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The Islander Aug 7, 1915

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Array Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
ii
IA
VOL. VI., No. 19       THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, AUG. 7. 1915. Subscription price, $1.50 per year
CUMBERLAND AMBULANCE CAR FOR USE OF MEDICAL & ACCIDENT FUND EMPLOYEES
OF CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
The above car was built for ambulance work by Messrs. Kierstead & 'Burton, carriage builders and
blacksmiths of this city, for Thos. E. Banks, local undertaker, to be used for general purposes and
in connection with the Medical & Accident Fund. The car is complete with the latest appliances
for first-aid work, and reflects great credit upon the builders, who have also under construction a
12-passenger auto stage for Mr. John Thomson, proprietor of the B.C. Garage, of Cumberland.
LETTER FROM PRIVATE BOYLE
I The following letter has been
received by Mr. James Whyte
from Mr. R. B. Boyle/ who is at
the front:
In the Trenches
July 10. 15
Dear Jimmy,—Just a few lines
to give you an idea of what it is
to be fighting in France and Belgium. I have already been in both
places, but Belgium seems to be
a finer looking country. All along
this part of the line there must
have been lots of very prosperous
farmers, judging from the size of
the houses (ruins now) and fine
looking crops, some of which had
not been harvested last year and
just went to seed, took root and
grew again this year. They seem
to grow lots of tobacco here, and
only about 100 feet from where I
am sitting now there is an old
ruined house which has been
badly battered by shell fire, inside
this there are lots of tobacco
leaves nicely cured. This morning I went in and got some leaves
and made a few cigars, not very
nice looking but good smoking.
Some days everything is very
quiet here, you would hardly
know there was a war on, and we
sit around and peddle the old dope
just as if. we were sitting on the
porch at the Union Hotel. Who
do you think I met a few days
ago, looking as large as life, but
George Lloyd. He has been with
the Canadians here for 5 months
and has been fairly lucky, never
got a scratch yet. Burns was
wounded 24th May and has not
come back yet. Out of nine who
came down from Cumberland,
Courtenay and Comox there are
only two in the firing line, Billy
Brown and myself. All the rest
are either killed or wounded, and
out of our section, which included
Nanaimo,Cumberland, Courtenay
and Comox, twenty-six mon, there
are only eight left. We are well
fed and gets lots of tobacco and
cigarettes, but we certainly do
miss the McDonald chewing, we
never get any.
A big shell going through the
air sounds exactly like a locomotive running down hill and popping off when you can hear nothing but the escaping steam. You
can always hear a shell coming,
but you never know how close it
is to you. I had one drop between my legs, but luckily it
failed to explode. If it had I
would have been wearing wings
now. There is a little shelling
going on now but they are well
over our heads and meant for
some other object than our trench.
We go out of the trenches tomorrow for a rest, probably a
week. We usually go to some
town five or six miles back from
the lines, have a few good baths
and a rest, are allowed into town
and manage to enjoy ourselves.
When writing address as
follows : Private R. B. Boy e,
No. 4 Co., 7th Battalion, Car a-
dians, c/o G.P.O., London.
Don't forget to let me have all
the news in your letter, as I li.-ce
to hear how things are going on
up there. Well, Jimmy, I must
have some dinner now.
The Kaiser says the war will be
over in October; he must be
beginning to realize he is about
all in.
R. B. Boyle.
P.S.— The Germans shouted
across this morning: " When are.
you coming bvef ?" ; '' - *       ■•>■■ %
MACHINE GUN FUND
Peviously acknowledged $253.00
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd. 10.00
John Sutherland.  5.00
C. H.Tarbell & Son  5.00
T. H. Mumford..:  5.00
W.A.Clark...  1.00
W. R. Dunn  1.00
Thos. Hart  1.00
T. G. Montgomery  1.00
John McKenzie  1.00
Edmund Watt  1.00
Matthew Brown  1.00
Thos. Bannerman  1.00
Thos. Rickson  1.00
JohnG. Biggs  1.00
Thos. Cessford  1.00
Thos. E. Bate  1.00
I Octover   1.00
L. J. Aston  .50
Dr. E. R. Hicks  10.00
Miss A. Macintosh  1.00
Miss E.Rogers  2.00
Rev. A. Bischlager  5.00
John Baird   2.00
R. F. Mills   2.00
C. H. Grant.  1.00
Alex. Aitken  1.00
Total  $315.50
Further subscriptions will be
announced next week.
J. M. Little of Union Bay was
here on Thursday.
Hugh Brennan has returned
from a visit to the Mainland.
Samuel Jones has returned from
a business trip to Vancouver.
M. Curran, of Denman Island,
was here during the week.
A. Pearson left on Monday for
Victoria and San Francisco.
Mrs. Nottingham, of Denman
Island, was here on Sunday.
Mrs. G. R. Johnston is visiting
Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Nordgren.
City team defeated a baseball
team from the'U.S.S. 'Albatross'
on the Recreation Ground on Saturday.
The Odds and Ends of West
Cumberland will play a game of
baseball on the RecreationGround
at six o'clock this evening.
Mrs. J. A. Tanner, Mrs. T. L.
McKae and Miss Johnson, of
Nanaimo, were week-end visitor*
in this city, the guests of Mrs.
Tanner's cousin, Mr. T. B. O'Con-
neli, manager of the Royal Bank
of Canada.
Mrs. George Robinson, of Sandwick, entertained a few of her
immediate friends at her home on
Monday evening in honor of Mrs.
W. J. Etherington and her little
daughter Dorothy and Miss Mildred  Bourne,   of Shaughnessy
Heights, Vancouver, who have^
been her guests for the last two-
weeks.   They returned to Vancouver yesterday enroute to the*
Panama Pacific Exposition. TWO
THE ISLANDUIK,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAB.
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, AUGUST 7th, 1915.
Red Herrings
It is a fact, well known to all
who have studied the question,
that the fuel oil interests and the
big corporations which have taken
to using oil have done a lot of
work and spent a lot of money in
the effort to prevent the imposition of a protective tariff on fuel
oil. It is a fact that they are
prepared to do and to spend
much more for the same purpose.
And it is probably also a fact,
though it cannot be proved, that
they are in large measure respon
sible for the numerous "red herrings" which are constantly being dragged across the trail to
divert public attention from the
real significance of the fuel oil
invasion in relation to the very
serious conditions obtaining in
the coal trade.
It is said, for instance, that the
business depression of the past
eighteen months or so has caused
a general slowing up of industry,
with a consequent reduced demand for coal. It is said that
the demoralization of metal mar-
eets owing to the war has caused
the shut-down of many metal
mining properties of the interior,
thereby restricting one market
for coal and coke. This applies,
of course, principall to the Crows
Nest, Nicola and other interior
coal fields.
As regards especially the Vancouver Island coal mines it is said
that the opening of the Panama
Canal, with its coaling stations
at Colon and Balboa, has changed
the routing of shipping to the
disadvantage of Island coal. And
further, that the withdrawal of
ocean tonnage due to the war is
the cause of slack times in the
Island mines. There are other
reasons given, but we need not
detail them all.
■
1
DRY  GOODS  AND
GENTS'  FURNISHINGS
-SALE-
AT CAMPBELLS
BEGINS SATURDAY, 14TH INST.
This will be the greatest sale in this district's history and will be the
biggest BARGAIN OPPORTUNITY in years to purchase High-Class
. Dry Goods and Men's Furnishings at Low Prices. We are going to
deluge our entire store with a distribution of Summer Merchandise for
Men and Women at prices that will be within the reach of everyone.
THIS SALE WILL CONTINUE FOR TEN DAYS ONLY
[See Large Posters.]
Considered as " red herrings "
all these reasons have the peculiar merit of being substantially
true, They are all based on facts.
But speaking of facts, they are
bagatelles compared to the fact
of fuel oil compet tion.
Consider this: the importation
of fuel oil in the fiscal year 1914
was equivalent to over 700,000
tons of coal; that is, 22 per cent
of the total output* in the biggest
year of British Columbia's coal
mining history, or 32 per cent of
the output in 1914. Is there no
significance in a fact of that
magnitude? Why, if that amount
of coal were being marketed instead of oil there would be prosperity in the coal trade today.
Not such prosperity, perhaps, as
we have had in the past; for the
other depressing factors would
still be in operation.    But com
pared with present conditions it
would be howling booming prosperity.
And yet you will meet men-
poor fellows whose living has
been cut down by oil competition
to seven or eight days' work in a
month—who will grin in your face
if you try to talk to them about
fuel oil.  It doesn't interest them.
Here is another fact which is
worth thinking about. The "red
herring" factors are not permanent. The war will end; business
will revive. In the main they are
transitory. We cannot mend
them, but in time they will ■ very
largely mend themselves. But
there is nothing transitory about
fuel oil competition. Given an
open market it is bound to be a
permadent factor of ever-increasing strength. There is really
only one small market which is
safe from its intrusion, and that
is household fuel. There is only
way to stop it from getting all'
the rest, and that is by putting a
thumping good tariff on it. And
that cau only be done by a long
pull, a strong pull and a pull all
TOGETHER.
Last fact of all. If we are not
willing to work with a will for a
tariff on oil it would be better for
all of us to pull stakes and get
out of this province as quickly as
we can. Because, failing that
tariff, in a few years' time Cumberland and all the other coal
towns will be as dead as Sodom
and Gomorrah; and British Columbia will be bogged in such a
mess of insolvency and stagnation
as will hold it back fer twenty
years to come.
Let us leave the "red herrings"
alone and go after the real enemy,
which is fuel oil. THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Comox District Patriotic War Fund.
Statement for the month ending June 30th, 1915:
RECEIPTS.
Balance on hand as shown on last
statement, May .30,1915 $1205.06
J. Ward (City Collection)       13.00
Union Bay*.       28.50
Total $1246.56
PAYMENTS.
Mrs. W.Brown  42.00
Mrs. M.Ellison.....  42.00
Mrs. C Macintosh  30.00
Mrs. R. Rushford............... .52.00
Mrs. Ponder  .30.00
Mrs.Cope  32.00
Mrs. W. Wallace  35.00
Mra. L. Piket  30.00
Mrs. R, Herd  37.00
Mra. G. Brown  35.00
War stamps 24
Islander Publishing Co. 1 month. 2.50
Cumberland News, 2 months  5.00
Balance on hand June 30,1915.. .$ 873.82
Total........... $1246.56
Respectfully submitted,
T. B. O'CONNELL, Treasurer.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Phone87
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Henderson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing aSpeoialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis ot Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining tights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Torn
tones and in a portion of the Province ef
British Columbia, may bo leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an aora. Not more than 2,000 aores
will be loosed to ono applicant.
Application for a lease must bo mado by
tho applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of tho district in which tho rights
applied fer aro situated.
In surveyed territory tho land must be
deacribed by sections, or legal subdivisions
of seotioas, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplioeut himself.
Kaon application must be accompanied
by a fee of $& which will be refunded if the
rights applied f erare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on tho
merchantable output of tho mino at the
rate of ivo oonts per ton.
The person operating tho mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights sre
not boing operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onoo a yoar.
The lease will inoludo the ooal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may bo considered necessary
for the working of the mine at thereto of
$10.00anacre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
DO YOU REALIZE ALL^
THAT LONG DISTANCE f
TELEPHONING MEANS •
One hundred and eighty words per minute can be spoken
over the telephone, speaking slowly and distinctly. It is the
cheapest means of communication.
Your reply is received without waiting. No other means
is faster.
The telephone is the only means of Long Distance verbal
communication. It gives personal contact. What is more
satisfactory?
B. C. Telephone  Co., Ltd.
SUFFRAGE LEADER
DESPISES GERMANY!
"Prussian militarism, If ft should
triumph, would be the moot terrible
catastrophe that cottld happen to the
women of tho world," declared Mrs.
Pankhurst ;n an Interview. "It would
mean the return of women to utter
slavery—the renewal ef the medteva'
conception of womankind. The mill-
tary-mad type of German retards his
wife as ohattel: he calls her *hU
housfrau'—his woman!
"The women of England would tar
rather face the Krupp cannon thai
submit to the soul-crushing dictate*
MRS. E, PANKHURST
of the Kaiser! If finally necessary to
can stand shoulder to shoulder with
the men of England, who are, after
all, our comrades—for the soul of the
English woman is now too unfettered,
too free, ever to allow the yoke of
the woman-contemptuous military
Germans to choke lt again into the
dumbness of slavery!"
Uncle Eph. Remarks:
when folks used t' take a hour off
three times a day reglar t' fill up ther
■waist baaketo'—an' bread an' dough-
lots wasn't 77 per cent holes."
&
■ •
'Is now open for
• -  /business in the
Willard Block
Dunsmuir Ave.
'     .:'■■•'■
i ■-.'•■:, i
s
TAKEN
DAY OR
NIGHT
First Class Work Guaranteed
at Low Prices.
Enlarging a
Specialty
Films Developed for Amateurs
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted on the Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
FIRE INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London A Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
Total Assets -126,788,930.
W. WILLARD
LOCAL AGEN1
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
SPECIAL LINES IN
WHITE PIQUE
TO-DAY AT FOUR
Blander. Cumberland, b.c
CONNER ON WARSHIP
MOST SEE TARGET
Vast   Difference    Between    Sea   and
and Land Fighting For That Reason-Effective  Range 11   Miles
Perhaps no subject is so little understood a3 naval gunnery, the general Idea being that the effectives es
of a naval gun depends upon its extreme range, says a writer in "Navy
and Army." One enquirer asks for
the ranges of the 12-inch, 13.5-i.rh.
and 15-inch tuns, and adds, "I am
asking this question because newspapers of late have quoted the ran e
for 15-inch guns as between 20 tnl
28 miles."
Suppose this was true, o> what uso
would be a 28-nrile range be? The
problems that face the naval artillerist are entirely different from th>sn
with which the military man has to
•cope. Military ..uns are used against
fixed objects. The gunner knows exactly where the object is, and. with
a map, ca:. fix its distance almost to
a yard, and so* with his h'ghanglel
howitzers oan drop shells on to that
object, aitnough he cannot see it and
a hill may intervene between it and
the gun. His task then is a comparatively simple one.
The naval gunner fires at a moving
object, so must see it before he opens
fire, and that fact limits the effectiva
range of all guns, no matter what
their possible range may be. Par example, to ~ee a distance of 28 milvs
at sea, that is, for the horizon to ba
28 miles away, one would need to be
600 feet above sea level. Obviously,
no ship in e:*;stenee has masts tut
height; 125 feet above sea level give.-i
us an horizon of 12.84 miles; 100 feet
an horizon of 11.49 miles. We may
take it that the control station of tha
average ship is not more than 10J
feet above sea level, and that, therefore, the extreme effective range oi
her guns 's 11 m'les and no noro.
At Five  Miles  Distance
But let us take a ship firing at fivo
■miles—roughly, 10,000 yards—,nauu-
cal miles), which is the distance it
was generally assumed before the war
that naval actions would commence.
It would take a projectile ^2 seconds
to travel that distance; if the ship
at which the shot was ".red was travel,
ing at 20 knots, she would have
moved 120 rds Iu that 12 seconds,
which, of course, has to be allowed
for when laying the gun. If the shly
from which th'e shot is .ired is also
traveling at 20 knots or more, that
forward movement must also be
counteracted on the sights, so that
when the gunner fires his gun he does
not fire at the ship he desires to hit,
but at the spot at which he expects
that ship to be when his shot reaches
it. Unless he can actually see thi
ship and jud6'e of her speed he would
only throw his projectiles into the   e:..
Last year, Mr. Churchill dealt with
the 15-inch gun in the House of Commons, and these were the exact words
used: "its i>ower may be measured
by the fact that whereas the 13 5-inoh
gun hurls a projectile of 1.400 poun.s,
a 15-inch gun lires a projectile of
nearly a ten in weight, aud can hurl
this immense mass >-f metal ten or
twelve miles,' which would be from
20,000 to 2-*- 000 yards, and it is pr .'liable that 'be papers have confused
the thousands of yards with mi. b.
The real advantage that the 15-inch
gun has over a 12-inch, or even 13.5-
inch, is that it has a flatter trajectory,
which means a tremendous lot In accuracy of shcrtin-. Some time since,
Sir Percy Scott dealt with shooting,
and said: "In firing at a range of
fifteen miles, which is possible, the
shot would go to an altitude of 22,500
feet, which, if my geography is cor'
xect, is 7,500 feet over the summit of
Mont Blanc."
Fall Directly Downwards
Leaving out the question of the different   atmospheres    it   would    pass
through, it would, in the iaUer part
of its flight, fall almost directly down-
wards, which very considerably reduces its chance of hitting. The deck*
of a ship presents a target of, say, 500
feet long by 80 feet wide, tapering
off towards each end, and that would
be the target that a shot falling from
a great height woul have to hit. But
with a flatter trajectory, the target
would be increased immeasurably because the danger zone increases (thia
really needs .. diagram to make it
clear). The 12-inch gun can penetrate any -.rmor in existence at possible naval ranges, .nd can fire a
projectile just as Tar as a 13.5-inch
or 15-inch, further, in fact, so our
object in increasing 'he size of the
guns was for neither of those purposes, but because we can make .a-ch
more accurate shooting with the larger guns, and their destructive power
Is, of course, immensely greater.
CREMATED THE DEAD
Thousands ef Bodies of German Soldiers Burned In Blast Furnaces
A Catholic cleric writing from the
trenches in North France mentioned
the following incident regarding the
German dead and the mptiner of their
disposal: "In the towns of Lille and
Namur in north France there are
large blast furnaces for the smelting
of iron ore, which is found in large
quantities in this part of the country,
The furnaces have long since ceased
the work of smelting, and the dump
cars used for bringing the 'ron or9
have geen emptied of their loads and
put to a far different purpose. Every
day two and some times three long
trains of these dump cars are brought
in loaded to the brims with German
corpses and piled high at the mouth
of the furnaces. A large gang of men
are employed day and night placing
the bodies lour at one time in a sling
and dropping them into the huge fires,
where they are quickly incinerated.
"Thousands, have been disposed ol
in this way and the work still goes
on."
CRACK REGIMENT OF RUSSIA'S ARMY
Dropped Into Poetry.
•"Our office boy dropped into poetry
yesterday."
"How was that?"
"The literary editor kicked him intt
the wastepaper basket."—Tit Bits.
Nice Distinctions
"So you want to make a fresh start,
my man?" said the philanthropist, as
he looked at the notorious young
cracksman.
"Yes, sir," answered the expert
safe-breaker.
"I take it you're prepared to do any
honest work?"
"Anything that'll give me another
chance, sir."
"Well, now," continued his patron,
"I've a friend who is just producing
a new melodrama. In it there Ib a
scene where a burglar enters the room
and rifles the safe. Nbw, you coald
■do the thing to the life. Fifteen dollars a week, and you can start tomorrow."
The convict shook his head in a
resigned manner.
"Sorry, boss," he said, "but It's no
go."
"What! It's the chance of your
life!"
'Can't help lt. But I promised my
mother I'd never go on the stage,
toss!"
The Fat Calf
I   Teacher:   "When the prodigal son
jreturned, Tommy, what did his father
Wo?"
I   Bright Boy: "He nearly killed the
lat calf."
Men of the Fonogorijski Regiment of Moscow in a shallow
hastily constructed trench at the front, awaiting orders
to advance. This regiment is regarded as the best in the
Russian army, and is one of the two Russian regiments
accorded the privilege of marching with rifles at the
"charge."
CORRESPONDENCE
AN INQUIRY
To the Editor of the Islander
Dear Sir, — Have the School
Trustees authority to allow the
principal to resign after the school
has closed for vacation? Can he
not be prevented from going even
now? lt gives Cumberland simply
no chance to secure a good principal as the worthwhile teachers
all have positions ere this, and it
is certainly too late to bribe a
good teacher from another position, as no trustees with the welfare of their town or school at
heart would consent.
The trustees were elected by
he pec;•!■   with full confidence
t at tl";     ould have the welfare
at heart,  and
I   i ach of trust.
acancy there
should be three in the next election. Even yet they should reconsider the matter and withdraw
their consent.    .
A. H. PEACEY.
LADIES' ARSSULANtyE CLASS
A ladies' branch of St, John's
Ambulance Association bas been
organized, with the following'
officers: President, Miss Muriel
Evans; vice-president, Miss W.
Wilcox; Secretary. Miss Net+ie
Stewart. The class will meet for
instruction in the public school
building on Friday the 13th inst.,
at 7.3o p.m. All ladies wishing
to join the association will please
hand in their names tp secretary.
irt"t-
Dr.   Montgomery,' of Comox,
was here on a visit on Tuesday.
 _____^__ THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, R C.
FIVE
t't
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
.  Methodist Church.
Services: Evening at 7 o'clock.
Service at Bevan, 2 o'clock p.m.
Bible Study   (Sunday  School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Tenth Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m., Holy Communion
11 a. m. Litany and Holy
Eucharist.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M. Forces on Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
'Columbia'
Double-Disc
Records for
JULY.
The Columbia Double-Disc Records for June have just come
in and are now on sale.
These records are for use on
either  Columbia    or   Victor
^machines.
The June list contains some
of the finest selections ever
offered to the public. Every
class of good music is well
represented.
If your name is not on our
monthly mailing list, or if you
have not received one of our
Free Record Catalogues
We shall be glad to add your
name on request.
Order Your Records  Early
G.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
When u a Kitchen
Not a "Kitchen"?
With a Hughes Electric Range, it
is a parlor. Just as cool and clean
and airy.
The modern "kitchen" deserves a
better na ne. In truth, it is a cook*
ing apartment—as bright and tidy
as any other room. For since the
perfection of electric cooking, all
the clumsy ugliness and every
trace of dirt and soot and gas
have gone. .
The modern cook works with her
head and not her hands. She has
hours of time that Were never
hers before. Simple figures show
that in a life time five solid years
of drudgery are saved by this
practical invention.
And that isn't all. Consider the sacrifice of
happiness, health and youthful charm. Old-
fashioned methods have truly exacted a heavy
toll.    .
es Electric Ranges
Beauty fades fast over a hot, dirty coal stove. Gas positively poisons! In combustion, gas takes up oxygen and gives out poisonous fumes. That is why plants
will not live where gas is burned.
Mr. Master-of-the-House, this is not a luxury but a choice—not a choice but a necessity! Think it over. Then come in and see this Range. You will hear some facts
that will astonish yoa
FOR SALE BY
CUMBERLAND ELECTRIC LIGHTING Co., Ltd.
T. E. King, land surveyor, was
in town during the week.
A. S. Henderson, of the local
branch of the Canadian Bank of
Commerce, returned on Sunday
from a two weeks' vacation to
Chilliwack and mainland points.
H. McArthur, principal of.the
Cumberland Public School, has
resigned, and accepted a similar
position at Vernon. The citizens
of Cumberland regret his departure but do not wish to impede
the progress of,an able man in his
profession.
G. Atkinson, principal of the
Cumberland High School, stated
today that he has not resigned,
as rumored. Although it is said
that the School Trustees have reduced his salary to $55 a month.
Of garden hose and sprinklers
we have a good stock. C, H.
Tarbell and Son.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamel ware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
(Iraphopliones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
Phone 31
P. O. Box 279 SIX
—BB
THE ISLANDER CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SALMON RIVER MINES
Work has been commenced on
the McKay group os three claims
on Salmon River by Mr. J. C.
Haas, of Spokane, who bonded
the property a month ago. Mr.
Haas has at present all the men
working he can use, but he will
put more on as the development
proceeds.    A'
Salmon River empties into
Johnstone Strait, about 120 miles
north of Vancouver, and is on
Vancouver Island. The property
under bond is seven miles from
tidewater, and there is no means
of transportation at the present
time except a trail which has
been swamped out this summer
by Alex. McKay, the owner of
the property.
The ore on the property is
cdaracteristic of the coast copper
except that it carries more gold
than the average. The mining
engineer's report shows that assays across the productive pa-t of
the lead run $17.60 in copper,
$11.40 in gold, and $1.60 in silver
to the ton. This is supposed to
be an average assay, but others
have been taken showing values
from $19.60 to $52 per ton. The
lead shows about seven feet of
shipping ore.
FRENCH MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR
L. J. Majvy — (It is rumored that
there may be a reaisuiuuiionoi portfolios in the French Cabinet, although
that country has now what might be
termed a Coalition Cabinet.)
Brighten-up with a little Sherwin-Williams Paint. It wears
longest and looks the best of any
on the market.
t%*
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECT VE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
W<5d.
Thurs
Fri.
Sit,
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35     3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
1030
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
1030
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10..55
2.25
10:55
735
10:55
735
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
230
11.-00
730
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00    3.00
(f) Uke Trail Road
735
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:06
735
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55     2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45'
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
•3.30
6.30
3.30
mtmmmm
6.30
3.30
3,30
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
1135
8:00
1135
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY IMG   ISLANDER.  (JUMBEKLANU, B. U
SEVEN
(
0
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O., L L. D., D.CU President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. Gmrri Manager JOHN AIRD. Aaa't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE Him, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing- business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che*
ques and Letters of Credit issued sud available in all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates. S22
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW FULLY STOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT  TO  CUSTOMERS:—No  Orientals,  Agents,  or  Solicitors
employed.
SweepingReduction
-IN-
LADIES' and GENTS'
TAILOR-MADE
CLOTHING
Suits made to order that were $30.00 and
\       $35.00.   Your choice now for	
$25.00
When material is supplied making is reduced from $20.00
to $14.00.
S.   ISAKA,
Cumberland   Tailor
Maker of Ladies' and Gents' High-class Clothing
Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B.C.
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
nvsci
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
mam
I
HORSES AND SWORDS
•i
Queer Reason Advanced For Hitching
Smaller Horse on   Left Side
You have noted that unless the
larger horse of a team were driven
on the off side you are annoyed or
even distressed? This is, of course,
because your heart is on your left
side. You may say that it is because
you are used to that particular arrangement of horses; but did yoj
ever ask yourself why the larger
horse is harnessed upon the r.ght
side? Let us follow lt up; it is really
very interesting.
It Is because, not so very long
since, we nad a posti.ion to dr.ve for
us, who rode one of the horses. It
was his habit to hitch the smaller
horse on the lefthand side, bs.ca.sj
it is easier to get on a small Uorsj
than on a larger one—anj because it.
was the habit to mount a hurse trom
the left side.
The habit of getting on a tiorsii
from the leit s.de was foim;;d becai.3-j
men had the habit of wearing t.;e
sword upon the left side; therefore,
to gat upon a horse from the riant
side while wearing a sword, was not
practical; one's sword would get
tangled between one's legs. The
liabit of wearing the sword 012 the Lft
side rather than on the right was
formed because most men were
habitually right han led; and so cold
draw easier and quicker from a scabbard on the left. The habit 0:' bein-;
right-handed was formed so 'that the
heart might not be eas ly rea :1 d by
the opposing sword.—Eugene M.
Rhodes, in Harper's Weekly,
WORLD'S SM« Ll EST ARMS j
If ever the disarmament of the
world occurs, there will be several
countries that will not have much to
do in that line, such as, for instance
Monaco, the army of which comprises
seventy-five guards, seventy-ti/e carbineers, and twenty firemen.
Another diminutive army is that of
the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
numbers 135 gendarmes, 170 vo un
teers, and thirty musicians. Thu
Republic of San Marino can put in
the field a total of nine companies of
950 men and thirty-eight officers com
mauded by a marshal. Tbe army on a
peace footing consists o£ o.ie com
pany of sixty men.
The fighting force of the "BlacK
Republic," Liberia, is compjsed cflt
700 men and almost as many oilers
Liberia, however, evidently co.isi e 3
its army a formidable one, since upon
the occasion 01 hostilities between
any of the Powers, it always issues
a. kroclamatlon of neutrality.
Too Much Enthusiasm f>r Idleness.
Long ago Robert Ste-enson suggested that a lad who played truant
might be doing himself more good
than he who never missed a lecture.
Now we hear a professor declaring
"We are prone to forget that the
twin gifts of youth are enthusiasm
and idleness." All our young people
are terrifically ln earnest about something or other. But they havo not
much chance of idleness. Even their
games are so organised that sport itself begins to be a systematic business."—London Telegrayh.
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
& don't you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumbertand
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS   AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,        Cumberland, B.C.
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
General   Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing   a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Kebuilt, or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.
Kierstead <fc Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland. B.C.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
F resh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BL.DG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mr. F. Lighter returned from
a visit to Calgary on Sunday.
William Hayman has severed
his connection with the Ideal
Store.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bryden and
Robert Bryden arrived by auto
on Saturday.
Miss Hazel Frame returned
from a visit to Seattle on Saturday.
Hy. Devlin, inspector of mines,
arrived on Saturday on his usual
monthly tour of inspection.
The Cumberland Boy Scouts
returned on Monday from a
week's camp at Comox.
Mrs. Syd. Horwood left for
Victoria this morning on a week's
visit to friends in that city.
M. Manson, M. P P., visited
Cumberland and Union Bey on
Saturday, and left for Vancouver
on Sunday.
Joseph Hunter, chief engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., was here on official
business on Friday.
H. S. Fleming, chairman of tie
executive of the Canadian Collier-
ies(Dunsmuir), Ltd, has returned
to Victoria.
Miss Louisa Bickle, of the Victoria Jubilee Hospital staff, is
home on a month's sick leave and
not on a vacation as stated in the
Islander.
John Hunden, son of Mr. and
Mrs. David Hunden, and Miss
Elizabeth Shearer was united in
marriage on Monday by the Rev.
Thos. Menzies, at Sandwick.
A meeting of the Cumberland
Board of Trade will be held in the
Council Chambers on Monday
evening, commencing at 8-30.
Members are urgently requested
to attend.
M. H. Davis left on Wednesday
for Nakusp, where he has been
transferred to a similar position
to the one he l"eld in the Cumberland hranch of the Canadian Bank
of Commerce.
Mary Lighter, wife of Mr. F.
Lighter of this city, died at Calgary on Saturday, July 24th. The
deceased lady was 41 years of
age and leaves a husband and six
children to mcurn her loss.
At a meeting of the Ladies Aid
of the Grace Methodist Church
held in tha Parsonage on Tuesday
evening it was decided to hold a
garden party on Tuesday. August
17th. Mr. and Mrs. H. Mounce
have kindly consented to allow
the Ladies Aid the use of their
lawn for the day.
(^^^%,
s*w^
THE   BIG   STORE
SEMI-ANNUAL
EARING RALE
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
and Gents' Furnishings,
Commencing
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14TH
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
TERMS STRICTLY CASH
Our stocks in the above departments are much too large
and must be reduced considerably. We intend making
a large reduction and we know prices will do it. Our
stock is composed of general dry goods, most of it
bought before prices advanced.    A double saving is
yours at this sale.
All Regular Lines of Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, and
* Gents Furnishings will be reduced 10 per cent, for
this sale.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE
Phone 3-8

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