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The Islander Aug 1, 1914

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Array itf.
£egisUtion Library
%%l?mbtv
h
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. v., No. 20
CITY COUNCIL
The regular meeting of the
city council was held on Monday
evening in council chambers.
His Worship the Mayor presided, and there were present Aid.
Parnham, Maxwell, Banks, and
Mitchell.
Minutes of previous meetings
were passed as read.
Correspondence was read regarding the sale of city bonds,
which matter was arranged to
the satisfaction of all parties.
Tenders were submitted for
the painting of the council chambers and magistrates office.
which were held over till next
meeting.
The following accounts were
received and ordered paid if
found correct:—
News-Advertiser $19.75
A- R. Kierstead     4.75
C. H. Tarbell        3.55
Ezectric Light Co.     76.60
Water Works      4.00
Macfarlane Bros. Ltd.     1.55
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, AUG. 1. 1914.
Subscription price, $2.00 per year
Rumored That British Has German
Fleet Bottled Up.
M10.10
Aid Maxwell's amendment to
the Trades By-Law was held over
till next meeting.
Complaints were made about
thc City Constable interfering
with the City Band whilst the
latter were playing on Dunsmiur
Avenue.
Constable Ward gave a satisfactory explanation of the whole
affair.
Aid Parnham aaid there should
be a time limit when bands, etc,
be allowed to disturb the peace
i n the evening.
Aid Maxwell said he was of
the same opinion as Aid. Parnham that a time limit should be
set. The public had been allowed so much liberty in the past
that they looked upon the pre
sent matter as an infringement
of their rights.
Police matters were under dis
cassion when the meeting ad.
journed.
Ncbxly likes a fast girl. She
may be pretty and rich, but if
she is bold and fast among men
she will never be well respected.
Well bred people appreciate
modesty in women and cannot
t ilerate the want of it. We are
glad to say that as a rule girls
are retiring and modest, but
occasionally we see one that is
lioitlenish and bold, and the
younger she is the worse she
seems to be. The proper place
for a girl under 18 is among her
dolls and the longer she stays
there the better for her future
happiness. The girl who sits out
at 14 will be an old woman at 25.
Mothers, keep your daughters at
your knees as long as possible
and you will never have cause to
regret it.
H. W. Spencer of Nanaimo
arrived on Tuesday.
B. C. TELEPHONE FOREST PROTECTION.
The B.C. Telephone Co. recent- The town of Hearst in Ontario
ly removed their central exchange waa recently destroyed hy a for-
                                       office from Dunsmuir Avenue to e8t fire.   Several villages in New
Special to The Islander. :the cor"er of 2nd Streot ami 1)er" Brunswick have been swept away
Berlin, July 30th, 12 noon.-Germany have given Russia 22 went Avenue. A new type of \u f0,*est fil.es thi3 summer
hours to declare herself in regard to Austria-Servian war, and to switch board has been installed During the past four summers at
explain why Russia is mobilizing troops. j with 165 jack capacity and five least two dozen villages have
St. Petersburg, July 31st.-Leading St Petersburg papers new to„ poBitions. which will suffered through forest fires in
publish news that Russia will declare war against Austria tomorrow! „rtnp *.. .. suiierea tnrougn toiest tires in
and all eyes now centre on the Emperor, who is expected to make 7* , , , ^ er increasing Eastern Canada. The prime cause
the announcement which will plunge all Europe into war. Ideman,) for telephone service. 0f these fires is neglect in pro-
London, July 30th.—Early tomorrow will decide whether Ger-I The new switch board is one of tecting young timber from fire,
many is to mobilize, which act will in all probability decide whether the Northern Electric Co.'s No. Since the burning of the Crows
Europe will be plunged into a great war in the event of Germany 1240, and is thc first one to be Nest Valley in 1908 with the
forcing matters. Asquith will at once ask parliament for a large: insta„ed on thfa ifj, d d he '
vote of credit to enable Britain to mobilize its force at once and; . . ,, bann m,lllons 0l intake whatever means are necessary to support the alliance withsecona one in tne province. ia,.s worth of property, special
France and Russia. Any move on part of Germany will be met by i ",s the intention of our genial care has been paid throughout
corresponding move on part of France. While both nations deny | local manager to give the people the Province of British Columbia
mobilization both are gathering its forces together for any eventuality of Cumberland a telephone ser- J to the prevention and control of
Paris, July 30th.—Germany is mobilizing and rushing troops to
the French frontier.
London, Aug. 1st.—
Germany denies that she has declared war against Russia, she
claims she has declared a state of war, but not against any particular nation, Austria captured Belgrade, but for three days there
has been fighting in the pass above Belgrade and on the Austrian
border. The Servians have held their own ground and prevented
the Austrians from advancing. British fleet believed to be off the
German Coast .and is rumored that they have the German fleet
bottled up. Rumored that two Japanese warships have headed
this way to protect the B. C. Coast. The British Government have
taken the C. P.R. Empress of Asia and Russia and are mounting
them with guns to use as cruisers.
vice second to none, and to keep
it up-to-date as far as transmission and strict attention to business is concerned.
forest fires in young timber as
well as ma: u red timbsr.
It has been found by experience
that, a large proportion of the
On the first of the year there j f j,*es which start in slash or young
were 108 subscribers, there are; timber will, if allowed to run,
LABOR FOR HARVEST
Winnipeg, July 27—A meeting
of the passenger heads of the C.
P. R., C. N. R. and G. T. P. was
held at the Canadian Pacific
offices here this morning to consider the question of bringing to
the harvest fields of the West
farm laborers from the East.
It is expected that the number
the railways will be called upon
to bring in this year wiil be considerably less than in years past.
Conditions ars such in the West
that there is already on the spot
a considerable number of men
ready for work during the harvest. Only isolated districts
report an insufficient supply of
laborers, while a very large
proportion report the supply
greater than the demand, lt is
certain that the migration from
south of the line will be very
small this year. What men are
needed will come from Eastern
Canada and from the cities of
the West and Middle West.
At today's meeting of the
railway passenger agents arrange
ments were completed for the
shipment of these men to the
harvest fields. In the Eastern
cities hundreds of men are ready
and waiting.
The habit of treating those
who are nearest and dearest to
us with discourtesy, is one that
clouds the sunshine of too many
homes. If you are young and
looking for your prince, just test
his home conduct. Do not be
guided in your choice by what a
young man is in the parlor; find
out what he is in his mother's
sitting room. Do not judge him
by the way he can tip his hat,
but by the way he treats the old
especially his parents,
now 123,
The new cut in long distance
rates came into effect on July 26,
and parties wishing to communicate over the long distance can
make appointments during the
day without extra charge and
talk after 7 p.m. at a greatly
: reduced rate.
spread to valuable timber or property, and when beyond control
destroy the homes of the settlers
in the small villages now being
built up throughout the Province
and cause loss of life. The protection of the settlers, as well as
the increase in exports is found
in cattle. Canada exported in the
twelve months $7,180,348 worth
to the United States as against
$2,232,542 to all countries in 1913
Canada's total trade with all
countries for the twelve months
ending April 30 last was $1,096,
773,675, asagainst$l,079,934,018
for 1913, or an increase of about
EXPORTS                 ralK alter ' P'm' at a *-*reat|y of the timber, is not assured un-
Ottawa,July 27-During the:reduced rate- [ less all bush fires fires are kept
twelve months ending April 30,1   il,nder control d"*-'**.? the dry sea-
Canada's exports to the United; LOCAL  NEWS son.
States totaled $.300,836,664,   as;   Henry Devlin,   Inspector  of,   Young timber growing on non-
against   $168,605,800   for    the jmlnes arrived on Sundry. (agricultural lands  is an assest
corresponding period in 1913.       j   Ml's*. William Jones, left for'worth    protecting   from   fire.
Imports from the United States \ Nanaimo on Friday. j Nearly every settler knows how
on the other hand, totaled $402,! Mrs- A- Haywood left for j rapidly young timber grows to
985,425, as against $442,213,343. jSoutn Wellington on Friday on a pole and tie size. In most districts
A great factor undoubtedly in j vis*t to her daughter. j in    British    Columbia   timber
See Mrs. John Gillespie, West' reaches commercial size in sixty
Cumberland, for millinery at!or eighty years. It requires no
cost, I planting, grows without care or
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Baldwin ] expense and produces a valuable
visited Nanaimo by auto on Sun-! crop which now beautifies the
day. returning the same day.       j hills, protects   the   watersheds
Mrs. J. V.   Nordgren left on' and will in another generation
Tuesday for a few  weeks visit support industries.   These facts
to friends in the Uaited States.    | are so well understood in British
S. S, Granby put in at Union, Columbia that the Forest Branch
$17,000,000.     Imports    totaled IBay on Thursday ior 100° tons of js every-where securing the co-
$621,322,564, as against $678,587-!coke> operation of the residents in pre-
617, or a decrease of $56,000,000'   West Cumberland United Foot venting destructive fires in the
Expo-ts totaled $475,061,111, asball Club will giveasmoker in young as well as the old timber.
against  $401,346,401, or an in-lthe  New  Hall on the recreation  ■	
crease of $74,000,000. grounds tonight. There are some persons in our
 ,. Mrs. Harry Wilson ami Miss community  who    seem   to  bo
May Walker returred from a vi;;it mentally unbalanced with some
to Nanaimo ami Victoria on Pun- get-rich-quick idea. They are
day. spending their time  in   reading
Mrs. G. R. Joheston and family plowing prospects of some dead-
also Mrs. Robert Matheson  of sure silver mine or gilt-edg oil
Puntledge  loft on Tuesday  for company,   Thousands of hard-
Vulcan,Alberta, earned dollars have  been  vvith-
Union Bay and Bevan teams drawn from the banks and sunk
will play a game of football at forever into some wild cat  min-
Recreation Grounds,  Bevan, to- ing or other company.   A   fool
night, kick off at 6-30. ami his money arc soon  parted,
A  house,   furniture  and  150 hut don't fool any longer.   If a
.......     '-■'": chickens for sale cheap.    Just stock promoter wants to sell you
develop and   direct,  and  thusL _,, ,.._,._.,_  ^^..[some stock that will  make you
independent  for lifo within six
.,.,.,   months on an investment of 1100,
,      , .      N0W   be wise.
Seeing that Bevan Sports will    ...    .  .     ,      .
not field ateam  in  football or pftjftS^^
baseball against us,  We hereby straight handle bars, two outside
challenge   them   to  a   game of patches on Dunlop tyre 6ii back
marbles or perhaps a fast game wheel.     Information   to  Elisor,
of croquet would he more suitable Brentnall, No. « Aline, or to Jas.
West Cumberland Baseball Club. Ward, City Police, Cumberland.
Educate your boy. You may
think money spent in this way
is money spent in vain. There is
nothing in him; he has no pride,
no aspiration. You don't know.
No one can tell what is in a boy.
Besides, there may be an un-
kindled spark, an unfanned flame
a smouldering flame, a latent,
energy, which the teacher's rod
may stir, the association, which
the books and men may arouse
.   .      , . ...        ,   outside the city limits,
start a boy agoing, with such ,     *
culars apply at this ofhee.
WHO HAS COLD FEET
energy and determination that
no power on earth could stop
him short of the topmost rouud
in the ladder of fame.
Robt. W. Wendehorn, Dominion
Telegraph operator, left for
Powell River on Wednesday. TWO
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
The Ideal Store
SPECIALS
FOR THESE HOT DAYS
Children's Rompers,
Wash Blouses and Suits,
Dresses, Cashmere Coats
etc.
Ladies' Waists, Night Gowns
Underskirts, Combinations
Corset Covers, Aprons
Housedresses, etc.
Underwear in Lisle and Silk,
Fine Ribbed, Mesh, etc.
Men's Silk Shirts, Socks, Ties,
Fine Underwear, etc.
The Ideal Store
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Phone 72.
Winding Engine at No. 7 Mine
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited.
When visiting Cumberland stay at the
Cumberland   Hotel
Dunsmuir Avenue
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
Guests have every comfort.
Excellent Cuisine.
WILLIAM  MERRIFIELD,   Ploprietor.
FOR SALE BY TENDER
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned not later than 4 p. m.
j on the 4th day of August, 1914,
| for the purchase of South East
' Quarter of the South West Quarter of Section Thirty-Five (35),
Township Six (6), Sayward District, Vancouver Island, containing forty acres more or less.
Cabin situated on the property
and several acres cleared. The
property is on the banks of the
river and known as the Kavan
Ranch.
Highest or  any   tender   not
necessarily accepted.
WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator,
Cumberland, B. C.
Call and See
BANNERMAN
FOR CHOICE FRUITS
CONFECTIONERY
CIGARS AND   TOBACCO
Headquarters for
McKenzie's Ice Cream
Exclusive Agents
This" picture represents the electrically driven main winding
engine at No. 7 mine, which is located in the same power house as
the air compressor last described. This winder is used for hauling
coal trips up the main slope to the pit-head and replaces a steam
driven hoist formerly used but which was not powerful enough for
the work. This winder is of an unusually large size for this class of
work and is driven by a motor of 750 horsepower. The winding
drum is 8 feet diameter, 5 feet wide, with a clutch ring attached
8 feet diameter and brake ling 10 feet 4 inches diameter. The drum
is built up of Steele plate and Steele castings and has a capacity of
coiling 9000 feet of 1 1-4 in wire rope in 7 layers. The winder was
designed to haul 15 loaded cars at a speed of 15 miles per hour up
a 25 per cent grade, but in actual use has been found to be capable
of greatly exceeding this. At this speed 40 trips can be hauled a
distance of 7500 ft in 8 hours. The main shaft supporting the
drum is 14 inches diameter in the bearings, and 15 inches through
the drum.
The total weight of the drum and shaft with clutch and brake
rings exceeds forty tons.     The clutch and brake are operated by
means of compressed air, cylinders fitted with cataract oil cylinders
These cylinders are controlled from the engineers platform  (which
is seen in the foreground) through the medium of rods and levers,
and the control gear is so arranged that the brake and clutch may
be operated with any degree of pressure on the  brake and clutch
bands that the engineer may desire by the simple manipulation of
the levers. The brake band is fitted with specially made asbestos
] wearing blocks and the clutch band is fitted with wood blocks.    A
j large dial indicator is fitted facing the engineer which shows the
; position of the trip in the slope at all times
i       On the engineer's platform are also fitted gauges for showing
the horsepower taken by the winder, the air pressure for the clutch
I and brake cylinders, and also a tachograph for recording on a circular
paper chartfwhich is driven by a clock) the time, speed and loca- j ■
' tion and number of trips handled on each shift,    The drum is
driven by the motor through the medium of a large cast s'.eel cut,
herring-bone gear and pinion, totally enclosed in an oil tight gear
case, although these gears are of such a large size, they operate
i very quietly.    The coupling between the motor shaft and pinion
shaft is of a flexable wire rope type.    The hoist was built by the
Wellman, Scaver, Morgan Co., Clevland and the wire rope coupling
, by the Bruce Macbeth Engine Co.
The motor, which is in the left hand of the picture behind the
staircase is rated at 750 horsepower and operates at 250 revolutions
per minute. It is furnished with electric power at 2200 Volts. 3
phase, 25 cycles. This motor is known as a slip ring induction
motor and was built by the Canadian Westinghouse Co. Hamilton
i This motor is a standard type and has no special features and extended description is unnecessary, but the type of control equipment furnished with this motor is worthy of a short description as
it is new to this part of the country, although it has been used for
some years in the Old Country coal mines. This control is known
as a liquid tpye and its function is to start, stop, and reverse the
motor and control its speed under any condition of load, It con-'
sists of two principal parts. One part, consisting of electrically
operated oil switches, changes the direction of electrical power
supplied to the stationary wind ng of the motor, its purpose being
to reverse the direction of rotation. The second part consists of a
liquid rheastat which is used to vary the resistance in the winding
of the rotating part of the motor, its purpose being to control
the speed. This liquid rheastat consists of two large sheet iron
tanks, one placed above the other. The lower tank is tilled with a
solution of soda and water and a motor driven centrifugal pumps is
attached to this tank which pumps he water into the upper tank,
The water flows over an adjustable weir in the upper tank and returns to the lower tank and is thus in constant circulation. Cooling
pipe coils are fitted in the lower tank to keep the liquid cool, the
upper tank contains a large number of iron plates placed side by
side and connected in groups to the rotating part of the motor. The
liquid circulates round these iron plates and the height of the
liquid or depth of immersion of the plates determines the resistance
in the circuit and consequently the speed of motor. The height of
the liquid is controlled by the adjustable weir above mentioned and
this weir is operated by a motor driven device which in turn is
controlled from the engineer's platform. In fact the whole control
consisting of magnetic reversing oil switches, and motor driven
liquid rheastat control is opera'.ed by a single lever on the engineer's
platform.
It might be stated that this type of controller was deemed to
be the best to use for this installation on account of the large size
of the motor and the rigid requirements for perfect control of the
motor. This installation was put into operation beginning last
September and was installed without interruption to the operation
of the mine and has been in continuous rervice without a hitch
since tbat time,  LO CAL
Pianoforte tuition
Mr.RICHARD KIRKHAM, Jr.
Late Pianist of Criterion Theatre,
Dudley, and Coseley Pifcture House,
Wolverhampton,   England,   is  prepared to take Pupils for thu piano.
Apply: Residence. Derwent Ave,
or P. O. Box 112,
CUMBBRLNND, B.C.
Piano sinner
Makes regular visits to Cumberland representing the George A.
Flectcher Music Co. of Nanaimo.
Orders left at the Islander Ollice
will receive prompt attention.
\l f)lul.ip Davrison
Bin-Inter. Solicitor
,t Notary Public
luurari. IB. ffirklr
NOTARY PUBLIC, CONVEYANCER
AND REAL ESTATE
(Cumbrrlauii.il. ffi.
. do Eiurartte
sTrariu-r af fltuoir
Ijtte Musical Director nf Victoria Theatre,
'Vlngate aud Durham; Rdndeli WiUlamH
Picture A vautlevjlle Theatre, Ferryhlll,
Durhiuu; late Orennisl ami (*liiilriiia.sti.r
nf MilrtiinHrlndtlVeMetlnsdhtPrlzeClloir,
Durliimi, England.
Has Vacancies for Pupils on
Piano, American Organ &
Pipe Organ, Theory,
Harmony, etc.
Terms Moderate
Apply-
P.O.Box398, Cumberland,B.C.
Fire Insurance
For absolute
protection write
a Policy in the
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co. of
L iverpool.
Total Assets
§26,7 88,930.00
Wesley Willard
AGENT THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
THREE
Look! I have the Goods and I want
the Money. Now if you want to get
BARGAINS
In Watches, Clocks &
Jewelery, also Books
and all the Latest
Magazines and Papers
all going Cheap for
Cash Only.
For the next 10 Days
T. D. McLEAN
THE   LEADING   JEWELER
Cumberland, B. C.
If you wish to please your children and see
them grow strong and healthy, buy a waterfront lot at Roy Beach. On asking a seven year
old son of one family located there if he was having a good time, he quickly answered "Ubetcher
ROYSTON
'* They Will Not be Happy Till They Get There"
RING  UF  36.
j British Columbia Investments Ltd. Court,ecnay
HAEEY   IDIENS,   Manager.
CARIBOO
Hon, William R.Rose, Minister
of Lands, has issued a pamphlet
on the Cariboo Land Recording
division which describes in detail
the topographic, climatic and
other features of the district.
This pamphlet, which will be of
great value to those seeking information regarding the territory
within the boundaries of the
Caribb Land Recording division
is the latest to be published of
the series of similiar publications
issued by the Department of
Lands on various other sections
of the Province. The pamphlets
previously published were descriptive of the Fort George, Fort
Fraser, Skeena and Peace River
Land Recording divisisions.
There has been a large demand
for these pamphlets, which are
replete with valuable information.
Cariboo, the district with which
this booklet deals, has been reached, since the days when gold
was the loadstone that brought
the argonauts, who were pioneers
of the division, from many lands
by way of Panama, California,
and across the then untravelled
Western Provinces over the Cariboo Wagon-road. The Pacific
Great Eastern Railroad is now
being constructed to cross the
division north and south through
the valley of the Fraser River.
This railroad, with many lateral
and cross-lateral roads, will give
access to large areas of land
available for settlement
Much of the land in this division is open, rolling grass land
and uplands covered with bunch-
grass-stockmen find vast areas
of pasturage there- and there
are wide stretches of parklike
country with little clumps of
poplar ard other light timber.
Much of the district, in addition
to the great extent of excellent
range it offers, on which great
herds of cattle are being pastured
will be found to be admirably
adapted for dairying, seed-grass
production, and the growing of
general farm produce of all kinds,
as well as cattle horses, sheep,
and hog-raising. Following upon
the completion of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway and resultant influx of settlers, the
Cariboo division will doubtless
ship much farm produce to the
markets on the Coast, where the
opening of Panama Canal is
bound to draw traffic and make
an ever-increasing market for
farm produce.
There is much land in the Cariboo Division pre-eminently
adapted for farming along mixed
or dairy lines: also for dry-farming, a system of agriculture
which will afford large returns
to the farmer. There are various
areas which are lacuatrine, but
others, especially on thc high
plateaux, are more or less arid,
and dry-farming will offer the
most profitable method of agriculture there. To demonstrate
the method of dry-farming and
the possibilities it offers for
successful farming on the semi-
arid lands of the Dry Belt, the
Hon. the Minister of Lands has
established experimental dry
farms, one of which is locoted at
103 Mile House—and the opportunities offered to the dry-farmer
in this part of the Province are
being demonstrated there.
The office of the Government
Agent for the Division, to whom
all applications for pre-emptions
within its boundaries must be
made, is at Quesnel.
SPECIAL
OFFERINGS
At the
Furniture Store
Novelty Glassware3 nM"3S^.25c^
Tea Pots^new style in e°^lino ilec'oi'at'ons$i 50
loilet WarenewXuSns.etisUni$3 to $8.50'I
Lups and SaucerssaSCcffn^d^mdcroraltn*2^
A full line of Furniture, Stoves, Ranges, etc.,
always in stock.
?«B«a«.^EffUE   A- McKlNNON
Km Bc"      THE FURNITURE  STORE
HOTEL UNION
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION
First GUss in every respect. Perfect Cuisine
Headquarters for Tourists and Sportsmen
Wines Liquors and Cigars
John N. McLeod, Proprietor
When in Cumberland make tlio Union your bradqumrteni
Cumberland Electric Light Company
Electric Appliances
6 1-1 Ib Electric Irons $3.25
Electric Toasters       3.25
Electric Hair Dryers  3,00
5 Watt Tungsten Lamps      .10
10 and 15 Watt Tungsten Lamps  .       45
25 and 40 Watt. Tungsten Lamps ....    50
Tungsten Lamps 5 to 150 Watt. Also Hylo
and Ruby Lamps for Sale.
Up-to-Date Millinery
Mrs. John Gillespie
Union Street
CumberlandJB. C. FOUR
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
^$e §sCcm6er
The liters of papers which Mr- St. John:   "Let me say right here that the Socialist party has
thinks of as "capitalistic" naturally do not approve;no sympathy with the methods of the I. W. W.- they
such utterances.   The New York world remarks are ineffective and childish.   But through the I. W. w.
PubT!ll^^I>vnlUrty.VT|C^^,^nHm?KH^mMPA^v'"" that the "defiant lawlessness" of the I. W. W."has' manifestati°ns there looms  a  new spirit.    The cause
«.S^UEK , H.M.NC. ANO. MU8MM, COMPANY „ L^Jfc,   the *«-***.   fe   the   fact that   the
 i li  . i ii r ; spread of the use ot machinery has made skilled  labor
relief in the thought that- l( relatively usele8s in compari80n■ with unskilled labor
"Industrially, these people do not count.    Politically jThe Federation should have  made  stronger efforts to
and socially, they are blanks. They never yet have had!orBanize unskilled labor'"
a following of any kind except among those who were'
ignorant of American life and laws.    To steady-going
inhabitants of the United States,  the very violence of
of their utterances is the best antidotes."
i furnished
Subscription: 3LI.0O, payable in advance.   Advertising Rat
on application.
To Correspondents; The Editor does not hold himself responsible for
views expressed by correspondents. No letters will be published in the
islander except over the writer's signature.   The Editor reserves the
ri-tht io refuse publicationof any letter.
SATURDAY, AUG.  1, 1914.
But when President Samuel Gompers, of the
Federation of Labor, had his chance, he replied,
according to tlie New York World's account of
the hearings:
The Three Programs of Labor.
[From The Literary IMjjesil
Labor Leaders and Agitators are sometimes
vaguely lumped together in the minds of those
who can see no possible good in either.     But an LoUjs journal notes that
occasional incident or utterance shows how highly
antognistic the various labor movements often^are    "But 14'000 L w- w- 's are 'in BOoa Ending', ™m&
In thus promulgating his gospel of violence,
"St. John sounded the doom of his organization,"
in the St. Louie Republic's opinion; because
"there are not enough acknowledged murderers f*nization?f u"8k"!edalabo^than a ,ias to a,1-v othei'
° fpnrnvp  unci frst* lis,o tlio CsnsnHsslc u.,,.,. „«.... <:■ *—*.„,.i.
"The American Federation
more of its energies,   its time,
of Labor has devoted
and its money to tho
in the United States to keep it alive."    The St.
to one another.   And the Federal Commission on
Industrial Relations,  which  is seeking  "to dis-
ing to St. John's admission. Of the 120,000 cards issued
it is evident that only 14,000 found themselves willing
to ran even a remote risk of going to the gallows or the
feature, and for this the Socialists have seen lit to attack
me bitterly in New York and elsewhere, lt is the intention of the Socialist party to divert the attention of
the workmen from the immediate struggle and the
immediate needs to something remote."
The cross-examination of Mr. Gompers by
Mr. Hillquit developed into a verbal tilt which
cover the underlying causes of industrial tiniest," eiectric chail. at the direction of St. John and others of I.
and "to  agree  upon remedies of a constructive the leaders. The movement is progressing backward, so became at times bltten 0ne explanation of this
nature,"  thinks  it valuable at the start to get far as its growth is concerned. hes in the fact that Mr. Gompers has led the
differing labor leaders to state their platforms in "His sounding the murder note has lessened the j successful fight to keep the American Federation
their own words In order to do so the better cnancesof Mr. St, John's pleasant little organization of Labor from committing itself to Socialism, and
it has not only listened to the direct statements ff"1* m"h farther alomr than "»"»**»*> allev- some of the Socialistic attacks upon him have been
given at the recent hearings in New York, but has       " ^ vitrohc-    Throughout the debate, Mr. Hillquit
allowed these representatives to subject one Mr. St. John's remarks lead Uie New York tried in vain to force from President Gompers the
another to cross-examination as to their motives Evening Post to take a quick glanceat Colorado, admission that the Federationalist and Socialist
means and purposes. The New York dailies have Ulster, the-London art-galleries, and other dis-l P«*ram differed only **• the point of quanitity.
been printing at some length the testimony thus turbed places, and to include that " jiolence as a Mr" GomPers made »* clear to his questioners
secured, and some of them pay editorial tribute to means of attaining political or social pnds seems ^at the only kind of force he approved was
its value. It is clear enough to the New York to be in a kind of revival the world Over.,, Yet "moral force;" when conclusion is used, only
commercial that "the labor-unionist is as far The Evening Post still hopes that this,is but "a iresentment is aroused and the end is not gained,
away from the I. W. W. or the Socialist sis is passing madness," and is confident that "a little|0nly throuSh moral suasion and appeal to man's
capital itself, according to the claims regarding experience will show its futility." The Brooklyn Ireason can a movement succeed." Recalled
the position of capital set up by all three". As this Eagle takes comfort by reflecting tjhat "luckily |attention to the federation's successful work for
conservative financial newspaper understands the organized Socialists, with analogous ideals', Ibetter wages and working ho-urs-for more effect'-
them, "the labor leaders fear that the Socialists to those of the I. W. W., "favor no suihmethods," jive inspections of workshops and mines, and
will capture their  organization  and  use  it  for "and still more luckily for domestic peace, the!against child"labor"   He said that the Federation
political purposes, and the I. W.W.'s fear that the larger section of organized labor is not arguing
favors legislation limiting the work-day for women
Socialists and the labor-unions will endeavor to for a programme of violence." jand children*     But Mr. Gompers objects to mini-
sustain some form of government, whereas they This brings us to Mr. Morris Hiljquit's state-1 mum-wage and maximum-word-day legislation for
themselves wish to substitute absolute anarchy ment that the purpose of the Socialistic party in!men. because he thinks they can secure the same
for the existing social order." Or one might pic- the United States is the nationalization of industry |end by their own initiative and because he looks
ture the three armies as moving along different As The Evening Post summarizes the testimony iwith susPicion upon the extension of the powers
roads, in the same direction, but with the eyes of, of this lawyer, who has so often defined andjof the Government over the worker. When asked
the three generals fixt on goals at varying dis-defended Socialism; | to state the Federation's  remedy for unemploy-
' "Important industries should not be privately controlled for profit without regard to the public welfare.
ment, Mr. Gompers said his plan would be: "To
divide existing work with the unemployed, to
work for an increasing share in the production
tances ahead.
In the statements of Mr. Vincent St. John,
General Secretary and Treasurer of the I. W. W., Ty,e
these editors find of greatest interest tlie frank industries, but would substitute for private ownership
admission that his organization beleives in the some form of social ownership best adapted to individual
use of force "when necessary,"   The "primary cast's. F°*' instance, it would Btand for national ov-njr-
object of the I. W. W.," the New York sun quotes shil>of railroads or interstate communication, or mines our economic system." The Federation "would
Mr. St. John as saying, or  'tnistiliec1'  business now organized on a national favor any practical plan" for solving this problem
scale. Other industries might be best operated  by the but, added Mr.  Gompers, with a thrust at his
"is to organize and educate the working class on a class; State; others,  such as gas and water-works, by cities, Socialist questioner, it " is less interested in the
party, does not advocate nation*  ownershp of al  „„j „„„„,.„,»,.•,.„ „*       ui_ t    *.u i j
, .    , .      ..   . ... ... H     ," iand consumption of wealth for the workman, and
atrii's, but would substitute for private ownership :       . . . • .» ,,,,*,,
to maintain the worker s belief that unemployment is not a necessary or permanent element of
basis, the workers constituting a distinct class,    There and some smaller still by  cooperative groups working
promulgation of idle and alusive programs for
Mr. St, John does not exactly mea
are really only two working classes that we can see, the' under public regulation. Industries might even be run   ....
workers and the employers.   Our object is ultimately to under private management, such as the arts and crafts, eliminatlng everv human '" than in actual work
place the industries in the hands of the working class which are not based on exploitation of Labor." for tne -aboring class."     But he went right on to
without having to pay tribute to the employing or any . ' admit that among the things endorsed by the
other parasitical class." Testifying later,  Mr.  Hillquit  went on to Federation  were free  speech  and  assemblage,
show the  relation  between  Socialism  and the equal suffrage, and the initiative, referendum and
that he and his fellows advocate violent" LZ Ame.^an Federation of Labor, as seen from the recall, proportional representation in government
tnat ne and nis teilows advocate violence.   But he Socialistic viewpoint.  He said, as quoted
does  say,  as quoted in the New York evening Eveeing Post:
post, which has printed   the   most   complete ,
accounts of the hearings: "The number of persons  who support the Socialist tha" n0W -Prevai1' and extension of the Public and
movement in the United States is about 3,006,000.   The |vocational svstem of education.     Mr. Gompers
"We won't tell our members to allow themselves to be labor movement and the Socialist movement must be Perhaps' had his recent court experiences in mind
shot down and beaten up like cattle.     Violence, as a considered  as one,   in ultimate aim.    The Federation when he told the Commission how sure he was
general rule, is forced on us. holds, like the Socialists, that an increasing share of the; that the Federation favored "curbing the power
UJ "to Z^rtTT",°[ \TT' '^"'^'T h iS r1"*8 °f lab0'' Sh°u!d g°t0 'abor' a"d thateventua»y of the courts to punish forcontemptin laborcases.
""l" " n'"k" " ',,k'" ^ "" "an'"r-     Fhe emp,0ye,'a the W°fS —"entirely own the wealth the,, pro- M ^ seemed J, Mr_ m    k ^ ^
Thus the aim is the same. The difference is one
in The direct election of the President and Vice-President
amendment of the Constitution by easier methods
not  particular   if they injure our only property     ducc
They put us to work with half an of consciousness.     The Federation looks to present
Gompers's   organization   stands for "all the de-
are
In'ain and muscle.
education,  speed us up. wear us out, and leave us to remedies; tlie Socialist  looks to the ultimate resultsj mands of the Socialist party, with the exception
die in the poorhouse. So we don't propose to show any and builds his philosophy  consciously  on  that  larger 0I the maximum-work-day and minimum wage."
j view,   .   .   . ."No"  was the retort;  "the  Socialist party has
respect for their property. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B, ('.
FIVE
\
•v
3
I
"THE   SQUARE   DEALING   HOUSE
-*
=u
MONEY 15 SCARCE!!
Everybody admits that now. Our town is passing through a crisis. Owing to a combination of circumstances, some of which are beyond our control, and some of which are
universal. Our main industry,.the mining and production of coal, is almost paralized and
our usually large payroll has shrunk in proportion.
May we venture to suggest at this point, in our mutual experience, that the main slogan
should be:-"PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY/'
At least do not send money away to the big departmental stores in other cities until you
have paid us a visit and compared values. Then consider that we do not ask you to send
cash with order unless your name is new to us. Consider also that your home merchant
helps to circulate money in your own town; whereas ever dollar sent away in gone from
the district for good. Do not overbuy, buk let us have your requirements. Keep your
money at home.   Stand by one another and hope for the best.   *
" The darkest time is just before the dawn."
MACFARLANE BROTHERS LIMITED
Phone 10  P.O. Box 100
<§>
Cumberland, B.C.
purloined the long-established platform of the
American Federation." At intervals Mr, Hillquit
would propound similar questions, to the growing
irritation of Mr. Gompers, who declared that
organized labor was working to make the life of
the workers better from day to day, that it set no
final goal for itself, and that for his part he would
"appeal to the devil and his mother-in-law" (here
going Charles S. Mellen one better) "if labor can
be helped in that way." Mr. Gompers paid his
final respects to the Socialist party by asserting
that it "purposes to put the American working-
man in an economic strait-jacket. It purposes
something to which the American labor move
ment declines to give its adhesion."
But there was one prominent witness on
hand to show that a man can be both a good
Federatidnalist ond a good Socialist. Mr. Max S.
Hayes, besides editing the Cleveland Citizen, is
an organizer for the Typographical Union and also
a Socialist National Committeman. As a representative of the Union, he says, he has enjoyed
the cooperation of the Socialist party. The
immediate demands of the two bodies, he thinks,
are the same, and he does not wholly support the
policies of Mr. Debs on the one hand or Mr.
Gompers on the other. He is "a member of the
trade-union movement because it is a bread-and-
butter movement, meeting laborers'daily needs
day by day." Hence he considers the Federation
the logical economic organization for this country
But, says Mr. Hayes, as quoted in The Evening
Post,"we should at the same time have a political
organization expressing the larger aims of the
labor movement." He looks forward to a time
when the workers shall control both the Government and the production of wealth. Then, perhaps
we will make Brother Rockefeller business agent
of the oil division and Judge Gary manager of the
steel department.
Taking the discussion as a whole, thc New
York Times concludes that it "revealed Mr.
Gompers as an opportunist, taking what he could
get from any .source, and Mr. Hillquit as more or
less discontent with anything less than the recognition of a theory and the attainment of an ideal.
They seemed to agree only in hostility to the
capitalistic system." The chief regret of The Times
is that the Committee on Industrial Relations did
not give money a chance to talk:
"The difficulties which confront wage-earners and
wage-payers alike can not be settled by considering
either class alone. If the report is to be a factor in reviving prosperity it must find out what is tho matter
with capital as well as labor. It is the duty of the Commission to induce money to talk, and itis also tho duty
of money to talk, and to talk with sense rather than
selfishness-
"If capital has ideas which it is a shame to entertain
they ought to be dragged from it, and put in contrast
with such other ideas as are a discredit to the party or
the other part, which shows no reluctance to put itself
on exhibition. Unless the community is to surrender
either to unrestrained capital or to unrestrained labor
it is the duty of public opinion to put restraints upon
either or both as they may show need of it. In order
that this may be done, the one side ought to speak as
fully and candidly as the other. Money is making a
mistake when it allows labor and philanthrophy to do
all the talking."
3>
The father and mother ought to be numbered
with the boys and girls in every holiday and frolic
as well as in every responsibility.
Cost of Living
ADVERTISING turns over stocks rapidly,
and thereforo multiplies profits. This meaus
that prices in a shop which advertises can be
short rather than long.
Of this you may Iks sure: Prices in a shop which
advertises are not MORE than in a shop which
does not advertise. Thc chances are that they
are oftentimes lower.
This, also, is generally true: You will ffjid better
goods, better values and better sorvice in those
shops which turn over their stocks rapidly.
This means as a general thing shops which
advertise.
A NOTE   TO  MERCHANTS
Advertising costs you nothing-it is paid for by
the profits on increased isles.
Advertising is easy-it is simply saying in writing
what you say to customers in your shop.
Turn over stocks quickly, if you would make
more money.
I
Shop Where You are Invited FOUR
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
The editors of papers which Mr- St. John:    "Let me say right here that the Socialist party has
thinks of as "capitalistic" naturally do not approve n0 sympathy with the methods of the I. W. W.- they
such utterances.   The New York world remarks iare ineffective and childish.   But through the I. W. W.
Publ^r?™ by that the "defiant lawlessness" of the I. W. W. "has i ^if«*"«°™ "*«■ looms a new spirit.   The cause
the islander 1'RINUNO and 1'UBUSHING company .underlying the demonstrations  is  the  fact that the
 never before been so boldly exprest."  But it finds !„„.„..., ,     ,.      ,        ..,,,,,.
. j ——— 1  *     r , spread of the use of machinery has made skilled  labor
relief in the thought that— i relatively useless in comparison  with unskilled labor.
"Industrially, these people do not count.    Politically jThe Fed«ration  sl™»d have  made  stronger efforts to
and socially, they are blanks. They never yet have had jorganize unskilled labor'"
a following of any kind except among those who were!       But when p^.^ Samuel G rf
ignorant oi American life and laws.    To steady-going ., , ,.   ,      ,   , ,.
■ i ,;   ,.   ni. it .. i a. .     -x. • i       e federation of Labor, had his chance,  he replied.
inhabitants of the United States, the very violence of ' '   "'
of their utterances is the best antidotes."
^§e $sfcm&er
Subscription: $2.00, payable in advance.   Advertising Kates furnished
on application. »
Tu Correspondents: The Editor does nm hold himself responsible for
views expressed by correspondents. No letters will be published in the
Islander except over the writer's signature.   Tiie Editor reserves the
ri^ht to refuse publication^ any letter.
SATURDAY,
AUG. 1, 1914.
In thus promulgating his gospel of violence,
The Three Programs of Labor.    "St. John sounded the doom of his organization,"
[From The Literary Digest] in the St.  Louie Republic's opinion; because
according to the New York
the hearings:
World's account of
"The American Federation of Labor has devoted
more of its energies, its lime, and ils money to tho
Labor Leaders and Agitators are sometimes "there are not enough acknowledged murderers wta«»»J»"»W>l«> labor than it lioa to «v other
vaguely lumped together in the minds of those in the United States to keep it alive." The St.
who can see no possible good in either. But an loujs journal notes that-
occasional incident or utterance shows how highly
antognistic the various labor movements of ten "are
to one another. And the Federal Commission on
Industrial Relations, which is seeking "to discover the underlying causes of industrial tiniest," eiectl.ie chair at -j-e direction of St. John and others
and "to   agree   upon remedies of a constructive the leaders. The movement is progressing backward,
"But 14,000 1. W. W.'s are 'in good standing', according to St. John's admission. Of the 120,000 cards issued
it is evident that only 14,000 found themselves willing
to run even a remote risk of going to the gallows or the
of
so
this the Socialists have seen lit to attack
me bitterly in New York and elsewhere, lt is the intention of the Socialist party to divert the attention of
the workmen from the immediate struggle and the
immediate needs to something remote."
nature,"   thinks  it valuable at the start to gel far as its growth is concerned,
differing labor leaders to state Iheir platforms in
tlieir own words.   In order to do so the better
The cross-examination of  Mr. Gompers by
Mr. Hillquit developed into a verbal tilt which
became at times bitter. One explanation of this
lies in the fact that Mr. Gompers has led the
"His sounding the murder note has lessened the I successful fight to keep the American Federation
nances of Mr. St. John's pleasant little organization of Labor from committing itself to Socialism, and
it has not only listened to the direct statements ?°!fn« ™,ch farther a'°nK than the soaP-box- ^ *>me of the Socialistic attacks upon him have been
hM^ee. vitrolic.    Throughout the debate, Mr. Hillquit
given at the recent hearings in New York, but has
allowed these representatives to subject one
another to cross-examination as to their motives
means and purposes.   The New York dailies have
Mr. St. John's remarks lead tire New York tried in vain t0 force from President Gompers the
Evening Post to take a quick glance at Colorado, admission that the Federationalist and Socialist
Ulster, the-London art-galleries,  and other dis- Pr°Bram differed only ■» the point of quanitity.
been printing at some length the testimony thus turbed places, and to include that 'jiolence as a Mr- Gompers made it clear to his questioners
secured, and some of them pay editorial tribute to means of attaining political or social lends seems ithat the only kind of force he aPProved was
its value. It is clear enough to the New York to be in a kind of revival the world over.,, Yet "moral force;" when conclusion is used, only
commercial that "the labor-unionist is as far The Evening Post still hopes that Ms,is but «'a| resentment is aroused and the end is not gained,
away from the I. W. W. or the Socialist .is is passing madness," and is confident that "a little l0^ throuSh moral suasion and aPPeal to man's
capital itself, according to the claims regarding experience will show its futility." The Brooklyn Ireason can a m°vement succeed." He called
the position of capital set up by all three". As this Eagle takes comfort by reflecting tbat "luckily Iattent,on t0 the Federation's successful work for
conservative financial newspaper understands the organized Socialists, with analogous ideals',!better wages and workin2 ho-urs- for more effect"
them, "the labor leaders fear that the Socialists to those of the I. W. W., "favor no suihmethods," jive motions of workshops and mines, and
will capture their organization and use it for "and still more luckily for domestip peace, the!against chlld-labor- He said that the Federation
political purposes, and the I. W.W.'s fear that the larger section of organized labor is not arguing I favors legislation hmit.ng the work day for women
Socialists and the labor-unions will endeavor to for a programme of violence."
sustain some form of government, whereas they This brings us to Mr. Morris Hillquit's state-
themselves wish to substitute absolute anarchy ment that the purpose of the Socialistic party in'
iand children. But Mr. Gompers objects to minimum-wage and maximum-word-day legislation for
; men, because he thinks they can secure the same
for the existing social order."   Or one might pic- the United States is the nationalization of industry jend by their own initiative and because he  looks
ture tlie three armies as moving along different As The Evening Post summarizes the testimony I
roads, in the same direction, but with the eyes of, of this  lawyer,  who has  so  often defined and j
the three generals fixt on goals at varying dis- defended Socialism;
tances ahead.
,   .,     . , ,      ,,,    ,,.       .  o-vt i "Important industries should not be privately  con-
In the statements of Mr.  Vincent St. John, .   ,, , .        „,   ....   . ..   ..        ...     '
trolled tor profit without regard to the public welfare.
General Secretary and Treasurer of the I. W. W„jThe .,arty( does not advocate national ownership of all
these editors find of greatest interest the frank industries, but would substitute for private ownership
admission that his organization beleives in the some form of social ownership best adapted to individual
use of force "when necessary," The "primary cast's- ir°r instance, it would stand for national o«mr-
object of the
Mr, St. John as saying.
scale. Other industries might be best operated  by the but, added Mr.  Gompers, with a thrust at his
"is to organize and educate the working class on a class j State; others,  such as gas and water-works, by cities. Socialist questioner, it " is less interested in the
basis, the workers constituting a distinct class,    There and some smaller still by  cooperative groups working prornulgation of id'le anc, alusive programs fol*
only two working classes that we can sec, the l,ntlt'1' pubhc regulation. Industries might  even be run   ,.   .    .. . •„ .,      . , ,
eliminating every human ill than in actual work
for the laboring class."    But he went right on to
with suspicion upon the extension of the powers
of the Government over the worker. When asked
to state the Federation's remedy for unemployment, Mr. Gompers said his plan would be: "To
divide existing work with the unemployed, to
work for an increasing share in the production
and consumption of wealth for the workman, and
to maintain the worker's belief that unemployment is not a necessary or permanent element of
: I. W. W„" the New York SUN quotes 8hiP of railroads or interstate cpmmunicatioh, or mines our economic system." The Federation "would
is savinc or  'tnisuned'  business now organized on a national favor any practical plan" for solving this problem
programs
are really only two working classes that we can  ""    '
workers and the employers.   Our object is ultimately to under private management, such as the arts and crafts,
place the industries in the hands of thc working class which are not based on exploitation of Labor."
without having to pay tribute to the employing or any admit that among the things endorsed by thc
other-parasitical class." Testifying later,  Mr.  Hillquit  went  on to Federation   were free speech  and  assemblage,
show the  relation  between  Socialism  and the equal suffrage, and the initiative, referendum and
Mr. St, John does not exactly mean to say American Federation of Labor, as seen from the recall, proportional representation in government
that he and his fellow's advocate violence.   But he Socialistic viewpoint.  He said, as quoted in The direct election of the President and Vice-President
does  say,  as quoted in the New York evening £VEE1NG Post: amendment of the Constitution by easier methods
post, which has printed   the   most   complete .. ■     .,      ,    ,    .   - , ,       ...       .
"■i-i-o „,,,,-,«.,. „*„  »   „    u c .u   o  ... s. than now prevail, and extension of the public and
Ihe number of persons  who  support the Socialist .
movement in the United States is about 3,006,000.   The!vocational system of education.     Mr. Gompers
"We won't tell our members to allow themselves to be labor movement and the Socialist movement must be i Perhaps had his recent court experiences in mind
shot down and beaten up like cattle     Violence, as a considered  as one,   in ultimate aim.    The Federation ' when he told the Commission how sure he was
general rule, is forced on us. holds, like the Socialists, that an increasing share of the; that the Federation favored  "curbing the power
"As for the destruction of property, it isn't ours. It is products of labor should go to labor, and that eventually j0f the courts to punish forcontemptin laborcases
used to make the workers lot harder. The employers the workers should entirely own the wealth they,., pro-1M ^ seemed tQ Mr m k tQ mean ^ Mn
are   not  particular   if they injure our only property     duce.     Thus the aim is the same. The difference is one!,-. , ...       \    ,   ,     „ „    ,    ,
brain and muscle. They put us to work with half an of consciousness. The Federation looks to present GomPers s organization stands for all the de-
education, speed us up. wear us out, and leave us to remedies; the Socialist looks to the ultimate results,'mands of the Soclallst P31"^' wlth the exception
die in the poorhouse. So we don't propose to show any and builds his philosophy consciously on that larger 0I me maximum-work-day and minimum wage."
respect for their property." view.   .   .   . ."No"  was the retort;  "the  Socialist party has
accounts of the hearings: THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. ('.
•  ■ '   r    i .      —
FIVE
\
•V
3
<$>-
<$>-
"THE    SQUARE   DEALING   HOUSE"
MONEY 15 SCARCE!!
Everybody admits that now. Our town is passing through a crisis. Owing to a combination of circumstances, some of which are beyond our control, and some of which are
universal. Our main industry,,the mining and production of coal, is almost paralized and
our usually large payroll has shrunk in proportion.
May we venture to suggest at this point, in our mutual experience, that the main slogan
should be:-"PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY."
At least do not send money away to the big departmental stores in other cities until you
have paid us a visit and compared values. Then consider that we do not ask you to send
cash with order unless your name is new to us. Consider also that your home merchant
helps to circulate money in your own town; whereas ever dollar sent away in gone from
the district for good. Do not overbuy, buk let us have your requirements. Keep your
money at home.   Stand by one another and hope for the best.   -
" The darkest time is just before the dawn."
MACFARLANE BROTHERS LIMITED
Phone 10  P.O. Box 100
Cumberland, B.C.
purloined the long-established platform of the
American Federation." At intervals Mr, Hillquit
would propound similar questions, to the growing
irritation of Mr. Gompers, who declared that
organized labor was working to make the life of
the workers better from day to day, that it set no
final goal for itself, and that for his part he would
"appeal to the devil and his mother-in-law" (here
going Charles S. Mellen one better) "if labor can
be helped in that way." Mr. Gompers paid his
final respects to the Socialist party by asserting
tliat it "purposes to put the American working-
man in an economic strait-jacket. It purooses
something to which the American labor movement declines to give its adhesion."
But there was one prominent witness on
hand to show that a man can be both a good
Federationalist ond a good Socialist. Mr. Max S.
Hayes, besides editing the Cleveland Citizen, is
an organizer for the Typographical Union and also
a Socialist National Committeman. As a representative of the Union, he says, he has enjoyed
the cooperation of the Socialist party. The
immediate demands of the two bodies, he thinks,
are the same, and he does not wholly support the
policies of Mr. Debs on the one hand or Mr.
Gompers on the other. He is "a member of the
trade-union movement because it is a bread-and-
butter movement, meeting laborers'daily needs
day by day." Hence he considers the Federation
the logical economic organization for this country
But, says Mr. Hayes, as quoted in The Evening
Post,"we should at the same time have a political
organization expressing the larger aims of the
labor movement." He looks forward to a time
when the workers shall control both the Government and the production of wealth. Then, perhaps
we will make Brother Rockefeller business agent
of the oil division and Judge Gary manager of the
steel department.
Taking the discussion as a whole, thc New
York Times concludes that it "revealed Mr,
Gompers as an opportunist, taking what he could
get from any source, and Mr. Hillquit as more or
less discontent with anything less than the recog
nition of a theory Md the attainment of an ideal,
They seemed to agree only in hostility to the
capitalistic system." The chief regret of The Times
is that the Committee on Industrial Relations did
not give money a chance to talk:
"The difficulties which confront wage-earners and
wage-payers alike can not be settled by considering
either class alone. If the report is to be a factor in reviving prosperity it must find out what is tho matter
with capital as well as labor. It is the duty of the Commission to induce money to talk, and itis also the duty
of money to talk, and to talk with sense rather than
selfishness-
"If capital has ideas which it is a shame to entertain
they ought to be dragged from it, and put in contrast
with such other ideas as are a discredit to the party or
the other part, which shows no reluctance to put itself
on exhibition. Unless the community is to surrender
either to unrestrained capital or to unrestrained labor
it is the duty of public opinion to put restraints upon
either or both as they may show need of it. In order
that this may be done, the one side ought to speak as
fully and candidly as the other. Money is making a
mistake when it allows labor and philanthrophy to do
all the talking."
The father and mother ought fo be numbered
with the boys and girls in every holiday and frolic
as well as in every responsibility.
Cost of Living
ADVERTISING turns over stocks rapidly,
and thereforo multiplies profits. This means
that prices in a shop which advertises can bu
short rather than long.
Of this you may Ikj sure: Prices in a shop which
advertises are not MORE than in a shop which
docs not advertise. Thc chancers are that thoy
are oftentimes lower.
This, also, is generally true: You will fold bettor
goods, better values and bettor service Jn thoso
shops which turn over their stocks rapidly.
This means as a general thing shops which
advertise.
A NOTE  TO  MERCHANTS
Advertising costs you nothing-lt is paid for by
the profits on increased sales,
Advertising is easy- it is simply saying in writing
what you say to customers ln your shop.
Turn over stocks quickly, if you would make
more money.
Shop Where You are Invited SIX
THK ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
The
Magnet Cash Store
For
STOVES and RANGES
Wallpaper
Paints, Oils,
Tin and
Enamel ware
Crockery
Furniture
Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
AMENDING BILL
London, July 27—The amending Home Rule bill has again
heen postponed. Last Sunday's
outbreak in Dublin has made the
atmosphere in the House of
Commons anything but favorable
to the discussion of the bill today
as previously arranged. The
Government will proceed with it
next week.
The belief in political circles
now is that the postponement
of the amending bill in the
House of Commons is tantamount to its withdrawal.
The Unionist press demands
the resignation of Irish Secretary
Birrel as a result of the Dublin
affair,
Charles G. Callin
Accountant & Auditor
ESTATES MANAGED
RENTS COLLECTED
Land Registry Office Work a
Speciality
PHONES 42 & 48 COURTENAY, B. C.
T. E. BA
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
Buy yourself a Home near
N0.8M
BEST  ON   VANCOUVER   ISLAND
Blocks, from one acre to eight acres,
$200 per acre and upwards
Finest Homesites in Comox District
FOR PARTICULARS APPLY TO
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting',     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
From July 26th to August 9th.
Bible  Study   (Sunday  School),
10.30 a.m.
Services, 11,15 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday
8 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tues- |
day of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev, Wm. Elliott, B. A., Pastor.
J. E. Boffey
Fishmonger
(Next to Magnet Cash Store)
FISH & POULTRY
Orders Promptly Attended To
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O., L L. D., D.C.L., Prclldcnt
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager JOHN AIRD. Aia't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $t and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor, 821
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.      W. T.   WHITE, Manager.
Capital Paid Up ?11,560,000
Reserve Fund *13,500,000
nt
MAIL TIME TABLE
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
The one incomparable musical instrument."
he most versatile and indispensable enter
gainer."
MM
C^^HE recent advance in the science of the reproduction
\b$\j of sound waves has been so revolutionary that you
C? cannot possibly realize the true musical quality of
these late models of the Columbia until you have heard one
of them.
There is a Columbia that conforms to every requirement of
cost or surrounding. Between $25 and $650, the price you
wish to pay. is matched by an instrument thai gives you the
money's worth, even if measured by its intrinsic value.
Measured by ils musical quality, and its capacity for bringing
you "all the music of all tlie world" the money value is
multiplied beyond any computation.
G. A, FLETCHER MUSIC Co.
22, Commercial Street
"EDISON   HEADQUAR'I
Nanaimo, B.C,
ARRIVAL OF MAILS
Sunday, per S.S.Cowichan, 9a.m.
Tuesday,      "        "      10 a.m.
Tuesday, per S.S.Charmer, 8 p.m.
Thursday,       "      " 8 p.m
Saturday, " " 8 p.m.
Mail service from Bevan, Punt-
ledge, Courtenay and Rural Route
No. 1 daily except Sundays at
11.45 a.m.
MAIL CLOSES FOR DISPATCH
Sunday,per S.S.Cowichan, 12noon
Tuesday, " " 0 a.m.
Wednesday, S.S.Charmer, 0 a.m.
Friday, ." " (ia.m.
Saturday,    "        " 4 p.m.
Mail closes for Bevan. Punt-
ledge, Courtenay and Rural Route
No, 1 daily except Sunday at
•J-uO a.m.
Persons forwarding mail matter
to Happy Valley or Minto should
see that the address reads: Rural
Route No. 1, Cumberland. Letters
require 2 cents postage. As there
are other Happy Valley and Minto
post offices in British Columbia
this would prevent miss-sent
miil.
Drafts issued in any currency, payable all over the world
SPECIAL ATTENTION paid to SAVINGS ACCOUNTS and Interest at highest current rates allowed on deposits of $1 and upwards.
Cumberland, B.C. Branch	
Courtenay, B.C.       "     	
Union Bay, B.C.       "      	
 D. M. Morrison, Manager
 It. H. Hardwicke,   "
 F. Bosworth,
FOR SUMMER
WEAR
Dry Goods, Dress Goods, White Wear
Hosiery, Silk Goods, Boots and Shoes
C. Sing Chong
CHINATOWN,   West   Cumberland
v

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