BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Islander Aug 21, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342428.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342428.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342428-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342428-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342428-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342428-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342428-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342428-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342428-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342428.ris

Full Text

Array *l*ttber
!*>/
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
legislation Library
VOL. VI., No. 21       THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY. AUG. 21. 1915.       Subscription price, $1.50 per year
TARIFF ON FUEL OIL DISCUSSED AT PUBLIC MEETING
One of the most important
public meetings which has been
held in this district for a long
time was held in the City Hall on
the evening of August 18th, the
object being to discuss the
demand for the imposition of a
duty on fuel oil. The hall was
filled to capacity, indicating a
lively public interest in the question.
Mayor Parnham, in the chair,
called the meeting to order, and
after a few general remarks called upon the first speaker, Mr.
Thos. E. Bate.
Mr. Bate lamented the fact
that the fuel oil question was so
little understood by the public.
The war and other causes were
blamed for a larger share of the
hard times than they were really
responsible for. Fuel oil, in fact,
is the bitterest enemy of the coal
mines. The provincial newspapers did not deal fairly with
the subject, but quoting from one
editorial he read that the business depression in British Columbia was due almost entirely to
the paralysis of the coal mining
industry, which was due in its
turn to the importation of fuel
oil duty free, while the power to
deal with the situation rested
entirely with the Dominion Government.
It was his opinion that the fuel
oil interests had been a little too
strong heretofore. He was one
of a deputation which waited on
the Premier of British Columbia
earlier, in the year, and they
thought they had made a good
impression, i and that he would
use his influence h} favor of putting on the duty. But immediately afterwards a deputation
from the users of fuel oil also
waited on the Premier to protest
against the proposed duty, and
he was alarmed to note that the
deputation included some of the
wealthiest and most influencial
men in the province.
All foodstuffs, clothirg and
-other necessaries of life to the
ordinary citizen were subject to
duty, but fuel oil, which was
used almost entirely by wealthy
corporations, came, in duty free
in competition with coal, which
was the means of so many peoples
livelihood.
It is necessary for us all to
stand together on this question,
and the government must be
given to understand that we want
relief and mean to have it. Personally, Mr. Bate said, he had
been a Conservative all his life,
but this was a question of bread
and butter, and he for one was
not going to sacrifice his bread
and butter to party politics. He
would like to see party politics
forgotten, and everyone in the^
commun ty to get together and
fight under the banner of a "Duty
on Fuel Oil Party."
At the conclusion of Mr. Bate's
remark* there were some interruptions from a few people in the
audience who seemed to be a
little uncertain about what the
meeting was called for, and
wanted to bring forward other
matters. The Chairman insisting
on confining discussion to the
fuel oil question.
Mr. Thompson asked if the
C.P.R. claimed to be using oil on
account of the labor troubles in
the coal mines.
Mr. Bates replied that the strike
had nothing to do with it. The
C.P.R. took to using it because
it was cheaper. The strike gave
them a good excuse, however.
Mr. McMillan* said he had come
to voice his own sentiments only.
He compared conditions in Cumberland today with conditions
which obtained four years ago,
when it was the most prosperous
coal mining town in the province.
While admitting the share which
the war had had in bringing
about the change he claimed that
the principal blame must be
blamed on the free importation of
fuel oil. He quoted statistics
from the latest report of the
Minister of Mines, showing the
big decrease in the production of
coal. As compared with 1911
there was a decrease in 1914 of
644,416 tons. That amount of
coal would have kept the Comox
mines working steadily night and
day to the limit of capacity for
the entire year.
The C.P.R., he said, was the
greatest consumer of fuel oil and
the strongest opponent of a duty
on oil; yet the C.P.R. when it
was being built received no less
than 125 millions of the people's
money to help them along, none
of which had yet been paid back.
Now they are taking away our
livelihood. It is not true that
the C.P.R. was forced to turn to
oil because the strike prevented
it from getting coal. He, himself,
had ridden, behind an oil-burning
locomotive on the C. P. R. three
years before the strike began.
The only way to secure a return
of prosperty was to insist on the
Government putting a duty on
fuel oil, and if the government
would not do that it should be
turned out of office.
He did not come as a representative of the Conservative
Association, although he was the
president of that body, but he
would say what the association
had done. They had passed a
resolution'ten months ago which
had been sent to all members of
the Dominion and Provincial
parliaments and governments
throughout the country, and had
been doing everything in their
power ever since to secure favorable action on their resolution.
But there is so much business at
Ottawa that it is a hard matter to
get anything of this kind properly
before the government, which
makes it all the more necessary
for everyone who is irterested
either directly or indirectly to
give their help.
Mr. O'Connell said the meeting
had been called by the Boaid of
Trade for the specific purpose of
an effort to obtain protection for
the working men of the country
from unfair foreign competition.
The coal industry, he said, was
vital to the province, and was to
day in a state of* serious decline.
The only reason fuel oil had not
yet seriously affected the eastern
provinces was because freight
rates were too high. He wished
his hearers to understand that
there was a live Board of Trade
in Cumberland which was not
tied to any company or political
party, and he wanted the working men to join. The board had
taken up the fuel oil question
vigorously a year ago and was
working on it continually. But
a point had been reached where
it was found necessary to start a
a public campaign to get more
support.    A resolution would be
presented to provide funds for
such a campaign. Nothing unreasonable is being asked for,
simply such a measure of protection as will give us a chance
to exist.      c
E. T. Searle was the next
speaker, and began by describing
the general apathy and indifference which was the chief drawback in the way of a successful
prosecution of the campaign for
a duty on fuel oil. Illustrating
the point with an anecdote, he
declared that the attitude of the
public at large seemed to be one
of "Don't know and don't care;"
while in fact they were face ta
face with a serious danger.
The speaker produced some
telling statistics taken from government reports, but presented
in an entirely novel and very illuminating way, which may be
given in a condensed form as
follows:
Taking the Coast District—that
is, Vancouver Island and Nicola
—the year 1911 was marked by
the largest total output of coal
since coal mining began in those
fields, viz., 1,855,661 tons. In
the year 1914 the output dropped
to 1,211,245 tons, a decrease of
34.7 per cent. In the year 1914
the amount of fuel oil which was
marketed in competition with
Coast District coal (not the total
amount imported into the Province) was equivalent to 448,447
tons of coal, which is 24.2 per
cent of the total output of coal in
the big year of 1911. The- unavoidable conclusion is that if oil
had not been available as a competitor of coal the output of coal
in 1914 would have been only 10.5
per cent below the record breaking output of 1911. That 10.5 per
cent decrease is accounted for by
various causes acting together,
but it is evident that fuel oil is
d6ing far more harm than all
other causes combined.
The evidence regarding the regular increase in oil consumption
was equally conclusive and interesting. The following short table
shows the extent to which fuel
oil has cut into the coal market:
In 1909 oil captured 1.4 per cent
1910 "       "    ' 1.6 -    "
1911 "       "       4.3       "
Continued on Page Four. TWO
THrJ 1SLANUEK.   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
Sty? Mantor
'Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, AUGUST 21st, 1915.
Union Is Strength.
The public meeting which was
held on the 18th inst. to deal with
the fuel oil question was in some
w:iys very successful, but there
were some things in connection
with it that gave ground for
serious thought.
On the one hand, the large attendance (the hall was crowded)
seems to show that the public is
really waking up at last to the
gravity of the situation. That is
a hopeful sign. Public interest is
the first thing needful and it is
indispensable. Without it there
is not the slightest chance of
success. With it the chances are
excellent.
On the other hand, it was made
■evident that there is an element
amongst us which has not yet realized that the fuel oil question is
something entirely different and
distinct from any political, social
or labor question which has engaged our attention in the past,
•or is troubling us today. That is
a great pity.
If there is one thing which is
quite certain in this connection it
is that neither the people in-California who produce and sell fuel
oil, nor the people in British Columbia who buy and use it, care
one jot for any of the questions
of any kind whatsoever which
have vexed Cumberland since the
beginning of time until now. It
is a business question, pure and
simple. People who use fuel oil
in preference to coal do so because
unit for unit, oil is cheaper than
coal: they save money by using
it. There is really nothing in that
to discuss.
The only thing we have to make
up our minds about is whether
fuel oil is really being used to
such an extent as to be danger-
DRY  GOODS  AND
GENTS'   FURNISHINGS
-SALE-
AT CAMPBELLS
BEGINS SATURDAY, 14TH INST.
This will be the greatest sale in this district's history and will be the
biggest BARGAIN OPPORTUNITY in years to purchase High-Class
Dry Goods and Men's Furnishings at Low Prices. We are going to
deluge our entire store with a distribution of Summer Merchandise for
Men and Women at prices that will be within the reach of everyone.
THIS SALE WILL CONTINUE FOR TEN DAYS ONLY
[See Large Posters.]
ous to our interests, as people
whose livelihood depends upon
the continued prosperity of the
coal mining industry. And on
that point it is difficult to see how
there can be any difference of
opinion in the face of the indisputable evidence furnished by
governmental statistics.
Those statistics have now been
reduced to a point of conciseness
where they show the exact situation at a glance. Thus: the total
coal output in the Coast District
in the year 1914 was equal to 65.3
per cent of the output in the banner year of 1911. The quantity
of fuel oil which was imported in
actual competition with Coast
District coal was equal to 24.2 per
cent of the total coal output in
1911.  Now, 65.3 plus 24.2 is 89.5.
That means that if no oil had
been imported in 1914 the total
coal production would have been
only 10.5 per cent less than the
output in the banner year, instead
of 34.7 per cent as was actually
the case. It means, further, that
the year 1914 would have been
almost as good as the year 1910
and better than the year 1909,
both of which will be remembered
to have been fairly good years. It
means that close on to a million
dollars would have been spent in
wages in the coal towns more than
was actually spent, and the greater part of that million would have
been spent in Cumberland. There
is no escape from these conclusions unless we assume that if
there had been no oil available
the railroads and steamboats and
manufacturers concerned would
have ceased to do business rather
than to burn coal. Perhaps, however, the*y might have run their
machinery with hot air, or with
some of the natural gas which is
so abundant and cheap.
The situation is as though two
men in the middle of a desert had
their whole supply of water in a
leaky barrel; whi,le one man was
trying to stop the leak the other
insisted on discussing the question, "'Arethere men on Mars?"
Meanwhile the precious water
was draining into the sand because it was a two-man job to
stop the leak.
The very life is draining out of
the coal mining industry through
fuel oil competition. If a protective tariff is not imposed there
will soon be no coal mines left in
operation. Let every man, if he
will, keep his own opinion on
other matters, but on this question let us all, in the name of
common sense! get together and
act unitedly. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
SPECIAL LINES IN
WHITE PIQUE
TO-DAY AT
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent (or the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Henderson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty >
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
toriesandina portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for s term
of twentjr-one years st an annual rental of
11 sn sore. Not more than 2,500 aores
will be leased to one applicant
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions
of sections, snd in unsurveyed territory
the traot applied for shall be staked out by
theapplioaut himself.
Eaoh application must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of ther mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for tbe full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year.
The lease will inolude the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purohase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for tbe working of the mine at the rate of
$10.00anaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
Are you taking complete advantage
of your Telephone Service ?
When you wish to communicate with som^ne within your own exchange district, how do you do it ?
By Telephone, of course.
Naturally, because it is the quickest and easiest way.
Do you realize that there are over 40,000 telephones on the lower mainland of British Columbia and Vancouver Island that can be reached in the
same quick and easy way ?
In one minute, one hundred and eighty words can be spoken distinctly
over the telephone. The cost of long distance telephoning is a very small
fraction of a cent per word; besides, the charge includes your answer, which
is received immediately. Between 7 p.m, and 8 a.m. you can talk three times
as long as the day period at the same rate. Appointments may be made at
any time during the day.
Can you afford to write letters and wait for answers when this service
is at your command day and night ?
B. C. Telephone  Co., Ltd.
A Nightshirt Council
The most picturesque war council
known to history took place during
the battle of Mons. Commander-in-
Chief, Sir John French, General Sir
Douglas Hals, and General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, were awakened
with the news that the English forces
were gravely threatened by the Germans. Gathered about their maps in
their nightshirts, they planned out
new movements for the English and
then went back to their beds.
In the morning, as tht Eng'ish
again took up their retreat from Mons,
riir John French all at once broke
out into a hearty laugh.
"What do you see that's funny?"
demanded Sir Douglas Haig.
"I was only thinking how funny
that nightshirt council would look in
a history boo*," replied French.
Soldier's Queer Biscuits
The Indian and Australian can
make their own army biscuits; the
former is a "chupatty," the latter
"damper.' A chupatty results from
the mixing into a stiff paste by an
Indian of flour, salt and water, and
baking it on a metal dish over a hot
fire. But the Indian cook seems a
necessary ingredient to make it trsty
as well as nutritious.
Damper needs flour, baking powder,
water and wood. A hole in the
ground is tne oven. Fill it with your
wood, and while that is burning make
yrur dou*'., then Uv it on a large
stone, cover it with a tin, and cover
the tin with the hot wood ashes, and
tho resalt will be damper.
A Gallant Ghurka
The famoms Queen's Own Guides
are considered one of the finest bodies
of Indian troops serving under the
British flag. An anecdote illustrative
of their devoted gallantry can be told.
In an expedition against a troublesome
tribe of hill robbers a littlo party of
the Guides, twenty-five in number,
with an English officer in command,
had rushed c e of the enemy's san-
gars (a sort of rifle-pit, built up 'with
loose stones) and held possession of
tt. But the enemy were still in strong
force in the immediate vicinity, and
it was apparent that anyone leaving
the shelter would be   hot.
A Ghurka trooper stepped forward
and, saluting his officer said, "Sahib,
we mustn't stop here all day. I will
jump on the top of the parapet; they
will fire at me, and we shall be able
to rush on them before they can load
again."
So saying, the gallant fellow sprang
on the parapet, and, defiantly waving
his sword, shouted insulting epithets
at the enemy, who, boiling over with
rage, all discharged their muskets at
the Ghurka.
Strange to say, the gallant fellow
was absolutely unharmed, and Jumping down, he cried out, "Now, Sahib,
come!"
In an Instant the Guides were
charging at the enemy, who soon fled
headlong down the hills.
mi
<v;sf>*».
g COXT StRAFE ENGLAND §|
.       .. . _—^
Germany's Bitter Hate
Thousands of brooches bearing the
words "Gott Strafe England" (God
punish England) are being worn in
Germany. This one, which is ln
colored enamel, showing the German, Austrian and Turkish flpg
colors was received at the head
office of the Canadian Pacific Railway in Montreal as a souvenir.
I
V
\
Is now open for
business in the
Willard Block
Dunsmuir Ave.
TAKEN
DAY OR
NIGHT
First Class Work Guaranteed
at Low Prices.
Enlarging a
Specialty
Films Developed for Amateurs
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be-
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
FIRE   INSURANCI
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
Total Assets • $26,788,930.
W.   WILLARD
LOCAL AG E N 1
MEAT!   MEAT!
MEAT!
If you want QUALITY don't
forget to call at the
City Meat Market
WE BUY FOR   PAQU
WE SELL FOR   V-/Aan
THEREFORE:
We are the best and cheapest
in town. FOUR
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FUEL OIL MEETING
1912 "       "      15.4
1913 "       "      26.6
1914 "       "      27.0
The fact that at the present
time a new plant is being installed
at Victoria to handle increased
quantities of oil fuel indicate that
the process of expansion is still
unchecked, and the inevitable result must be the total extinction
of the coal mining industry in the
near future, unless v a protective
tariff can be placed on fuel oil.
After a few remarks upon the
difficulty of getting action from
the Dominion government in the
face of powerful interests on the
other side, the speaker went on
to explain the absolute necessity
for a publicity campaign to enlist
a large measure of support from
the general public. The obvious
fact that a publicity campaign
can not be run without some expenditure of money was sufficient
explanation and justification for
a resolution which he placed before *he meeting in closing. The
resolution, which was seconded
by Mr. R. Robertson, was as
follows:
Resolved: That this meeting
endorses the committee which
has been appointed by the Cumberland Board of Trade for the
purpose of pushing the demand
for an import duty on fuel oil;
and, in order to provide the
nucleus of a fund for the use of
the said Committee, undertakes
to make a contribution of twenty-
five cents per month per man.
The resolution was adopted.
LOCAL TEACHING STAFF
WOMEN'S PATR|0TIG SOCIETY
The Red Cross Society and St.
John's  Ambulance   Association
are holding a joint Tag Day in
every city and village throughout
B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 28th, for
the purpose of raising at least
$25,000 to provide surgical instruments,   X  ray  machine, motor
ambulances, etc., for No. 5 General Hospital C.E.F.   This is our
own B.C. hospital for the front,
and   Cumberland  has   already
made a very valuable contribution
to it in the person of Miss Brown
our most efficient hospital matron.
Let those of us who are safe at
home try and do our share towards helping the doctors and
nurses who are to endure the
hardships and toil of field hospital'
work by supplying them with the
necessary equipment.   On Saturday next therefore the Women's
Patriotic Society are holding a
Tag Day for this purpose and
tags will be sold in Cumberland,
Union Bay and Bevan, the price
being left to the generosity of
the   purchaser.     On   Saturday
afternoon some of the Cumberland ladies will make a house to
house visitation and tags will also
be sold in the streets from 6 to 9
p.m.   Please wear your tag all
day to avoid being asked to contribute again. If anyone is missed
by mistake contributions may bt
sent to the Secretary (Mrs. Clinton) or any of the committee.
The assignment of teachers in
the Cumberland Public Schools
for the coming term which will
open on Monday morning next
has been approved. Several
changes have taken place since
the commencement of the summer vacation. Three lady teachers have been appointed by the
school board. H McArthur,
principal at the last term, has
left for Vernon, and A. J. Richards, ;irst assistant, becomes the
principal, with Miss Margaret
O'Neil. who takes charge of Division II., as first assistant.
The arrangement of the teaching i>: aff for the coming year 1915
-191 li is as follows:
Div. [., A. J. Richards, Entrance (lass.
Div, I., Miss Margaret O'Neil,
Four ii 'leader divided into A and
1:> das.    i.
Div. III... Miss J. White, Third J evening.
Reader, senior intermediate.
Div. ! /,, Miss Nettie Robert-
ior intermediate   Third
•  id Reader.
V.,  Miss Lizzie Gibson,
and First Reader pupils.
Div. VI., Miss Effie McFadyen,
First Reader and Second Primer.
Div. VII., Miss Agnes Frame,
Second Piimer and First Primer.
Div.  VIII.,  Miss Eva Bickle,
First Primer pupils.
Div. IX.. Miss Hilda Watson,
First Primer pupils and receiving
class, composed of beginners.
The Misses Gibson, McFadyen
and Frame are in charge of the
same rooms as last year.
Mrs. M. J. Dazell, of Bute,
Montana, has arrived on a visit
to Mr. and T. G. Montgomery.
John. C. Brown has joined the
Canadian Expeditionary Forces
and left on Thursday.
H. S. Fleming, chairman of the
executive committee of the Canadian Collieries, arrived here on
Thursday evening.
Mr. Haynes, of Victoria, assistant to Postoffice Inspector Fletcher, was here on an official visit
on Tuesday.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for
Ladysmith and Victoria on Monday and  returned on Thursday
son,
and S(
, Div.
Seconc
]ui
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dalby and
family have returned from a visit
to Denman Island. Mr. Dalby
has resumed his duties at the
Canadian Collieries Railway Station.
The garden party given under
the auspices of the Ladies Aid of
Grace Methodist Church on Tuesday was very successful, taking
into consideration the depression
that prevails. The Ladies Aid
wishes to thank Mrs. Harry
Mounce for the use of the lawn
for the occasion and all others
who kindly assisted in making
the garden party a success.
je's Latest
LORD, wha in the heavens does dwell,
I fear that things are no gaun weel,
Hoo this can be I canna tell;
Baith "cultured" courses
And "frightful" methods fail to quell
The Allied Forces.
Lord, I set out to slay a Bear,
And hunt a Lion to its Lair,
And thraw.the neck o' Chanticlair;
The cock was game.
An' a' I've got's a Belgian Hare
I canna tame.
0 Lord, I hope Ye understand
It was at Thy express command
My people took the sword in hand,
Their foes to chasten.
If Thou would'st help the German Barnd,
O do Thou hasten.
Ye sharely canna realize
Ma army's dwindlin' doon in size,
An' sassages are on tht rise;
It's maist distressin'.
Some mirecle, 0 Lord, devise,
And reap ma blessin'.
0 Lord, ma faith is sairly tried;
1 look to Thee to turn the tide,
I thocht Thou ever would'st abide
A freen tae Willie; (
But noo wi' foes on ilka side
I'm near driven silly.
"The Day," 0 Lord, hast Thou forgotten?
Thy blessing I was shair I'd gotten,
Yet here wi' grief an' rage I'm stottin',
Ahint the trenches,
While Joffre nibbles like a rottan
At ma defences.
Lord, I beseech Thee, hear my prayer;
Bless me on land an' sea an' air,
Preserve me frae the Russian Bear;
Clip Thou its claws,
Or set it dancin' at a fair,
Wi' muzzled jaw.
I've ca'd doon kirks. O Lord, but those
Were filled wi' French an' ither foes,
Wha live on haggises an' brose,
An' worship Burns,
An' wear extraordinary clo'esV
That gie folk turns.
0 Lord, destroy the Scottish chiels,
That dress like lasses, fecht iike deils,
They're slippery as conger-eels,
I canna match them;
0 lay Thou saut upon their heels,
That I may catch them.
O Lord, what made my spies a' think
That Britain was at ruin s brink,
Wi' Ireland seething like a sink,
Wi' civil strife,
And Scotland's glory drooned in drink
Devoid o' life.
Sink Thou, 0 Lord, the British fleet,
For puir audTirpie's fairly beat;
Stop this infernal rain an' sleet
That fills the trenches,
And grant me something to defeat,
E'en weans an' wenches.
0 Lord, excuse this hurraed prayer,
Ma armies need me everywhere,
'An' I maun travel here an' there,
Frae east to west,
An' sae had nae mair time to spare-
Excuse the rest.
St. Andrew's Citizen.
A THE IRLANDKR. CUMBERLAND) K'ff.
FIVE
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Evening at 7 o'clock.
Service at Bevan, 2 o'clock p.m.
Bible Study (Sunday School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7,30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 12th Sunday after
Ttinity:
8.30 a. m., Holy Communion
11 a.m. Matins.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M. Forces on Wednesday at 8-30 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
Be as up-to-date in
your Music as in
your book-reading
You hostesses, either daughter
or lady of the home, can you
more pleasantly entertain your
callers and guests than by playing for them the latest music ?
Our diversified stock of latest
compositions includes every
class of music from the newest
opera to the most recent ragtime hit.
i
Here are some of the latest
"Best Sellers:"
"There's a Little Spark of Love Still
Burning,"
"Fm on My Way to Dublin Bay."
"When You Wore a Tulip, etc."
"Charlie Chaplin Walk."
"My Little Girl."
"Little House Upon the Hill."
"My Little Dream Girl."
"In the Hills of Old Kentucky."
Only 15c. per copy
Add one cent per copy
extra for postage.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
V
fC
When is a Kitchen
Not a "Kitchen"?
With a Hughes Electric Range, it
is a parlor. Just as cool and clean
and airy.
The modern "kitchen" deserves a
better na ne. In truth, it is a cooking apartment—as bright and tidy
as any other room. For since the
perfection of electric cooking, all
the clumsy ugliness and every
trace of dirt and soot and gas
have gone.
The modern cook works with her
head and not her hands. She has
hours of time that were never
hers before. Simple figures show
that in a life time five solid years
of drudgery are saved by this
practical invention.
And that isn't all. Consider the sacrifice of
happiness, health and youthful charm. Old-
fashioned methods have truly exacted a heavy
toll.
lectric Ranges
Beauty fades fast over a hot, dirty coal stove. Gas positively poisons! In combustion, gas takes up oxygen and gives out poisonous fumes. That is why plants
will not live where gas. is burned.
Mr. Master-of-the-House, this is not a luxury but a choice—not a choice but a necessity! Think it over. Then come in and see this Range. You will hear some facts
that will astonish yoa
for sale by
CUMBERLAND ELECTRIC LIGHTING Co., Ltd.
■sea
B. Nichols. W. B. Pollard, J.
M. Gillespie, C. Jewitt and Albert
Pickard, left Union Bay on Sunday to join the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. A large number
were present to bid the men farewell. Boat and train whistles
gave them a parting toot,
Dr. A. McKay -Jordan, eye
specialist^ Vancouver; arrived
on Thursday noon and remained
at T.D. McLean's jewellery store
until the evening. Several of
the residents availed themselves
of the opportunity of consulting
.the specialist. Dr. .Jordan will
visit Cumberland again on Thurs
day, September 2nd.
The Canadian Bank of Commerce has been authorized to accept from Italian residents subscriptions to the Italian National
4 1-2 per cent War Loan. The
date for receiving subscriptions
expires on the 31st inst. For f ur-
theHn form ation apply to Mr. A.
Burnside, bank manager.
Furniture, Crockery  Enamel wa-re
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
<«nij>hophoii(is
:      Novelties, Toys, Etc.
ii-iJi wr.u,tiu
■■Ji.a
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CUMBERLAND WINS IN FINAL   MACHINE GUN ACCEPTABLE
The final gane for the Stewart
Cup was played on Bevan Recreation Grounds last Sunday. - The
game was called by Umpire Jos.
Horbury at 3 p. m. A large crowd
from all parts of the district was
present, filling the benches, to
watch the two teams battle for
the championship. The game
was full of snappy plays,although
through several errors the Courtenay boys, being slightly out of
trim, went down to defeat by a
score of 11 to 3.
Score by innings:
123456789 Total
Cumberland    0 12 0 3 2 0 0 3-11
Courtenay       10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0— 3
Batteries: LeClaire and West-
field; Bailo and Downing.
Struck out by LeClaire, 7; by
Bailo. 7.
Two base hits, LeClaire, McKay, Mallard and Glazebrook.
The Rev. Venerable Archdeacon
Scriven, M.A., of Victoria, so
well known to many residents of
this city, is to be consecrated
Lord Bishop of Columbia on S.
Bartholomew's Day, Aug. 24th,
in Christ Church Cathedral, at
Victoria.
In response to a query sent to
Ottawa from the chairman of the
civic employees' gun fund at Victoria re the acceptability of the
gift of a machine gun by the department of militia, the following
reply was received:
"Gove nment would gratefully
accept gift of machine guns. The
Lewis machine gun, costing
$1,000, is the only one obtainable;
purchase can be arranged through
this department. Many thanks
for your endeavors in this direction. James A. Lougheed,
Acting Minister."
LOST: Between Cumberland
and Happy Valley a brown leather hand bag, contents of no use
to anyone but owner; anyone returning same to King's store, at
Cumberland, will receive suitable
reward.
Brighten-up with a little Sherwin-Williams Paint. It wears
longest and looks the best of any
on the market.
House for rent on maryport
Ave. House at present occuped by
W.F. Ramsay. Low rent to one who will
keep it in good condition. Apply Simon
Leiser & Co., Ltd.
I
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
!             TIME TABLE No.
!
.2.
1915.
EFFECT VE   MAY   1st.
i
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon
Tues.
Wed,
Thurs
Fri.
Sat.
1
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.     P.M.
j   9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M      P.M.
7.00     1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A,M.
7:00
A.M.
10,30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10  I   9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25     1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05      9.05    3.05
Puntledge
7.30     1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00      9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35     1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55     6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55    3.55      8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40     1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
1
3.50 : 3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45     1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45;
|
6.45
i
3.45 j 3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50     1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
|
3.30    3.30 j
8.30    2..30
Union Bay
8.00    2.00
11:35
3,00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY THUJ   ISLANDER, (JUMtfUKLAJND, ts. O.
SEVEN
C
3
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, CV.O,LL.D^D.C.U President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General MuugH JOHN AIRD. Aaa't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che.
ques and Letters of Credit issued and available in all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates, S22
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW FULLYISTOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT  TO  CUSTOMERS:--No  Orientals,  Agents,  or  Solicitors
employed.
SweepingReduction
-IN-
LADIES' and GENTS'
TAILOR-MADE
CLOTHING
Suits made to order that were $30.09 and        002 f\f\
$35.00.   Your choice now for ...       ipLJ.VU
When material is supplied makin? is redussi from$23.03
to $14.00.
S.   ISAKA,
Cumberland   Tailor
Miksr of Ladiei' and Gjits' HifHolais JCbtVuig
Dunsmuir Ava., CinA!-la:rl,]B.C.
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, A C.
Phone 14
wmmmmmammmmm
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
GALLIPOLI PENINSULA
Galllpoli Peninsula, the Chersone-
sus Thracica o* classical geography.
is a fruitful land, whose conditions
at one time gave prom.se cf a world-
important coma ercial future. The
Turkish occupation of 1357, however,
cut off this promise, according to the
National l'eogr.:ph.cal Society, "and
the land has remained as obscure to
the twentieth century as it was to
the Greeks of Per.clts' Athens. Tho
wonderful water avenue which stret h
e." behind .t toward u.e 1. ait 0 ce .■
tral Asia has remained stagnant of
all development.
Galllpoli Peninsula forma the European bank of the Dardanelles. To
the north it is inciostd uy the deeply
indented Gulf of Saros. Tne soils of
this district are exceeding.y .fertile
and well adapted to agriculture. The
peninsula is a hil y rib of and fifty'-
five miles in length md varying jo-
tween three and thirteen miles in
breadth. It supports about 100,000
people. It was the Irst section ot
Europ an land to come under the
domination of the cr. scent.
Wheat and maize are grown in
consliierab e quantities there, and are
exported to the Aegean Islands and
to Turkish ports. Barley, oats and
linseed were raised large,y for Great
Britain, and canary seed was exported to Australia.
The Potato Face.
An alarming prophecy b.v an artist in
"London Opinion" based    n the extensive use of potatoes by the Germans.
"SPIKING" MOTOR CARS
Problem of Destroying Autos Captured
From Enemy and  Abandoned
When the French cavalry in 1S70
captured German guns, being unfamiliar with breechloaders, tliey
were at a loss to spike them, and in
some cases were driven off before
they had disabled them, lt might be
supposed that motor cars would be
easier to dispose of, yet experts are
offering suggestions to the inexperienced, such as dropping steel nuts in
the rear axle casing. Another way
is to open the throttle, run off the
radiator water and then throw cold
water upon the engine, which will
thereupon crack in a way most detri
mental to future usefulness. Civilization seems more eager in these days,
to smash things than to make them,
but motor cars can at least be replaced, which cannot be said of
cathedrals.
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don t you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
-    your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
jj Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C.
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
General   Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing  a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Rebuilt,  or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.   „
Kierstead & Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland. B.C.
The
New Home
Bakery
A (ine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily,
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY  PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND   INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES; OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER  430
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Wesley Y, illard returned from
a visit to Victoria on Tuesday.
Miss Agnes Frame returned
from a visit to Vancouver and
Sound Cities on Saturday.
Miss Effic McFadyen returned
on Saturday from a visit to Victoria and mainland points.
Albert Haywood, of West Cumberland, is on a visit to the
Panama Exposition San Francisco.
A. J. Richards, recently appointed principal of the Cumberland Public School, returned on
Sunday.
Mrs. Syd. Horwood returned on
Wednesday from a two weeks'
vacation to Victoria and mainland
points.
Mrs. Richard Dowdall has arrived from Victoria and is now
camping at Royston.
Miss Hazel Frame has accepted
a position an the teaching staff
of Trail, B.C., and left for that
city on Saturday.
T. P. Osborn, of Lund, B.C.,
was here on a visit on Friday and
left for Campbell River the same
day.
N, G. Fitzpatrick, traffic manager of the B. C. Telephone Co..
was here on an official visit on
Wednesday.
David Tully and John Sloan left
for Nanaimo on Tuesday. Failing to secure work there they will
proceed to Scotland.
H. Simms has passed the medical examination and is undecided
as to joining the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.
Nordgren's babies were registered at the Vancouver Fair on
Monday and stood 91 and 95 per
cent in the Better BabirS Registry.
Mr. Frank Dalby received the
pleasure of a visit from his two
brothers during the week. One
resides at Ruby Creek, Alaska,
a-id the other at Victoria.
Miss Ruth Clinton, of the Victoria Jubilee Hospital staff,
arrived on Tuesday on a visit to
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo.'
W. Clinton. Miss Clinton will
enjoy a two weeks' vacation at
home.
!\ recruiting officer is expected
to arrive in this city during the
coming week for the purpose of
establishing a volunteer movement for home defense. Between
fifty and sixty of our citizens
have already expressed their desire of joining the movement,
which is absolutely voluntarily.
The members will receive a goodv
training, with everything to gain
and nothing to lose.
rw-^N.
' ^^^"wvx
SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARING $ALE
»
ts and Shoes,
and Gents' Furnishings,
Commencing
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14TH
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY TERMS STRICTLY GASH
Our stocks in the above departments are much too large
and must be reduced considerably. We intend making
a large reduction and we know prices will do it. Our
stock is composed of general dry goods, most of it
bought before prices advanced.    A double saving is
yours at this sale.
All Regular Lines of Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, and
Gents Furnishings will be reduced 10 per cent, for
this sale.
SIMON LOSER'
LIMITED.
&
CO.,
THE
BIG  STORE
•
Phone 3-8
*w\*0

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342428/manifest

Comment

Related Items