, n considerable
distance off, tho engineer nf a train,
then standing idle on tho track, conceived it to be his duty to put out ths
lire. Accordingly he steamed up lo n
point opposite the building building,
turned on all his steam, and blew out
llie fire ill a lew minutes. Steam will
In many cases smother fire.
Progressive Farmers.
Farmers' Clubs in various counties
of Ontario, with the assistance ol the
local representative of the Ontario Department of Agriculture, have secured,
among otlier things, tho establishment
of a Continuation School, the opening
of a produce store where butter and
eggs are purchased according to quality, municipal telephones and co-operative purchasing of supplies.
Any Briton May Draw Plans,
The commission appointed by the
Government lo make arrangements for
the competition for deigns (or tha
new Government buildings at Ottawa,
has prepared a competition (or the
structures which will cost about ten
million dollars. It la -pen to tha
Uritish Eiuyiie
•Ir William   Macdomld   li  a Unlqul
Personality.
The first time the writer saw "Sir
. William  Macdonald was   some   hail
I dozen years ago following the buniin.
el the Medical and Science Building.
. at McGill, says J.  C.  Ross  in  Tin
Toronto Sunday World.   I h id known
that Sir William MacIcnalJ was the
| chief financial power back of McGill,
and  when   the  science  building  fir.
I took place a few days alter the burn*
| Ing of the medical school. I went to
him to get a story regarding the torture plans of tho-Jestroyci Institutions.
Sir William was a millionaire msny
! times over, known to everyone as a
' great tobacco king, .as a governor nf
i McGill  antl  as  a  generous  giver  lo
, educational institutions. I expected to
| see him housed in an elaborate ollice
, building, with a magnificent suite ol
; rooms and as difficult to interview as
would be the Czar.    Instead of that,
I I looked in vain in the telephone directory for an inkling as to his telephone number or whereabouts, and it
was only after much questioning and
' searching, that I located his office on
Notre Dame street.    A  frosted glass,
| (rom which Ihe frosting bad largely
1 been  removed  and  was replaced  by
1 cobwebs and dust, contained the sign:
! "Office cf Sir William   Macdonald."
The office was one flight up llie nor-
[ rowest and steepest stairs it had ever
been my experience to climb.   On the
landing   were   three   or   four   dingy,
bnrcly furnished rooms devoid of e~fir*
pets, rugs, telephone, type-writer4, ct
any of the other paraphernalia belong-
ing to ihe thodernly equipped olfltV.
| Instead of these things, were found a
lot  of old-fashioned   high   desks,  on
I which bent and worn men were seated
on high stools working over ledgers.
• The whole looked ns if a clisi.ter bad
I been   taken  out  of  one  of   Dickens'
I books and transplanted lo busy, bus.
tllng modern Montreal.
On my request for nn interview with
Sir William. I was told to go into a
room, through the open door of which
I saw the great man himself. I entered, and in answer to my query as
to what would be done with McGill,
Sir William quietly replied: "Wc will
wait until the ashes cool."
Further questionings from many
angles nnd sides tailed to elicit sr.y
further information.
Sir William Macdonald is in many
ways, the most unique man in Can.
arlian industrial life to-day. Rofn in
Prince Edward Island ill .1--31. Sir
William is now in his 83rd year. He
if the son of llie late lion. DoiialJ
Macdonald, member of the Legislative
Council ol Prince Edward I_1ar.il. Sir
William got his start in the tobacco
business at the limo of the American
Civil War. Willi the shrewd Scottish
foresight which has always character,
ized him, ho saw further .'.head than
most men of his day, and when the
war broke out. he cornered the tobacco crop. To-day he is wortfl proh-
ab!/ a score nf millions, all aflwlil.il
have been made Irom the "Godde.-s
Nicotine."
.His interest in education is of comparative recent origin, and illustrates
the peculiarities of the man. Like
most universities, McGill has had per*
inds of financial stringency. On one
of these occasion4, tho aid of the students was cnllsle'd, nnd an effort made
to secure suflicient funds to title the
college ever nn especially t-IIBcul. period. The students in question with
the confidence horn of ignorouce iinl
inexperience, called upon Sir William
nnd laid Ihe claims of "Old McGill"
before tho quiet littlo old tobacco
king. To llieir surprise, and to tha
surprise ot tbe McGill authorities, Sir
William responded with a hsncl.-orne
contribution, and followed it up with
n series of 'contributions not only to
McGill, but to the cause of education
throughout Canada, that has made his
name a household word throughout
lite Umpire. It is estimated thai lie
has given in tlie. neighborhood of fl_va
million dollars to tho Agricultural an 1
nffilinfc.l colleges at Sle. Anne d_»|
Bollevuo, and as many more millions!
In McGill; while liis Macdonald tiistl*
lule ot Guclph, hia "good seed" and
manual training movements and oth.-r:
donations lo can oat io na I work, will:
probably run into more millions,
Prairie  Teacher   Is   1 leroine.
Surrounded on all sides by a raging:
prairie lire, which fed upon llie grasses'
nnd dense underbrush. Hint grew to
the very doors of the little log school-j
house in which she wns hearing
classes, Miss Esther Smith, a .chool
teacher near Poplar Creek, in tb.
south country, saved more than ri
score of pupils ond herself from prob.
able death in the flames recently.
Word ol her presence cf mind wis
brought lo Moose Jaw hy member, cf
the Royal Northwest Mounted Police.
Miss Smith rushed thcni to h clnaretj
spot. Within a lew minutes the deserted seho-lhouso was a mass of
ruins.
While the flames were raging on
all sides nnd blazing twigs and sparks
were falling among them, tho teacher,
despite tho smoke ami Intense heat,
continued her classes, forcing the pupils to pay strict heed to Iheir lessons.
Made Bullion of Medals.
A considerable portion nf Ihe money
which was used to establish the Toronto General Hospital in 1318, wa4
raised in a peculiar way. Geld and
silver medals were sent to Yrrk from
Kngland to he awarded to the heior.
of the war, but through some strange
quibbling, they were never given out,
but were exchanged fnr money, which
\yer)t toward erecting the hospital. A
blacksmith and two apprentices hammered the medals into bullion.
ANCIENT SKYSCRAPERS.
th« Sir..-* WafrowiLirtt.-.
The tenement bodse Is no new thins.
Bo gre.it was the mm.ber or sucft
bouses mid so badly were they put np
ln ancient Itoine thnt In ttO A. I>. tbe
Emperor OtllO, who was then marching
ngainst Vit-Ilii.3. found liis way hatred
for twenty miles hy the ruins of build*
Ings thut had heen undermined by nn
Inundation. The spontaneous collapse
cf tenement bouses was so common au
•occurrence that little attention was
■paid to It.
Thu tenants of these houses havo
been described by U writer of the Unit,
as fearing to be. buried or .burned
alive. Companies existed for the purpose of propping and sustaining
houses.
In comparison with the tenements of
raost   modern  cities,   those  of   I tome
were excessively high.  .Martial alludes
to a poor mnn, a neighbor, who bad to
"mount 200 steps to reach bis garret.
Tbat jjarret must have beeu perched
nearly 100 feet above tue level of tho
street.
I    It Is possible Hint Martial exaggerated, but lt Is certain that Augustus, to
make less frequent the occurrence of
■disasters,  limited  the  height of new
j houses that opened upon the streets to
; nbout sixty-eight feet.    As this wns a
1 remedial regulation and referred ouly
1 to new bouses fronting on t,be street,
i It follows that some houses must have
exceeded that height
I    Tbls, moreover, wns Irrespective of
j tbe breadth of tbe street. In Berlin tlie
medium width of tbe streets Is twenty*
two meters, nnd In Purls the narrow*
I est  streets nre  nearly   eight   meters
.wide, while tbe street* of Home extended only live or six meters', nnd on
these narrow streets the tnll  bouses
were built   LlglA and air must have
| bad some difficulty In penetrating thoso
narrow, walled In passages.
SARD0U AT REHEARSALS.
H. Worried the Actors to Scowls and
the Actresses to Tears.
Sarilou, the great Trench playwright,
knpw bow to prollt by the views ot other people, .leroine A. Hurt writes In
bis book, "Sardou and the Sardou
nays:"
"Like Alexandre Pumas pere, Sardou
was extremely sensitive to llie opinions
nf'the less subtle spectators of his rehearsals, lie closely wntched and
beodetl the !mfircs.<dbn.*rnnd ci>;umeuts
of,the stage enrpenters. scene painters,
firemen, supers and oilier humble peoplo behind the seeues. They represented to him the average miud of the average audience. Tu the opinions of actors of bis unprodiiccd pieces he paid
little heed: to the opinions of critics,
noue nt all. At rehearsals no details
escaped him. He would scat himself
on the stage chairs nnd sofas, open and
shut the practicable doors, go to I ha
back of-the parterre to slmly the perspective of the scene, climb to the highest gallery to see If the audience there
could hear, and then hasten back to
tbe stage.
"There he would seat himself. Jumping up during the rehearsal thirty or
forty times to show the actors bis Idea
of tbo action. In doing Ibis he would
laugh, would cry, would shriek and
would even dlo a mlralc death. Coming to life again, he would call for bis
overcoat and hnslen to mtidle himself
up ns before He wns very sensitive to
cold and always came nn Ihe stage
with a heavy coat a muffler nnd cap
to protect him from tlmfls.
"He would rehearse from 10 In the
morning until 3, when he would take u
sandwich nnd a glass of wine. After
this he would resume his work until I.,
at which hour ho would go blithely
forth Into the street, smiling nnd hum*
mlng, 'followed,' ns one resentful player put It, 'by scowling ucturs and weeping actresses.'"
Tho Idler Works Hard.
Work, Ideally, should bo congenial,
fruitful, nnd tbe worker aware of his
worth to tho world. Nobody works
harder thnn the Idler. He has on his
hands the dire Insk of killing time.
Knowing Ihe nwfiilness of vacuity, ha
fills the dn.v .villi a semblance of activity and while gnawing nt his peace Is
conscious of the barren folly of It till.
The finest argument for real work la
the spectacle of Iti counterfeit present-
ment—Itlchard llurtou In the Uellmau.
Long Felt Want.
Tenst—I see a man bas patented a
hend rest to be fastened to the arm
| of a cur seat to aid the comfort ot
j passengers  obliged   to  sleep  ln   day
coaches.   Crlmsotibeak—What Is most
needed In day clinches Is n rfitn rest
| for the man who Happens to sit next
to you.—Yonkers tUfltOSmRn,
His Excuse.
"Why Is It Hint you wish to be excused." asked the judge of the unwilling Juror.
"I'm deaf, your honor—so denf that
I renlly don't believe I could hear
more than one side or tho cone."—
Cleveland Leader.
Field Crop Contests.
Under the direction of the Agricultural Societies Branch of the Ontario
Department of Agriculture, 153 jecie*
tie* held field crop competitions, .1,000
Individual farmers entering, and a
total of 30,000 acres was seeded, hi
compared with 300 acres in 1907, wh.ti
thc competition, began.
Women's Institutes.
There   are   725   branches   ol   the
Women's  Ins'.i.utcs,   wilh more than
The Surprise.
I A man told ids daughter that ir she
i learned to cook he would give her a
'surprise. She learned the art, nnd he
surprised her Ky discharging tbe servant girl.
Load For Load.
"Brown Bays hu drinks because It
drlres nwny his troubles."
"ITo exchanges One load fur another,
so to spenk."-llosliui Transcript.
Coofterp
points
Cherry Shortcake*
For cherry shorten be make a  soff
dough by mixing together two cupfula
ot' .tour sifted with a heaping teaspoon-
fut of baking powder, n teaspoonful of
salt and half a cupful of shortening,
which may be half each of butter nnd
lard or bacon fat. Add two tablespoon-
t'uls of sugar und mix with n well
beaten egg. Add enough milk to make
the dough of the right consistency.
Itoll out lu two It-fen. ttud bake in the
Fame pan with decks of butter be*
tweeu.
When baked the two layers will separate easily. The cherry lining should
be iu readiness to spread between tbe
shortcake and on top. Large ripe
cherries are pitted and crushed slightly
In a bowl with sugar. Taste tbe juke
to tell If it is sweet enough. Prepare
the cherries some time ahead and you
will Und them much nicer. Serve with
or without whipped cream.
Frown Fruits.
Combination of fruit flavor* will
often Ijrlug about cooling and delicious;
results. Peaches nnd plums combine
perfocrly und frozen In u sugar etni|)
yield a most delightful sweet. Itoil
one quart of water with oue pound of
sugar until tbey form n rich sirup,
then strain and stand nslde until cold.
Pare twelve line ripe peaches and
chop tine with a silver knife. Scald
one pint of plums, remove tbe skins
and the stones, mash the pulp and add
to tbe peaches. Crack the pits to remove tbe kernels, blanch nnd pound.
Add the fruit and the mushed kernels
to thc sirup. Let it stand for thirty
minutes and then freeze.
Blackberry Jam Cake.
Utlb to a cream half a cupful of but*
ter und then gradually add one cupful
of sugar, the beaten yolks of three
eggs and the whites of two, reserving
tbe third white for frosting. Take half
n cupful of thin cream or milk, a level
teaspoonful each of cinnamon, allspice
nnd two scant cupfula of Hour, nud
last of all stir In one cupful of blackberry jam or preserves. Hake In mod.
eralely hot oven for about three quarters of nn hour. This makes a nice
pudding If eaten ns soon as baked and
n currant Jelly or lemon sauce is serv*
ed with it
&0CO member, in Ontario.
Genius.
"Tn he clever?"
"Well, he* cun hnnft his "wn w«lips per nnd pill lit his own klt'tiuu door."
—iji-o-oli -Vree Preee.
Gold and Silver Omelet.
Hnve ready as many eggs aa tbere
nre people to be served. Separate lbs
yolks from the whites and beat each
thoroughly, then add to each a dash uf
salt and pepper or paprika and a little
Uillk. PourTjuth egg mixtures Blmul-
taueously iuto tbe pan, letting ths
white omelet cover one-half of the bottom aud the gold omelet tlie other half.
Cook them gently until firm throughout, taking care that they do not burn.
Theu fold the white or silver one over
on to tbe other und serve immediately.
Souffle Glace,
rialf n pint of cream, one table-
ipoonftll of grated lemon rind, four
eggs, half a pound of sugar, half a
gill of wine, one tnblespootiful of lem*
on Juice and a pinch of salt Mix the
yolks of the eggs, lemon juice, lemon
rind, sugar nnd salt Stir over a slow
tire until thick. Cool. Add the whites
of eggs, well beaten, nnd tbo cream,
beaten until stiff. Add tlio wine. III!
the mixture Into paper eases, pack hi
l pail and pack tho pall In Ice and
salt for four hours.
,, Burnt Almond Ice Cream.
Blanch nnd chop half n pint of
ilmonds, Cook four tnblespooufuls of
sugar to ibo caramel; mid tlie chopped
Blmonds. When cold pound to a pow-
3er. Put one pint Of milk Into n saucepan with half n pound of sugar and
tbo yolks of four eggs. Stir over u
sluw flro until It coats the ppooti;
then strain and cool. .Add one pint of
whipped cream, a pinch of salt, ono
teaspoonful of almond extract and the
pounded almonds.   Freeze.
Grape Cup,
Tour hnlf a cupful of boiling water
over four lablc.;poonfuls of grape jelly
nnd stir until dissolved. Add tbe sauus
quantity of cold water, one tablespoon-
ful of sugar aud n little lemon Juke.
Placo a lump of Ice In u glass pitcher
and pour the liquid over. Any kind of
Jelly will answer if the grape ll not nt
hand. If currant Jelly Is used then
less lemon juice will bo required, cur*
rants being rather (art.
Summer Sandwich.
Cncmnber and green nepper mltir.-t
fine nnd  seasoned   with   ninyoi l-o
make as tasty n hot weathrr sandwich
as it Is ensy to find. If the sandwiches
nro not to be used nt once the Julco
should be squeezed from the vegetables
after they nre minced, for otherwise
the bread will become water 800ked
For Afternoon Tea.
To vary tlio nflem-mii Iced ten drop
n sprig op two of fresh mint Into the
pot with tbe dry ten nnd turn Ihe bulling water over It A bit of the crisp,
frpsb niltit In enHi glass looks refreshing on a hot afternoon.
New Wrinkle For Potato Si'ad.
Instead of onion, try mixing tlie potato salad with cucumbers rut In small
;>!pcps Unions may lie used. Ino, but
in'ess the quantity Is (tptnll I lie flavor
)f the potato sud cucumber hieml wlif
tkt losl -.ne. IBtiA-MJBB, OomhBBJjAlSO,  «•.<
THE ISLANDER
Published every Saturday at Cumberland, Vancouver Island, B.C.. by
Tilt: ISLANDER PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY
Edward VV. Bickle, Editor.
Subscription! $1.50, payable in advance.   Advertising Rates furnished on application
To Correspondents : The Editor does not hold himself responsible for views
expressed by correspondents. No letters will be published in the Islander
except over the writer's signature.   The Editor reserves the right to
refuse publication of any letter.
SATUKDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1913
Like begeta like. That is fundamental. Mon do not gather
%s from thistle-. Violence breeds violence, As the twig is
Lent the tree's inclined, 1 could string these saws 'ind sayings
nut indefinitely, hut tlie foregoing will serve as the basis for an
interesting little study inhuman nature.
Everybody* believes that as a man soweth so shall he also
reap ; yet some misguided humans to-day are busily engaged
in sowing disorder and confusion and violence in the fond hope
that they will reap order and peace, stability and comfort,
brotherly love and prosperity.
Let us iiii'c/ine the simplest possible case of united human
action the better to illustrate the point I am trying to bring out.
Two men have joined material forces to conduct a certain
business. They have two men working for them at a A'ti/mlated
wage. After a time, the hired men become discontented with
conditions as they are in that modest establishment—the reason
or fancied reason Inr the discontent matters not—and combine
to make a change. Being impatient, these men want the
change to come about as quickly as possible ; so they plant a
nice little chunk of dynamite or a keg of giant powder under
the property of their employers—the property that thus far
has been paying their wages—and scatter it in the direction
of the vaulted sky. They repeat this performrnce until the
owners get disgusted aud move to another part of the earth to
begin life afresh,
Then the hired men, having come into possession through
violent methods, of some dust and wreckage that once had
been a going industry, essay to reconstruct it according to their
own theories. -'Ind here appears their greatest ene?)iy—Human
Nature. As long as the immediate object was violence and
destruction,the wage-earners worked in close harmony and without the suggestion of friction—save perhaps in an occasional
controversy as to whether the debris should be thrown a toot or
a mile high. But when the period of construction arrived,
when they had to take the chaos of their former business and
bring out of it the order of a new business, when the passion
to "tire, kill, burn," yave place to the deliberation required for
rational and constructive operations, these men discover they
were far from being a unit. One was more radical than the
other ; always this is so with any two men you may select any
place on earth -one will be ?/tore radical, less judical, more impatient, lev; amenable to restraint, than the other.
Finally they compromised ; which means that no matter
how they tried to equalize their differences, the balance tipped
iu favour nl' "lie or the other of the mell ill the accepted plans
of reorganization. Hot as each still held to the original idea on
which they hul acted with some show of harmony—that is, that
destruction is tho lust and surest j'oad to reconstruction—it was
but a short time when the man whose coustrructive plan had
carried became the enemy of the other fellow, owned more of
the busi'ies. than the oilier fellow, exercised greater control,
demanded a larger share of the /nolits. Ami one dark night
the other fellow, reverting to the original scheme, lifted his
partner and their joint property towards the (/littering stars.
If vou will fancy the two radicals taken for our illustration
as eventually growing in numbers until they secure an1! exercise
governmental control of any country, you will find the saint*
characteristics in the controlling muss as I have pointed out in
the individuals. One faction assuredly will be more radical
than all the other factions, and the most radical will seek to
gain its ends through violent methods, just as originally the
combined factions secured control through violence It is also
Mell to rememeber that violence seldom is—I might in fact .say
never is -the' rule' of the majority. Almost invariably it means
the temporary rtcendancy of the minority, the smaller part compelling tho larger part to bow to its will, Auy government
set up by violence almost tn a certainty is doomed to fall by
violence; and this will repeat itself as long as any part of government -bo  that part  big or little—consider.)  violence an
admissible path toward a desired, or even a desirable goal.	
"A'emaiks by an Old Fogy," from The Y.dvo World.
Macfarkn
We invite you to inspect the following
NEW
ARRIVALS
Men's Footwear
Just to hand our First Fall Shipment of Ames Holden and
McCready Shoes. In the newest shapes, colors black and
Brown; both button and lace,   see our window for display.
Men's Suits
These are here in all the newest shades and styles. Colors
Navy, Brown, Bronze, Black, Purple etc.
Ladies' Millinery
First showing of Ladies' Fall and Winter Millinery.
Ladies' Blanket Coats
In the Newest Shades and Styles,
For the Children
The famous "Margaret" Sweaters and Sweater Suits complete.   In shades of Narvy, Cardinal and White.
"The Corner Store," Cumberland, B.C.
Phono 10 P. 0. Box 100
Fine Watch
T. D. McLEAN
THE   LEADING   JEWELER
Cumberland, B. C.
The Ideal Store
FALL OPENING
OF DRY GOODS
For one week starting Saturday
13th, come on the start and make
your selections while the stock is
new.
Ladies' and Gents' Sweaters and
Sweater Coats; Infants Jackets,
Hoods, Bonnets and Booties;
Ladies' Fancy Motor Hoods,
Scarfs and Silk Shawls; Gents'
Underwear and Shirts; Gents',
Ladies', and Childrens' House
Slippers; Blankets Comforters.
The Ideal Store
Next door to Tarbells.
Cumberland Courtenay & Comox AUTO STAGE
will leave Post Office every day (except Sunday) until further
notice on Uie following schedule.
L ves Cumberland for Courtenay           8 a.m,
"   Courtenay for Cumberland   8-30 a.m.
"   Cumberland for Courtenay and Comox..    10 a.m.
Comox for Courtenay and Cumberland.".    11 a.m.
"   Cumberland for Courtenay       1p.m.
"   Courtenay for Cumberland   1-30 p.m.
"   Cumberland fort'ourtena.v and Comox. .  2-30 p.m.
"   Comox for Courtenay and Cumberland..  3-30 p.m.
FARES—Cumberland to Courtenay 75c, Courtenay to Comox 50c.
All parcels must be prepaid and letters stamped.
Phone 18. E. C. EMDE, Cumberland, B. C.
Capital Paid Up ?11,560,000
Roaerve Fund -.13,000,000
THE R0YHL BANK
OF eANRDH
Drafts issued in any currency, payable ail over tho world
SPECIAL  ATTENTION paid to SAVINGS ACCOUNTS and In*
terebt at highsat current rites allowed on deposits of *1 and upwards.
CUM3ERI.AND, B.C .Branch      - - -     OPEN DAILY
UNION WHAE.E, Sub-Branch, OPEN TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
D. M. MORRISON, Manager.
COURTENAY, B. C, Branch, OPEN DAILY.
R. H. HARDWICKE, Manager.
f__-____B-_*_--l _-__-__-._.-_M-M-_M___B_W..-_.«_l_
ROCKERS
C
AND
4
A new stock of Rockers ranging in price from
$1.75 and up. Blankets and Comforters at
■ popular prices. A good selection of Sideboards
Extension Tables, Parlor Tables, etc. Dressers
and Stand at from $1G per set and up. Try a
Fawcett Range, guaranteed to give satisfaction,
from $25 up.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
J. BARRIE
CONFECTIONERY, ICE
ORE AJyl, FRUIT, CANDY
CIGARS    &   TOBACCOS
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
B.C.
HOTEL UNION
0 P P0S1
HALLWAY STATION
First Class in every respect. Perfect Cuisine
Headquarters for Tourists and Sportsmen
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
John N. McLeod, Proprietor
_*s> f'.-t
W«>:^.   ......
y^I.>f.^''.:^:^~,i)
S&S&Xaa.  ■._  ?..,.i_-f-,.*'.-
v¥ 1914
iUCES
Effective August 1, 1913
Model T Runabout - - $600
Model T Touring Car - 650
Model T Town Car - -   900
With   Full   Equipment,   f.   o.   b.   Walkerville
Ford Motor Company
of Canada, Limited
WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO
E. C. Emde, A gent for Comox District. THE 1SL..HD*-., COMBERUM), 11. C.
iH
SALE OF LANDS FOR UNPAID DEUNQUENT TAXES
IN THE COMOX ASSESSMENT DISTRICT,
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Saturday, the 11th day
of October, 1913, at the hour of 10 o'clock in the forenoon at the Court House, Cumberland, B. C, I shall sell by
public auction the lands hereinafter set out, of the persons in
the said list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes unpaid by the said persons on the 31st day of December, 1912,
and for interest, costs and expenses, including the cost of
advertising said sale, if the total amount is not sooner paid.
LIST ABOVE MENTIONED.
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
Snow, Major A. B.	
Hamilton, Alexander 	
Davis, Leonard 	
Dutcher, Byron W...	
Dutcher, Byron W	
Vaughan, H. J. 	
Brenchley, R. H 	
Harwood, John   	
Denman Island Stone Co	
Gordon, Walter	
Herbert, D. L. &T. L., Smith (T)
Wilson, Walter, Estate	
Powers, William -N. 	
Hinchcliffe, Elizabeth A. L .
Levy, Emil S...	
McLelan Lumber Co	
McLelan Lumber Co	
McLelan Lumber Co	
Finlayson, Donald Bain, ]
Dickie, Edwin, & Lumsden, Fred J J
Craig, .lames _.	
Cranmer, Theodore Louis..	
Maclure, Fred S  	
Hall.Dr.F.W.&Johnson.C.M	
Hall,Di\F.W.&Johnso__,C.M	
Hall.Dr.F.W.&Johnson.C.M	
Hall, Dr. F. W, &Johnson, C. M.. _..
Nash, Dr. Richard	
Richardson, F	
Milnes, Fred	
Mcintosh, Findlay	
Johnson.John 	
Allison, A. P 	
Comox District.
10 acres of Section 17, Oomox
15 acres of West.. of Lot 114
Fr N. W. j Sec. 16 & Fr. S. W.
Section 21, Township 1
Si of S.W..} of Sec 15, Tp9, Comox
55acresofN.W.lSecl5,Tp9 "
Fr N.W.I of Sec 16. Tp 9
S. of N, E.I&N. iofS.E. JSecl7,Tp9
Nelson District.
Section 5, Nelson District.
Denman Island.
2 acres of N. 1 of N.E. i Sec 18)
20
SHOUT DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY
181
S. { of N.E. i
Hornby Island.
85 acres of N. E. i of Section 4a
S. E. 1 of Section 4a
Undividediof E. .of N. W. Jof Sec51
io"fS._ofS.W.JofSecll/
3 acres of S.. of E. t N.W.i Sec 10
Groupl.NewWestminsterDistrict
Lot 1650
Sayward District.
Undivided4-20ths ofLot68(21ar's)
Lot 159
Lot 160
Lot 161
N. E. 1 of Lot 216 except lots 12,
17, 18, 19, 22, 23 and 31
Lot 31 of N.E. J Lot 216, Map 1109
Lots22&23ofN.E.JLot216 "   "
Rupert District.
W. i of Section 14, Township 3
N. W. .1 of Section 25, Township 9
N.E.1-4 of Section 26, Township9
S.E.l-4of Section 35, Township 9
S, W. 1-4 of Section 36, Township 9
Fr S.W. 1-4 of Sec 35, Townsnip 9
S.W. 1-4 of Section 5, Township34
Coast District, Range 1
Lot 7
Lot 283
Lot 463
Lot 1061
Taxes
150
150
14 40
17 40
1100
29 80
32 00
17 50
57 50
7 50
12 00
3 00
75
8 00
1416
7 50
10 50
5 00
85 00
3 00
3 50
64 00
24 00
24 00
24 00
32 00
20 00
20 00
57 00
7 50
12 00
12 00
School
Taxes
5 50
46 00
155 83
642
Int'r'tCo'ts
05
07
72
70
55
1 50
1 60
1 15
2 85
40
60
15
05
40
1 40
35
50
25
4 25
15
15
2 85
37
60
60
2 00
2 00
2 00
2 00
200
200
2 00
2 00
200
Total
3 55
3 57
1712
2010
13 55
33 30
35 60
2615
108 35
990
14 60
515
2 80
10 40
17 56
985
13 00
7 25
2 00
200
200
2 00
2 00
200
2 00
2 00
2 00
2 00247 08
200
2 00
200
2 00
2 00
200
2 00
200
200
200
200
200
2 00
515
12 07
69 20
27 20
27 20
27 20
35 60
23 00
23 00
6185
9 87
14 60
14 60
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 2nd day of September, 1913,
JOHN BAIRD,
Deputy Assessor for Comox Assessment District, Cumberland, B.C.
{). pilliija gavvisoit
B»rri«tcr, StiH-ltnr
A Noliir)' 1'ul.l
OVER 65 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
jmyons lending a Bl_et<.h and d-3-riplio.i mny
n.ilokly H-icortaln our cii-iiiinii freo whetheran
...volition Ih pr'-tial-ly P'lteiinjble. C.ininnnilrn.
tlmiB«tr.cMFCon!.d-ntlal. HANDBOOK on PntoiiU
aoi.trro©. Oldost naoiicy (or Bocurinc put-tit a.
Patents taken thrmu... Munn & to. receive
special notice, without chnruo, iu tha
Scientific American.
A towdiomely Illustrated weekly. HS&ti circulation of any -..-.eutill-. J.miu.L U'l'ni*. tor
Caimiln, $8."r. a year, ii_-ta_. ini'i'iinl. J>_Lii hy
all newn'tealers.
MUNN & Co.3eiB"ad""" New York
Bruuch Offlco. G25 F St# WashluKtoii, D, 0,
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY PUBLIC,
CONVI.Y.JM'J./.,
nnd r.E.II- ESTATE
Cumberland, B. C.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L.. President
CEALED TENDERS addressed to the
*J undersigned, and endorsed "Tender
for Wharf at Roy's Beach, B.C.," will he
received at this office until 4 p.m., on j
Thursday, October 9, 1913, for the con* |
structiori of a wharf at Roy's Beach,
Comox I i trict. B.C.
Plans, specifications and form of contract can be seen and forms of tender
obtained at this Department and at the
offices of J. S. MacLachlan, Esq.. District
Engineer, Victoria, B. C„ C. C, Worsfield,
Esq., District Engineer, at New Westminister, B.C., and on application to the Postmaster at Roy's Beach, B.C.
Persons tendering are notified that
tenders will not be considered unless
made un Ihe primed forms supplied, and
signed with their actual signatures, stating their occupations and places of residence, ln thc case of firms, the actual
signature, the nature of the occupation
and the place of residence of each member
of the firm must be given.
Each lender must be accompanied by
an accpled cheque on a chartered bank,
payable to the order of the Honourable
of thc Minister of Public Works, equal to
ten per cent. (10 p.c.) of the amount of
the tender, which will be forfeited if the
person tendering decline to enter into a
contract when called upon to do so, or fa I
to complete the work contracted for. It
the tender lie not accepted the cheque
will be returned.
The Department does not bind itself to
accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R. C. DERSOCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September 5, 1913.
Newspapers will not be paid for this
advertisement if they insert it without
authority from the Departmeut.—47187
FIRE
INSURANCE
For absolute
protection write
a Policy in the
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co. of
L iverpool.
Total Assets
§2 6,7 88,930.00
Wesley Willard
LOCAL AGENT
ALEXANDER LAIRD
General Manager
JOHN AIRD
Aieittant General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000^)00 REST, $12,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing business
with foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and
sale of Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign drafts, Money Orders, Travellers'
Cheques and Letters of Credit issued and available in all parts of the
world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates.
S.3
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.      W. T.  WHITE, Manager.
New England Hotel
JOSEPH  WALKER, Proprietor.
Lnnsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
B.C.
SEABROOK   YOUNG
BRINGS
The Latest
and Most
Fashionable
Garments
FOR YOUR INSPECTION
This will be our second visit to
your districts and we invite you
to see our samples, all of which
will be marked at Victoria's lowest cash prices.
Coats, raincoats, capes, and
sweater coats for women, misses
and children; overall, dresses,
underclothing and hose for girls
and the little folks,
Also the
Newest
Millinery
Including fashionable shapes in j
beaver, fur and felt hats.
Please Remember the Dates and
Places -
UNION   BAY,   at the  Scotch
Bakery, Sept. 17th. and 18tl\
CUMBERLAND, at the Union
Hotel, Sept. 24fh and 25th.
COMOX, at the Elk Hotel, Sept.
29th and 30th.
COURTENAY,   at   the   Opera
House, October 2nd and 3rd.
Seabrook Young
623, Johnson Street,
Victoria, B.C.
'The Store for better values and
variety."
MarocchiBros
GROCERS   AND   BAKERS
REST
Uread &
Ueer
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Ladies' Tailored Suits
To the Ladies of  Cumberland  and vicinity:
We would like to take  your   order for your
Fall Suit, Coat, Skirt, or Dress.    Latest Styles
Newest Fabrics,      Moderate Prices.
The Ideal Ladies   Tailoring Company
of Montreal.
P. DUNNE
Merchant Tailor
Agent
Leave your order with Teamster
for
HAY, GRAIN
AND FLOUR
A. B. CRAWFORD
Feed Store   -   -  Courtenay, B. C.
Grand
Fall Millinery
Opening
Fascinating Hats from
London, New York &
Paris. Ladies of Cumberland are cordially
invited to inepect my
comprehensive and
unique exhibition of
Hats for   Fall   Wear.
Mrs. John Gillespie
Union Street
Cumberland, B. C. 'HfK4i^ASI_El-_-CLllIlEKr,A>."I?. B.C.
%
LOVE CONQUERS Ml
IH1SGS
(BY ARTHUR APPLIN)
Ward, i-ock & Co., Limited, Lon
don, Melbourne nnd Toronto
(Contlnt  d)
llcnr nf:cr hour passed. The clock
outside chimed midnight; then struck
nit the hours o[ thc new day one hy
ono. But Hetherlngton was. unconscious ol time. Ile searched feverishly hut lu vain, recking everywhere
ti, find 'Himself.' Sometimes amonc
hi* treasures there was something
which aroused strange feelings in his
breast, emotions rather than memor*
leo. When dawn crept through the
win lows i.e was as far oil solving tlie
mystery ef himself, and ot the terrible
happening, el the previous day, as
enr. There were three things he
had placed aside ou his bed; bis
cheque took, and a small diary In
which entiles had been made at tare
Intervals just in a casual way. Roth
tite-.' gave him some small Insight Inlo his past; beside them a piece of
very old lace to which clung a sweet
elusive perfume. Obviously lt belonged to a woman and equally it bad
lately been we'rn.
The perfume was strangely suggestive of the mingling ot 'ancient and
modern 'lays. It was the one thing
which somehow seemed near to Hetherlngton, tiie ono thing he had known,
lie almost dare say—remembered! Perhaps it was ti e woman who had worn
il? Tbe touch of it. just the perfume seemed to soothe an.l calm him
ln an extraordinary way, it gave him
strength und courage. And Indeed
he wanted both.
lie bad finished stacking n whole
mass of stuff into one ot the cupboards when from between tho pages
of a guide book a photograph fell out.
He picked It up, it was carefully
wrapped in tissue paper. A portrait.
Th- first be had found, all the other
photographs were snapshots ot towns,
or scents of forests and hills, deserts
and jungles, occasionally groups ot
I eopl uuiccognizable. But 'this
was r, portrait—and of a woman. He
sat on the edge of ''- e.bed. holding
lt between his lingers, staring at it.
A very beautiful woman—dark hair,
clear cut. features, large sad e.cs. like
tlie ryes of Russian people, with a
beautifully shaped niouih; a mouth
that might be very kind or very cruel.
It was a remarltabh face, a face that
would haunt one. This was the woman to whom the strip of old lace
belong d, he felt sure of it. And then
the question came like the stab of
n dagg.r. Was this the woman wiiose
shadow Iffy across the dead body of
Oecar Sorai?
Drawing back tho curtains from the
- tido-.v he looked out, but the gar-
(1 ns were wrapped in mist, tlie trees
locked lite great ghosts, hut up and
away over the moorlands thc sky was
growing red; day was breaking. Getting Into his boots and breeches, antl
slipping on his heavy .iding coat,
licuherington crept out of the house
to tli-1 stables. The groom was leaning from his window above one of
the loose boxes; Ilethcrington called
to him to come down and saddle bis
horse fo.- him. Ten minutes later be
was Tailoring over the moorland in"
the direction of Deepshot Wood;
cince memory did not serve him, be
trusted to instinct. Ile turned his
horse into tho wood nt a point where
the stream sang' noisily, then dismounted and' began lo search for Oscar Serai's bod\\
li wan a .bock' caused by:a sudden
blow which had robbed him of mem-
cry.' lf"he had murdered Iblrman
and now found bis body that shock
mfilil be runic-lent fo restore memor.-. Then at lasl lie would know.
Ho fit be could bear anything, could
face death mere easily than live without remembrance, without knowledg
of rmself—without anything that
makes life worth living;
: CHAPTER HI I Owning the  Farm «r  Being  Owned
Ilethet Ington could    see   the   sun | by It
shining through the tops ot-_K> trees; i   When the plain truth la written lt
here and there It threw patches of must bo stated that the magnificent
(gold about the bracken tracing a black | prairies are Inhabited ln large meas-
i and yellow carpet ou the ground, lie i uro by people who are very material*
had been searching a long time and Istlc in thei.- tastes and thinking. In
'had found notbing. Tiie ferns antl un-j the hurry and excitement of making
(tlerguwih Ehowed no trace of foot- j good on the homostead, the finer sen*
I step3 or u struggle, and nowhere was J sibilltles  are  frequently  dulled,  and
there auv hint of a dead body lying ; many forget that worthy citizenship
Mil,   '
Origin of Irish Laco
Irish laco originated from the failure of the potato crop that caused -Infantine of 1S46. Tbe abbess of a convent in County Cork, looking about
for some lucrative    employment    to
Life In Macedonia
Wu arose early one February morning and left ot r fairly clean hotel
ln NeapoIIs for four j.ours of travel
over the modern road near the Via
Egnatla, which should take us to an-
help the half-starved children who at-  clcnt Phlllppl.      Our vehicle was a
tended her schools, unravelled thread! somewhat dilapidated hack, such as
hidden au
At first he had searched wildly, hut
lately he had gone to work systematically; he had searched every bit of
ground within a radius    of    several
Is uot simply a matter ot making a
living, but of living a life. We need
more frequently to be reminded that
man,, does not live by bread alone—
that we have other needs than the
hundred vards of the noisy river pool j mere vulgar necessity of three meals
to which'Ilistcr had referred. a a^. and a place to sleep at night.
Is lt possible for one man to lure | The farmer and his wife who decide
another Into a wood, murder him ln i *****t so far as their house Is concern-
cold blood and then absolutely forget I ed <-he esthetic, tho beautiful, the love
the terrible deed nnd all the clrcum-;0* truth and goodness, tho pleasure of
stances connected  with  lt? i*nire <*"<* lnnoccut fun, tbe comraue-
a„ »-- i,- k»j i, ...  v. ,i   vi. •_.„•   S,1|P of worthy books, tho gladness of
So far ho had kept hoth his feel-
by thread a scrap of point de Milan,
and finally mastered the complicated
details. She then selected tho girls
who were quickest of needlework nnd
taught them what she had painfully
learned. The new Industry prospered, and one ot tho pupllf, In- a pardonable bull, declared that If lt had
Americans are familiar with at almost
every considerable railwav station but
surprisingly comfortable conveyance
for this part ot tho world. Rattling
clown some steep, roughly paved
streets we onme to tho centre of tie
great Roman aqueduct and ascended
another steep street on the other side
who
The SiffM Soap
For Baby's Skin
Is Cuticura Soap
. b'N the care of
IJ■' K l! baby'Bapiaiw*
'-*"'' f\ 'ia'r' Ciiticura
V-:'-'// Of Soap is the
\X^Zp2/ i*3other's fa-
C^'X^ v^___\ vsoutite.    Not
i- ''     •* only is it unri
valed in purity and rcfrerhing
fragrance, but its gentle emollient properties render it of
great value 'in promoting skin
and hair health generally. For
the trealmentof eczema?, rashes
' and other itching, burning infantile eruptions, warm baths_
with Cuticura Soap, followed"
by gentle applications of Cuticura Ointment are usually effective when other methods fail."
Cuticura Soap wears to a wafer,
often outlasting- several cakes
of ordinary soap and making
its use most economical.
r.'icura f-oap and Ointment arc Bold
throughout the world. A liberal samplo of
each, with 32-pago booklet on tho care and
treatment or llie skin and scalp,"Otno**
live Addrcs*. -otter Drua _ Cbtm. Corp.,
Sept. 10D, llo-ton, U. S. A.
W    N. U. 961
ings and his nerves fairly well under
control; now a shudder swept .'.trough
his body as he was conscious of tlie
solitude, tho silence and his own
helplessness, He walked on almost
automatically penetrating deeper ln
tiie wood. It seemed useless searching any further, yet ho knew ho must
be absolutely convinced that this man
Ulster had lied to him and fooled
him. He hardly knew whether he
hoped he had '.led or spoken.the
truth. If ho found the body ot this
Oscar Sornl. he would know that he
was a murderer—and life for him
would henceforth be impossible. On
the other band If he did not find the
body, nnd realized that he had been
the victim of a clever scoundrel, he
would know be was little better than
a living ghost; a shadow ln a world
of reality, and lt would bo equally Impossible for him to live under such
conditions.
Suddenly he stopped, the muscles ot
his body stiffened, his nostrils quivered. But he saw nothing, ho heard
nothing, Imagination had suddenly
brought the scent from a piece of perfumed lace; the subtle odor ot an unknown woman.
Hetherlngton drew out his handkerchief and mopped his face; In a minute his nerves would give way and he
would rush shrieking through the
wood. Imagination had already commenced to play tricks on him. He
advanced a tew more steps—haltingly—and .lopped again as he saw a
patch of bracken fern all bent and
broken il'-wn.
Proof at last! But—no—when he
advanced he found nothing, It only
looked as though It had been trampled
down. He advanced yet a little further: he had found a trail. Some
one had passed this way. two, perhaps
tlnee p.ople. Tbe undergrowth became ve.y thick; ln places the bracken was four or live feet high.
Tiie trail stopped suddenly, just be-
for. a tangle of bramble bushes and
ferns. Hetherlngton commenced to
boat them down with tbe butt end
of his bunting crop. Then his arm
fell limply by his side; a half strangled cry tiled away on his lips. There,
almost at ills feet, lay the body of
Oscar Soral.
He lay on his back, quite straight
and (tiff, his arms by his side; the
ferns grew all around liko a canopy.
There were no signs of a struggle,
it almost, locked as If he had been
reverently laid to rest ln this braok-
en bed of nature's making. Thc eyes
were closed but the mouth was open
as if, when he fell, he had cried out.
Ilo was a man of powerful buljd,
bearded, with "a swarthy complexion.
Iletberington bent forward, then
knelt hy the dead mans side. Ills
shirt was stained red Just above his
heart and the blood had trickled down
ills arm. A revolver was lying close
to his left hand. Hetherlngton picked It up and put It Into bis own pocket, lie was quite calm nnd cool now
as he commenced to search that which
and onco been—man.
Tiie rackets were empty, coat trousers  and  vest—quite empty.
not been for the famine we would all  of the market place
have been starved. Early as lt was, we found that th-
I people of Kavalla were up and doing.
! The stalls of the fruit men were attractive with oranges, pomegranates,
lemons  and   dates.    The'    vegetable
dealers displayed a tempting array i.
cauliflowers, cabbages, onions,   olera,
leeks and potatoes.
As In all eastern cities, there was
The cook was preparing
Who Was He?
Father, said a boy of twelve,
was Shylock?
What, exclaimed his  father,  have
  „ ....    —,1 sent you to Sunday school for tho
music, tho mirth c laughter tho mys-, past six years, only to have you ask
terious awe which comes over thoso me who Shylock was? Shniuo on
who take time to pry Into Nature's | vou!     Get your Bible nnd find out nn Privacy.
pound ton.
wonderland—wo say that the farmer | this minute
nnd his wife who decldo that these
things are legitimate and desirable—
that they are worth taking timo for
—such persons as these make no mistake.
There are many farm homes ln
which far too great a premium Is put
upon that quality of character which
is misnamed Industry. The father
takes pride In the fact that his boys
are everlastingly on the grindstone
from dawn to dusk and that they
have no time for gadding. He prides
himself that they are bard workers.
And yet his sons are mere drudges.
Tbey may hold the record for a big
day's stocking but they know nothing
about books or flowers or tho relaxation ot an Idle day with a fishing
rod. They pass by, unnoticed, the
6unllt rlpples*nnd the cool, deep shadows ot the farm brook; they never
look up to behold the glory of the
sunset; they know not the cunning
ways of the bee, nor the wonderful
world of plant life about their feet;
they are Just common drudges, working ail day long ln God's wonderful
laboratory, but with eyes that are
holden that Itey piay not see.
Wc make in plea for mere Idling.
Pure lndcler.cn Is always a crime.
And frequently lt loads to other
crimes worse even than Itself. Bul
there is no Indolence ln an hour now
and then with the children ln gathering, naming and admiring the prairie
flowers; ln an effort to surround the
other things of beauty; and ln a word
to live ln companionship with the
farm, regarding It not merely for Its
mercenary value, but also for Its delightful associations and constant
round of Interest and of surprise.
There are some families who really
own their farm and enjoy lt; but there
are other families who think they own
a farm, but who ln reality aro owned
by lt, and havo become Us slave.—
Nor-West Farmer.
water to
his breakfast  on  the sidewalk,  the
| shoe-maker waa  plying his awl, the
Customer—I want a ton  cf coal,   tailor his needle, and tho blacksmith
Dealer—Yes. sir.     What size?        was shoeing his horses almost ln the.
Customer—Well, If It's not asking very .treet.
t<y> much, I'd like to have  a   -000
His Cusy Time
Doctor, why don't you tako a vaca*
tl---?
I can't now. my patients need me.
Thiy aro beginning to come back
from their vacations.
He—Does your father know I expect
to ask htm tor your hand.
She—I think he does. He Is practicing for half an hour every morning
with dumb-bells.
Prom a second-hand book catalogue:
Dickens (C)—Plc-Nio Papers.
Just the thing to wrap, sandwiches
In.
>
State of clilo. City of Toledo,
Lucas County
Frank J. '.honey makes oath that he Is
senior partner ot the firm ot V. J.
Chenev Us Co., doing business ln tho city
of Toledo, County and State aforesaid,
end that sold firm will pay the sum of
ON'B HI'NUKED DOLLARS for each and
every case of Catarrh that cannot be
cur.il by the uso of Halbs Catarrh Cure.
FRANK J.  CHENEY.
Sworn to bel-.o mo and subscribed In
i * preaen.ee. ._..* fith day of Uecember,
A.'TjT 188..
IS__I.) A. W. ---ASQNi
Notary Publie.
Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken Internally,
end acts .directly on the blood and
muc.ua surfaces of the Bystem. Send
tor test: .nntals free.
F. J. CHENEV _ CO., Toledo, 0.
Sold IV all druggists,  76c.
Te.:« Hall's family Pills for constipation.
A Marina Misnomer
It's rather odd tbat they should call
a steamer tt tramp.
Why 60,'
Fancy a tramp needln
get along on.
Over the Counter
Are theso candles fresh my pretty
one? asked tho youth with the sunset socks.
They are fresh, hut not ln your
class, answered the saleslady with
the Titian hair-
Dr. Edwat- Sanger said ln New
York:
We should not announce cures unless they are real cures. Imagination plays too great a part ln a patient's feelings.
Imagination must always- be reckoned with medicine—sometimes as a
friend, sometimes as a foe. I know
a doctor who treated an old woman
for Uphold, and on each visit he
took her temperature by holding a
There I thermometer under her tongue.   One
dt-y, when sho had nearly recovered,
tho doctor did not bother to take hor
temperature and he had hardly got
100 yards from the house when her
son called him back.
Mother Is worse, said the man.
Come back at once.
Tlie doctor returned. On his entry into the sick room the old woman
looked up at him with augry and reproachful eyes.
Doctor, tho said, why dldn t you
give me the Jigger under r..e tongue
today? That always done me moro
good than all tho rest of your trash.
Sea! Sea everywhere, as the great
liner made her powerful courso over
the Atlantic.
Ob, captain, came r. disconsolate
groan from a seasick passenger, halt
reeling ln a deck chair, how far are
we off lan-1
No answer camo to thin remark,
which had   been   reiterated   several
was not even the faintest clue to tho
iiuin'i. identity. But Iletberington
knew that ho had been"Oscar Soral.
What made him certain of that one
fact he hnd no idea. But be just
knew. Also, that he—Hetherlngton
—had murdered him.
His search completed he turned
away and retraced his Eteps. But he
walked carefully now, disturbing, the
bracken fern as little as possible,.
It was a long time before he heard
ll.o singing of tho river and saw
through the trees the glint of thei sun
on the white road. lie lod tho horse
ont of the wood along the road until
he came to the deep and noisy pool.
He gazed down Into, the dark i colored water, trying to guess the depth.
Tho river was still at summer level.
Glancing cautiously around ho took
Ihe revolver from his pocket and flung
it inlo the centre ot the pool. Mounting his horse, l.e once again glanced
In all directions. No human being
was iu sight. He trotted his horso I t!l)ira ttlnt day.
In tin* direction nt Cranny Hall. |    oh captain, do
After n  while Hetherlngton found  far?
himself  glancing  over IiIb Shoulder; ,     Milo »na  tt half,
presently he put his liorse Into a canter.
llo was being pursued. Inclination again, or course, but he felt ns If
all sorts ot things had rushe:' out of
the wood and wero after hlin.
A tow minutes later he reached the
valley and was going at a gallop. He
passed a couple of sleepy waggoners
and thev stopped and stared, lie saw
their faces clearly—-toy looked in no
whit surprised.
Just In front of him a narrow bridge
spanned the river and ho remembered
that tlio village, lay oi. the other side,
lie began to draw rein when suddenly
Hue liorse shied violently and swerv-
I ing across the road, stumbled and fell,
pitching him against thc bodge. As
li- picked himself up ho noticed grimly that ho had escaped going over
Iuto tlie river by a narrow six Inches.
Evidently fate had not finished with
him! Blood \.as trickling from a
wound in his forehead; oue blow hail
robbed him of his memory, a
ad not given It hack to him!
answer   me—how
the
camo  the  puff
reply-,
Thank heaven!    In what direction
captain? ,
A twinkle • *.mo for b moment In
the eve ot the brusque old sea dog.
Straight down! he grunted
»
Their Aim
I suppose, said tho husband, I suppose that you women want to
just like men do?
Oh, no, replied his wife, that is not
the point. We want to vote a great
deal better than tho men do.
Contest Winners Shortly to be Announced
Though still busily engaged lr\ the
tremendous task ef reading the letters received from nearly 20,000
rchool children ln the contest conducted by the Remington Literary
Committee, the .udges are nevr near-',
lug the completion of their painstaking work and will shortly make au-
nouncemont of .winners. The general run of tho letters Is so excellent
and the determining of superior merit
hi Individual cases so difficult,, that
tho Judges have decided to give, In addition to the prizes already scheduled,
first, second and third medals ln each
of tho four classes. In a few days
the awards of these and of the 2,000
otlier prizes offeree1, will be known by
the pupils who throughout the country are eagerly awaiting the nows.
Corns are caused by the pressure of
tight boots, but no ono need bo troubled with them long when so simple
a remedy as llolloway's Com Cure is
avail ible.
Odd Uses of Sugar
Il all the sugar that Is eaten In Ihj
course of a year were to be equally
divided, every person in the world
would have at least twenty pounds.
But besides being used as food, sugar
has many Industrial uses. It is the
cheapest form of a chemically pure
carbohydrate, and Is often used ln
place of starch, dextrin, or glucose.
Sugar is frequently put in compounds
for removing and preventing holler
scale. It Is used in the manufacture
of shoe-blacking, transparent soap,
copying-ink, and inkrollers for print-
presses. Certain explosives contain
from Blx to forty per cent, ot lt. It
Is employed ln dyeing establishments,
by tanneries for filling leather and in
a large number of other industries.
Sugar has a hardening and strengthening action ln mortar. The mortar
used to rebuild tbo Museum of Natural History ln Berlin consisted ot
one part lime, one par sand and two
parts sugar. Even a very small
quantity, however, even as littlo as
one-quarter of one per cent, exerts a
very harmful effect on comont.
Minard's  Liniment  Cures  Garget  In
Cows
NERVOUS PEOPLE
MADE CHEERFUL
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills Rebuild
Shattered Nerves
Good blood—rich, red blood—makes
all the difference between health and
sickness. It tho blood la thin and
watery, the health of the whole bod/
suffers. The sufferer becomes nervous and Irritable; the stomach fall.
in strength and the appetite becomes
poor. Food does not give the necessary nourishment, and the first feeling ot weakness passes, as time goes
on, Into a general breakdown In the
health. The case of Mrs. Angeli-
que Gagnon, of St. Jerome, Que.,
Illustrates the truth of these statements. Mrs. Gagnon says: "I am
fifty years of nge and up to a few
months ago always enjoyed tho best
of health. Then I began to feel rundown and weak, without patience or
ambition. My appetite grew poor,
and my nerves seemed to be on edge,
and the least noise or worry would
make mi irr't.ble and nervous. Lite
became an i ctcal burden and I could
ro longer look after my household
duties. My doctor prescribed and ordered a change, saying lhat I was a
nervous wreck. I tried to become
interested ln other'things but failed,
and my condition wns really deplorable. I continued ln this condition
for several months, gradually going
down, and as my doctor was not helping me I was easily persuaded by a
friend to try Dr. Williams' Pink Pills.
After taking iho pills for a few weeks
I could see an improvement, nnd I
gladly continued using them for a
couple ot months, when I found my
health fully re.torcd. 1 nm more
than thankful fer what Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills have done for me, nnd I
gladly recommend them to all who
! are weak, nervous and run down."
By making rich, red blood Dr. Wil-
) Hams' Pink Pills cure such cases as
| Mrs. Gagnon's. In th) Eame way
they cure ervous headaches, neuralgia, Indigestion, rheumatism, St. Vitus dance, and the ailments that come
to growing girls and women of mature
years. If you ore at all unwell start
to-day to euro yourself with Dr. Williams' Pink Pills, what they have done
for others they will surely do for you,
It given a fair trial. Sold by all
druggists or by mall, post paid, at 60
cents a b&x or six boxes for $2.60 by
addressing The Dr. Williams' Mefn-
clne Co., Brockville, Ont.
GILLETTS LYE
EATSyMRTT
i mm. -run. oi»«ti(H* ipW *
&r$JS**e)'
■omniD
^'LLETTCOMPANYLIMI^
"     TORONTO ONT.    """'" "
RAILWAYS ANO    CARTAGE
Canadian   Railways   Cancel   Tariffs
Covering Cartage Polnt3 In
Dominion
lUllwayt, of Canada have- Issued
notice of cancellation ot tariffs Covering cartage points In Canada, effective October 1, .1913. On and after
that dale shipper, and consignees
will be expected to make their owa
arrangements for cartage.
It Is stated that this action on the
part of the transportation companies.,
ln the result ot the failure to renew
txlsting contracts with the cartage
companies at present prices, the latter
chiming thnt owing to Increased cost
of supplies, labor'and other matters
entering Into the performance of tho
service, they must have Increased
compensation. On the other hand,
tho railways contend that It Is impossible to increase their burden ot such
extra expenses for the very reason
given hy the cartage companies—
namely, Increased expanses.
The change In conditions at cartage point, ln Canada, it Is pointed
out, Is ln line with practices which
have long prevailed at American
Cities, where the public are obliged
to make their own arrangements with
the cartage companies for deliveries
to or from the railway terminal.
One of the commonest complaints
ot Infants Is worms, and the most effective application for them is Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator.
Aluminum 8ervant of Man
When  the  history  of our  age
At first lt has been contended, men
used both arms Indifferently, and
those who when fighting pushed the
right side forward hae". the advantage
of shielding their hearts and so lived
to produce descendants who Inherited
their tendencies. Be this as lt may,
there Is no doubt that tho two sides of
the brain have different functions, and
right or left-handedness Is by no
means restricted to the arms alone.
Ono investigator was very often able
to recognize left handedness by the
examination of the left eye. The
centre of speech Is on the left side
of the brain ot a right handed person
and on the right side ot a left handed
person. Children show unmistakable
evidence of two speech centres, though
ono atrophies owing to the preference given to one hand. Nevertheless experiments show that lt can be
successfully resuscitated.
Not 8 atlonary I
A carpenter who had been engaged
to build a cabinet for paper envelopes,
and other ollice supplies ln a local
commission house was busy at his
task when one ot tho bookkeepers in*
Quired:
Is that going tc be a stationery cab-
Tanning by Electricity
A new electric tannin.! process, invented by the Swedish scientist, Dr.
A. Groth, and applied on a practical
scale In an English works, is attracting much attention, and one of the
prominent electrical firms is to take
it up for commercial use. With this
method, the hides nre put in special
vats along with metal conductors, so
as to carry out an electrolytic action,
and this will tan the hides In much
less time than usual, for Instance,
six week3 as compared to several
months. Leather of better quality
Is produced In this wny, and the method gives a perfect and solid tanning.
Various electrical devices lu the shape
of regulators, also safely apparatus
for over-current, make the process almost an automatic one.
Minard's Liniment Cures Distemper
A Scotch caddie Is almost certain
to be a shrewd observer of men and
things, and be Ib frequently gifted
with a sharp tonguo ot his own..
Lang Willie was for many years
a well-known flg-re on tho St. Andrews golt links. On the occasion ot
Louis Kossuth's visit to St. Andrews
a public dinner was given in his honor and Willio applied for a Ucket to
the bailie wbo was In charge of tho
arrangements. Tho worthy man
curtly refused tho application, sayin.;
to Willie that it was no place for the
likes of him to be at the dinner.
No Tor the likes of me? was Willies
indignant rejoinder. I've been ln
the company of gentlemen from 11 to
4 o'clock niaist days for tho last
thirty years, and that's malr thau you
cm say!
A teacher In a big elementary school
had given lesBons to nn Infant class
on the ten commandments. In order
to test their memories sbe nslced:
Can any little child give mc a commandment with only four words is
lt?
A hind was '-.-Used immediately.
Well? said the teacher.
Keep oft the r/i.ss, was the reply.
la lnet?
econd
With
The Remedy
She—Georgo dear, here's a scientist
who savs the earth Is wabbling on Its
axis. What do you suopc_e they can
d i about lt?
George (absently)—Open up the
muffler, reverse the lever shnt-o" the
power, lubricate the bearings and
tighten the wheel cap.
a tightening of tho lips he told himself r„g
'bat'it didn't matter now-enough <.*£ tiou
ills past Ut- Uot) revealetl Wood I -
on his hand!     lie laughed aloud.
And while ho laughed there rose up
before him the figure of a young girl.
(To  bo  CantllULcdJ. .
Editor—Why do you persist In com-
hcre?     I tcil you_l don't buy fie-
In 1911 In the United States
person,  died of tuberculosis.
.4,203
Author—Oh,  I  don't  wish  to  scil
any ot my jtorles.    I am
short .eri:-.l entitled: Tbe Ugliest Marl
on Earth, and came In merely to obtain local color.
written the story ot aluminum Is going to occupy a prominent page, says
Harpers' Weekly, lt Is quite a3 won-
derful a3 tho story of electricity, tha
all-pcrvadlng giant that lay hidden
for ages in murky clouds, la masses
of coal, copper and soft iron, nnd ln
myriads of waterfalls, until Franklin
and Morse and Edison put him In
harness and made him one of the
i..ost useful and Ingenious servants ot
man Aluminum, which constitutes
nearly one-twelfth of the earth crust,
lay obscure ur.U'. EJlr Humphrey Davy
in 1808, declared that clay and many
clayey rocks depended upon some
metal as a baso.
A  Lark's Lofty  Flight
Some Bavarian officers experimenting with  n balloon  6,000  feet aloft
noticed a littlo   black   6P- I-   whloh
seemed to i.ecompany them and which
they thought was one: ot   the   cards
they carried tor throwing out reports
and that the dropping of the balloon
drew lt along, but on looking at the
barometer they found that the balloon
"  lu  B*-'  was rising and not dropping,   Sui'*
writing a| elonly, however, n loud eliirnlng sho*.
ed that It waa a !avk. whtc'  flying ftt
this extra.rdhv.iry helsht,   had   u-en
frightened by the balloon4
No, I don't think so, replied the
worker. At least I have Instructions
to put casters on lt.        ..
An ordinary piano contains about
a mile of wire. Genius will yet bena-
fit humanity by Inventing a wireless
piano for amateurs.
Now its See America First
I thought they were going to Europe for tho summer?
When did they tell you lhat?
Last November.
Oh, everybody was going to Europe
for the sumniev last November-
Johnny, said the mother severely,
some one has taken a big pleco ol
ginger cake out of the pantry.
Johnny blushed guiltily.
Oh, Johnny, ahe exclaimed. 1 did
not think It was in you!
It ain't all, replied Johnny. Part ot
tt la ln Elsie.
"Blue" Feeling
Only  a chtrap  person  will   try
make another person feel cheap.
Take tilings easy. If they don't belong to others.
Bmiui-HATnnmiunnuinininnmiin
_-s_r«_ •«   n IS ■___ When yen feel Ms-
ceursg-dandallthe
world seems to be
•gainst yoa-tliat's
yonr system's way
ol telegraphing yon that something Is WRONG and needs HELP.
It may be thit yonr liver Is tired and refuses to work, er yoar
ilMrtlre organs have had too much to do and need eere. Perhaps
vou havo been oating tho wrong kind of food, and your blood U to*
H_hor-_-__v«riBhed.  What jroa need U a tonlo.
pr.jMerce'g Golden Medical Discovery
will give the rewired aid. Tonesth* enUro system. The weak: stomach Is
madsatrocr. The liver vibrates with new life. The blood Is cleansed of all
taMrltlea ud carries renewed h«lth t» every vein snd nerve and muscle snd
organ of the body. Ho more attacks e<
the "bluei." Life becomes worth while
again, and hope takes place of despair.
[twist on getting Dr. Pierce'*
Golden Medical Dlteotxrii.
Mi bu dealer* in medieinett.
smssmeeaesemmmmm
P.csidcnt. WorUsDUpmser*
tledical i-K-wlsH-H. Buffalo, N. T.
■B THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
IY
1/
WILSON'S
FLY PADS
Ask your Druggist or Grocer
to show you the new plan for
killing all the flies in your
house or store in one niglit,
and have neither flies nor fly
killers about in the daytime.
Genius OH'Painter
It is told of Leonardo Set Tlnd thnt
whilo still a pupil, before his genius
bunt Into brilliancy, ho received •
special Inspiration ln this wny:
His old and famous master because
of his growing Infirmities ot ago felt
obliged to give up his own work and
one day bade Da Vinci finish for him
a picture which he had begun. The
young man had such reverence for
his master's skill that he shrank from
the task. The old artist, however,
would not accept auy excuse, but persisted In his command, saying simply:
Do your best.
Da Vlnd at last tremblingly seized
the brush and, kneeling before the
easel, said ths following prayer: It Is
for tho sake of my beloved master
that I Implore skill and power for
this undertaking. As he proceeded
his hand grow steady, his eye awoke
with slumbering genius. He forgot
himself and was filled with enthusiasm for Ills work.
Whon tlie painting was finished the
old master was carried Into the Btud-
lo to Pass judgment on the result. His
eyes rested on a triumph of art.
Throwing his arms around the young
artist, he exclaimed: My son, I palut
uo more.
FROM GREAT LAKES
TO THE ROCKIES
WOMEN SING THK    PRAISES
DODO'S KIDNEY PILLS
OF
GREAT  BRIDGES
Facts cf Great Structures Across the
Tay antl Forth
Not the least ot the extraordinary
feats of tlie redoubtable bridge-builder. Sir William At rol, was tho fact
that at ono time he carried on two
such gigantic contracts as tho Tay
and Forth Bridges. It was a striking
tribute Ic, his great powers of organization and to his genius for engineering on a mammoth scale. Tho construction of the Tay Bridge was only
helt'-llnlshod when he made a start
with the gigantic undertaking which
now spans the Firth of Forth, from
tbo designs cf Sir .lohn Fowler and
Sir Benjamin Baiter. Over a year
was spent In llie preliminary preparations alone—the designing antl making o( special plant, the erection f
workshops ou shore and the thousands
and one things essential to the success
of such a large scheme.    The eost of
^^^vlnl^^^Zi^ "aVC bee" Sdd f°r beef 10"g "*
i .tl otlier barges, tugs, launches nnl'
bcials. sixty steam cranes and winches,
fifty hydraulic cranes, fony-eight
sieam engines ar..i hydraulic Jacks,
hand-cranes and drillli.; machines almost Innumerable; not to
mention one million cubic feet of timber antl sixty miles of wire. The
enormous nature of tills engineering
wonder of the world may he gathered
from the following figures: The total
length Is over a mile and a half, and
consists of two spans, each nearly a
third of n mile long; two spans of six
hundred anil seventy-five feet each. In
Ihe piers there nre about ono hundred
and twe.ity thousand cubic yards of
masonry, aud in the super-structure
over forty thousand Ions of steel and
some fifteen thousand tons of Iron.
Tbe building ot the Tay Bridge was
an opportunity for a display of ills
engineering genius which the ambit-
.Ion.* brtdgernUtei' eagerly welcomed.
A rigorous examination revealed the
old foundations to be insecure, and It
teas decided to build an entirely new
.ridge a short distance farther.up the
river. Within five years from its
commencement—1882 to 1887—n re-
hiarkable erection, over
Plan for a Larger Milk Yield
What virtue Is there ln hereditary
when It conies to abundant milk production per cow? Many a dairyman
notices a eow is good, her heifers may
turn out good milkers, .onietimes thoy
do not. What Is the trouble? Apart
Irom such considerations as feed,
care and health, look tor one moment
at the possible value of the sire. If
tlie cows bred to a particular bull
have dropped good milking progeny;
that bull camo from good milking
ancestry. Thore is tlio virtue of heredity worth thousands of dollars to
our dairying Industry. The melancholy reflection Is that scores ot theso
good milkers can be traced to sires
re their real value had become
known.
Every dairyman who Is doing anything at testing his Individual cows,
and all progressive dairymen appreciate the far reaching benefits of such
study, knows that it would be worth
at least 1,200 pounds ot milk extra per
cow to secure the right bull. All
members of cow testing associations
should co-operate In the purchase of
good pure bred sires, changing them
round alter two years In one section,
and prove thereby the Immense value
of heredity In their own herds.
length, 'till constructed nt n cost of
seven hundred and fifty thousand
pounds, spanned the estiary, a struct-
ire strong enough to dely the fiercest
rale that ever blew. It was tho
greatest engineering triumph of the
ige, until it was eclipsed by a greater—the Forth Bridge,
Where C.lleges Fall
Any effort to benefit the nation
must be made through the child. To
enlarge further the scope ot agricultural-teaching In tho high schools or
the universities will gain but little for
the people. Such effort will but develop the latest talent of the few, who
will soon begin to oxplolt their knowledge for personal ends.
Knowledge acquired after 16 lacks
the elements of unselfishness.    Such
knowledge tends toward self center-
.....____      , Ing ends.     It Is a waste to give more
tw. miles in i to institutions for higher learning, for
Most Infants nre Infested by worms,
which cause great Buffering, and if
not promptly dealt with may cause
constitutional weaknesses difficult to
remedy. Miller's Worm Powdei-3
will clear th? stomach and bowels of
worms aud will po act upon the system that thei will be no recurrence
of the trouble. And not only this,
but they will r-patr the injuries to
Ihe organs that worms, cause and restore them lo soundness.
He Wouldn't Do
W- were going along at an awful
fipoeil. he said, I didn't see the dog,
hut I beard lib kl-yi, so I ordered the
chauffeur to slop. Going back, we
-"found an irate woman standing over
her dead dog—one of the ugliest dogs
you ever saw. She met us with a
tirade of strong remarks, telling
us In no uncertain terms what she
thought of us and motorists In general, finishing up by calling us the
murderers of her dog. It was then
that I thought I would pacify her.
Madam, I eald, I will replace your
tone of voice, you Hatter yourself.
Thc Way of '.:
Some men make fool3 of themselves
for a pretty girl nnd n lo: of others
don't even have that excuse.
Doing a Man's Part
What aro you doing for our cause?
asked a suffragette worker.
Doing, replied the num. I am
supporting ono ot your most enthusiastic members.
tbey have already proved themselves
Inadequate lu developing a conscious
citizenship..
The college graduate Is not always
a desirable attachment to a working
community. Expert knowledge we
must have, but the expert who has
net learned through doing, lacks balance, the soul ballast that streams of
sweat nnd corded muscles give to the
man who equalizes life through the development of both the mental and physical sell, a life rounded by experience and contact with actualities.
The Printer Pirates
An  Instalment  agent had sold
an
album lo every man In the composing
room. The terms were 2. cents down
and 25 cents a week, albums delivered
ou the flrst payment. We all
promptly sold or hooked our albums
and declined to pay even the first
weekly instalment. The agent as a
last resort decided to complain fo
tho foreman. Ho came Into the office about 8 p.m. and the foreman
spied him as ho entered tho composing loom.
Boys, said the boss printer ln a
tone loud enough for every one ln
tho room to hear, why are we like
pirates?
We all gave lt up.
Because, announced the boss, we'll
give  -ho album man no quarter.
The album man turned and., left
and we saw him no more.
Lost Caste
Three generations will think I am
tho President ot tbe Ananias Club,
tin? shade of General Sherman moodily remarked.
What's the matter? asked Napoleon.
Why Carnegie has abolished war
and tlio theologians have abolished
hell, replied Sherman.
THE HANDY HAND CLEANER
Keep ft can at 3-our office, workfllop or
home. iMwny- i!*.fiil. antiseptic, oood
lor your band-. All Dealers sell Snap,
S*UP C0Mr4*i.. U3.ITED. • tlttttrcil.
W.  N. U. 961
A number of men gathered ln the
smoking car of a train from Little
Itock to another point In Arkansas
were talking of the food best calculated to sustain health.
One Arknnsan, a stout, florid man,
with short, gray hair and a self-satisfied air, was holding forth in great
style.
Look nt mol ha exclaimed. Never
had a day's sickness lu my life. All
duo to slmplo food. Why gents,
from tho time I was twenty to when
I reached forty I lived a regular life.
None of iheso effeminate delicacies
for mo. No late hours. Every day,
summer and winter, I went to bed nt
I); got up at 6. Lived principally on
corned beef and corn bread. Worked
hard, gents—worked hard from 8 to
1. Then dinner; plain dinner; then
an hour's exercise, and then—
Excuse me, interrupted the stranger, who had remained silent, hut
what were you In for?
A ring at tho telephone drew the
office boy.
Lady to talk to you sir, he said to
the senior partner.
The senior partner took up the receiver aud stood at the phone for several minutes.
Then ho laid the receiver down
nnd went back to his desk.
Twenty minutes later he raised tho
receiver, said a few word3 and presently hung It up.
Then ho turned to his partner.
It was my wife, he explained, sho
was still talking and hadn't missed
mo.
The Foolish One—Just walll Sho
She'll catch hor husband flirting some
day.
Tho Wise Ono—That's how she did
catch hlra.
Saskatchewan Lady Adds Her Testimony to What Haa Already Been
Said of the Great Work Dodd's Kidney Pills are Doing.
Caesarvllle, Bask.    (Special)—The
scarcity of female help ln a new country subjects the women of the prairies to unusual strain, and careful observation has established the fact that
this stiaiti first mak i Itself felt In
the kidneys.   For this reason Dodd's
Kidney Fills are making an enviable
reputation from the Great Lakes to
the foothills of tho Rockies.
Everywhere you will find women
singing the praises of the great Canadian kidney remedy that has banished tbelr pains and weariness, and
brought them back to health. Among
the many Is Mrs. Edgar Cowen, on
estimable lady of this place. "
"I have found Dodd's Kidney Pills
very beneficial," Mrs. Cowea states.
"If anything I can Bay will help any
sufferer I am glad to add my testimonial to what has already been said."
The kidneys strain all the refuse
material out of the blood. If they
are out of order this refuse remains in
the blood, and becomes poison. That's
why sound kidneys mean pure blood
and good health. Dodd's Kidney
Pills make sound kidneys.
Dicing on Books
With the exception of minerals lt
Ib difficult for one to find on the
earth's surface substances that do
not tempt the appetite of some sort
of animal. The list of cfueer articles
of diet Includes the earth, which Is
munched with satisfaction by the
clay eater, and the walrus hide, which
the Eskimo relishes as much as John
Bull his Joint of beef.
It Is not generally known, however, that men, aB well as mice and
bookworms have eaten dinners that
have consisted only of books.
In 1370 Barnado de Vlscontl compelled two Papal delegates to eat the
bull of excommunication which they
had brought him, together with Its
silken cords and leaden seal. As the
bull was written an parchment, not
paper, lt was all the more difficult
to digest.
There was also an American general who had signed a note for 2,000
florins, and when it fell due compelled
his creditors to eat lt. The Tartars, when books fall Into their possession, eat them, that they may acquire the knowledge contained ln
them.
A Scandinavian writer, the author
of a political book, was compelled to
choose between being beheaded or
eating his manuscript boiled ln broth.
Izaac Volmar, who wrote some spicy
satires against Bernard, Duke of Saxony, was not allowed the courtesy ot
the kitchen, but was forced to Bwal-
low them uncooked.
Still worse was the fate of Philip
Oldenburger, a Jurist of great renown
who was condemned not only to eat
a pamphlet of his writing, but nlso
to be flogged during his repast, with
orders that the flogging should not
cease until he had swallowed the
last crumb.
Quotations That are Wrong
Some ot the most frequently used
quotations are not quotations at all,
but In 'many cases convey the opposite meaning of the original wording.
Fenlniore Cooper, for Instance,
thought he was quoting from tho Bible when he spoke of an Inscription
being so devised that he who runs
may read, signifying that It was easier to run than read.
If Cooper had looked ln his Bible
he would have found in the book of
Habakuk that the passage he tried
to quote was: Write the vision and
make lt plain that he may run that
readeth It. The vision was a warning : nd the reader was to flee from
danger, but the Cooper version has
survived the original and practically
put It out ot use.
A popular chronic misquotation Is
Lhat ot the passage In Hudlbras,
which says: He that complies against
bis will is of the same opinion still.
Authors and public speakers without
number have twisted that Into: A man
convinced against his will Ib of tbe
same opinion still, forgetting that a
man who was convinced could not
possibly remain of the Bame opinion
for If he was of the same opinion he
would not be convinced.
Theodore Roosevelt publicly declared that Washington In his farewell address said: To he prepared for war
Is the most effectlvo means to promote
peace. But the first President Bald
nothing of the sort ln his farewell
address. In his first message to Congress ho said: To bo prepared for war
Is one ot the most effective means of
preserving peace, and he spoke of other means as well.
Novelists do not scorn to be very
strong ln their knowledge of the
Scriptures somehow, and Sir Walter
Scott, In 'The Heart of Midlothian,'
attempts to point a moral with the
words: Our slmplo and unpretending
heroine had tho merit of those peacemakers to whom It is promised as a
benediction that they shall Inherit the
earth. The fact Is that the peacemakers did not receive any such promise, but It Is said that the meek
shall inherit the earth.
Pro.—They   say   lightning    never
strikes twice ln the same place.
Kohn—Well, what's the use.
Bon of the house to caller—I want
to see you 'cos father says you made
yourself.
Caller—Yes, my lad, and I am proud
of It.
Son of the house—B-but why did
you do It like that?
Major Bang-tick (of Indian Army)
Tell your scoutmaster lhat now I'm
home I -shall bo pleased to help hlm,
If he'd like lt, with field work and Bo
on.
Horace—Thanks, awfully, dad, hul
—er—are you quite up-to-date? Drills
are altered a lot since you woro home
UM.
ONTARIO WOOD  SUPPLIES
Light Thrown on Forest and Trade
Conditions by  Now  Government
Bulletin
Ovor 1200 wood-using Industries Is
Ontario contributed the data for a bulletin on this Industry now being issued by the Forestry Branch, Ottawa.
Thirty four different kind* of wood
are being used by these Industries
and tho detailed Information regarding tho various use* to which such
woods aro put, should be of considerable value not only to the manufacturer by showing new means of waste
disposal, but also to tho house holder
by Indicating what native woods are
best fitted to replace ths more expensive Imported stock, for Interior decoration, furniture and flooring.
The bulletin also shows Incidentally the Increasing poverty of Ontario
with regard to tho more valuable work
woods. Almost half of the thirty-
four kinds of wood* used are obtained
principally from outside sources and
three and one half million dollars are
annually 6ent out of the province for
Imported wood stock. The Imported
oak alone costs on* million six hundred thousand dollars annually, for
this tree has become commercially
extinct In Ontario while the hickory
and chestnut groves of southern Ontario have also, almost entirely disappeared. Even good clear white
pine is becoming hard to obtain and
Its market value la steadily rising for
It represents twenty one per cent
of the total wood consumption ln Ontario for Industrial purposes.
Of moro Interest to the small consumer of wood-products are the side
lights the bulletin throws on the possibility of substituting cheap home
grown woods for the expensive foreign species now used bo extensively.
Recent tests made of their physical
properties havo demonstrated the suitability for certain purposes of many
native species, hitherto despised by
tho dealers. For hardwood flooring
In place of the oak and maple now
In general use, may be substituted the
home grown birch and beech which
take a high polish and have tho advantage of being considerably cheaper. Likewise for Interior finishing,
the expensive oak can be very closely
Imitated by stained black ash and
stained birch Is almoBt Indistinguishable from mahogany, while stained
red gum requires an expert to distinguish lt from the costly Circassian
walnut. The now expensive whit-
pine Is being replaced, where durability Is not a requisite, by the cheaper
spruce, basswood and elm. Poplar
and balsam fir are two of the most
common trees ln Ontario and that
they have wider uses is evident from
the fact that poplar Is highly valued
for h-.rdwopd flooring ln Manitoba
while balsam fir Is perhaps the most
widely used native species In. the
Maritime provinces.
The bulletin also Indicates the existence of a market In Ontario for
sumac, apple and cherry logs. The
lumber cut from them being worth
$30, $46.50, aad $44.50 per thousand
feet board measure respectively. The
Forestry Branch hns already been instrumental ln securing sales of the
wood of worn out apple orchards and
Is desirous of further (serving the public along these lines. The bulletin
on The Wood-using Industries of On-
tarlo can be had gratis from the Forestry Branch, Department of the Interior, Ottawa. A similar report
dealing with the Maritime Provinces
will appear shortly.
I bought ertiorse with a supposedly
Incurable rlngbono for $30. Cured
him with $1.00 worth ot MINARD'S
LINIMENT and sold him for $85.00.
Profit on Liniment, $54.00.
MOISE DEROSCH.
Hotel Keeper, St. Phillippe, Que.
Novel Musketry Practice
A report comes from Vienna of the
utilisation ot the cinematograph for
Instruction ln musketry. The firing
squad Is poBted ln front of a cinematograph screen, nnd a moving colored
picturo of the battlefield Is thrown on
lt from behind them. Each man has
to pick up his target, take aim and
fire. When a shot Is fired the film
stops for a second, and the hole mado
by the builet ln the,-screen la illuminated by a flashlight behind It, which
shows the position of the bit with
reference to the target.
Answered
Pa, What Is meant by Idle curiosity?
A very good example of Idle curiosity
my son, Is a twelve-dollar a week
shoe clerk asking the price of i.uto-
moblle tires.
The equator Is an Imaginary line,
running around the earth, said the
boy who likes to tell what ho has
learned at school.
An Imaginary lino, repeated the
great railway financier, absent-mindedly.     Who Is promoting lt?
Aunt—How's this, Bobby? I hear
that the little boy next door gets promoted at school much oftencr than you
do.
Bobby—Well, his father's a promoter.
' A 8uro Remedy
The story Is told tnat When M,
Polncalre, the new president of the
French Republic, first entered politics
one of Ills political opponenta taunted
him with his youthfulnesB.
I may be young, M. Polncalre replied, but I promise you that something Bhall be done every day to
wipe out that disadvantage.
ARROW and
NITDO CLUB.
\JTH4AT do you pay for in shot-  **•
** shells)    Why, plainly for shooti:
quality which means accurate loads, uniformity, sura
fire, care and experience in tho making. t/fl\
Then tpec.fy Reminglon-UMC— Canadian made, from our new      ^ lEV*^.'*-
factory at Windsor, Ontario. Arrowor NitroClub smokeless loads.      •^*^**K_.
Slightly higher in coat—mora reliable in the field* ' .^   '
Wo will ba plat! to send a b___J_*t _xp--Jn.ng simply tnsny te-!m! ■«■. points of arnmu-
nit-on lu-aultttuia.   Vour nmno aad ____.-1 ea a post-caid brings il by leiutn ma.l
Remington-Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Windsor, Ontario
POISONOUS MATCHES ARE PASSING AWAY
Dangerous chemical, are not uted In tipping EDDY'S 8ei-qul Safe Light matehee.
Sea that you get EDDY'S end ne other
"just ae good."
Safety—In Ita complete lonse—le abt»
lutely guaranteed, but vou mutt aik for
EDDY'S new
Your
Dealer
Has Them
..
Ses-qui"
Matches
Correcting the Answer
At a horse-stealing trial out weit a
Jury was gathered and shut up ln a
room after a brief trial, and when an
hour had gone by a mob hurst in and
unceremoniously demanded what the
verdict was.
Not guilty, Bald the foreman.
That won't do, eald the leader of
the mob fiercely. You will have to
do better than that. And he shut
the jury up again.
In half an hour the door was opened once move.
Well, gents, jour verdict, said tho
leader.
Guilty, the foreman replied.
There were hurrah Irom the crowd
and the leader Baid:
Corroct, You can go now. We
strung him up an hour ago.
Potatoes and Power
One forseos the triumph of the potato, uaforseen by William Cobbett,
not so much as a food, but as a means
ot ir-.tion. Coal la giving out; petrol Is going up ln price and down In
production. The Biipply of both Ib
limited anumust come to an end, but
thero com*3 the cheer tbat alcrfhol
will bo tho motive force of the future.
Petrol and coU may .give out, but ttie
earth will always grow potatoes. Potatoes can produce alcohol and alcohol can drive engines. In the potato we seem to have discovered tho
secrot of perpetual motion.
Real Gratitude
Pessimists declare that tho days of
gay romance nro dead—that there Is
no spirit of chivalry left ln the
br-asts of tlie men of modern times.
They are all wrong. Here we have
the Btory ln tho dally papers that a
man In Ohio left nil his money to the
girl who refused to marry hlm years
ago.     That's gratitude for you!
Hard to Tell
There were a lot of old shoes on
the street when I went out this morn-
.lug.
Wedding or a cat fight, do you suppose?
Altruletlo
Hose—He said ho would kiss mc or
die ln the atlempt.
Marie—Woll?
Rose—He has no life-insurance, and
I pitied hie poor old mother.
Why don't women drees eenslhly?
If they did, half the tndustrlee of
the world would go to Bmash.
Another One on Twain
Mark Twain at a dinner at the
Author'! Club, said: Speaking ot
fresh eggs, I am reminded of tha
town of Squash. In my early lecturing days I went to Squash to lecture
In Temperance Hall, arriving In tha
nfternoon. The town seemed poorly
billed. I thought I'd find out if the
people knew anything at all about
what was In store for them. So I
turned ln at the general store. Good
afternoon, friend, I eald to the general
storekeeper. Any entertainment
here tonight to help a stranger while
away the evening? The general
storekeeper, who waa sorting mackerel, straightened up, wiped his briny
hands on his apron and said: I expect there's going to be a lecture, I
been selling eggs all day.
Comfort for the Dyspeptic.—There
Is no ailment bo harassing nnd on*
haustlng as dyspepsia, which arises
from defective action of the stomach
and liver, and the victim of it Is to
be pitied. Yet ho can find ready relief in Parmelee's Vegetabl. Pills, a
preparation that has established Itself
by yeara of effective use. There aro
pills that are widely advertised as
the greatest i ver compounded, but
not one ot them can rank In value
with Parmelee's.
Her Portrait
nThe painstaking artist, anxious fo
please, remarked to prospective customer:
I can paint you a portrait of your
wifo which will be a speaking likeness.
H'm. Couldn't you do lt In what
Ihey caa still life?
It may be better to give than to
receive, but few of us are In a position to keep lt up Indefinitely.
Good Advice
A young lawyer who has recently
hung out his shingle hore, was retained by a criminal with $5 uud a
very poor defense.
Well, you got a case, son, said his
proud father.
Yes, dad.
And what n'lvlc-o did you give your
client?
After listening to his slory I collected what money he had nnd advised hlni to retain a more experienced lawyer.
The dread of ridicule extinguishes
originality ln Its birth.
Tired and Weak
Nerves Exhausted
Try Murine Eye Remedy
It you have Red, Weak, Watory Eyes
or Granulated Eyelids. Doesn't Smart
—Soothes Eye Pain, Druggist* Sell
Murine Eyo Remedy, Liquid, 25c, 50c,
Murine Eye Salve In Aseptio Tubes,
25c, 50c.    Eyo Books Free by Mail.
»« *V< nnl. «<-' l.r AH *m thai **•.- Car,
Murln, Eyt K«_n,d»  tie...  Chloal,
The feelings of fatlgu*- and languor
which overcome eo many people at
this eeason of the year tell of tho exhausted condition ot the nerves.
It Is Impossible to keep up the action ot the heart and the vitality of
the nerves when the blood Is thin
and watery', and this Is why nearly
everybody needs tonlo treatment ln
tho spring.
Some ot tho symptoms are restlessness, purposeless activity, Insomnia,
absent-mindedness, tired gait, lack of
ambition and enthusiasm, head-ache
and neuralgia pains, dyspepsia and
feelings of languor and depression.
Monotony ot work and mental overstrain or worry Bap the nervous system, as does also the Btrommusness
of modern life, whether ln the bust-1
ness or 30ctal' world j
More and more men nnd women
are obliged to se*k tbo assistance of
such concentrated foods as Dr.
Chase's Nerv-j Food to restore vitality
to the tired and worn-out nerves.
Such treatmont la necessi.ry, because diseases of the nerves do not
Tight themselves. As norve force
runs low the digestive system falls to
extract the necessary nutrition from
tbo food. Dr. Chase's Nerve Food
supplies In condensed form tho Ingredients required, and restores
health.
A little patlenfo Is necessar • In
treating diseases of the nerves and
rest helps to restore strength, You
can bo ..ure of lasting beneficial results when you use
Dr. Chase's Nerve Food
60 cents a box
for t- .EO at all deal
Limited,
ers,    or Kdmanson,
Toronto.
Bates  &.    Co., T«ft-iAI,AXIJE---Xi:iinEBLANp, B.C.
f
LOVE GONQUEFtS fill
lies
(BY ARTHUR APPLIN)
Ward, I-ock & Co., Limited, Lon
don, Melbourne and Toronto
 M
\m
(ContUu '(1)
Hour after hour passed. The clock
outside chimed midnight; then struck
oft U'o hours of tho new day one by
ono. But Hetherlngton was unconscious of time. He searched fever;
Ubly but \\\ vain, seeking everywhere
tt> find 'Himself.1 Sometimes amonc
lits treasures there was something
whlcb i roused strange feelings in his
breast, emotions rather than memory
le.?. When dawn crept through thc
win.lows ho was a3 far off solving the
mystery ol himself, and ot the terrible
happening, cf the previous day, ns
ever. There wero three things he
had placed aside o.i his bod; bis
cheque Look, and a ..mall diary In
wMeji t-uuifcti lmd beeu made at rare
Intervals just in a casual way. Both
these gave fftffi some small Insight in*
to his post; beside them a piece of
very old lace to which clung a sweet
elusive perfume. Obviously It belonged to a woman and equally it had
lately been worn.
Th-.1 perfume was strangely suggestive of the mingling of "ancient and
modern days. It was the one thing
which somehow seemed near to Hetherlngton, the ono thing he had known,
he almost dare say—remembered! Perhaps ir was ti e woman who bad worn
it? Tho touch of it. Just the per*
fuma seemed to soothe and calm him
In an extraordinary way, lt gavo him
strength und courage. And indeed
he wanted both.
Ilo had finished stacking a wholo
mass of stuff into one of the cupboards when from between tho pages
of a guide book a photograph fell out.
Ho picked 'it up, It was carefully
wrapped in tissue paper. A portrait.
Ths first be had found, all the other
photographs were snapshots of towns,
or scents of forests and hills, deserts
and Jungles, occasionally groups of
peopl unrecognizable. But 'this
waa a portrait—and of a woman. He
gat on the edge of.*- e bed.holding
it between his lingers, staring at it.
A very beautiful woman—dark hair,
clear cut features, large sad ejes. iike
tho c-yes of Russian people, with a
beautifully shaped mouth; a mouth
That might be very kind or very cruel.
Ii was a remarkabh face, a faco that
would haunt ono. This was the wo-
man to whom tbo strip of old lace
belong; d. he felt sure of it. And then
ihe question oame liko the stab of
w dagger. Was this ibe woman whose
shadow l:iy across the dead body of
O-car Soral?
Drawing back the curtains from the
• iinJo'W he lpoltrd out, but the gardens were wrapped in mist, the trees
looked l.ke great ghosts, but up and
away over tbe moorlands the sky was
growing rod; day was breaking. Getting into htn boa's and breeches, and
slipping on his heavy riding coat,
Hetherlngttfl. cr^pt out of the house
to tho stables. The groom was leaning from his window above one of
the loose boxes; Hetheriffjgton called
to him to come down and saddle bis
horse fo.1 hj.n. Ten minutes later he
was ralloping over tbe 'moorland in'
the direction of Deepshot Wood;
cince memory did not serve him, be
trusted to instinct. He turned his
horse into the wood at a J^olnt where
the stream sang nol'slly, then dismounted and' began to search for Oscar Soral's bod.\\
It war, a shock cans:d by a sudden
blow which had robbed him of memory? If ho had murdered this man
and now found his body that shock
hi ight ho EtSFfflcTen. to restore memory. Thin at lasl he would know.
He felt lie could bear anything, could
face death more easily than live without remembrance, without knowledge
of 1 "mself—without anything that
makes life worth living:
CHAPTER III
| Hetherlngton could see the sun
I shining through the tops of-tbe tr-ees;
here and there it threw patches of
gold about the bracken tracing & black
and yellow carpet on the ground, lie
!'had been searching a long time and
|had found nothing. Tlie ferns and un-
derguwth showed no trace of footsteps or a struggle, and nowhere was
there any hint of a dead body lying
hidden away.
At first ho had searched wildly, but
lately he had gouo to work systematically; he had searched every bit of
ground within a radius of several
hundred yards of the noisy river pool
to which Bister had referred.
Is it possible for one man to lure
another into a wood, murder him ln
Owning the  Farm or  Being  Owned
by It
When the plain truth Is written it
must be stated that the magnificent
prairies are inhabited In large measure by people who are very materialistic In the-.- tastes and thinking. In
the hurry and excitement of making
good on the homestead, the finer sensibilities are frequently dulled, and
many forget that worthy citizenship
is not simply a matter of making a
living, but of living a life. We need
more frequently to be reminded that
man., does not live by bread alone—
that we have other needs than the
mere vulgar necessity of three meals
a day, and a place to sleep at night.
The farmer and his wife who decide
that so far as their house Is concern-
fhe Rigpit Soap
For Baby's Skin
Is Cuticura Soap
|N Uie care of
baby .skin and
hair, Cuticura
Soap is thc
i; *'oa:
mj1/ mother's L-
\yj\\ voiirilc. Not
■=£-»* only is it unrivaled in purity and refreshing
fragrance, but ils gentle emollient properties render it of
great value 'in promoting skin
and hair health generally. For
thc trcatme'i. tof eczemas, rashes
and other itching, burning infantile eruptions, warm baths
with Cuticura Soap, followed
by gentle applications ot Cuticura Ointment arc usually effective when other methods fail."
Cuticura Soap wears to a wafer,
often outlasting several cakes
of ordinary soap and making
its use most economical.
(V.lcura Soap nnd   Ointment r.ro cold
lliroushout *■>• world' A lib''n'1 "•'"'' -
ear IvHh 32-pago booklet on tho rare and
treatment of tho skin und scalp. «entpo»t*
B.pt, 1UD, J-oston, U. -. A.
W. N. U. S61
colli blond nnd then 'absolutely forget! e<* tn0 esthetic, tbo beautiful, the love
■ of truth and goodness, Ibo pleasure of
pure aud lnnuccut fun, the comradeship of worthy books, tho gladness of
music, tho mirth < laughter tho mysterious awe which comes over thoso
who take lime to Pry Into Nature's
wonderland—we say thnt tho farmer
nnd his wifo who decido tbat these
things are legitimate and desirable—
that they aro worth taking time for
—such persons as these muke uo mistake.
There are many farm homos ln
which far too great a premium la put
upon that quality of character which
Is misnamed Industry. The father
takes pride in the fact that his boys
are everlastingly on the grindstone
from dawn to dusk and that they
have no time for gadding. He prides
himself that they are hard workers.
And yet his sons are mere drudges.
Tbey may hold the record for a big
day's stocking but they know nothing
about hooks or flowers or tho relaxation of au Idle day with a Ashing
rod. They pass by, unnoticed, the
sunlit rlpples*and the cool, deep shadows ot the farm brook; they never
look up to behold the glory of the
sunset; they know not the cunning
ways of the bee, nor the wonderful
world ot plant life about their feet;
they are Just common drudges, work-
lug all day long ln God's wonderful
laboratory, but with eyes that are
holden that ttey -Bay not see.
Wc make io plea for mere Idling.
Pure lndolir.cn Is always a crime.
And frequently It leads to other
crimes worse even than Itself. But
there Is no Indolence tn an hour now
and then with the children ln gathering, naming and admiring the prairie
flowers; ln an effort to surround the
other things of beauty; and ln a word
to live ln companionship with the
farm, regarding It not merely for Its
mercenary value, but also for Its delightful associations and constant
round of Interest and of surprise.
There are some families who really
own their farm and enjoy It; but there
are other families who think they own
a farm, but who ln reality aro owned
by lt, and have become Its slave.—
Nor-WB'st Farmer.
the terrible deed and all the clrcunr
stances  connected  wilh  It?
Bo far he had kept hoth his feelings and his nerves fairly well under
control; now a shudder swept through
h!s boily as he was conscious of the
solitude, tlio silence and his own
helplessness. He walked on almost
automatically penetrating deeper ln
the wood. It seemed useless searching any further, yet ho knew ho must
Ihe absolutely convinced that this man
Bister had lied to him and fooled
him. llo hardly knew whether he
hoped be had lied or spoken, .the
truth. If ha found the body of this
Oscar Sornl. he would know that he
was n murderer—and life for him
would henceforth be impossible. On
tbe other hand If he did not find the
body, nnd realized that he had been
the victim of a clever scoundrel, he
would know he was little better than
a living ghost; a shadow ln a world
of reality, nnd lt would bo equally Impossible for him to live under such
conditions.
Suddenly lie stopped, the muscles ot
his body stiffened, his nostrils quivered. But he saw nothing, he heard
nothing, Imagination hnd suddenly
brought the scent from a piece of per-
furaid laco; the subtle odor ot an unknown woman.
Hetherlngton drew out his handkerchief and mopped his face; in a minute his nerves would give way and he
would rush shrieking through the
wood. Imagination had already commenced to play tricks on him. He
advanced a few more steps—haltingly—and stopped again as he saw a
patch of bracken fern all bent and
broken d'-wn.
Proof at last! But—no—when he
advanced he found nothing, lt only
looked as though-lt had been trampled
(".own. He advanced yet a little further: he bad found a trail. Some
one hat! passed this way. two, perhaps
thiee people. Tho undergrowth became ve.y thick; In places the bracken was four or five feet high.
The trail stopped suddenly, just be-
for.. a tangle of bramble bushes nnd
ferns. Hetherlngton commenced to
beat them down with the butt end
of his hunting crop. Then-his arm
fell linirly by his Bide; a half strangled cry died away on his lips. There,
almost at ills foet, lay the body of
Oscar Soral.
He Iny on his back, quite straight
and .tiff, his arms hy his side; the
ferns grew all around like a canopy.
There wero no signs of n struggle,
il almost locked as If lie had been
reverently laid to rest ln this bracken bed of nature's making. The eyes
were closed but the mouth wns open
as IT, when he fell, he had cried out.
Ilo was a mnn of powerful buijd,
bearded, with 'a swarthy complexion.
lletherington bent    forward,    thjeu
knelt by  the  dead  mans  side.   Ills
hlrt was stained red just, above hi;
Origin of Irish Lace
Irish laco originated from the failure of the potato crop that caused th*
famine of 1S.G. The abbess ot a convent In County Cork, lopking about
for some lucrative employment to
help the half-starved children who attended her schools, unravelled thread
by thread a Bcrap of point de Milan,
and finally mastered tbe complicated
details. She then selected the girls
who were quickest of needlework and
taught them what she had painfully
learned. The new Industry prospered, and one ot tho pupilj, lm a pardonable bull, declared that If lt had
not beon for the famine we would all
have been starved.
who
Who Was He?
Father, said tt, boy ot twclv
was Shylock?
What, exclaimed his father, have
I sent you to Sunday school for tho
past els years, only to have you ask
nie who Shylock was? Shamo on
you! Oet your Bible and find out
this minute!
A Marine Misnomer
It'B rather odd that they .hould call
a steamer i_ tramp.
Why so;
Fancy a tramp needing water to
get along on.
Over the Counter
Are these candles fresh my pretty
one? asked the youth with the sunset socks.
They are fresh, but not ln your
class, answered the saleslady with
the Titian hair.
heart and the blood had trickled down
his arm. A revolver was lying close
lo his left hand. Hetherlngton picked lt up and put lt Into his own pocket, lie was quite calm and cool now
as he commenced to search that which
iiad onco heen—man.
Thc r.cckols were empty: coat trousers and vest—quito empty. "'
was not even the faintest cine to tho
runn't, Identity. But Hetherlngton
l:ne-.v that he had boetrOsear Soral.
What made him certain of that one
.act he hnd no idea. nut he just
know. Also, that he—Hetherlngton
—had murdered him.
Ills search completed he tuftied
away and retraced bis steps. But he
walked carefully now, disturbing, the
bracken fern aa little as possible.
It was a long time before he heard
tbo singing of tho river and saw
through the trees thc glint of the!sun
on the white road. He led tho liorse
out ot the wood along the road until
ho came to the deep and noisy pool.
He gazed down Into, the dark ' colored wafer, trying to guess the depth.
Tho river was still at summer level.
Glancing cautiously around ho took
Ihe revolver from his pocket nnd flung
It Into Iho cenlro of the pool. Mount-
in? his liorse. l.o once again glanced
In all directions. No human being
was lu sight. He trotted his horse
In the direction nf f'ranhy Hall.
After n while Hetherlngton found
himself glancing over his shoulder; j
presently he put his horse Into a canter.
llo wns being pursued. Implication again, of course, but lie felt ns If
all sorts ot things had rushed out of
thc wood and wero nfter hlm.
A few mlnules later he reached Ihe
valley and was going nt a gallop. Ho
passed n couple of sleepy waggoners I
nnd they stopped and stared. lie saw
Iheir faces clearly—they looked ln no
.whit surprised.
Just In front of him a narrow bridge
spanned the river and ho remembered
that the village lay oi. the other side.
Ile began to draw rein whon suddenly
i Ihe horse shied violently and swerving across the road, stumbled and fell,
pitching hlm against the hedge. As
he pi'.ked himself up ho noticed grimly that ho hnd escaped going over
into the river by a narrow six inches.
Evidently fate had nol finished with
him I nl™-'1 vas trickling from a
I wound in his forehead; one blow had
1 robbed hlm of his memory, a second
j Rail not given it back to him! \\ l-h
\ „ tightening of the lips he told himself ■„.
that It didn't matter now-enough ot llo7n
3 nasi  bad ken  revealed.   Blood      A
Customer—I want a ton ct  coal.
Dealer—Yes, dr.     Whnt size?
Customer—Well, If it's not asking
to" much, I'd like to have a -OOO
pound ton.
Life In Macedonia
We aruso early one February morning and left oi r fairly clean hotel
ln NeapolU for four J.ourB of travel
over the modern road near the Via
Egnatla, which should take us to ancient Phlllppl. Our vehicle was a
somewhat dilapidated hack, such as
Americans are familiar with at almost
every considerable railwav station but
surprisingly comfortable conveyance
for this part ot tho world. Rattling
down some steep, roughly paved
streets we oame to the centre of tho
great Roman aqueduct and ascended
another steep street on the other side
ot the market place.
Early as it was, we found that th_
people of Kavalla were tip and doing.
The stalls ot the fruit men were attractive with oranges, pomegranates,
lemons and dates. The' vegetable
dealers displayed a tempting array i •
cauliflowers, cabbages, onions, okra,
leeks and potatoes.
As In all eastern cities, there was
no privacy. Tho cook was preparing
his breakfast on the sidewalk, the
shoemaker was plying his awl, tho
tailor his needle, and iho blacksmith
was shoeing his horses almost ln the.
very .treet.
GILLE-TT'S LYE
EATS DIRT
NERVOUS PEOPLE
MADE CHEERFUL
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills Rebuild
Shattered Nerves
Good blood—rich, red blood—makes
all the difference between health and
sickness. If tho blood Is thin and
watery, the health of the whole bod/
suffers. The sufferer be.omos nervous and Irritable; the stomach fall i
From a second-hand book catalogue: I ■•* strength and the appetite becomes
_ .   .         ...     ...       —  Tlnnr. SYiml   '_.   -in*   l.   vn iha  rnn.,..
His Cusy Time
Doctor, why don't you take n \ aca*
UK.?
I can't now, my patients need me.
Thiy aro beginning to come back
from their vacations.
He—Does your father know I expect
to ask him for your band?
She—I think he does. He Is practicing for halt an hour every morning
with dumb-bells.
Dickens (0)—Plc-Nio Papers
Just the thing to wrap, sandwiches
In.
State et Uhlo, City ot Toledo,      \
Lucas County !
Frank T. Uieney makes oath tbat he Is
Fonlor partr.er ot tho firm of V. J.
Chenc-v ft Co., doing bustne.. In tho city
of Toledo, County ond State aforesaid,
and that sold firm will pay tho sum of
ONE Hti.Nl.HED D0IXARS for each and
cverv case ot Catarrh that cannot be
cured by the use of Hall's Catarrh Cure.
FRANK 3.   CHENEY.
Sworn to bet... mo and subscribed In
1 * presence, I-..* fith day of Ueeember,
A.D. 188..
Its.nl.) A. W. G..EASQN,
Notary Publie.
Halt's Catarrh Cure Is taken Internally,
cud acts .directly on the blood and
muc.ua surfaces of the Bystem. Bend
for test: -nnials free.
F. J. CHENEY - CO., Toledo, 0.
Bold tv all druggists,  ,5c.
•tr.:a Hairi Family Pills (or constipation.
Dr. Edvarc'. Sanger said in New
York:
We should not announce cures unless they are real cures. Imagination plays too great a part in a patient's feelings.
Imagination tnuBt always be reckoned with medicine—sometimes as a
friend, sometimes as a foe. I know
a doctor who treated an old woman
for typhoid, and on each visit he
took her temperature by holding a
ThereI thermometer under her tongue. One
duy, when she had nearly recovered,
the doctor did not bother to take her
temperature and he had hardly got
100 yards -Tom the house when her
son called him back.
Mother Is worse, said the man.
Come baclc at once.
Tlie doctor returned. On his entry Into the sick room the old woman
looked up at him with angry and reproachful eyes.
Doctor, tho said, why didn't you
givo me the jigger under nie tongue
today? That always done me moro
good than all the rest ot your trash.
Contest Winners Shortly to be Announced
Though still busily engaged In the
tremendous task cf reading the letters received from nearly 20,000
.-chool children ln the contest conducted by the Remington Literary
Committee, the Judges are nev» near-
lug the completion of their painstaking work and -,.111 shortly make an-
iiouncemo_.t of .winners. The general run of tho letters Is so excellent
and the determining of superior merit
In Individual cases so difficult,, that
tho Judges have decided to give, ln addition to the prizes already scheduled,
lirst, second and third medals In each
of the four classes. In a few days
tha awards of these and of the 2,000
other prizes offered will be known by
the pupils who throughout the country are eagerly awaiting the news.
Corns are caused by the pressure of
tight boots, but no ono need be troubled with them long when so simple
a remedy as llolloway's Corn Cure is
avail .ble.
Bea! Sea everywhere, as the groat
liner mado her powerful courso over
the Atlantic.
Oh, captain, camo rt disconsolate
groan from a seasick passenger, halt
reeling In a deck chair, how far are
we oft lan.i.
No answer camo to this remark,
which had been reiterated several
times that day.
Oh captain, do answer me—how
far?
Mllo and a half, came the gruff
reply.
Thank heaven! In what direction
captain? ,  ,
A twinkle •■ '.mo for n moment In
the eve ot the trusquo old sea dog.
Straight down! he grunted
.i ii
Their Aim
I suppose, said tho husband, I suppose that you women want to vole
just liko men do?
Oh, no, replied his wife, that Is not
the point. We want to vote a great
deal better than tho men do.
The Remedy
ghe—Georgo dear, here's a scientist
who savs the earth is wabbling on Its
axis. What do you suppt:a they can
dj about lt?
George (absently)—Open up tho
muffler, reverse the lever Bhut-0'- the
power, lubricate tho bearings and
tighten the wheel cap.
Editor—Why do you persist In com-
; here?     I tell you I don't huy fic-
Odd Uses of Sugar
If all the sugar that Is eaten ln th.
course of a year were to be equally
divided, every person ln the world
would have at least twenty pounds.
But besides being used as food, sugar
has many industrial uses. It la the
cheapest form of a chemically pure
carbohydrate, and Is often used ln
place of starch, dexlrln, or glucose.
Sugar Is frequently put In compounds
for removing and preventing boiler
scale. It Is used In the manufacture
of shoe-blacking, transparent soap,
copying-ink, and inkrollers for print-
presses. Certain explosives contain
from six to forty per cent, of It. It
Is employed ln dyeing establishment.-,
by tanneries for filling leather and ln
a large number of otlier Industries.
Sugar has a hardening and strengthening action ln mortar. The mortar
used to rebuild tho Museum ot Natural History in Berlin consisted ot
one part lime, one par sand and two
parts sugar. Eveu a very small
quantity, however, even as littlo as
one-quarter ot one per cent, exerts a
very harmful effect on cement.
poor. Food does not give the necessary nourishment, and the first feeling of weakness pnsses, as time goes
on, Into a general breakdown In the
health. The case of Mrs. Angell-
que Gagnon, of St. Jerome, Que.,
illustrates the truth of these statements. Mrs. Gagnon says: "I am
fifty years of ago and up to a few
months ago always enjoyed tho best
of health. Then I began to feel rundown and weak, without patience or
ambition. My appetite grew poor,
and my nerves seemed to be on edge,
and the least noise or worry would
moke m. trr't:bic and nervous. Lite
became nn t ct.'al burden and I could
ro longer look after my household
duties. My doctor prescribed and ordered a change, saying that I was a
nervous wreck. I tried to become
interested ln other'things but failed,
and my condition was really deplorable. I continued ln this condition
for Several months, gradually going
down, and as my doctor was not helping mo I was easily persuaded by a
friend to try Dr. Williams' Pink Pills.
After taking tho pills for a few weeks
I could see an improvement, and I
gladly continued using them for a
couple of months, when I found my
health fuliy restored. I am more
than thankful for what Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills have dono for me, and I
gladly recommend them to all who
are weak, nervous nnd run down."
By making rich, red blood Dr. Williams' Pink Pills cure such cases as
Mrs. Gagnon's. In thi Eame way
they cure ervous headaches, neuralgia, Indigestion, rheumatism, St. Vitus dance, and the ailments that come
to growing girls and women of mature
years. If you are at all unwell start
to-day to euro yourself with Dr. Williams' Pink Pills, what they have done
.for others they will surely do for you,
it given a fair trial. Sold by all
druggists or by mall, post paid, at 60
cents a b6x or six boxes for $2.60 by
addressing The Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville, Ont.
At first lt has been contended, men
used both arms Indifferently, and
those who when fighting pushed tho
right side forward hau the advantage
of shielding their hearts and so lived
to produce descendants who Inherited
their tendencies. Be this as it may,
there Is no doubt that the two sides of
the brain have different functions, aud
right or left-handedness Is by no
means restricted to the arms alone.
Ono Investigator was ver; often able
to recognize left handedness by the
examination of the left eye. The
centre of speech Is on the left side
ot tbe brain of a right handed person
and ou the right side of a left handed
person. Children show unmistakable
evidence ot two speech centres, though
ono atrophies owing to the preference given to one hand. Nevertheless experiments show that lt can bo
successfully resuscitated.
RAILWAYS AND    CARTAGfl
Canadian    Railways    Cancel    Tariffs
Covering Cartage Points In
Dominion
Railway., of Canada have Issued
notice ot cancellation of tariffs covering cartage points ln Canada, effective October 1, 1813. On and after
that dato shipper! and consignees
will bo expected to mako thoir owa
arrangements for cartage.
It is stated that this action on the
part ot the transportation companies.,
ln the result ot the failure to renew
existing contracts with the cartage
companies at present prices, tho latter
claiming that owing to Increased cost
of supplies, labor'and other matters
entering Into the performance ot tho
service, they must have Increased
compensation. On the oilier hand,
tho railways contend that it is impossible to increase their burden of such
extra expenses for the very reason
given by the cartage companies—*
namely, Increased expanses.
Tho change in conditions at cartage point.; in Canada, lt Is pointed
out, is In line with practices which
have long prevailed at American
Cities, where tho public are obliged
lo make their own arrangements with
the cartage companies for deliveries
to or from tho railway terminal.
One of the commonest complaints
of Infants Is worms, and Iho most effective application for them is Mother Graves' Worm Exterminator.
Tanning by Electricity
A new electric tanning process, Invented by the Swedish scientist, Dr.
A. Grolh, and applied on a practical
scale in an English works, is attracting much attention, and ono of the
prominent electrical firms is to take
it up for commercial use. With this
method, the hides are put in special
vats along with metal conductors, so
as to carry out an electrolytic action,
and this will tan thc hides In much
less time than usual, for instance,
six weeks as compared to several
months. Leather of better quality
Is produced In this way, and the method gives a perfect and solid tanning.
Various electrical devices in the shape
of regulators, also safety apparatus
for over-current, make the process almost an automatic one.
Minard's Llnh.ient Cures Distemper
Minard's   Liniment Cures  Garget
Cows
A Scotch caddie Is almost certala
to be a shrewd observer ot men and
things, and ho Is frequently gifted
v.ith a sharp tongue of his own,.
Lang Willie was for many years
a well-known flg-i-e on tho St. Andrews golf links. On tho occasion of
Louis Kossuth's visit to St. Andrews
a public dinner was given in his honor and Willie applied for a ticket tithe ballio who wan in charge of tho
arrangements. The worthy man
curtly refused the application, sayln.;
to Willie that lt was no place for tho
likes ot him to be at the dinner.
No for the likes of me? was Willie's
Indignant rejoinder. I've been in
the company ot gentlemen from 11 to
4 o'clock maist days for tho last
thirty years, and that's malr tban you
c*- say!
A teacher In a big elementary school
had given lessons to nn Inrant class
on the ten commandments. In order
to test their memories sho asked:
Can nny little child givo me a com-
mnndmeut with only four words ia
it?
Alund was '-alsed Immediately.
Well? Baid tho teacher.
Keep off tho fi.ss, was the reply.
ou his hand!     Ho laughed aloud.
And while he laughed thero rose up
before him the figure of a young girl.
(To  bo  Con'tlilUEi)...
In 1011 in the United States 91,-03
person, died of tuberculosis.
Author—Oh,  I   don't  wish
any ot my jtories.   I am -
to sc'.l
(ting a
short serial entitled: Tbe Ugliest Mall
on Earth, and came In merely to obtain local color.
Only  a chwip person  will  try
make another person feel cheap.
Aluminum Servant of Man
When tho history ot our age
written the Btory ot aluminum is going to occupy a prominent page, says
Harpers' Weekly. It Is quite as wonderful S3 Iho story of electricity, tho
all-pcrvadlug giant lhat lay hidden
for ages in murky cloud3, ln masses
of coal, copper and 6oft Iron, and In
myriads of waterfalls, until Franklin
and Morse and Edison put him In
harness and made him one ot the
r.ost useful and Ingenious servants of
man Aluminum, which constitutes
nearly one-twelfth of the earth crust,
lav obscure until Sir Humphrey Davy
In' 1808, declared tbat clay and many
clayey rocks depended upon somo
metal as a basj.
A Lark's Lofty Flight
Borne Bavarian officers experimenting with a balloon 6,000 feet aloft
noticed a littlo black sp. :1c whloh
seemed to i.ecompany them and which
they thought was one! ot the cards
they carried for throwing out reports
and lhat the dropping of the balloon
drew It along, but on looking at the
barometer they found that the balloon
was rising and not dropping, Sm1-
il'-nlv, however, a loud chirping sho*;
ed lhat It wan a lark. whlc'. flylflg at
tills extraordinary he'slit, naa ut_n
frightened by the balloon^
Take things easy, if they don't belong to others.
Not 8 atlonary
A carpenter who had been engaged
to build a cabinet for paper envelopes
and other ofl.ee supplies ln a local
In  commission house  was busy at his
task when one of tho bookkeepers Inquired:
Is that going tc be a stationery cab-
IbIInet? „_
No, I don't think so, replied tho
worker. At least I have Instructions
lo put casters on lt.       ,_
An ordinary piano contains about
a mile of wire. Genius will yet benv
flt humanity by Inventing a wireless
piano for amateurs.
Now Its See America First
I thought they were going to Europe for the summer?
When did they tell you that?
Last November.
Oh, everybody was going to Europt
for the sumtnev last November.
Johnny, said the mother severely,
some one has taken, a big pleco ot
ginger cuke out of the pantry.
Johnny blushed guiltily.
Oh, Johnny, she exclnimed. I did
not think It was ln you!
It ain't all, replied Johnny. Part of
It Is In Elsie.
RumnTEJlTswmnmimi-i
"Blue" Feeling
Wben yen (eel dis*
caw-aged and all the
world seems to be
against yon-tbat'■
yoar system's way
of telegraphing yon Uut someUiUig Is WRONG and needs HELP.
It may be that your liver l» tired and refuses to work, or ytm
digestive organs have had too much to do and need em.  Perhaps
you hsve been oating the wrong kind of food, and too* blood is too-
rich or Impoverished.  What yon need Is a tonic.
pr. Pierce's flftlden Medical Discovery
wttl give tbe remired aid. Tones tho onttee system. Tha weak itomseh U
toadfatroiir. The liver vibrates with new life. Tho blood la eleanaed of all
Impurities and carries renewed health « every veto snd nerve sad nmscto and
organ of the body. No more attacks of
the, "blue*." Life becomes worth whilo
again, ai><5 hope takes place of despair.
/nail. »n actiino tk. Pierce'*
Golden Medical Discovery.
Bold by dealer* in medicine*.
*^^rj?*x«M^v*ft
r,emltnt. World's__jwu«rr
Uedtoal AssoeiaHoa, Buffalo. K T. THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND. B.C.
If
WILSON'S
FLY PADS
Ask your Druggist or Grocer
to show you the new plan for
killing all the flies in your
house or store in one night,
and have neither flies nor fly
killers about in the daytime.
GREAT BRIDGES
Facts cf Great Structures Across the
Tay and Forth
Not the least of iho extraordinary
feats of thr- redoubtable bridge-builder, Sir William Airol, was tho fact
that ut ono time he carried ou two
such gigantic oontracts as tbo Tay
and Forth Bridges, lt was a sulking
tribute Ic. his great powers of organisation and to his genius for engineering on a inannuctli scale. Tho const met,nn of tho Tay Bridge was only
hnll'-llulslieil when he niude a stnrt
with ihe gtgnntto undertaking which
now spans the l-'irth of Forth, from
tho designs of Sir John Fowler nnd
Sir Benjamin Baker. Over a year
was spent In Ihe preliminary preparations alone—the designing and making of special plant, the erection f
workshops on shore an- tlie thousands
and one things essential to the success
of such a large scheme. The cost of
temporary plant ran to linlf-a-mllllon
sterling, ami included thirty stenirr
t d other barges, tugs, launches anl
boats, sixty steam cranes and winches,
fifty hydraulic cranes, forty-eight
steam engines ar..l hydraulic Jacks,1
hsnd-craneB nnd drillli.; machines almost innumerable! not to
mention one million cubic feet of tim*
ber and sixty miles of wire. The
enormous nature or this engineering
wonder of the world may be gathered
from the following figures: The total
length Is over a mile and a half, and
consists or two spans, each nearly a
third of n l.iilo long: two spans of six
hundrod anil seventy-five feet onch. In
the piers there nre about ono hundred
and twe.ily thousand cubic yards ot
masonry, and In the super-structure
over forty thousand Ions of steel and
soni;1 fifteen thousand tons of Iron.
The building of tho Tay Bridge wns
an opportunity for a display ot his
engineering genius which the ambll-
•tplls bridgonu.ker eagerly welcomed.
A rigorous examination revealed the
old foundations lo be insecure, and It
-vas decided lo build an entirely new
.ridge a short distance farther up tho
river. Within five yoars from its
commencement—18S_ lo 1887—a remarkable erection, over two miles in
length, 'nil constructed ut a cost of
seven hundred and fifty thousand
pounds, spanned the estrary, a structure strong enough to dely the fiercest
.lale that ever blew. lt was tho
greatest engineering triumph of the
Ige. until it wns eclipsed by a greater—the Forth Bridge.
Qenluo Oil'Painter
It la told ot Leonardo d_ Tlnd -int
while still a pupil, betoro Ua gonitis
burst Into brilliancy, ho received •
special Inspiration la this way:
His old and famous master because
ot his growing infirmities ot ago felt
obliged to give up his own work and
one day bads Da Vine! finish for him
a picture which he had begun. The
young man had such reverence for
bis master's skill that he shrank from
the task. The old artist, however,
would not accept any excuse, but persisted In his command, saying simply:
Do your best.
Da Vinci at last tremblingly seized
the brush and, kneeling before the
easel, said tho following prayer: It Is
for tho sake of my beloved master
that 1 Implore skill and power for
this undertaking. As he proceeded
his hand grow steady, his eye awoke
with slumbering genius. He forgot
himself nnd was filled with enthusiasm for ills work.
Wben tho painting was finished the
old master was carried Into the studio to pass Judgment oo the result. Ills
eyes rested on a triumph of art.
Throwing Ills arms around the young
artist, he exclaimed: My son, I paint
uo more.
FROM GREAT LAKES
TO THE ROCKIES
WOMEN SINQ THI    PRAISZS
DODO'S KIDNEY  PILL8
OF
Plan for a Larger Milk Yield
What virtue Is thero In hereditary
when It comes to abundant milk production per cow? .Many a dairyman
notices a cow is good, her heifers may
turn out good milkers, sometimes they
do not. What Is tht* trouble] Apart
from such considerations as feed,
rare and health, look for one moment
at the possible value of the sire. If
the cows bred to a particular bull
have dropped good milking progeny;
lhat bull camo from good milking
ancestry. There Is the virtue of heredity worth thousands of dollars to
our dallying Industry. The melancholy reflection Is that scores of theso
good milkers can be traced to sires
that have been sold for beef long be-
"foro their real value had become
known.
Every dairyman who 13 doing anything at testing his individual cows,
and all Progressive dairymen appreciate the far reaching benefits of such
study, knows that it would be worth
at least 1,200 pounds of milk extra per
eow to secure Ihe right bull. All
members of cow testing associations
should co-operate ln the purchase of
good pur. bred sires, changing them
round after two years in one section,
aud prove thereby the immense value
of heredity In Iheir own herds.
Saskatchewan Lady Adda Her Testimony to What Has Already Been
Said of the Great Work Dodd's Kidney Pills are Doing.
Caesarvllle, Bask.    (Special)—The
scarcity of female help in a new country subjects the women of tho prairies to unusual strain, and careful observation has established the fact that
this si lain first mak ; Itself felt In
the kidneys.   For this reason Dodd's
Kidney Pills are making an enviable
reputation from the Great Lake* to
the foothills of tho Rockies.
Everywhere you will find women
singing the praises ot the great Canadian kidney remedy that haa banished their pains and weariness, and
brought them back to health. Among
the many Is Mrs. Edgar Cowen, an
estimable lady ot this place. *
"I havo found Dodd's Kidney Pills
very beneficial," Mrs. Cowen states.
"If anything I can say will help any
sufferer 1 am glad to add my testimonial to what has already been said."
The kidneys strain all tho refuse
material out of the blood. If they
aro out of order this refuse remainB ln
the blood, and becomes poison. That's
why Bound kidneys mean pure blood
nnd good health. Dodd's Kidney
Pills make sound kidneys.
Most Infanta ore Infested by worms,
which cause great suffering, and if
not promptly dealt with may cause
constitutional weaknesses difficult Io
remedy. Miller's Worm Powders
will clear tiie stomach and bowels of
worms antl will so act upon (lie system that tllBt will he no recurrence
of tlio troujle. Aud not only this,
but Ihey will r.palr the Injuries to
the organs that worms cause aud restore them to soundness.
W
He Wouldn't Do
were going along ut
^^^^^^^ nwful
speed, he suid, 1 didn't see the dog,
but I heard his ld-yl, so I ordered the
chauffeur to slop.     doing hack, we
-found an irate woman standing over
her dead dog—ouo of the ugliest dogs
you ever snw. She met us with a
tirade of strong remarks, telling
us ln no uncertain terms what she
thought or us and motorists iu general. Finishing up by calling us the
murderers of her dog. It was Ihen
that 1 thought I would pacify her.
Madam, I raid, I will replace your
tone of voice, you flatter yourself.
The Way of '.:
Softie men make fools of themselves
for a pretty girl nnd a lo. of others
don't even havo Hint excuse.
Where C.lleges Fall
Any effort to benefit the nation
must he made through the child. To
enlarge further the scope of agricultural-teaching In the high schools or
the universities will gain but little for
the people. Such effort will but develop the latest talent of the few, who
will soon begin to oxplolt their knowledge for personal ends.
Knowledge acquired after 16 lacks
tho elements of unselfishness. Such
knowledge tends toward self centering ends. It is a waste to givo more
to Institutions for higher learning, for
they have already proved themselves
Inadequate ln developing a conscious
citizenship..
The college graduate Is uot always
a desirable attachment to a working
community. Expert knowledge we
must have, but the expert who has
hot learned through doing, lacks balance, the soul ballast that streams of
sweat and corded muscles give to the
man who equalizes life through the development of both the mental and physical self, a life rounded by experience and contact with actualities.
The Printer Pirates
An instalment agent had sold an
album lo every mau in tho composing
room. The terms were 25 cents down
and 23 cents a week, albums delivered
ou tho flrst payment. We all
promptly sold or hooked our albums
and declined to pay even the flrst
weekly Instalment. The agent as a
last resort decided to complain to
tho foreman. Ilo came into the office about 8 p.m. aud the foreman
spied him as ho entered tho composing room.
Boys, said tlie boss printer ln a
tone loud enough for every oue ln
tho room to hear, why are we like
pirates?
We nil gavo It up.
Because, announced the boss, we'll
give _ho album man no quarter.
The nlbum mail turned and , left
and wo saw him no more.
Doing
Wl
i Man's Part
aro you doing for our Cause?
ashed a suffragette worker,
Doing, replied the man. I am
supporting ono of your most enthusiastic members.
Lost Caste
Thrre generations will think I nm
tbo President ot the Ananias Club,
the shade of General Sherman moodily remarked.
What's Ibe matter? nsked Napoleon.
Why Carnegie has abolished war:
nnd Ilio theologians have abolished ■
hell, replied Sherman.
ASK
YOUR
DEAI.EH
IOR
SNAP
THE HANDY HAND CLEANER
Keep o can ot your ofiice, worlcrlion or
home. Ahv_v9 uncful, ruHisc]it!c, cood
for your bauds, AU Dealer. Bell Snap.
SNAP C0MPUIY, LIMITED, ■ tU-ntr-.l.
A number of men gathered ln tho
smoking car of a train from Littlo
Hock lo another point In Arkansas
were talking of the food best calculated to sustain health.
One Arkansan, a stout, florid man,
with short, gray hair and a self-satls-
iled air, was holding forth In great
style.
Look at mo! hn exclaimed. Never
hnd u day's sickness Iu my life. All
duo to slmplo food. Why gents,
from tho time I was twenty to wheu
I reached forty I lived a regular life.
None of these cffemlnato delicacies
for me. No late hours. Every dny,
summer nnd wluter, I went to hod at
0; got up nt 6. Lived principally on
corned beef and corn bread. Worked
hard, gents—worked hard from 8 to
1. Then dinner; plain dinner; then
an hour's exercise, nnd then—
Excuse me, Interrupted the stranger, who had remained fiilent, but
what were you in for?
Dicing on Books
With the exception of minerals lt
Is difficult for one to find on the
earth's surface substances that do
not tempt the appetite ot some sort
of animal. The list of (Jueer articles
of diet Includes the earth, which is
munched with satisfaction by the
clay eater, and the walrus hide, which
the Eskimo relishes as much as John
Bull his joint ot beet.
It Is not generally known, however, that men, as well as mice and
bookworms have eaten dinners that
have consisted only of books.
In 1370 Barnado de Vlscontl compelled two Popal delegates to eat the
bull of excommunication which they
had brought him, together with its
silken cords and leaden seal. As the
bull was written an parchment, not
paper, It was all the more difficult
to digest.
There was also an American general who had signed a note for 2,000
florins, and when lt fell due compelled
his creditors to eat it. The Tartars, when books fall into their possession, eat them, that they may acquire the knowledge contained ln
them.
A Scandinavian writer, the author
of a political book, was compelled to
choose between being beheaded or
eating his manuscript boiled ln broth.
Izaac Volmar, who wrole some spicy
satires against Bernard, Duke of Saxony, was not allowed the courtesy of
the kitchen, but was forced to swallow Ihem uncooked.
Still worse was the fate of Philip
Oldenburger, a Jurist of great renown
who was condemned not only to eat
a pamphlet of his writing, but also
to be flogged during his repast with
orders that the flogging should not
cease until h" had swallowed the
last crumb.
A ring at tho telephone drew the
office boy,
Lady to talk to you sir, he said to
tho senior partner.
The Benlor partner took up the receiver and stood at tho phone for several minutes.
Then he laid tho receiver down
and went back to his desk.
Twenty minutes later ho raised tho
receiver, said a few words and presently hung lt up.
Then ho turned to his partner,
It was my wife, he explained, sho
was still talking and hadn't missed
i mo.
W. N. U- SGI
The Foolish One—Just waltl Sho
She'll catch hor husband flirting somo
day.
Tho Wise Ono—That's how sho did
catch him.
Quotations That are Wrong
Some of the most frequently used
quotations are not quotations at all,
but in 'many cases convey the opposite meaning of the original wording.
Fenlmoro Cooper, for Instance,
thought ho was quoting from the Bible when he spoke of nn Inscription
being bo devised that he who runs
may read, signifying that lt was easier to run than read.
If Cooper had looked ln his Bible
he would have found ln ths book of
Ilabakuk that the passage he tried
to quote was: Write the vision and
make It plain that he may run that
readeth it. Tlie vision was a warning : nd the reader was to flee from
danger, but the Cooper version has
survived tho original and practically
put it out ot use.
A popular chronic misquotation Is
that of tho passage ln Hudlbras,
which says: He that compiles against
his will Is of the same opinion still.
Authors and public speakers without
number havo twisted that Into: A man
convinced ngainst his will Is of the
same opinion still, forgetting tbat a
man who was convinced could not
possibly remain of the same opinion
for it he was of the s-ime opinion he
would not bo convinced.
Theodore Itoosevclt publicly declared that Washington In his farewell address said: To he prepared tor war
Is the most effective means to promote
peace. But tbe lirst President said
nothing of tho Bort in his farewell
address. In his first message to Congress ho said: To bo prepared for war
Is ono of the most effective means of
preserving pence, and he spoke of other menus as well.
Novelists do not scorn to be very
strong ln their knowledge of the
Scriptures somehow, and Sir Walter
Scott, In 'The Heart of Midlothian,'
attempts to point a moral with the
words: Our slmplo and unpretending
heroine had the merit of those peacemakers lo whom lt Is promised ns n
benediction that they shall Inherit the
onrthi The fact Is that the peacemakers did not receive any such promise, but It Is said that the meek
shall Inherit the earth.
ONTARIO  WOOD  SUPPLIES
Light Thrown on Forest and Trade
Conditions by  New  Government
Bulletin
Ovor 1200 wood-using Industries In
Ontario contributed the data for a bulletin on this industry now being Issued by the Forestry Branch, Ottawa.
Thirty four different klnda of wood
are being used by these industries
and the detallsd Information regarding the various use* to which suoh
woods are put, should be of considerable value not only to the manufacturer by showing new means of waste
disposal, but also to tho house holder
by indicating what native woods are
best fitted to replace tbe more expensive Imported stock, for interior decoration, furniture and flooring.
Tho bulletin also shows Incidentally the Increasing poverty of Ontario
with regard to the moro valuable work
woods. Almost halt ot the thirty-
four kinds of wood- used are obtained
principally from outside sources and
three and one half million dollars aro
annually Bent out of the province for
Importod wood stock. The Imported
oak alone costs one million six hundred thousand dollars annually, for
this tree has become commercially
extinct ln Ontario while the hickory
and chestnut groves of southern Ontario have also, almost entirely disappeared. Even good clear white
pine Is becoming hard to obtain and
Its market valua is steadily rising for
it represents twenty one per cent
of the total wood consumption ln Ontario for industrial purposes.
Of more interest to the Bmall consumer of wood-products are the side
lights the bulletin throws on the possibility of substituting cheap home
grown woods for the expensive foreign species now used so extensively.
Recent tests made of their physical
properties havo demonstrated the suitability for certain purposes of many
native species, hitherto despised by
tho dealers. For hardwood flooring
ln place* of the oak and maple now
In general use, may be substituted the
home grown birch and beech which
take a high polish and havo tha advantage ef being considerably cheap
er. Likewise for Interior finishing,
the expensive oak can be very closely
Imitated by stained black ash and
stained birch Is almost Indistinguishable from mahogany, while stained
red gum requires an expert to distinguish lt from the costly Circassian
walnut. The now expensive white
pine is being replaced, where durability Is not a requisite, by the cheaper
spruce, basswood and elm. Poplar
and balsam fir are two of tho most
common trees ln Ontario and that
they have wider uses Is evident from
the fact that poplar Is highly valued
for h-.rdwopd flooring in Manitoba
while balsam fir is perhaps the most
widely used native species In. the
Maritime provinces.
The bulletin also indicates the existence of a market In Ontario for
sumac, apple and cherry logs. The
lumber cut from them being worth
$30, $46.50, and $44.60 per thousand
feet board measure respectively. The
Forestry Branch has already been instrumental ln securing sales of the
wood of worn out apple orchards and
Is desirous ot further'serving the public along these lines. Tho bulletin
on The Wood-using Industries of On
tnrlo can be had gratis from the Forestry Branch, Department ot the Interior, Ottawa. A similar report
dealing with tlie Maritime Provinces
will appear shortly.
ARROW and
NITDO CLUB
Mads in
Canada
V^HAT do you pay for in shot-  —    -___?-»__«*rg*- -*.'
*' shells?    Why, plainly for shooting
quality which means accurate loads, uniformity, sura
fire, care and experience in tho making.
Then specify Remington-UMC—Canadian made, from our new
factoiy at Windsor, Ontario. Arrow or NitroClub amoLel--- loads.
Slightly higher in coat—mora reliable in the field.
Wo wilt bo gl.il to lend a booklet explaining .imply many led,ni.-.l point, nf
nmon Dutauiactura,   Vour n-ino aad ac.-i.___ on a post-call! bung, it hy im
Remington-Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Windsor, Ontario
1WP
'A Belter Cup of Tea■
More of Them to the Pound
I bought iMiorse with a supposedly
Incurable rlngbono for $30. Cured
him with $1.00 wortli ot MINARD'S
LINIMENT and sold htm for $85.00.
Profit on Liniment, $54.00.
MOIS1. riEROSCH.
Hotel Keeper, St. Phillippe, Que.
Pro,—They   sny   lightning    never
strikes twice In the Bame placo.
Kolin—Well, what's the use!
Son of the house to caller—I want
to see you 'cos father says you mado
yourself.
Caller—Yes, my lad, and I am proud
ot lt.
Son of tho house—B-but why did
you do It like that?
Major Bangstlck (of Indian Army)
Tell your scoutmaster tbat now I'm
home I shall bo pleased to help him,
It he'd like It, with field work and so
on.
Horace—Thanks, awfully, da., but
—er—are you quite ttp-to-dato7 Drills
nre altered a lot since you woro home
lift.
Novel Musketry Practice
A report comes from Vienna of the
utilisation ot the cinematograph for
Instruction ln musketry. The firing
squad Is posted In front of a cinematograph screen, and a moving colored
picture of the battlefield Is thrown on
lt from behind them. Each man has
to pick up his target, tako aim and
fire. When a Bhot Is fired the film
stops for a second, and the hole made
by the builet ln the-screon Is Illuminated by a flashlight behind lt, which
shows the position of tlio hit with
reference to tha target.
Answered
Pa, what Is meant by Idle curiosity?
A very good example of Idle curiosity
my Bon, is a twelve-dollar a week
shoe clerk asking the price ot f.uto-
mobile tiros.
The equator Is an Imaginary line,
running around the earth, said the
boy who likes to tell what ho has
learned at school.
An Imaginary lino, repeated the
great railway financier, absent-mindedly.      Who Is promoting lt?
Aunt—How's this, Bobby? I hear
that tbe Utile boy next door gets promoted at school much ofteucr than you
do.
Bobby—Well, his father's a promoter.
' A Sure Remedy
The story Is told tnat wnon M.
Polncalre, iho new president of the
French Republic, first entered politics
one of Ills political opponents taunted
him with his youthfulnes3.
I may be young, M. Polncalre replied, but I promise you that Bomo*
thlng shall be done every day to
wipe out that disadvantage.
Try Murine  Eye Remedy
It you have Red, Weak, Watery Eyes
or Granulated Eyelids, Doesn't Smart
—Soothes Eye Pain, Druggists Bell
Murine Eyo Remedy, Liquid, 25e, 50c.
Murine Eye Salve In Aseptio Tubes,
25c,  50c,    Eyo Books Free by Mail,
Aa T.a Tanta 0. .* !•- All Eyas lhat tt... Cara
Murine Ers K--oa<l» ■*)»•• Chloatt
POISONOUS MATCHES ARE PASSING AWAY
Dangerous chemicals are net used In tipping EDDY'S Ses-qul Safe Light matches.
See that you get EDDY'S tnd no ether
"Just as good."
Safety—In Ita complete sense—Is abso
lutely guaranteed, but vou must ask for
EDDY'S new
Your
Dealer
Has Them
"Ses-qui"
Matches
Correcting the Answer
At a horse-stealing trial out west a
Jury was gathered and shut up in a
room after a brief trial, and when an
hour had gone by a mob burst in and
unceremoniously demanded what the
verdict waB.
Not guilty, Bald the foreman.
That won't do, eald the leader ot
the mob fiercely. You will have to
do better than that. And he shut
the jury up again.
In half an hour tho door was opened once more.
Well, gents, your verdict, said the
leader.
Guilty, the foreman replied,
There were hurrah from tho crowd
and the leader said:
Correct. You can go now. We
strung bim up an hour ago.
Potatoes and Power
One forsees the triumph of the potato, unforseen by William Cobbett,
not so much as a food, but as a means
ot motion. Coal Is giving out; petrol Is going up ln price and down ln
production. Tho supply ot both Is
limited anc.must come to nn end, but
thero com.-s the cheer that alcoTiol
will be tho motive force ot the future.
Petrol and coi*l may give out, but tho
earth will always grow potatoes. Potatoes can produco alcohol and alcohol can drive engines. In the potato we seem to have discovered tho
secret of perpetual motion.
Real Gratitude
Pessimists declare that tho days of
gay romance v.ro dead—that there Is
no spirit of chivalry left ln the
br.asts of the men of modern times.
They are all wrong. Hero we have
the story in the dally papers that a
man ln Ohio left, all his money to the
girl who refused to marry him years
ago.     That's gratitude for youi
Hard to Tell
There were a lot of old shoes on
the street when I went out this uiorn-
.lug.
Wedding or a cat fight, do you suppose?
Altrulatlo
Bose—He said ho would kiss mo or
die ln the attempt.
Marie—Well?
Rose—He has no life-insurance, and
I pitied his poor old mother.
Why don't women dress sensibly?
It they did, halt tho Industries of
the world would go to smash.
Another One on Twain
Mark Twain at a dinner at tha
Author. Club, said: Speaking ot
fresh eggs, I am reminded ot the
town of Squash. In my early lecturing daya I went to Squash to lecture
ln Temperance Hall, arriving In ths
afternoon. The town seemed poorly
billed. I thought I'd find out If the
peoplo knew anything nt all about
what was In 6tore for them. So I
turned ln at the general store. Good
afternoon, friend, 1 said to the general
storekeeper. Any entertainment
hero tonight to help a stranger while
away the evening? The general
storekeeper, who was Bortlng mackerel, Btralghtened up, wiped his briny
hands on his apron and said: I expect there's going to be a lecture, I
been selling eggs all day.
Comfort for the Dyspeptic—Thero
Is no ailment bo harassing and exhausting as dyspepsia, which arises
from defective action of tho stomach
and liver, nnd the victim of it Is to
be pitied. Yet ho ean find ready relief In Parmelee's Vegetabl. Pills, a
preparation that has established Itself
by years of effective uso. There aro
pills that aro widely advert ised as
tlio greatest iver compounded, bul
not one ot them can rank in value
with Parmelee's.
Her Portrait
~The painstaking artist, anxious to
please, romarked to prospective customer:
I can paint you a portrait of your
wifo which will be a speaking likeness.
H'm. Couldn't you do lt ln what
they caU still life?
It may be better to give than to
receive, but few of us nro In a position to keep lt up indefinitely.
Good Advice
A young lawyer who has recently
hung out his shingle here, was retained by a criminal with $5 und a
vory poor defense.
Well, you got a ease, son, said his
proud father.
Yob, dad.
And what advice did you give your
client?
After listening to his story I collected what money he had and advised him to retain a more experienced lawyer.
The dread of rldleulo extinguish?*
originality in Its birth.
Tired and Weak
Nerves Exhausted
The toolings of fatlgtn* and languor,ness or social'world.
which overcome so many peoplo at
this season of the year tell of tho exhausted condition ot the nerves.
It is Impossible to keep up the act-
Ion ot tho heart and the vitality of
the nerves when tho blood Is thin
and watery, and this lt why nearly
everybody needs tonlo treatment in
tho spring.
Some ot the symptoms are restlessness,  purposeless activity,  Insomnia, _—_..._
absen't-mlndednesB, tired gait, lack of! supplies In condensed form
ambition  and enthusiasm, headache I gredlents     required,    and
More and more men nnd women
aro obliged to so-k tbo assistance of
such concentrated foods as Dr.
Chase's Nerve Food to restore vitality
to the tired and worn-out nerves.
Such treatmont Is necessi.ry, because dlsenBee of tho nerves do not
right themselves. As nerve force
runs low tho dlgesilvo system falls l"
extract the necessary nutrition from
tlie food. Dr. Chase's Nerve Food
tbe In*
restorea
and neuralglo  paint,  dyspepsia nnd j health. ^^^^^^^
feelings of languor and depression. A little patlenco Is nceessar- In
Monotony ot work and mental over- treating diseases of the nerves and
strain or worry sap the nervous sys- rest helps to restore strength, You
tern, es doos also the Btrcnuousness ■. can be ..uro of lasting beneficial root modern lite, whether ln the bus!-1 suits when you use
Dr. Chase's Nerve Food
EO cents a box.
for (2 .60 at all deal ers,    or Edmanson,
Limited, Toronto.
Bates   _    Co., IHB, 1»__A^KK,'C-M1J1!.K1*A1,<---
NEW
WATERPROOFS
Waterproofs .or Ladies
We are sole agents here for the celebrated
"Cow" Coats, of London, England. Ladies'
Fawn Waterproof Coats at prices from
$5 75 to $18.50. The Makers' guarantee is
back of every coat we sell.
Girls'& Misses'Waterproof Capes
In shades of fawn, navy and cardinal. The
most useful garment a girl can wear, especially in this climate.   The prices are from
#3.75 to #5-50 for the largest size .
New Millinery
Our Showroom is rapidly assuming a Fall
appearance. Shipment after shipment o
Exclusive Millinery are arriving, and our
prices are very reasonable. Infants', Girls'
and Misses' Hats are here galore. You are
invited to inspect our stock.
FALL SWEATER COATS
B   One of tlie largest shipments of Sweaters and Sweater Coats
|   have just arrived, including such well known brands as ''The
Monaroh" and Penman's.both good and reliable lines. Already
the evenings are chilly and cold.  Protect yourself and e comfortable by wearing one of our new ooats.
LADIES' UMBRELLAS
We have a Specially Good Umbrella to show you at*l,25.
At *2.25 you can have your choice of a rare assortment of
Handles with Splendid Coverings.
New Dress Goods for Evening Wear
in a Number of New Shades.
Simon Leiser & Co.
LIMITED
"The Big Store"
00 Stock
Consisting of Ready -to-Wear
Clothing, Dress Goods, Ladies'
Silk Waists, Hosiery, Boots and
Shoes,Smallware,Hardware,etc.
10 per cent discount for Five Days
SATURDAY 13th UNTIL THE 17th
C. Ching Chong
CHINATOWN,   West  Cumberland
ABSOLUTELY
The Latest in
Fall Hats
Your Choice of London, Paris
and New York
Models.
Dency Smith
Milliner
Courtenay, B.C.
Get your Cleaning,
Pressing, Repairing
and  Shoe  Shining
done by the
CUMBERLAND
CLEANERS
Next door to the Bank of Commerce.
WATEK NOTICE.
Application for a Licence to
take and use and to store or pen
back water will be made under
the "Water Act" of British Col
umbia as follows:—
1. The name of the applicant is
The CanadianCollieries Dunsmuir
Limited.
2. The address of the applicant
isPemberton Block,Victoria,B.C.
3. The name of the stream is
Boston Creek. The stream has
its source in un-named mountain,
flows in a south easterly direction
and empties into Comox Lake
about 2 3-4 miles from east end of
lake.
4. The water is to be diverted
from the stream on the east side
about 1 3-4 miles from its mouth.
5. The purpose for which the
water will be used is domestic.
6. The land on which the water
is to be used is described as foi
lows: Bevan Town andNo.7Mine.
7. The quantity of water applied for is as follows : 2 cubic feet
per second.
8. The quanty of water to be
stored is sixty-six thousand gallon
9. The reservoir site is located
on Supply Creek, 5,000 feet from
No. 7 Mine.
10. This notice was posted on the
the ground on the Fifth day of
September, 1913.
11. A copy of this notice and
an application pursuant thereto
and to the requirements of the
"Water Act" will be filed in the
office of the water Recorder at
Cumberland. Objections may be
filed with the said WaterRecorder,
or with the Comptroller of water
Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited
By (Signed) W. L. Coulson
SEALED TENDERS addressed to tho
underpinned, and endorsed "Tolider
Jetty and Dredaing at ihe Ni.rlh Aim nf
Fraaer River, li 0 ," will ho received
at this i dice until 4 p m. Tuesday, September 30, 1913, for the e natriiotinn of
jatty and Dredging; nt the North Ann of
the Fraser River, B.C.
Plans, specilicatiuna'»nd form of contract can be seen and forma of tender
obtainod at iho i llicos of C. C. Worafuld,
E q. Distriot E dinner, Now Westminister; H.C.: W. Z. Earle, Esq., Dialricl
Bnjzii ear, Winnipeg, Man.; J. S. Mac
Uchlmi, E '|., District Engineer, Vio-
oria, li C.; J. L. Michaud, Esq,, D strict
Engineer, PostOflioe Buildings, M intrea),
I'.Q } ,i (I Sin., E«q , Dl.trletEngineer,
Confederation Life Building, Toronto,
Out., and f<n application to the Post*
master at Vancouver, B C.
Parson tendering are notified that tend
ara wiil not ba considered unless nude
on tlio printed forms supplied, and signed with their actual signatures, stating
their occupations and places of residence.
iu the case of linns, the actual signature,
ihe nature of tlio occupation and place of
residence of each member of tho lirni
must ho givon.
Each tender muat be accompancd by
an accepted ch(quo on a chartered b.ok,
payable to the older of the Honourable
lie Miniater of Public Works of Canada
equal to Hue per cent of tho amount of
•he tender, which will be f rfoited if the
person tendering de line* to enter into
a coutract when called upon to do so, or
fail to complete tho woik contracted for.
if the tender be not accepted the cheque
#ill he totuined.
Tho Department does not bind itself to
iccept, tlio lowest or any tender.
By ordi r,
R C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
O tawa, August IH, 11112
Newspapers »ill  not be   paid f rthis
advertisement  if they insert it without
authority from tlie department.—16074.
Synopsis uf Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of thu Dominion
... Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, tho Northwest Torri
tories and iu a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may bo leased for a term
of twenty-olio years ar au annual rental of
SI ao aero. Not more I ban 2,500 acres
will be leased to ouo applicant.
Application for a lease must be made battle applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
lo surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions
of sections, and in uusurveyod territory
thei race applied for shall be staked out by
theapp'icatlt himself.
Ko-h application must be accompanied
by a fee of gfi v. Inch will be refunded if the
li.-hls applied forara not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on tlie
merchantable oui put of the mine at the
rate tf live cents per tun,
Tlio person operating tlio mine shall
furnish the Agent wilh sworn returnsac-
eouoiing for the full quantity of merch-
antablecoal mined and pay tlio royalty
thereon. If tho c> al itiiniag rights are
not being operated, such rut urns shall bo
furnished at least once a yoar.
Tho lease will include tbo cnal mining
lights only, hut the I ssao may ha permitted to purchase whatever available sur
faco rigbta may he considered necessary
fortha w< irkiltgof the miueat the rate of
$10 00.tna.r_i,
For full information application should
ho mado to the Secretary of tlie Depigment of the lntetinr, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub Airint if Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N R- Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will nut be; aid for.
TIMBER SALE X 58.
Sealed tenders will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later than noon on the 29th day of
September, 1913, for the purchase
of Licence X 58, to cut 1,750,000
feet of timber on the area immediately north of Lot 1431,
Range 1, Coast District, on the
east side of Cadero Channel.
Two years will be allowed for
the removal of the timber.
Particulars of H. R. MacMillan
chief Forester, Victorta, B. c.
TIMBER SALE'X47,
Sealed tenders will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later
than noon on the 18th day of
October, 1913, for the purchase
of Licence X47, to cut 1,720,000
feet of timber on Lot 2747, situated nearLund.NewWestminister
District.
Two years will be allowed for
the removal of the timber.
Particulars of Chief Forester,
Victoria, B.C.
■Ml
-^-sei
TIMBER SALE X118.
Sealed tenders will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later
than noon on the 26th day of
September, 1913, for the purchase
of Licence X118, to cut 90,000
feet of timber on the area immediately south of Timber Licence
37469, Bute Inlet.
One year will be allowed for
the removal of the timber,
Particulars of Chief Forester,
Victoria, B.C.
NOTICK
Cumberland    and    Unmon
Water Works Co., Ltd,
Sprinkling will be allowed
only t\vo nights a week, viz.
Tuesday und Friday, from 7
till   9  o'clock in  the evening.
Leaky tups must be attend-
to at once.
Any changes or additions to
existing piping must be sanctioned by the Company.
By order.
L. W. Nunns,    Sec.
Cumberland, B. 0.
Inly  29th,   1913.
New Townsite-No. 8 Mine
This consists of Eighty Acres, half of quarter section 228
thu Canadian Colliery owning tho other half on which
the main shaft and saw mills are situate, so that it is
well situated being close to business operations antl
absolutely inside property.
Price of Lots S150 and upwards, on easy terms.
Vancouver
Island
Farms ami
Acreage
Specialist.
Apply: HARRY IDIENS
British Columbia nvestments
Limited
Courtenay, B. C.
TBLBPHONB   30
Vancouver
I-lanil
Farms and
Acreage
Specialists
ill
BUY A LOT IN
terminal
Centre of Town |
Subdivision «-.:.**
■—    ~"    '       ——'— - an_ up.
The Island Realty Co.
Fire, Life, Live Stock P. L. ANDERTON.
. . Accident. Phone 32.     Courtenay, B. C.
M*
" The Magnet Cash Store"
STOVES
HARDWARE
FURNITURE
SOLE
AGENT
FOR EDISON AND
COLUMBIA   PHONOGRAPHS
ALSO GOODYEAR NON-SKID
PNEUMATIC AUTOMOBILE TIKES
1 eL^«l3i\ 1   Cei
Phone
Cumber.and, B.C.
THK
G.A.Fletciier MusicCo 1
p
ittnos, Pluyer Pianos,
(Jol n ml) i it Graplia-
pliones uiul Records
Edison  Records und
Mttclli lll'S—i-n.ee.fr4A- -•
Tlie McKinley Edition of Ton Cent Music
NANAIMO,
Special.1/.
b. c;
Wanted to Rent, a four roomed
house, by end of September.—
Apply Box 430, c.o. Islander,
SILKS SILKS SIL-ECS
We have al) kinds of Silks imported direct
from Japan ; Cream, Blue, White, Pink and
Grey. Price 65c. to $1.25 per yard.
Pongf ;e Silk, 55c. to $1.50 per yard.
K. ABE  &  COMPANY
f->v nsmtiir Avenue1* Cumberland, I", C.

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