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The Cumberland Islander Jan 29, 1921

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Array VICTORIA
Provincial Library
THE CUMBERLAND
fi m\^A\
v v IN
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. B.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Championship Still Undecided
.Another Drawn Game Sunday
Two Hours' Play at Nanaimo Between Cumberland and South
Wellington Fails to Result in Score—Teams Very Evtnly
Matched and Good Game Taking Place, Cumberland Having
Best of Play, Though Unable to Register.
Chinese Relief Fund
Public Meeting Called for Sunday Evening—Objectors and
Sympathizers Invited.
In China thirty millions of Industrious people of the farmer class are
starving. The failure of the harvest
for three successive seasons ls responsible for their plight. In their need
they appeal to us to help. Their own
government and the peopfes of other
countries and communities the giving
assistance to them. *
The need, however, ls stupendous,
and we in Cumberland have been asited
to do what we can to aid them.
The Chinese residents of Cumberland gave liberally to the appeal for
the sufferers ln Europe. They are doing what they can to help their own
countrymen.
Can we do less than they?
The committee ln charge of the local
appeal have been made aware that
some people have objections to aiding
the famine sufferers, and suggest that
the objections be frankly stated at the
meeting in the Anglican Church Hall
at 8.30 on Sunday evening.
TWO GAMES SCHEDULED
FOR THE WEEK-END
Once again the Cumberland football team made strenuous but
unsuccessful efforts to secure «the custody of the Upper Island
League cup, when on Sunday last they jHurneyed to Nanaimo and
played the South Wellington team in another scoreless game.
This was the second attempt of the team to decide the custody
of the Island Challenge Cup. Cumberland was without the services
of Bannerman, who failed to arrive on time. South Wellington
were at full strength with the exception of Craig, who was on the
injured list.
The ground was very heavy, some	
snow showing lu patches, aud making
the pitch in places like a skating rink.
Campbell won the toss, and referee
Craig started the teams on time.
Misrsil Open ('mil.
Play In the first half was of a give-
and-take nature, the defence of both
teams being too strong for the opposing front rank, the goalkeepers having
little to do. Cumberland missed a
golden oppodtunity when Nicol, James
and Carle missed an open goal from
a free kick.
The second portion of the game was
decidedly ln favor of Cumberland,
South Wellington being seldom within
shooting distance of Walker, who only
got one shot to stop during the entire
game. At the other end Shepherd was
being worked overtime, and gave a
finished display ot gonlkeeping. James
was well matched, but was always
dangerous, and with a little luck would
have been through on several occasions.
Twice during this half Cumberland
claimed a penalty, but the best they
got was a free kick against McFagan,
for handling the ball on the dreaded
line; Craig, after examining the
ground, gave the defenders the benelit
of the doubt.
Carle at outside right had several
good tries, one of his shots hitting the
upright and bounding into play again.
Ooordle was playing the game o( his
lite, and It was no fault ot his that the
local team could not And the net.
Splendid Defence.
Playing extra time the Island champions kept South Wellington on the
defence during the whole period, and
only their splendid defence saved the
game, Cumberland stood the heavy
going much better, and finished
stronger, and on the play should have
won easy.
South Wellington's defence is to be
congratulated. They were up against
a stronger and better balanced team
and came out of the game with credit.
Stubbart at centre halt was a tower of
strength, and time after time brought
the B. C. Champions' front rank to a
stop when they looked like going
through.
South Wellington's' front rank was
seldom, If ever, dangerous, Home,
Conti and Irvine having their measure
from beginning to end. This Is probably the finest half-back line that ever
"represented Cumberland, and it would
he hard to say which was best. Home
probably did more work than any other
.man on the field, and his punting on
the heavy ground was a feature.
Irvine's display was more polished,
Jock being an adept in the art of tackling. Conti at centre half was here,
there and everywhere when needed.
Strang, and Campbell at back were
. 'always sate, and as a pair will be hard
i.to equal. They know the gome and
.'■iiave developed a splendid understanding of each other's play.
The forwards deverved a better fate.
The breaks went against them; on
play they wero value for goals, and In
the replay should find the net.
Referee Craig handled the game to
perfection and kept the players well
ln hand.
Replay Saturday.
| The management of the local club
are well pleased with the display of
the team, and so confident are they
ot success that they have agreed to a
replay at Nanaimo on Saturday next.
DEPT. OF SOLDIERS' CIVIL
RE-ESTABLISHMENT
	
Temporary Relief Fund.
All communications re the above
can be obtained from Mr, A. J. Four-
acre, Penrith Avenue, who has been
appointed Inspector for Cumberland
{district. It Is earnestly requested that
If there are any known cases of ills
tress among returned men in this dis
trict, that information be given at
once.
Cumberland United to Play Yarrows at Victoria Saturday
in Island League.
Manager Dave Wilson mustered ur*|
two teams on Thursday and took them
down to Union Bay for a practice
game. The day was an Ideal one for
football and the ground in excellent
condition.
After a hard-fought game, which was
absolutely free from any roughness,
the result was a win tor the Blues by
a score of 4 to 2 goals. -.
One unfortunate incident happened
when Campbell hurt his leg, which
will keep him out of the games this
week-end. He has a worthy substitute in Harold Roberts, who will be
Strang's partner with the back division.
Hens Players Good Footballers.
Milligan, Gough, Hitchlns, Bowman
and Roberts, new men on the club,
played brilliant football. Jock Clark,
after his severe Illness, which has kept
him from playing for several weeks,
played a sterling game.
Two games arc down for decision
this week-end—one at Victoria on
Saturday, when they play the Yarrows
team in the Vancouver Island Football
League, and another game at Ladysmith on Sunday.
The team to meet Yarrows has been
selected as follows: Walker, Strang,
Roberts, Irvine, Conti, Oraham, Milligan, Nicol, James, Boothman and
Home, with Harrison and Carle on
the reserve.
In addition to the above, the following will travel to Ladysmith on Sunday
morning: Hitchlns, Gough, Bowman
nnd Clurko.
INTERSTING ADDRESS
TO HIGH SCHOOL CLUB
At thc High School Club last Friday
evening, Dr. Hicks was present and
gave a very interesting and Instructive talk on "Bacteria and Disease."
He outlined briefly the various
methods for ensuring pure water supply and described how filtration ls
done on a large scale. With regard to
milk he explained the proper preventive and pasteurization methods for
the reduction of Injurious bacteria.
Then he took up the subject of vaccines and antitoxins, describing their
nature and action In preventing or
counteracting the various diseases.
The doctor spoke'in his usual vivacious
style and his address was heartily enjoyed by all the club members.
Price Statistics
Show Decrease
Report of Cost of Living Commission Calls for Reduction
In Miners' Wages.
The Cost of Living Commission, ap
pointed to investigate the fluctuations
in the cost of living, as affecting the
miners in the employ of the Island
collieries, sat recently at Nanaimo,
aud as a result of Its investigations
found there was an appreciable decrease in the cost of commodities over
the quarter ending December 31, as
against the previous quurter ending
September 30.   .
The report ot this committee has
just been received and Is printed below. It will be seen that the reduction in the dally wage amounts to
forty aud a quarter cents on the $3
base rate, and forty-two and a quarter
cents ou the $3.15 base rate. The reduction goes Into effect February 1.
Nanaimo, B.C.,
January 22, 1921.
Dear Sir—
We respectfully submit herewith the
report of the Cost of Living Commission appointed to investigate the fluctuations in the cost of living prices ou
Vancouver Island covering the agreement between the Coal Operators and
the Miners for the quarter ending December 31, 1920.
The usual custom was followed in
sending out forms containing a list of
the commodities on which prices were
required to the leading merchants In
the several districts where the miners
are employed; the forms containing
the same articles of groceries, provisions, meats, etc., as was used on former investigations.
The method of determining the
amount to be awarded as found by
the fluctuations that had occurred
during the quarter under investigation j
was the same as used on all former
adjustments; to take the percentage
of increases or decreases, as the case
may be, of December 31, 1920, over
that of September 30, 1920, for groceries, provisions, meats, etc., and adding two-fifths of the percentage of such
Increase, or decrease as the case may
be, so found as an equivalent to cover
similar Increases, or decreases, allowed
tor clothing, hoots, shoes, etc.
The base rate ot the day miner effective at the mines wherein he is employed will be used to determine the
amounts granted, or deducted, to such
employees who are entitled to participate under the present findings.
Comparing the list of groceries, provisions, meats, etc., submitted by the
merchants for the quarter ending December 31, with those submitted for
the previous quarter ending September 30, 1920, we find the general decrease for the quarter ending December 31, 1920, to be as follows:
Decrease   in   foodstuffs,   meats,
etc P QS5C
2-5 of above decrease added to
cover   similar    decrease    for
boots, clothing, etc 0382
Total per cent, decrease  133S
The above amount of .1338 deducted
from the base rate of the day miner in
the districts where the rate is $3.00 per
day will give a decrease of .4014 or,
approximately, forty and one-quarter
cents per day; where the rate was
$3.15 per day the decrease will be
forty-two and one-quarter (42'4c)
cents per day. .
The decrease so awarded to become
effective from and including the first
day of February, 1921. All underground, surface, clerical and office employees shall be included as parties to
the reduction.
Retail price lists returns were made
by fourteen (14) general merchants
and seven (7) retail dealers in meat
in the towns of Nanaimo, Ladysmith.
Cumberlaud, Courtenay, South Wellington, Union Bay, Bevan and Cassidy.
Sugar, all kindB of flour, soda biscuits, lard, oatmeal, rice, sago, brooms,
syrup, tea, coffee and rolled oats
siiowed sharp declines. Slight decreases were found ln dried vegetables, barley, tapioca, canned Hoiuiv
toes, lunch tongue, soaps, plckloB,
cheese, ham, bacon, butter, evaporated
milk, flavoring extracts, currants,
evaporated peaches and prunes.
Slight increases were found ln jam,
molasses, canned Balmon, canned roast
beef, vinegar, cookies, raisins, tigs,
apricots and matches.
No changes occurred In cornmeal.
canned corn, beans and corned beet.
All ot which Is submitted for your
consideration.
We have the pleasure to remain,
yours respectfully,
D. L. BULGER,
Chairman.
TULLY BOYCE,
For Operators.
j. McAllister,
For Miners.
GIRLS ENJOY SLEIGH RIDE
The girls of tho W. H, O. Club enjoyed a fine sleigh ride party last Friday evening. Ou their way they
stopped at the homo of Mr. Horwood,
Minto, and spent a pleasant evening
playing games and singing. They
came home in the small hours with
much cheering and singing.
MARJORIE   DAW
IN
'DON'T EVER MARRY"
Showing Saturday
Clothes make the man, but as to how
far they make a--woman Ik another
question. Joe Benson trusted to
clothes to make an irate father he-
lieve the girl he was about to mar/y
was another than his daughter.
He didn't get away with it, because
the father didn't believe a young
woman should be married with her
veil down. What happened afterwards
provides a series of humorous interesting events, and an exceedingly fascinating story as presented by Mr.
Marshall Neilan, Hie famous producer.
In his latest production, "Don't Ever
Marry," which is showing at the llo-
Ilo Saturday, January 29
Meeting To Form
Parent-Teacher
Association
to fie Held This (Friday) Evening in the Public School—
All Interested Invited.
The staff of the schools invite all
parents and others interested to attend a meeting in the School, Friday
at 8 p.m., to discuss the following
questions.
The opinion of this mooting will also
be taken on the advisability of forming a Parent-Teacher Association.
These questions have been sent out
by the Executive of Hie B. C. Teachers'
Ktderation lo all districts in the province. • Thc object in asking teachers
and others to give their opinions
is that the association may know the
attitude of the majority on questions
concerning the curriculum. Knowing
this, they will be in a position to lay
the information before the Education
Department for their consideration
when the matter of a revision of the
curriculum is taken tip by that department.
UIGH SCHOOL
1. Give details of a course most helpful for students who do not intend
to go to the Normal School or to
the University.
2. What subjects would you consider
compulsory?
3. When would options begin? Suggest options.
4. How would you solve the present
difficulty of having students begin
so many new subjects upon entering High School?
5. Should students begin their study
of some High -School subjects, as
French, La till, Algebra in tlie Public Schools? in other words, is a
Junior High School possible?
G. What is your opinion as to a four-
year instead of a three-year High
School course? In a four-year
course would you make it possible
for a superior student to gel
through in three years or would
the requirements be Increased?
(Continued on Page Five)
CAPT. MORTIMER
OUT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE SERVICE
Constable C. F, Luciaii Agassiz, ol
the Provincial Police, arrived in Cumberland Tuesday and at once took
charge of the  work  iu  tills district.
We understand the Provincial Police
Department has dispensed with the
services of Capt. Mortimer.
Mr. A. G. Jones  has  been  electe
secretary   of   Court   Bevan,   Ancient
Order of Foresters, in place   of   Mr
Chas. O'Brien, resigned.
School Board_	
Estimates for Year
Show Increase of $3,000 Over
Last Year—Extra Teacher
To Be Appointed.
At the meeting ot the Board ot
School Trustees on Monday evening,
thc principal business was the estimates for the year, which were finally
adopted and will he before the meeting
of the City Council on Monday next.
As they now stand, these estimates
call for tho total sum of $22,110, boiug
about $8,000 above those of lust year.
The Iticraese is made up of $1,000 for
an extra teacher, a Hat increase of
$f>0 per annum for all teachers in tllc
public school, and $100 und $200 respectively in tlie high school; and the
Increase in the general running of the
school.
The estimates  as prepared are as
follows!
High School.
Principal  $2,000
Assistant  1,300
Public School.
Principal     $1,850
first assistant  1,150
Second assistant   1,000
Third assistant   1,000
Fourth assistant  950
Fifth assistant   950
Sixth assistant .....'.  950
Seventh assistant  960
Eighth assistant   900
Ninth assistant  900
Tenth assistant   900
Eleventh assistant   970
Janitors  2,100
Medical inspection   100
Secretary    100
Fuel  650
bight nnd water  100
Extension of School grounds  250
Repairs and supplies  1,500
Furnace repairs   500
Fire insurance   350
New seats  600
Japanese School rent  600
Needed Improvements.
There is an urgent necessity for Improved sanitary arangements In the
old school building, which will cost ln
the neighborhood ot $4,000.
The same school also requires a new
steam heating plant, to cost about
$8,000.
Thc school buildings and plant, etc.,
is of the estimated valeu of $150,000.
Progress nn School.
The new addition to the school is
making good progress, the carpenters
being nearly through, and it will be in
tho hands of the painters shortly.
The school should be available for
occupation in the near future.
.Heeling Friday Mght.
Thu following letter was received
from Mr. Chas. E. Burbrldge, representing the Comox District Teachers'
Association:
"Tlie Teacllers' Federation is desirous
of obtaining the opinions of all Interested in education and proposed
changes in the Course of Study.
"In order to give those interested an
opportunity of discussing the question,
the stall's ot the schools are holding a
joint meeting of parents, teachers and
others on Friday, January 28, at the
school. The opinion of this meeting
on Ihe advisability of forming a
Parent-Teacher Association will be
taken.
"The teachers hope to see all members ot the Board present, feeling
assured thut they will co-operate with
the school staffs on this occasion."
ST. JOHN'S FIRST AID
ELECTS OFFICERS
Arrangements  Made for First
Aid Lectures By Dr. Geo.
K. MacNaughton.
The Cumberland Brunch of Die St.
John's First Aid to the Injured has
made arrangements for class lectures
to lie delivered by Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, and also proposes having a
class for "Home Nursing" for females
only.
Anyone wishing to become a student
of either course must register at once
with the secretary of the local association.
The First Aid class will be held on
the sccand, third and fourth Sundays
of the month, at 10.30 a.m., In tho First
Aid Hall.
New Officers Elected.
The following oflicers havu been
elected for the year: President, J.
Williams; vice-president, R. Walker;
secretary-treasurer, Jonathan Taylor;
class instructors, A. J. Taylor, W.
Beveridge, Geo. Richardson.
Burns' Birthday
Duly Honored
Burns' Club Commemorates the
162nd Anniversary of Scotland's Immortal Bard.
The 162nd anniversary of the birth
of "Hobble" Hums," Scotland's loved
poet, was fittingly honored Tuesday
evening by an admiring assembly,
when some 200 persons sat down to a
sumptuous supper in the Miners' Hall,
under the auspices of tlie Hums' Club.
A lengthy programme of toasts and
vocal selections wus gone through, after which dancing was Indulged in until the wee sina' hours.
The Toast List.
The toast list wus responded to by
the speakers witli some very able and
interesting addresses. The list comprised, "Tbe King"; "The Immortal
Memory," responded to by .Mr. Chas.
Graham; "Bonnie Jean," responded to
hy Mr. Kobert Strachan; "Scotland,
the Home of the Bard," responded to
by Hev. James Hood; "Canada, the
Lund of Our Adoption," responded to
by Hev. Thos. Menzies, M.P.P.; "Our
industries," responded lo by Mr. A.
Auchinvole, iu tho absence of Mr.
Thos. Graham; "The Ladies," responded to by Mr. Donaldson; "Cumberland
and District," responded to hy Mayor
MacDonald.
"The Immortal Memory" was the
title of the main toast of tlie evening.
The following splendid eulogy of Scotland's loved poet was delivered by Mr.
Chas. Graham:
"It must he a source of jo ami prido
to see our greatest Scotsman receive
the honor aud admiration ami affection
of humanity in many gatherings such
as this held tonight throughout tho
world. Men and women of all nationalities and of every degree in life unite
in bringing homage and tribute to our
glorious dead bard.
"These are only signs and symptoms
of world-wide reverence and devotion.
That generous and immortal soul pervades the universe today. In the humming city and in the crowd of men, tn
the backwoods and in* the camp,
whether under the Stars and Stripes or
under that glorious flag upon whose,
bright colors the sun never sets, the
Union Jack, the thought and sympathy of men and women are tonight
directed to Robert Burns.   •
"If a roll cal of famo were read over
at tho beginning of every century, how
many men would answer a second time
to their names? But uf our Immortal
poet there is no question. The superiority of Burns rings out clear and unchallenged. Thero aro few before him
on the list and we cannot conceive of
a list without him. He towers high iii
the world of intellect and yet he lived
in an ago in which some of the world's
greatest intellects were produced. Wo
can only mark somo of tho principal
figures, Burke, Fox, Gpethe, Mozart,
Pitt, Wellington, Napoleon and Burns.
Among these titans, Burns was a conspicuous figure, a figure which appeals
most, of all to the imagination and affection of mankind. Napoleon probably looms larger to tho imagination,
hut on tho affection he has no hold.
It Is in tbe combination of two powers
that Burns is supreme. Tho clue to
Burns' extraordinary hold on mankind
is possibly a complicated one. It has
perhaps many developments which wo
do not have time to consider tonight.
I personally believe ihe causes aro,
like most great causes, simple
"The secret, it seem:, tu me, lies in
two words, inspiration and sympathy.
The two great examples of sheer inspiration in the Kuglish-speukiug
world arc Shakespeare aud Hums.
This is not the time nor the place to
speak of Shukespuro.
"Try and reconstruct Burns as he
was, a peasant born in a cottage that
no sanitary inspector lu these days
would tolerate for a moment, struggling with desperate effort against
pauperism almost in vain, snatching at
(Continued on Page Two)
PUBLIC SCHOOL
The Principal of the Cumberland
Public School announces that pupils
will not bo admitted into the Receiving Class until thc new huilding is
ready for occupation.
Promotions to the various classes
will be made at the same time.
SYNOD MEETS TUESDAY
The annual synod of the Anglican
Diocese of Columbia will he held iu
Victoria on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday of next week. Rev. W.
Leversedge, Mr. T. M. Mumford and
.Mr. K. T. Searle will represent Holy
Trinity district. <■•
Twd
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 2$, 1921.
I     COMFORT
IP     is what the whole world wants,   There's some people
§§     who won't take it when offered, they're so skeptical.
I   Heaters Which Bring  Comfort j
A We have them with duplex grates.   This is the most
B modem type of grate for coal.
^ The firepot is heavy and corrugated, to give adtli-
j|§ tional strength.
THERE'S A HEATER HERE
TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS
'■     «
T. E. BATE
M    P- O. Box 279
Phone 31    H
CUMBERLAND
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
Cascade Beef   The Beer Without a Peer.
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO. B.C.
Illlll
Illllllllllllllllllli
TO ARRIVE IN A FEW DAYS
FRESH SHIPMENT OF
PERRINS'
High-Class
Fancy Biscuits
AT REDUCED PRICES
Burns' Birthday
Duly Honored
(Continued from Page One)
scraps of learning in the intervals of
toll, a heavy silent lad, proud of his
plough.
"All of a sudden, without preface, he
breaks into exquisite song like a nightingale from the brushwood, and continues singing as sweetly until he dies.
The nightingale sings exquisitely because he knows no other. So it was
with Hums. What is this but inspiration? One can no more measure or
reason about it than you can measure
or reason about Niagara, and remember the poetry is only a fragment of
Burns. Amazing as It may seem all
contemporary- testimony i* unanimous
that the mail was far more wonderful
than his works.
"If bis talents were universal his
sympathy was not less so. His tenderness was a more selfish tenderness
Tor bis own family, for he loved all
mankind except the cruel and base -
nay, we may go further and say that
he placed all creation, especially the
suffering and depressed part of It, under his special protection. The oppressor in every form be regarded with
direct and personal hostility, but above
all he saw tbr charm of the home; he
regarded it as the basis of society.
"il«' honored it in its humblest form,
for he know as few know, how sin-
cerfty the family In the cottage i:*'
welded by mutual love and esteem.
His verses go straight to the heart of
every home, thoy appeal to every
father ami mother, but it is only the
beginning, perhaps the foundation of
his sympathy, There is something for
everybody in Burns,
"He has a heart even for vermin; he
has pity even for the nrch enemy, of
mankind, and his universality makes
his poems a treasure-house in which
all may lind what they want. Every
wayfarer in the journey of life may
pluck strength and courage from it as
he passes. The sore, the weary, the
wounded will all lind something to
heal and soothe.
"There Is an eternal controversy
which it appears nothing will ever
assuage as to Burns' private life and
morality. Some maintain that these
have nothing to do with his poems;
some maintain that his life must be
read in his works, and again some
think tbat his life damns his poems,
while others claim tliat his poems cannot be fully appreciated without his
life. The life of Hums does not consist iu his vices, they lie outside it. It
is a life of truth and tenderness, and
though like all lives it has its light
and shade, Remember wc know all of
the worst as well as the best.
"His imagination was a supreme and
celestial gift, but his imagination often
led him wrong. This much seems certain, had he been devoid of genius
his vices would not have attracted attention. It is Burns' pedestal that affords a target. I woud like to say
that we have something to he grateful
for even in the weaknesses of men like
Burns.
"Mankind is helped lu its progress
t\s much by tlie study of imperfection
as hy the contemplation of perfection.
Had we nothing before us in our futile
and halting lives but saints and the
ideal, we might well fail together. We
grope blindly along tbe catacombs of
tho world, we climb the dark ladder of
life, we feel our way to futurity, but
we scarcely see an inch around or before us. Wo stumble, and falter, and
fall; our bands and knees are bruised
and sore, and we look up for light and
guidance.
"Could we sec nothing hut unapproachable perfection we might well
sink prostrate in the hopelessness of
emulation and the weariness of despair. It is not then, when all seems
blank and ligbtless, when strength and
courage Hag, and when perfection
seems as remote as tbe stars—it is not
then that perfection helps us,
"Man, after all, is not ripened by
virtue alone. Were it so, this world
would be a paradise of angels. How,
then, shall we judge?
"How at any rate shall we judge a
giant, great in gifts and great in temptation, great in strength and great in
weakness? Let us glory iu his
strength and be comforted in his weaknesses, and when we thank heaven for
the inestimable gift of Burns, we do
not need to remember wherein be was
imperfect. We can not bring ourselves to regreat that he was made of
the same clay as ourselves.
"Let us ever hold dear in our imagination tiie memory of this great man.
Let us look to him for inspiration. Our
greatest regret is that his work was
brought to an till too early end, cut
down iu the prime of manhood when
he was coming into his best.
"We have to regret that just at a
time when his experiences had taught
him wisdom, when in he fullness of
IiIk heart he was pouring forth to the
world a great storm of song, he died
leaving behind him even in that short
lifetime a great flood of Scottish song,
song that is not for a day, bul will go
on ringing down tlie aisles of lime together with his fame, to which passing time only adds greater lustre.
"The wonderful power of his genius
remains lor all lime, and his works
are hailed the world over as tt treasure
of great priCQ. Large-hearted sympathy, generous enthusiasm, reckless
abandonment, fierce Indigatiou, melting compassion, rare flashes of moral
insight, are all portrayed in Ihe writings from his prolific pen.
"Everywhere is evident the strong
intellect, driven direct to the mark by
the fervid heart behind. Absolute
truthfulness, intense reality, these
have been made the poet immortal. It
is a great personality one meets in the
poems of Burns; above all shines the
great heart which makes him increasingly a power among his brother men,
and the genius by virtue of which he
sits secure among the immortals.
"Thos. Carlyle, the great Scottish
essayist, in his Essay on Burns, which
is one of the most masterly expositions
of Burns' life and works, in the concluding paragraph of the essay, says:
" 'With right thinking men everywhere we do not require to plead for
Burns. In pitying admiration he lies
enshrined in all our hearts in a far
nobler mausoleum than that of marble.
Neither will his works pass away from
the memory of man. While the works
of Shakespeare and Milton roll on like
mighty rivers through the country of
thought, bearing fleets of traffickers
and assiduous pearl fishers on its
wave, this little valensa fountain will
also arrest our eye, for this Is nature's
own, and most cunning workmanship
burst forth from tlie depth of the earth
with a full guiding torrent into the
light of day, und often will the traveller turn aside to drink of its clear
waters and to muse among Its rocks
and pines.'
"Mr. Tonstmaster, ladles and gentlemen, is it any wonder, then, that year
after year on the anniversary of his
birth, Scotsmen gather in all parts of
the civilized world to do honor to the
memory of one who possessed such a
keen insight into human nature, who
left us such a legacy in the form of
inspired writings?
"Robert Buns the poet still lives In
the noble legacy he bequeathed to us,
a heritage—national and imperial—of
which we have   every   reason   to   be
proud.   .May his memory be treasured
in the hearts of all his countrymen,
Until the sun grows cold,
And the stars are old.
And the leaves of the Judgment Book
unfold.
"In conclusion, I wish to express
my thanks to the Burns' Club for the
honor done me hy inviting me eo respond to this toast.
"I also wish to thank you all
heartily for the manner iu which you
have done honor to the immortal memory of Scotland's greatest son.
The Rexall Store
ENTAL
CREME
COMPLETE deanlinc« ia your bat a
tooth tr-vblea. There ii no dentifrice ao well deviaed
to give supreme cleanlineti u Klenio.
The creamy, quickly toluble lather whitest the teeth,
harder.! the guru, and bring! to the mouth thit Cool*
Clean, Klenio Feeling.   Step in today and get a tube.
■      Mumford & Walton
illllllllllllllllllli
FAMINE  CONDITIONS  IN CHINA
100 millions in the famine area!
30 millions actually starving,
eating grass, roots, leaves,
bark of trees and leaves.
20 millions will die in spite of all
that CAN be done.
10 millions may be saved.
ill
II
HOW MANY LIVES
WILL YOU SAVE?
One dollar a month will feed
one person until the next harvest in June. Can you spare a
dollar a month for five months ?
COME TO THE MEETING
in the
ANGLICAN CHURCH HALL
SUNDAY EVENING AT 8.30
AND   HELP   MAKE   PLANS
FOR A WORTHY RESPONSE
National
Syrup of Tar and Cod
Liver Oil
Pleasant     Efficient     Safe
A REAL COUGH CURE
75c.
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
CUMBERLAND
Boots     Shoes    Findings
It is not economy to buy old
shop worn shoes no matter
how cheap they are
DON'T BE FOOLED BY CATCH PRICES
We have the largest stock of shoes in town to choose
from, and our stock is new and up to date.
Our prices are marked in plain figures and are the
same to everyone.
TRY US FOR YOUR NEXT PAIR
WE WILL DO OUR BEST
TO GIVE YOU EVERY SATISFACTION
Special for Saturday dȣ AA
Hipress Rubber Boots N>O.UU
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
RUBBERS
SLIPPERS
GAITERS
FOR Sa4LE
CORNER KNOWN AS THE WILLARD BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, B. C.
Good paying proposition.   For full particulars apply
P. O. BOX 86, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
'■
•*' i
January 2$, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Threa
Household Helps
MAYTAG ELECTRIC WASHER,      (1*1 OC KA
with Wringer attached; special tyLt*dOt*J\J
WATER-POWER MACHINE—Regular d»97 PA
$32.00.   Special $4 * «DU
HAND-POWER WASHER—Regular      (gOQ HK
$27.50.   Special *VLtrJn i D
1 ONLY KITCHEN CABINET— <I»9C Kft
Regular $40.00.   Special <pOOaOU
1 ONLY KITCHEN CABINET— dJ97 QK
Regular $33.00.  Special «D*iS I »OU
A Full Line of Furniture and
Furnishings in Stock
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of afliuance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
EVERY time you telephone you have at your ready
command property worth millions of dollars.
Thousands are actually used for the long distance call, and for your simplest message you have the
use of hundreds of dollars worth of property.
This vast telephone plant must be not only constructed and installed, but must be kept electrically alive to
respond instantly to your convenience or emergency.
It is manned by a multitude of telephone workers day
and night to maintain perfect pathways for that delicate telephone current started by your nearest branch.
The service must always be kept up to maximum usefulness.
The telephone system is a vast, vitalized plant, but
is accepted in such a matter of fact way that its immensity and efficiency is rarely realized.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Mght
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
DR.R.P.CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
" t* „_
GOLD_RUSHES
In spite of many stories and a general belief to the contrary, few fortunes are gained ln gold rushes.
This may seem Incredible, but it is
nevertheless a fact. One or two men
only have stumbled on great wealth,
wealth beyond their anticipations,
wealth that has lifted them up from
the grim, hard grind of prospecting
into a world of comfort and clean
hands.
Gold Is a magnet that lures seekers
from all the corners of the earth. If
it were discovered at the North Pole
there would be the same wild rush of
prospectors, artisans, workers, thieves,
cahr-Bharpers and women as heretofore.
There was a new discovery at Snake
Creek in Saskatchewan, and hopes of
a quick claim, an immediate sell out, a
lucky find, a rich pan, drew hundreds
of men from all over Canada.
But only a very small percentage of
the hundreds who sped across tlie continent in the mad rush for tho yellow
metal will ever realize enough to pay
their expenses.
But it is just those few strange,
amazing cases of good luck that constitute the lodestar which calls them
Three men may make a fortune and
the rest nothing.
Lucky Fit of Anger.
Perhaps ten men In two thousand
may get {5000 apiece, but the rest go
on working and washing and panning
and digging till they lose hope and sell
their claim for a paltry sum and start
on their wanderings again.
Fortune singles out some men and
showers her gifts on them. An old Indian prospector, Jacob Cook, was wandering homeward to his cabin near
Copper Lake, Manitoba.
He tripped and fell over a rusty spur
of quartz, and ln a Ht of violent anger
struck it with his pick. A streak of
gold appeared before his astonished
eyes. He opened up the ground, discovered the streak was continuous,
pegged out his claim, and then called
in an engineer named Gordon.
The quartz yielded (7 to (11 worth
of gold per ton, and Jacob Cook, the
old Indian, became a wealthy man,
while into the Copper Lake district
poured the gold-seekers.
Burying the dead body of his companion brought a huge nugget to a
man who may be called X, in California, a nugget which Bold for $25,000,
after having earned $10,000 at various
exhibitions.
The story ls more akin to fiction. X
was little better than a tramp, spend
lug his time in doing odd jobs and
drinking whisky.
Sobered for Good.
One night, with a drunken compan
ion, he was making his way over
Grizzly Mountains to Camp Corona.
They slept one night in a deserted
shack which a mountain torrent carried away down Into a canyon, and X's
companion was drowned.
The next day X started to dig the
grave for his companion's body, and
when two feet down struck a hard
substance which he uprooted. A gold
nugget too heavy for.him to carry lay
on the sands at bis feet. It weighed
80 pounds, and X had to get assistance
to carry It to Camp Corona.
Considering It an act of providence
he never touched liquor again, and
went to Yucatan, where he made a
million dollars ln quartz mining.
Having been literally kicked away
from a mine in Bear Creek, near Sau
Francisco, a young Spaniard, Louis
Roderigo, procured a pick and shovel
and some food, enough to last for a
week or bo, and went off prospecting
on the Pine Ridge.
A fortnight later he returned hungry,
with a handkerchief containing nearly
ten thousand dollars' worth of gold
that he had secured by panning in a
spot he had discovered by accident.
Fortune'* Ill-Effect.
Ono of the large nuggets of the
world came from Hill End, In New
South Wales. Two miners, Byer and
Haltman, had exhausted their capital
and were practically living on charity.
They had been washing for weeks hut
had hud no luck. Then one afternoon
tbe pair turned up a nugget four feet
nine Indies In length. It sold for
£29,1100. The discovery so unnerved
one of the partners that he was prostrated for a long period and was absolutely unable to attend to affairs at all.
Imagine the feelings ot a Chinaman,
used to working for a small sum at the
most arduous work, suddenly discovering in a lonely spot that gold was adhering to the roots of Borne grass he
had pulled up. Yet that actually occurred In Perak, Malay.
Consider the feelings of the rabbit
catcher at Mudgee, New South Wales,
who, after robbing a bee's nest stumbled on a nugget that brought him ten
thousand dollars.
Once these finds become known, and
such news spreads like wildfire, thousands of people poured to the scenes of
discovery. And thousands of them
came away later, crestfallen and still
poor, yet still hoping for another rush
that would bring them fortune.
Grains of gold were discovered iu
the Minltonias, Manitoba, in 1912, and
caused tremendous excitement. Ten
thousand people flocked to tlie spot,
but thought they searched for weeks
and weeks among the sandhills no one
ever found wealth there.
('eld-Edged Fraud.
In the same year a strange case happened in the Yukon. A miner from
Hamilton, Scotland, had pegged out a
claim and had gained a small sum
from it, sufficient to pay his way home
to his native village. He had only been
home a day when there arrived a cable
from his partner recalling him. The
claim had suddenly showed rich deposits and was yielding $10,000 a day.
The two miners sold it for a quarter
ot a million dollars.
That is the most frequent way in
which grunt sums are made liy pros-
pectors. They stake out a claim which
proves rich. Then thoy sell while (lie
fever Is on.
Two years ago a Polish settler
staked out a claim in Quebec, on the
shores ol' Lake Kennavcek, anil sold it
(o an Knglish company for ,C 170.000.
Tlie days of fraud by "salting" mines
are almost over, it was prevalent in
tiie old days, but it is too dangerous
now. The hist enterprise of that nature was tlw salting ol* an Australian
tin mine, and it had a stronge sequel.
The buyers found gold instead ol* tin!
Verily these finds prove the truth of
the miner's axiom tliat "Gold Is where
you lind it."
LOYALTY
Money never bought u friend,
Nover hired a mail to love ns;
They who're faithful to the end,
See the something better of us;
Neither silver, rank nor gold
Wins a friendship we can hold.
Dollars never make men loyal.
He who offers money only,
Though the coins lie gives are royal,
Lives a troubled life and lonely.
Men who worship gold will fly
When another comes to buy.
Read the history of tho ages —
Money cannot hatred smother,
Service is not built on wages,
We must come to know each other;
More than gold a man must give,
If his friendships are to live.
Let us cease to dwell in blindness.
Let us learn what men are seeking!
Love is born of human kindness,
Fellowship and cheery i peaking—
Love is a thing we cannot buy—
'Tis but wasting time to try.
—Edgar A. Guest.
| As the Ancient Myth runs,
H Atlas held up the world, and as
jj Atlas held up the world, the busi-
| ness of Electric Light and Power
jj Companies sustain almost every
■ other business.
Each day we pass to and fro surrounded by the
Modernization of the World; we go to bed, we read,
by the glow of an ELECTRIC light, rise to a room
heated by the pleasant warmth of an ELECTRIC
heater, breakfast on toast made on an ELECTRIC toaster, wash it down with coffee from an ELECTRIC percolator, listen to the grind of an ELECTRIC
washing machine or the hum of an ELECTRIC vacuum
cleaner, and if we live in a large city we ride to business
on an ELECTRIC ear—with never a thought of tin*
great power, the great expense that is put forward to
maintain us in the Elysium of comfort.
It has become part of us, a thing beyond our contemplation, our due; and the fact that this business must
be fed to keep it running, like anything else, is beyond
the probability of even our consideration.
But give it a little thought—
Just imagine yourself working at your desk, in your
home, or your store by the light of a candle, your
ELECTRIC lamps useless (it occurred for a few short
minutes the other day and it surely was not pleasant,
was it?)
Imagine going home to a darkened house, to the
smoky oil lamp; your lights, your appliances—toaster,
washer, cleaner, iron, telephone—JUNK, just junk,
and this is what would come to you without the
ELECTRIC LIGHTING COMPANY. *
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P.O. 314
■11
Ford Service that is
Satisfactory
Ford repairs in our shop are made at contract rates
on labor. You know before the job is started how much
it will cost you.
The excellence of our shop equipment and the mechanical skill of our men enables us to guarantee our work
fully. If your repair work proves unsatisfactory, return
it to us within live days and we will do it all over again
to your satisfaction, free of charge. Genuine Ford parts
used.
The average man can easily afford a Ford car. It is the most inexpensive car to drive.
Twenty to twenty-five miles on a gallon of gasoline is an every-day
occurrence; 31! miles is frequently reported by Ford owners. Yearly repair
expenses of less than one dollar are not unusual. The car is light in
weight, and tires give more mileage on a Ford than on any other car.
You can always sell a "used" Ford at a good price. You have to accept
a big reduction for a "used" larger car.
Come and take a ride in the 1920 model. See how comfortable it is.
And stylish, too—stream line effect, tapered hood, crown fenders, beautiful finish. You need one for business. Your wife and children need one
for pleasure and health.
SEE US FOR FORI) PARTS, REPAIRS AND ACCESSORIES
E. C. EMDE, Ford "Dealer
COURTENAY, B.C.
Ull
Hi Foui*
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 29,1621.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. OOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921.
BOOST YOUR HOME TOWN
"Stick to your own homo town; make it so attractive to
live In und do business in that your young men will stay in
it and prosper Willi it," id the theme of a remarkable
address delivered by Herbert Cuthbert, executive secretary
of the Pacilic Northwest Tourist Association, to the Commercial Club of Corvalls, Oregon.
He pointed out that the prosperity of the state or province depends upon the development and prosperity ot the
communities of the state, both urban and rural, and that
thc* statu cannot prosper as it should when the business
and the young people of the smaller communities are diverted in the larger communities of the state and the buslnes
ed to tlie larger communities.
He advocates a movement to include each community in
tlie Pacific Northwest, sponsored by its commercial organization, leading citizens and its newspapers, to make their
towns cleaner, more attractive and more up-to-date In
appearance, not only to hold its young people, but to keep
business at home and to enlarge tho opportunity of its
citizens for the enjoyment of life and of profitable business
und employment.
Mr, Ctithbert's address, in part, is printed lu another
part of this issue.
WHAT BRITAIN OWES CANADA
Does It mean nothing to Great Britain that nearly 60,000
of our sons and brothers sleep ln France and Ffamlers?
asks the Fanners' Sun of Toronto, apropos, of all things,
of the postponement by Great Britain of decontrol of Canadian bacon.
The implication is that Great Britain owes something to
Canada because Canada rallied to her side during tlie
Great War. And so Great Britain does. She owes Canada
sympathy and understanding. She does not, however, owe
her anything in tlie material sense suggested by the Sun.
Great Brltuin cannot repay Canada in money, which in the
long run is what any adjustment of fiscal conditions against
Britain's Interest for the benefit of Canada really means.
Canadians did not send their sons to France that a better
price might be obtained for Canadian bacon in England.—
Kamloops Sentinel.
GEMS OF THOUGHT
Never lose sight of this important truth, that no one can
bo truly great until he has gained a knowledge of himself
—a knowledge which can only be acquired by occasional
retirement.—Zimmerman.
Everyone stamps his own value on himself. The price
we challenge for ourselves si given us. Man is made great
or little by his own will.—Schiller.
The worst education which teaches self-denial, Is better
than the best which teaches everything else and not that.
—Sterling.
A wise man knows his own Ignorance; a fool thinks he
knows everything.—C. Simmons.
If a man empties his purse into his head no one can take
it from him.—Franklin.
Above all things, reverence thyself.—Pythagoras.
Music hath charm to soothe savage breast, but it also has
power to awaken savagery in otherwise peaceful breasts.
.Much ls written nowadays of the inaneness and indecency
of the modern dance., but Sir Hugh Allen, principal of the
Royal College of Music, struck a right note when he pointed
out that music played at these dances was iu itself responsible for most of the immorality. It is a point worth thinking over. There is probably no department of creative art
which arouses the emotions so readily as music, and if
young people—or even old—hear nothing but bad music
they can never appreciate good music. Coarse, bad music
inspires coarseness of thought first and then inevitably
coarseness of action also.
IMMIGRATION TROUBLE
In considering permanent immigration legislation, Congress would do well to investigate Canada's way of dealing
with the'saine intricate problem. The Dominion immigration act is elastic, not rigid. By an order in council the
government muy relax restrictions when the need for them
has disappeared or to impose new restrictions to meet
critical new situations. Recently, for example, an order in
council was adopted requiring more than $50 wliieh, under
ihe law applicable to normal times, any would-be immigrant must have in his possession, The new rule requires
all laborers, other than farm workers, and all mechanics,
to bring at least $260, plus additional amounts for support
of minors unable to earn a living.
Increasing unemployment in tho industrial sections of
Canada is tlie cause of the new restrictions. The Canadian
Government is anxious to keep oul men who could not find
worlt under presenl conditions and would merely swell the
ranks of the city unemployed. On the othor hand farm
laborers and domestic help aro welcome. The order iu
council does not oxtend lo them,
intelligent flexibility should be one of the features of any
permanent act passed by Congress for the regulation of Immigration, Flexibility Is besl obtained, of course, by wise
administration of a law that vests Bufllclent discretion in a
nen political body Qualified lo discharge its duties.—Chicago
News.
NAVAL RIVALRY
A correspondent uf the London Morning Post, described
as a professional authority, asserts that in 1924 the United
Stales will have twenty-eight post-Jutland battleships and
battle-cruisers of the firs! class, or nine more than (treat
Britain, with complementary flotillas of cruisers, (lestroyers
and .submarines complete, in order to maintain a bare
equality with tbe United .states, and excluding consideration of Japan, Britain must build nine capital ships by 1921,
at a cost of ten million sterling each.
The Morning Tost bases on these figures a plea for a
naval agreement between tlie United States and Great
Britain to stop Ibis ruinous rivalry and spare the oppressed
taxpayers. There is nothing in tbe circumstances of the
United States calling for naval expansion, or even requiring
a formidable naval strength. She baa only two important
outposts, the Philippines and Hawaii, and the present gov
eminent has advised Congress to give tbe former its independence. Economically the United States is the most self
contained country in the world. She could feed herself and
carry on her essential industries for an indefinite period if
all her sea communications were cut off. No invading army
could touch more than the fringe of her territory. Great
Britain, on the other hand, depends for her very life on the
uninterrupted flow of overseas products to her shores. She
could hardly live for a mouth if she were effectually blockaded. Naval strength sullicient to insure that the ocean
routes be kept open is the condition of her existence so long
as war is possible and navies are maintained by other
nations. Tbe United States is building manifestly against
Japan, whose present programme calls for eight battleships and eight battle cruisers by 1H25. Japan has not the
financial strength for this rivalry, and will make a fatal
error if she does not explore every possibility of an agreement with the United States to curtail naval expenditure.
The American programme, while not inspired by a conscious design of wresting naval ascendancy from Great
Britain, will force the latter to build much beyond her
desires unless the two nations reach an understanding.
The situation calls for a compact embracing Great Britain,
the United States and Japan, in default of the entrance of
the United States into the League of Nations and of prompt
action by that body to redeem the disarmament pledges of
the Covenant. In a world in which multitudes have been
plunged into misery for want of the simplest necessaries
tbe present outlay upon armies and navies, heavier than
before the war, is an outrage upon humanity and a bitter
reflection upon our boasted civilization. The case for the
international limitations of armaments, under conditions of
security for all, is one that pleads for itself at the bar of
conscience.—Toronto Globe.
Mark Twain has been admitted to the American Hall of
Fame and Noah Webster, who made the dictionary, has been
rejected. This will please all the Toms and Hacks that
were "licked for bad spellin1."
CAMPBELL'S
Stocktaking Clearance
SALE OF GROCERIES
Ends   Saturday
SEE OUR
Big Window Display
Every Article Marked in
Plain Figures
CAMPBELL'S
Cumberland
iiBiliil
1
MISS MOUNCE WINS $1500
SCHOLARSHIP IN EAST
Former    Cumberland    Student
Wins Valuable Prize al the
Manitoba University.
Miss Irene Mounce, B.A., who received her public school education in
Cumberland, und is now a student ot
botany in the Manitoba University, lias
been awarded the  Hudson's Bay re
search scholarship of S1500. Miss
.Mounce, who is a graduate of the University of British Columbia, has been
engaged in research work at the Manitoba University for several months.
The .Manitoba scholarship is the culmination of a long list of prizes won
by Miss Mounce during her university
career. Graduating two years ago as
tlie winner of tlie Governor-General's
gold medal for general proficiency, she
secured her master's   degree   in   the
biological field last September and was
awarded the Dominion Industrial and
Scientific Research Council's scholarship, giving her a year's tuition at any
Canadian university. The award had
a monetary value of about $1000.
She Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
L. A. Mounce, of Vancouver.
The Sunday blue law business
sounds as if the Rev. Billy was at the
bottom of It.
I
zss
LE
S
ST. VALENTINE'S DAY, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14th
Grand
squerade Ball
In the Ilo-llo Dance Hall, Monday, February 14th
Ija
Six-Piece Orchestra will
provide all the
Latest Music
PRIZES:
BEST  DRESSED LADY  $10.00
BEST DRESSED GENT  $10.00
BEST  VALENTINE  LADY   $10.00
BEST SUSTAINED CHARACTER „   $7.50
BEST NATIONAL CHARACTER, LADY    $7.50
REST NATIONAL CHARACTER, GENT    $7.50
REST COMIC  GROUP  $15.00
REST  COMIC  CHARACTER      $5.00
REST TOPSY  .    $5.00
REST FLOWER GIRL    $5.00
Dancing Commences
at 9.30 sharp
Come and have a
good time
Masked Gent,, $1        Masked Lady, 50c.      Spectators, 50c.
3k n
January 29,1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Five
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, "ftS
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
JOTTINGS
By X-RAYS
The new "nickel" coins are out ln
the Old Country. Sixpence la worth
threepence. An old resident ot Glasgow was examining a sixpenny piece
one day, and trying to figure out, with
the cost ot living up 170 per cent,
how much he could actually buy.
Some—sum.
Some Attendance Records.
Rangers v. Ayr, at Ayr, 12,000 spectators.
Sunderland v. Manchester City, at
Sunderland, 18,000 spectators.
Manchester United*v. Newcastle, al
Manchester, 35,000 spectators.
Tottenham v. Bolton, at Tottenham,
30,000 spectators.
England v. Wales (Rugby), in England, 50,000 spectators.
Extract from criticism by Andy
Aiken: "Just a personal note on my
arrival at Cowdenbeath. I met Geordle
Wilson looking spruce and full of enthusiasm. George went to Newcastle
after I left. But I played against him
when he was partnering Harold Hard-
man at Everton, and with him against
England at Newcastle in 1907. Talk
about the secret of perpetual youth.
He had a great share in his side's success yesterday. He now possesses an
English cup medal, Scottish cup medal,
and Scottish qualifying cup medal, besides numerous international honors."
THE PARSON AT THE FRONT
A knowledge ot one's country should
be the first essential of the patriotic
citizen's education. Without this
knowledge he Is neither prepared to
advocate its advantages nor to defend
it from depreciatory criticism.
Canada has much that her citizens
should be proud of, but, unfortunately,
this fact is not as well known as It
should be by her citizens. Every Canadian should know what Canada's
forests, mines, fisheries, wild life aud
waterways represent to the country.
Many thousands bo abroad every year
and a very large number spend a portion of the winter season in southern
climes. Each and every one of these
travelers should be a missionary for
Canada, spreading knowledge of Its
many advantages.
This Information Is available for tbe
asking, the Commission ot Conservation being authorized by Parliament
to secure and compile Information on
Canada's natural resources and to advise the public of the same. The Commission has available many valuable
reports, two of which, "Water-powers
ot British Columbia," and "Forests of
British Columbia," have been but recently issued. They are handsomely
illustrated and contain much valuable
Information on this province which It
would be of advantage for the residents of Canada to know. These reports may be had ou request.
'E's a sportsman Is our padre,
Of that there ain't no doubt;
'E don't chuck religion at yer,
Nor preach at yer, nor spout;
But If 'e 'ears yer cussin'
When yer flllin' up sandbags,
'E jes sez "Fumigate yer throat,"
And 'ands yer out some fags.
'E don't take all for granted
That yer murderers and thieves,
But 'e alius tells yer now's the time
Fer turning over leaves.
An' 'e'll wander round the trenches
Just ter pass th' time o' day,
An' thar ain't a bloke as doesn't teel
A man has passed 'ees way.
I remember once at Yepes,
When things was pretty 'ot,
And yer 'ed to keep yer nut down
If yer didn't want It shot;
While Fritz was fairly plasterin'
As fast as 'e could load;
'E was rldln'—mind yer—rldln'
Way down the Menin Road.
'E was dosin' on a satlrcase
In pyjamas all complete,
When a 'igh explosion carried
'Art the 'ouse into the street;
While other blokes was runnin' wild,
An' kickin' up a row,
'E calmly arsts "Pray what is the
Correct procedure now?"
Then 'e'll have a look around 'im
An' wag 'Is bally 'ead.
Sez 'e, "It sems more respectful now,'
An' back 'e goes ter bed!
LUMBER PRICES CUT
SEVERELY IN ALBERNI
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
'CHARLIE SING CHONG, Cumberland
HONG CHONG & CO., Bevan.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sneclalty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
IF TOC REQUIRE
Windows, Doors
Frames
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2020 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C,
In order to induce building during
the slack season, a big lumber com
pany ln Alberni has cut the prices on
lumber up to $30 per thousand teet.
HIGHEST RAILWAY
STATIONS IN CANADA
The highest railway stations, with
their elevations in feet above s
level, in the respective provinces of
Canada, are as follows:
Province. Station.        Feet.
Britisli Columbia-Stephen  5,332
Yukon Meadows  2,924
Alberta Mountain Park..5,820
Saskatchewan Senate .". 3,171
Manitoba Erlckson  ,.2,063
Ontario Dunkalk  1,705
Quebec Boundary  1,850
Prince Ed. Is North Wiltshire   311
New Brunswick.... Adams  1,204
Nova Scotia Folleigh      612
LET'S GET IT OUT
OUT OF OUR SYSTEM
Suspend all business!
Quit buying and selling!
Quit eating!
Quit advertising!
Let's give ourselves up heart and
soul to an orgy of gloom!
Let's howl and howl and howl!
Let's cuss the country, business, our
town, our neighbors and each other!
Get It all out of our system and then
go to work!—Atlanta Constitution.
THE DIVORCE RECORD
CANADIANS SHOULD
KNOW THEIR COUNTRY
GUESS!
What will be the value in money of
the United States trade with Canada
tor February, 1921? Read the display
announcement on page six of this
issue and put in your guess, and go in
and win the $300 cash prize. Three
guesses allowed.
MEETING T9 FORM
PARENT-TEACHER ASSN
(Continued from Page One)
7. Should High School students who
purpose going to Normal have e
course other than and more suitable tor their purpose than the
Junior Matriculation?
8. Should English be taken up more
extensively and less Intensively?
9. What changes would you suggest
in the second year English?
10. Should English Grammar be re
established?
Should there be a definite text
book for Grammar and Composition?
Can time be made for library reading during school hours?
Give  suggestions  as   to  History
course.   Should it be compulsory
for three years?
If a foreign language ls to be compulsory for one year only, what
language would you advocate?
Why?
15. Would it be better to have a Latin
text dealing with the home life of
the Romans rather than with their
military art.
16. What readjustment of the French
ln the various years would you
suggest?
17. What suggestions have you to of
fer regarding texts?
18. Should one Science be equivalent
to one Language, provided it is
taken throughout the three years
and the requirements made equal?
19. Is the Science as at present taught
in our High Schools made as prac
tical as it should be for a student
who may finish High School?
20. To what extent could the Commercial, Manual and Domestic Science
courses be drawn upon to make a
practical general course? What
subjects would you replace?
Should Art be obligatory iu the
first year of High School? Should
it be allowed as an option in any
or all of the subsequent years as
training for Engravers, Decorators, Dressmakers and Milliners
etc.?
Could Music be placed on the
course as an option and taken In
the schools?
Should credit be given for Music
taken outside of school from un
accredited teacher?
Home Economics—What part of a
Home Economics Course dealing
with Physiology and Hygiene.
Home Sanitation, Housewifery,
Food Values, Dietics, Household
Chemistry, Millinery, etc., could be
used in a general course for girls
either as optional or obligatory?
11.
14.
21.
23.
24.
Reno no longer holds the divorce
record. Seattle has passed the Nevada
city In the presentation of decrees.
From January 1 to December 1 last
year, 2430 divorces were granted in
Seattle, which ls at the rate ot seven
a day. Only 991 were granted In Reno
In the same time. Churches and civic
organizations in 'the Washington city
have been stirred by the revelations
that the state has grown to be the most
lenient in the country ln the granting
of decrees. Figures show that in the
first three-quarters of the year there
was one divorce to every two marriages performed in the state.
A good definition of a fool ls one
who thinks "this time" doesn't count
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Give your opinion on the following:
1. Standard tests and measurements
should be applied ln all subjects.
2. Any curriculum should consist of
(a) minimum essentials and lb)
additional work for brighter pupils
for which credit should be given.
3. Reading—more silent reading-
more oral reproduction — more
supplementary readers.
4. What suggestions have you to offer
towards courses in language and
handiwork for primary classes?
5. Explain what principles you would
use ln selecting a primer for beginners with regard to the following features:
(a) Mechanism—size   of   type,
margin, paper, binding, etc.
(b) Illustrations.
(c) Character and arrangement
of content.
(d) Teachers'  manual  accompanying the primer.
6. Would you Introduce simple textbooks, such as history and Geography readers, in the intermediate
grade?
7. Would you have separate reader
1921 Price
Announcement Sale
YOUNG MEN'S ALL-WOOL 15LUE SERGE SUITS—Nicely tailored in three-button
style. A bargain every yoiuiy man needing a new Suit should con- •flJOQ CTrt
skier.   Reduced from-$45.00'to   ®6U OxJ
A BARGAIN IN HOYS' SUITS—Sizes 27 to 32; in good serviceable mixed tweed, with
belt and slash pockets; bloomer pants.   Only a few    (U"| A TC (U11   TK
Suits left. Good value at $15.00.   Now priced at «P1U. f O and «PJL 1. I U
The same line in smaller sizes, 22 to 20, reduced to  S7.7,")
^ &
Note these Values in Hosiery
BLACK ALL-WOOL CASHMERE HOSE—Pine Botany wool, suitable for boys', girls' or women's wear;
2-1 ribbed, seamless feet; sizes %%, 9, 9*.'. and 10
-inches.   Regular $1.50.                   " QK/»
My price, per pair   «7t)C
6 DOZ. PAIRS WOMEN'S PLAIN BLACK CASH-
MERETTE HOSE—Seamless feet, spliced heels and
toes.   Were selling at $1.00. p»A
Now, per pair  OUC
10 DOZ. PAIRS BOYS' AND GIRLS' BLACK HEAVY
RIBBED HOSE, in all sizes from G to 10 inches;
guaranteed to give the best CA/* "■' VP\^»
of wear and satisfaction.   Pair   OUC   to lO-L
The above lines were purchased direct from
the factory. You can not buy as cheap from
mail order houses.
Great Values-Men's Underwear
PENMAN'S LINE No. 95—1 am selling this garment at
a reduction of from 35 to 50 per cent. (j*(\ rrjj
off previous selling price.   Now «PaW»Ol>
ALL LINES OF STANFIELD UNDERWEAR AT A
REDUCTION OF 30 PER CENT.
Great Sweater Values
MEN'S SWEATER COATS, in Maroon and Khaki colors.   Regular
$4.75 values.   Now reduced to	
BOYS' SWEATERS—A large and varied range in all sizes, from $1.25 each.
I do not advi rtise anything that I haven't in stock.
BOYS' UNDERWEAR, Penman's Shetland Wool; all sizes.   Just the
thing for winter time.   Per suit, $2.00.   Per garment	
$275
Remember,
$1.00
SHOE   DEPARTMENT
I am now stocked with a full line of Dependable Footwear for Men, Women and Children
—bought at right prices, and I can therefore give you values not obtainable elsewhere.
See windows for prices on some of the staple sellers, and you will admit the correctness
of this assertion.
Yours for service and right prices, ..**     /     -m   >.     j
the model clothing
Hosiery and Shoe Store
Note the Address—
F. PARTRIDGE, Opposite the Post Office, Cumberland.
P.O. Box 313.
for two years?
Spelling—Shall be taken from a
minimum list of words bawd upon
active vocabulary and suiting local
needs?
Literature—wider selection—less
memorization.
Grammar—minimum essentials requisite for correct speech and
writing shall form the bask, of tlie
curriculum.
Writing—uniform system running
through all grades,
What system nl* writing do you
consider besl lor beginners? Why?
Does the system that you advocate
require that all writing lie dime
under supervision'.1 11* so, In whal
extent would the woi-1. in spelling,
dictation and written composition
be affected? *
,11'llliiuclii' problems based upon
life Interests ol the pupils.
Arithmetic course more clooi'ly
defined to lessen overlapping with
High School course.
Handwork - course linked up
throughout and compulsory iu all
grades.
Geography— local geography emphasized.
History—reduction in History—
definite amount, taught iu Intermediate not taken again in Senior
—Senior not to cover periods
taken up iu High School—History
tu be taken us u reading lessou
only.
.Nature Study—reduction iu the
amount.
Drawing—withdraw Blair and outline a syllabus running right
through,
Domestic Science—Is li feasible to
have In your school a Domestic
Science course dealing with Physiology and Hygiene, food values,
housewifery, sanitation, hand-sewing, textiles and art?
i'lriiieiilury Science -all grades lo
have simple lessons in elotncntsry
si-jeiii-e oi common things, such as
form pari of everyday life.
Publlc School course  eight  years
instead ol' seven.
A modified course for tiie mentally
slow pupil.
■ ;♦■•*■♦♦♦♦♦'
i AAA AAA at i i
♦+++**+++++++♦+*++*+++++++++++-H*'
$50 to $5,000
A YEAR FOR LIFE
A CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ANNUITY PROVIDES IT
—No better life investment available
—No better security obtainable
—Cannot be seized or levied upon for any cause
—Will be replaced if lust, stolen or destroyed
—Not affected by trade depression
—Free from Dominion Income Tax
—No medical examination required
Anyone over the une of 5 years resident or domiciled in Canada
may purchase.
Any two persons may purchusoajoiiitly.
Employers may purchase for their employees—school boards for
their teachers    congregations for thcit ministers.
Apply to your postmaiter; or write, pottage free, to S. T. Bmtedo, Super
intendciit of Annuities, Ottjw.i, for new booklet and other inform.ition desired.
State tei and age lust birthday.    ^
»++++-M--r»++++ *♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
A lesseuing or .subjects on thu curriculum to permit of more music
and training lu entertaining.
Re-naming   the   grades  — arst,
second, third, etc.
Wholesale Arrests
Canadians With Coughs
Haiti Who goes theref Homcono
with a cough, Pans friend I Stop
cough! 7011 aro under arrest. Thousands of luch arrosta uro being mado
every da/ in all parts of Canada. Too
long have ooughs and ooldfl evaded
Justice and caused untold suiTorlng to
humanity, bat at laat they have born
cornered And overpowered by Can*
ada's famous ooutfh dolectlvo—Buck-
loy'e Bronchitis Mlituro. Did you
ever hear of this wonderful remedy f
Why, everybody ls talking and writing about the great work It Is doing
in curing coughs, colds, bronchi til,
aathuia, ete.
The following ls one of thousands
of letters received]—*' Kindly accept
my sincere thanks for tho benefit my
wife derived by the use of ouo of your
bottles of Bronchitis Mixture. For
over thirteen years she hai suffered
acutely. After spending dollar after
dollar upon various remedies, no relief was obtained. Hearing of your
most marvelous remedy she doclded to
give it a trial and I am glad to say
one bottle has made her well. You
are at liberty to use my name and
ihould be only too pleased to answer
any Inquiries. Sincerely yours, Jotm
Holmes, Yorkville Ave." Tho orig-
inal of this letter may be seen at
W. K. Buckley. Limited, 143 Mutual
8t, Toronto. Don't allow a cough or
cold to lingor with you. Away with
itl Hall Buckley's Mixture aud have
cough arrested. This remedy never
fails. On every bottle Is a guarantee
to refund tho money If not satisfactory. Delays are duuKerous, Order
now from your Druggist 80
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND BY
IL E. fr'KO-ST. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 29, id2i.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
begs to advise that it has for rental at
moderate prices
SAFETY   DEPOSIT
BOXES
They are recommended for the protection from fire or
burglary of valuable business or private documents,
Victory Bonds, jewelry, etc.
THE MANAGER WILL BE GLAD TO FURNISH
PARTICULARS UPON APPLICATION
NOTICE
The First Sitting of the Court
of Revision of the Assessment
Roll will be held on February 8th
in the Council Chambers.
T. MORDY,
City Clerk.
Cumberland, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■  B. C.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, II. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double.load)...$5.00
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Plume «G
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried onr Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef I It ls delicious.
INCUBATORS
BROODERS
We have the largest and mosl
complete stock of Poultry Supplies in B, C.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUES
A. I. JOHNSON & CO.
811 Cumbie St. Vancouver
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 98110 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Hunger; Chas.
O'Brien, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
Pussy-footers put up a sign in Glasgow hearing these words; "Every corner in hell is soaked in whisky."
Glasgow students wrote underneath
the legend: "0 death, where is thy
sting."
Stick to Your Own Home Town
Putting a little more in than you
take out will eventually fill your
purse.
Make it the Best and Cleanest
In the Province—The Smaller
It is the Better a Chance it
Has to Grow.
Address delivered by Herbert Cuthbert,
Executive Secretary, Pacific Northwest Tourist Association, Jan. 18.
The prosperity of a country as a
whole depends upon the prosperity ol
each individual in it. It is not sufficient tliat tlie larger cities should Increase in population and in the volume
of business transacted in them. It is
of equal, if not greater, importance
that every small community increase
in population, iu production aud in
general business.
11' every rural community can pro-
dine more, can procure more settlers,
more residents, it will mean more local
prosperity, a greater buying power,
nnil will add to the wholesale business
and general commerce of the larger
cities, hence the entire country will
advanc and prosper.
It is tlie aim of the Northwest Tourist Association to develop every portion of tlie slate from within as well
as from without. There is no better
way of doing this than to seek to
create a forward movement In every
community, no matter how small it
may be. llt
He a Booster for Your Own Town.
The starting point for such a
movement is to have every person already in the smaller communities
determine to stick to his own home
town, to grow up with it, and to become a booster for it. It is better to
be a prominent citizen in your own
community than to lose your identity
in a big city. If we can eradicate from
the minds of the residents, and particularly of the children, the idea that
there are greater opportunities, and
tliat it is pleasanter to live in a large
city than iu their own town, the fouu-
dation of the future prosperity of that
town os already laid.
There is a grave and fundamental
danger not only to the well being of
the smaller communities, but to the
state as a whole, if this attitude of
mind is not changed, a danger so great
that when it is seriously considered, it
is appalling.
During my trip east I heard one
speaker make the statement that §V
years ago thc population of the United
States in the largest cities was ity per
cent, of the whole, and 95^ per cent,
in the smaller cities and rural districts.
Twenty years ago tlie largest cities
had grown to 33 per cent., while today
they have 50 per cent. It is estimated
that if this rate of exodus from the
country district into the larger cities
is maintained, in twenty years 80 per
cent, of the entire population will be
in the larger cities, leaving the rural
towns and districts almost without
population. He also stated that hi a
public school in one of the smaller
cities all the boys and girls who contemplated remaining there always
were asked to put up their hands. Fifteen per cent, of them did. He asked
tliose wiio contemplated at some future
lime leaving their home town and district to live in the larger cities to raise
their hands, and 85 per cent, of them
raised their hands.
He also stated that the business of
these rural districts, through the activities of the mail order houses, was
going to the larger cities not in their
own state, but to other parts of the
country, iu the same proportion.
Our association wishes to inaugurate
a campaign throughout the northwest
that will stop tliis exodus of popula
tion and of business, and I believe tiiat
remedies can be applied which will
effectually do this.
I have already suggested one means,
and that is by having the citizens
themselves become more loyal and
bigger boosters for their home town.
I suggest tliat they, in turn, commence
a campaign in their home town for
cleaner, a more attractive, a more up-
to-date town, and that they be sponsors for a development movement such
as they have never yet attempted; that
thoy endeavor at the same time to
make it attractive to the young people
and the children, to try and leach them
that there is no better place in which
to live and in which to enjoy life than
with their parents and amongst their
friends iu their own home town and
district.
I am going to take the liberty of suggesting some of the means hy which
this can be done.
If ihcrc is not a live commercial organization or other public body in existence, let the citizens I have referred
to immediately see that there Is one.
Taint Houses and Stores.
There are many ways which will
suggest themselves to such a committee. I might mention just two or
three. The painting of their homes
and stores that require paint, thc
cleaning up of every yard and every
vacant lot which needs it, the strength
ening of all fences that are good and
renewing of all fences that are dilapidated and an eyesore, the planting of
every front yard with shrubs or
flowers, and the offering of small
prizes for the best improvement tbat
has been made during the year in all
matters of this kind.
I don't claim that this can bo done
all in one year, but it can be started,
and if this progressive movement is
carried on, it will not be long before
that town is entirely changed ami has
become a thing of beauty and a delight to those who live in it, and to
those who pass through ii.
Ronovate Stores.
Now, as to increasing tbo business of
that town. Let every storekeeper
practically throw al his goods on the
sidewalk, clean up his store, lix his
shelves and his show windows, paint
them, if necessary, and kalsomine the
store, ami then put (hem back iu a
systematized and methodical manner
so that to his customers and to strangers his store has taken on tlie appearance aud attractiveness of any
store its size in the larger cities.
Let him sell as far as he can at the
same price that tlie people would havo
to pay elsewhere. Let him carry an
up-to-date line of goods, oven though
his quantities may be very small; but
wherever he has a small line of goods,
let him put the greatest possible stress
on the fact that he can procure in the
shortest possible time anything that
he does not happen to have in stock,
just as well as if the people themselves,
and much better in fact, ordered it
from the mail order houses.
Supply Good Moals.
Improve tlie hotels and restaurants,
no matter how small they may he; let
them get a reputation for putting up a
first-class meal, no matter how simple
and how plain it may be; let it bo good
and appetizing.
If thero is a newspaper in the community, let tho business men support
it. Don't let its existence depend upon
outside advertising which lures away
to other centres, but see to it that it
carries every inch of advertising tliat
business men and local corporations
can stand, so tbat its readers may he
educated and informed of the possibilities of doing business at home.
Buy your paint, your varnish, the
materials and tools required in the
improvements I have suggested, in
your home city, and bought by your
dealers from wholesalers in your province, and manufactured, if possible,
in the province.
Let the whole community inaugurate
athletic sports, establish tennis courts,
bowling greens, baseball and football
grounds and have their youngsters
playing at something in an organized
and healthy way. Keep their minds
and their bodies busy, eiher at work or
at play, from daylight to dark.
I have briefly sketched a few of tlie
things which might bo done to develop
the home town and the rural district.
Many others will suggest themselves
to you.
Make Town Attractive.
And now, where does this association come in in assisting to develop
the home town and the rural district
from tho outside? Why, every time a
family in an automobile, or on foot, or
who arrive by train, come into that
little town, they will fall in lovo with
it; they will say this is the cleanest,
the brightest, the most attractive town
they have seen. They will want to stay
there a little while; will want to see
the surrounding country.
California, Florida and other tourist
states don't rely altogether upon their
natural scenery for their attractiveness to strangers, and Ihe people of
these states know this. Thoy depend
upon the home life, tho attractiveness
of their cities, towns and villages to
lure the people to stay there aud to
become permanent residents.
Tlie Pacific Northwest Tourist Association is spending a small revenue,
compared with the objects for wliieh
it exists, in the most effective publicity
that is being carried ou today i.i the
United States. It is attracting thousands of people every year, both by
automobile, by train and hy steamship,
into British Columbia, Oregon and
Washington. It Is for us to sell our
states while they are bore, and there
Is no better way of selling thorn than
to Impress upon our visitors the one
truth which we all believe, tbat there
is no other place in the United States
or In Canada in which lite is so well
worth living as it is in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. If the
ideas I have ventured to submit to you
are carried out, this fact and this
truth will be more emphatic than il
has ever been before, and we will soon
have a very much larger population
and a very much increased prosperity
throughout this beautiful land of ours.
GUESS!
'Havo you a little fairy iu your
home?"
"No, but I have a little miss in my
engine."
"MY CANADA"      "MY CANADA"
$300 Cash Reward to any Person
Who is Nearest Right on 3 Guesses
FRANKLY, we want to draw your attention to the enormous
imports of United States goods into Canada. We want you to
realize what it all means to every Canadian—to Labor especially. So we will pay in Cash $300.00 First Prize, $100.00 Second
Prize, $50.00 Third Prize— and the next eleven prizes of $5.00
each to any person who makes and sends into us the nearest guess
to Ihe amount of money in goods that will be imported into Canada
from the United States for FEBRUARY, 1921, as will be reported
in
Canada's Trade Returns for
February, 1921
Tin* figures I'm* February, 1!I20, were $60,701,248.001 for February, 1919,
thu wore %82,265,900.00; for February, lilts, they were $41,186,814.00; for
Foli.'uary, 1017, they were $53,578,027.00, and for February, 1914 (before the
wan they were only $23,280,781.00, You see where we are and what we are
con infi lo in'Canada! What will Ihe figures be 1'or February, 19217 Are you
a good guosser?   If so, win one of the prizes.
HOW   TO   WIN
Get two of your nelirhbors to give you only ONR 1)01.1.Alt each
far a year's trial subscription lo **31Y CANADA" (regular price TWO
Dollars per year), and send hi tin* money with your three guesses.
Each subscriber is also allowed three guesses! Wlll you risk an
hour of your lime lo will THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS? COME!
«G0,GETIT! !w
"MY CANADA" will lio published monthly. It lives to help you and
Canada to better things. H goes without saying that the more readers we
have tbe better this National periodical will be. This is not only true com-
morclally, hut we feel that every additional reader means so mucli added moral
support.
Your guess must lie in by FEBRUARY 28th. 1921. As the old adage would
say, obey that impulse—obey it now! Help us hy this means to reinforce our
convictions as to Uie future and the present in Canada, and of leading the way
to better tilings for you, and yours, and us. Address your guess and send subscription to the publishers, ".MY CANADA," Suites 314-5 Stair DIdg., Toronto.
DANGERS OF CELLULOID
Celluloid is being used to a Rreater
extent than formerly for the manufacture of toilet articles, including combs
and backs of hair brushes, and for
children's toys. The very inflammable
nature of this material represents a
serious lire hazard, and one which has
received much attention from insurance and Tire protection associations.
.Stringent regulations are laid down
for safely of employees and property
during processes of manufacture,
while very little attention is paid to
(be dangerous nature of celluloid in
Ihe bands of the public.
The Professional Fire Brigades Association of England at a meeting recently dealt witli this subject. It was
suggested that legislation should he
passed prohibiting the use of celluloid
for children's toys, owing to its Inflammability. The National Fire Protection Association, in its quarterly
bulletin, refers to the ignition of a
celluloid comb through friction while
combing hair.
Owing to processes of manufacture
many products are placed on sale
which are imitations of non-hazardous
materials, such as tortoise shell, ivory,
etc. These should he distinctly
marked, to prevent accidents. It is of
the utmost importance that care he exercised in tho use of celluloid or similar inflammable substances under a
vorlety of names.
CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF
MINING AND METALLURGY
B. C. Division Will Hold Annual
Meeting in Vancouver Beginning February 9
The annual meeting of the British
Columbia Division of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy will
be held in Vancouver, on February 9
to 12 next.
Tlie programme that has been arranged possesses some novel features.
Instead of the customary presentation
of highly technical papers, there will
be a series of informal discussions on
matters of timely interest. The subjects selected for discussion include
"Metallurgical Problems of British
Columbia," "Fuel Supplies and Substitutes in B. C," "Geology in Relation
to Mining in British Columbia," and
"The Relation of the C. I. M. M. to
Government." In addition there will
be two popular lectures on the theme
of "Town planning with special reference to mining camps" by Mr. T. B.
Adams, of the Conservation Commission, and the other by Col. J. Leckie,
C.B., D.S.O., on the campaign in Northern Russia. "Jack" Leckie, by the
way, is a charter member of the Institute, and is most popular with the
members from tho Atlantic to the Pacilic.
The social side of the meeting la
also receiving due attention.
Everybody  Swings To
The Corner Store
ONIONS   10 lbs. 25c
ORANGES—Pet* dozen  25c
BAKING POWDER—2':.-lb. tins   90c
PLUM JAM—Pure; 4-lb? tins   95c
LIBBY'S MARMALADE—4-lb. tins 90c
EMPRESS STRAWBERRY JAM—4-lb. tins  $1.35
HORSESHOE BRAND SALMON 2 tins 55c
QUAKER ROLLED OATS—Pkt  35c
CARNATION MUSH—Pkt  SOc
PURE LARD 5 lbs. $1.50
SWIFT'S AND SHAMROCK SIDE BACON—
Sliced, or by the piece, per lb 55c
AYRSHIRE ROLL SIDE BACON, by the piece, lb. 50c
POST TOASTIES 3 pkts. 25c
B. C. EVAPORATED MILK 12 tins 90c
BRAID'S IDEAL TEA—3-lb. packets; regular
$1.85 for $1.25
Only One Packet to Each Customer.
DON'T BUY POTATOES NOW—WAIT AND SEE
DRY GOODS
MEN'S PURE WOOL SOX—Pair 85c
MEN'S FINE BLACK SOX (Penman's)—Pair .... 60c
LADIES' SEAMLESS CASHMERE HOSE—In black,
brown and blue; regular $1.75 pair.   Very special
value at  75c
BOYS' FINE RIBBED HOSE—Pair ' 45c
GREY BLANKETS—Pure wool.   To clear $6.50
/ sell for less-Buy here and save money
W.GORDON
THE CORNER STORE Phone 133 January 2d, ld&l.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
A. R PEACEY STARTS
IN BUSINESS AGAIN
Mr. A. H. Peacey, who for many
years conducted the drug store In
Cumberland, has purchased the drug
businesa of W. W. Gardiner, at the
corner of Pandora Avenue and Cook
Street, Victoria.
$300 CASH PRIZE CONTEST
Three hundred dollars In cash is being offered as a prize to the one who
guesses nearest to the correct figures
of trade of the United States with
Canada for February. See the offer
made by "My Canada" on page six.
"My Canada" is Boon to be Issued week
by week as Canada's National Weekly,
to provide a Canadian "Post" for
Canadians, for Canada, and tbe Empire.
MR. ARTHUR SAMPSON
DIES IN VICTORIA
Mr. Arthur Sampson, house detective at the Empress Hotel, Victoria,
was found dead ln bed late Friday
evening when hotel employees, who
got no response to repeated knocklngs,
broke Into the room. He had apparently succumbed during a fit. The
deceased waa 63 years of age.
Many residents ln Cumberland
knew Mr. Sampson when he was Chief
of Provincial Police at Fernie a few
years ago, being connected with the
police ln that district for a matter of
12 years. He was eventually transferred to Vancouver, where he became
Chief of Provincial Police, afterwards
going to the Cariboo as stipendiary
magistrate, and was for about a year
ln the Alberni district with the police
department.
BURNS SOCIAL AT
BEVAN JOLLY AFFAIR
What waa considered to be the most
successful and enjoyable social and
dance ever held at Bevan, took place
on Saturday evening last in the China
Hall. There was a record attendance
when Mr. J. Quinn opened with a few
remarks, dwelling mostly on the
worth of Scotland's most famous bard,
"Robbie Burns," concluding by—
thoughtfully wishing the assembly a
very pleasant evening. Dancing was
then proceeded with until eleven
o'clock, when about fifty couples sat
down to a splendid repast, provided
by the ladles' committee. A second
Kitting was necessary to provide for all
present
After supper Mrs. R. Brown opened
the second part of the programme with
a popular Scottish ballad, "Tbe Stor o'
Robbie Burns." Later Mr, "Watty"
Williams sang In his usual artistic
style, "The Longshoreman."
Dancing was again indulged in, after
which Mr. Roberts sang "My Ain
Folks" and "Bonnie Mary of Argyle."
Mr. Andy Waugh then very finely rendered "My Aln Wee House."
Dancing was again the order until
two a.m., when after singing "Auld
Lang Syne," the social was brought to
• close.
A number of friends from Cumberland were present. The Murdock or
ohestra from Cumberland provided the
dance music. For the success of th*
evening credit is largely due to the
ladles' committee.
CEEPEES LOSE STAR
The C. P. R. Vancouver football team
lost one of its main cogs the other day
when Sammy Sullivan, star half-back,
announced his Intention of coming to
the Island for the rest of the winter
His loss will be keenly felt by the railroaders, who are right in the thick of
hard games at present. Sullivan
was formerly a member of the Cum
berland football team, playing last
year ln the Inter-City Summer League,
Music and Photoplays
Marjorie  Daw
IN
Don't Ever Marry
Hilarious Comedy Showing at
Ilo-llo Saturday—All Married
And Unmarried Folks Should
See This Laughable Comedy.
"Don't Ever Marry" was the injunction given Joe Benson just three hours
before lie was secretly wed to the girl
of his choice. "Troubles always start
with marriage" wns the rest of tbe
warning, nnd within twelve hours after hit* wedding Joe had accumulated
enough to lust un average man through
a life time.
Don't Ever Marry" is the title of
the liUesi Marshall Neilan production
which tells the funny fascinating story
of the troubles which Joe Benson ran
Into by marrying. It will be shown at
the Ilo-llo tonight (Saturday).
"LIFTING SHADOWS"
Should a Child Bind Wife to a
Degenerate Husband?—Gripping Story of Love and Intrigue.
The tie that bound Sonia Howard to
her husband was their little daughter.
Once he had been famous. Now he
was a drug-ridden shell of a man. His
talent for writing had been sacrificed
through self-indulgence, and she had
grown to loathe him.
She could tolerate him no longer
and told him she would sue tor a
divorce. This threat and the fire ot
her anger roused all the beast ln him
and, in self-defence, she shot him.
Murder shadowed her life!
But that was not all, for the Ring
of Death was hounding her for papers
in her possession that gave the plans
of a Red revolution in America—the
country of her adoption and the native
land of the man she loved. This
man's life she refused to share until
the shadow of her guilt was raised
from her soul and the horrors of her
past had vanished.
Emmy Wehlen is the beautiful star
to whom has been entrusted the role
of Sonia ln "Lifting Shadows," a
gripping story of love   and   Intrigue.
This Pathe feature will be shown at
the Ilo-llo Theatre on Wednesday and
Thursday of next week.
JUANITA HANSEN
THE PHANTOM FOE
warneWoland
New Pathe Serial Showing on
Wednesday and Thursday
Next and Continuing for Fifteen Weeks.
la in evidence throughout tbe fifteen
episodes.
The motive tor the villain's attacks
against Janet Dale haB its inception in
an incident which occurred five years
previous to the opening ot the story
proper. Janet's father was a fur
trader and he Incurred the enmity of
some Indian trappers in the Canadian
fur country. A massacre resulted and
Leo Sealkirk, partner of Dale, suffered
the loss of his loved ones in the terrible affair. Leo swore vengeance, but
later relented and joined Dale in his
business near New York. Leo also
lived at the Dale estate.
At the commencement of the play
strange manifestations take place at
the Dale home. Janet's father disappears before her very eyes. Then her
aunt Edith is spirited away In the same
fashion, and the climax comes when a
note from Leo Selkirk takes Janet to
the city. She is then kidnapped, and
a scientific detective, Steve Roycroft,
starts out to unravel the mystery.
Everything points to Leo Sealkirk
as the perpetrator of the crimes
against the Dales. The attacks continue and grow more audacious until
Janet Is threatened with a most cruel
fate. The love interest is not neglected, for a romance of a most delightful
sort developes through Roycroft's association with Janet
"BUCHANAN'S WIFE"
Miss Virginia Pearson Coming
In a Singular Play of Present-
Day Mesmerism and Woman's
Love.
On Friday next, February 4, will be
shown the famous William Fox star,
Virginia Pearson, ln a play of many
unusual twists and features. "Buchanan's Wife" ls Its name, and tells of a
young woman who marries the man
she dislikes while under his occult influence. Later the man disappears,
and the woman he has abandoned
seeks happiness by marrying her girlhood lover. Then her first husband
turns up, shattered In mind and body,
and the woman has to make a difficult
choice between her compassion and
ber happiness.
At this point the problem takes an
unexpected turn, and the conclusion Is
said to be most sensational. Many Interesting phases of hypnotism are
shown, Illustrating tbe degree of power
one mind may exercise over another.
"EVANGELINE"
The Most Sublime Drama in the
History of American Literature—A Wm. Fox Production
Surpassing the'Most Brilliant
Motion Picture Achievement.
TREASURES OF MEMORY
A little house on a village atreet.
Tarnished by the snow and sleet,
With leaky roof and creaking door,
A fallen porch and sagging floor,
Tet sumptuous as a home can be,
It lingers In my memory.
A lullaby at evening time,
A story and a nursery rhyme,
A mumbled prayer and then away
To slumber till the break of day.
Ah, sweet as angels' songs to me,
They linger in my memory.
Success may bring us many things,
The hopes of men, the   dreams   ot
kings,
And music's strains be low and sweet
While home and friends make life
complete; -
Tet cherished more than all shall be
Those treasures of our memory.
—Robin A. Walker.
It had been a night of nights. Next
morning Reginald descended the stairs
swaying hazily and clinging to the
bannisters. Then he saw something
lying on the front door mat and a
gleam of hope shone ln his dreary
eyea. "Ah, the morning paper!" he
sighed. "Now I'll know what day of
tbe week it is!"
An Astounding Mystery Drama.
Logical, BnBlIng und Thrilling!
A phantom of evil whose motives
and Identity are never solved until the
last flash I
Hypnotism, uncanny manifestations
mediums add to the mystery)
Juanlta Hansen, far-famed ae a
screen beauty and the heroine ot several serial thrillers, makes her debut
as a Pathe Berlal star In a new fifteen
episode production entitled "The
Phantom Foe." This newest Pathe picture will be shown on Wednesday and
Thursday of each week at the Ilo-llo
Theatre.
Miss Hansen is the beau Ideal of the
serial enthusiasts because of her numerous performances. She has Bhown
herself tea/less as a player whose
scenes are striking for the action with
which Bhe Imbues them. Her new
vehicle is admirably suited to her
abilities. "The Phantom Foe" permits
the star every opportunity for the accomplishment of her vivid characterizations.
The play was written by George B.
Seltz and scenarlzed by Frank Leon
Smith. "The Phantom Foe" was directed by Bertram Millhauser, and deals
with a mystery story Involving a young
woman whose identity is concealed
most cleverly but whose dire plotting
The best loved work of Henry
Wadsworth Longfellow, the famous
poet, will be shown on the screen on
Saturday next, February 5, when the
William Fox big special production,
"Evangeline," with Miriam Cooper in
the title role, will appear at the Ilo-llo
Theatre.
"Evangeline" the poem achieved Instant success not only lu America, but
all over the world, and within a few
years was translated into every civilized tongue.
A Comparable success Is predicted
for the Fox film version, as It adheres
most faithfully to Longfellow's exquisite dramatic poem, ln addition to
being the most beautiful of all motion
picture productions.
As everybody who reads knows—or
ought to know—the story deals with
the exile of the Acadlans from their
native land, with their subsequent
wanderings In what now is the United
States, and with the love of Evangeline
and Gabriel—tbe latter well played by
Albert Roscoe.
Its outstanding feature* are Its
fidelity to the poem, the wondrous
beauty of many ot Its scenes and the
exceptionally capable Interpretation
of the title role by Miriam Cooper, a
well known and charming leading
woman of the screen. Her impersonation of the unbappy heroine Is said to
be a splendid achievement.
"Hiram," said the farmer's wife
"what makes you say 'By Gosh!' so
much and go round with a straw ln
your mouth?" "I'm getting ready for
them summer boarders that's coming
soon. If some of us don't talk and act
that way, they'll think we ain't country folks at all."
Psychology.
Professor: "Now I put the number
seven on the board. What number Immediately comes Into your mind?"
Class (in unison): "Eleven!"
A good way to have credit ls not to
need to use It
ffl
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, January 29th
Marshall Neilan has created a master work of live
sizzling entertainment in
Don't Ever Marry
STARRING
MARJORIE   DAW
"Don't Ever Marry" is Ihe production of Marshall Neilan, the noted director. It is
an uproarious comedy from the opening scene to the closing episode. The humor and
comedy, with which the picture abounds, come from situations in which everyday
people find themselves through a combination of circumstances.
Prospective Brides and Bridegrooms-Don't miss this
Monday, January 31st
AN   EXTRA   SPECIAL   ATTRACTION
The Dancing Fool
Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 2nd and 3rd
Emmy Wehlen
— IN —
LIFTING SHADOWS
A WONDER-PICTURE of timely and dramatic interest. A poignant soul-
gripping feature which will sway every man and every woman with its
powerful human appeal. A thunderbolt unrivalled in beauty and lavish
display.   An attraction which no lover of the best in pictures should miss.
An   Astounding   Mystery  Drama
THE PHANTOM FOE
FIRST EPISODE WILL BE SHOWN WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
NEXT, AND CONTINUED FOR FIFTEEN WEEKS
A mind-baflling mystery tale! A phantom of evil whose motives and
identity are never solved until the last flash! A tale of love and daring
against unseen enemies! Hypnotism, uncanny manifestations, mediums
add to the mystery!   Juanita Hansen and Warner Oland are tho stars.
Friday, February 4th
VIRGINIA PEARSON
— IN —
Buchanan's Wife
Gains Wife by Hypnotism—Wins Husband by Lying—April Weds December, and
Shivers—Death Fight Between Man and Dog*—Strange, Weird, Compelling, Human I
Rich Man, Unhappily Wedded, Turns Tramp—A Wife's Pitiful Appeal for Lovel
Don't forget the Country Store Drawing
takes place each Friday Night
Saturday, February 5th
HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW'S IMMORTAL LOVE EPIC
EVANGALINE
THE MOST SUBLIME DRAMA IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's immortal poem, thc most dramatic in all American
literature, has been made to live and move and breathe in the wonderful motion picture
presentation of "Evangeline." It was produced by William Fox as the screen's perpetuation of this charming story. It visualizes the word picture painted by the great,
poet, and all who love his works will wish to see it.   A Masterpiece to See and Hear!
A Fox Special Production surpassing the splendors of
the most brilliant Motion Picture Achievment
J Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 29, i$2i.
EXTRA SPECIAL PRICES
FOR
SATURDAY and MONDAY
LADIES' WAISTS—About 20 beautiful
Georgette Crepe, Crepe de Chine and
Voile Waists to be sacrificed at a very
low price for'a high-grade Waist. Regular prices to $11.95. Your
choice of this lot for	
$5.95
BE ON TIME.
LADIES'  SAXE   BLUE   SILK  POPLIN
DRESS, size 36. (P01   AA
Special price   »T>^l.Ull
LADIKS'  SAXE  BLUE  SILK  POPLIN
DRESS, fully embroidered. Special price	
$21.00
LADIES' TWEED COAT, in brown effect.
Size 36.   Regular price
$31.00.   Now for	
$19.75
LADIES' BROWN SILK DRESS, size 10.
Regular $32.00.
Special price	
$25.00
LADIES'  NAVY VELOUR  COAT
36; partly lined.   Regular
$37.50.   Special price	
•Size
$23.95
LADIES' NAVY SERGE DRESS, size 36.
A very good quality serge, i
Price	
$21.00
LADIES' DARK GREEN ALL-WOOL
VELOUR COAT, size 20; with large
collar and wide belt, with buckles in
front. Regular $39.50.
Special	
22.50
$25.00
LADIES' NAVY SERGE DRESS, size 36.
Nicely embroidered. -200 ftft
Regular $35.00.   Special  *P&y).\)\t
MEN'S    ALL-WOOL    COATS,    unlined.
Sizes 36, 38 and 40.
A genuine snap at 	
MEN'S TWEED COATS, Rubber-lined.
Just the coat for this «20K AA
weather.   Special to clear ty&0»\t\J
GIRLS' RAIN CAPES TO BE CLEARED.
Regular $5.95 for $4.50
Regular $8.95 for $6.50
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
HELP WANTED—MALE.
APPLICATIONS WANTED FOR THE
positions* of one Janitor and one
Billiard Marker in the club building
of the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association. State age, experience and salary required.
APPLICATIONS WANTED FOIt THE
position of Secretary, Librarian and
Physical Instructor to the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association. State age, qualifications, experience and salary required.
FOR SALE
WHITE ROTARY SEWING .MACHINE
iu first-class condition. Apply to
Mrs. Peter Myers, New Townsite,
Cumberland. 3-5
SINGER SEWING MACHINE IN GOOD
condition. Price $35. For address
apply The Islander.
LOST
BUNCH KEYS AT OU NEAR POST
Olllce; finder please return to the
Islander Ofiice and get reward.   3-5
GOLD WHIST WATCH IN FRATER-
nit/Hull on Friday, January 7. Reward on returning to Isobel Pryde.
FOR SALE OR TRADE
CHEVROLET CAR, 1010, In first-class
running order, Will trade for 1018
or 1010 Ford and cash, or would take
t**ood horse as payment. Call after 5
o'clock at Room 11, Riverside Hotel,
Courtenay, Ii. C. 2-li
G.W.V.A. MEMORIAL HALL
OPEN DAILY
Tho hall ls now open daily from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sundays from 2
to 5 p.m.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
January 20—Princess Beatrice, ya 11 -
couvor; Coqultlam City, Ocean Falls;
Tartar, Vancouver.
January 21—Charmer, Clayburn and
Scows, Vancouver.
January 22—Tartar, Ocean Falls;
Dauntless, coastwise; Faultless, coastwise.
January 25—-Olive M., coa.stwise;
Camrilco, Campbell River; Progressive, coastwise.
January 2ti—Prospective No. 2,
coastwise.
Church Notices
HOLY THIMTY CHURCH
Rev. W. Lcversedgo.
Sunday, Jan. Ull, Scxngoslnia Sunday.
Holy Communion, 21 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
ROHAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
ANNOUNCEMENT
F. C. Frazee, Chiropractor, has opened an ofllce at Mrs. Cairns', Victoria
Street, Courtenay.   Consultation Free.
CRICKET CLUB PROPOSED
Several influential gentlemen in town
have expresed a desire to see a cricket
club formed In Cumberland for the
coming summer. All interested ln tin
grand old summer game, and who
would like to see a club formed, aro
requested to send their names and addresses to "Cricketer," care of The
Islander.
If sufficient names aro received to
warrant it, a meeting will be called in
the near future.
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY
MEETS ON MONDAY
A special meeting of the Woman's
Auxiliary of Ihe G. W. V. A. is called
for Monday evening next, al 7 o'clock,
In Ihe Memorial Hall.
ritESBYTEBIAM SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at 2.30.
Evening Service nt 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. (1. 11. Kinney, H.A., F.R.O.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m
Sunday School und Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday at
7.30 p.m.
BIRTHS
CORNWALL—At. the General Hospital
January   21. lo   Mr.   and   Mrs.   W.
Cornwall, Bevan, a daughter,
BRADLEY—At tbe General Hospital.
January 26, to Mr. nnd Mrs. A. E.
Bradley, a daughter,
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
MONTHLY MEETING
Thos. H. Carey
FlItE AM) LIKE   I.XSUltANCE
Cumberland, I). C.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED
St. John's  First Aid and  Mine
Rescue Association
The above Association will meet at 10.30 a.m. on
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, in the First Aid Hall. The
paper to be read at this meeting will be "Accidents in
and About the Mines," by Mr. A. J. Taylor.
This paper concerns all employees, no matter what
position they may hold.
The monthly meeting of St. John's
Amliuplancc Asociallon wlll be held in
tho First Aid Hall on Friday next,
February 4th, at 7 p,m,
Smoker anil Social Broiling.
Tlie Cumberland Branch of ihe St.
John's Ambulance Association will
bold ii smoker and social evening in
lionoli of No. I Surface Team at a date
to he arranged later.
A hearty Invitation is extended to
all those Interested iu First Aid.
RE Y.M.C.A. DEFICIT
A meeting in connection with the
hoys' work in Cumberland, called for
the purpose of devising ways and
moans of paying off the amount said
to be owing hy Cumberland to tho Y.
M. C. A. headquarters at Nanaimo,
was held in the City Hall on Tuesday
evening. Mr, J. C. Brown was in the
chair, but as there was a very small
attendance, no definite action was
taken beyond discussing the matter.
Another meeting will probably be
called later on. Tlie Cumberland
portion of the deficit Is slated to be
$195.93.
Personal Mention
Mr. W. A. Oswald, Provincial Government Inspector ol Moving Picture
Theatres, arrived on Wednesday and
inspected the local theatre and left
for the south on Thursday.
Mrs. T. H.'Mumford left Friday
morning, going to Mechosin to visit
Rev. ami Mrs. Comley for a few days,
afterwards going to Victoria. She is
expected back end of next week.
Mr. R. E. C. Hooper, of Vancouver
arrived Wednesday and left Thursday
Geoffrey Porter of Victoria, Government Engineer, arrived here on Tuesday ou an ollicial Visli and left Friday
Mr. Robert Brown, manager of No
6 Mine, left for Victoria on Friday.
.Mr. William Kerr of Victoria arrived on Tuesday evening.
.Mr. 13. J. Ryan, of Vancouver, con
tractor for the Cumberland PubU
School, arrived on Wednesday.
.Mr. N. Hawkins, of ihe Canadian
Collieries engineering BtafC, arrived
on Wednesday and will remain hen
during tbe next few days.
Mrs. Hurry Fanner, of Nanaimo, re
turned to Cumberland nn Saturday.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Super
t tl ten dent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Victoria on
Friday nnd will return on Sunday.
Mrs. W. Walker was a passenger on
Tuesday morning's train for Vicloria.
Mr. A. Hayworth, of the Ladysmith
Moving Picture House, arrived on
Thursday and left on Friday.
Conrad Reifel, of tbe "Onion Brew
ing Co. of Nanaimo, wns here on a
business trip during the week.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Man
ager of the Canadian Collieries (Duns
muir) Ltd., returned from Vicloria on
Friday.
Mr. J. P. Hicks, of the Helntzman
Piano Co., Victoria, arrived on Thursday on a business trip.
Mr. Thos. R. Jnckson arrived on
Wednesday on his usual tour of in
spectlon.
"BOOK SHOWER" FOU
G. W. V. A. LIBRARY
Books of any description, suitable
for thc library nnd reading room of
the G.W.V.A. hall, will be gladly received by Mrs. J. Walton, at the "Book
Shower" she is holding on Wednesday
afternoon next, from 4 to 6 o'clock.
This affair is open to everyone, and is
not by invitation, as stated in a com
temporary.
'ACCIDENTS IN AND
ABOUT THE MINES'
The above is the title of n paper to
be read at the next meeting, on Sunday,
February fi, of tbe St. John's First Aid
and .Mine Rescue Association, by Mr.
A. J. Taylor.
All employees of ihe Canadian Col
lieries should keep tliis date in mind,
ns the paper is said to concern men in
nil departments.
GREAT WAR VETERANS
ELECT OFFICERS
At the meeting of the Croat War
Veterans Association on Tuesday last
the following otlicers were elected for
the term ending June 30:
President—Hugh McLean Davidson.
Vice-president—A. A. Brown.
Second vice-president, A. S. Johnston.
Secretary—A. J. Fouracre, Box 566
Treasurer—T. W. Scott.
Sergt.-at-arms—B. Nicholas.
Smoking Concert.
It Is proposed to give a free smoking
concert to all returned soldiers iu the
very near future.
Medical Tre.ilHioiit,
Through tbe efforts of tho B. C
Provincial Command, medical trent
ment will be provided for returned
soldiers out of employment. Any
comrades under this category should
ininiedalely apply for treatment
through the clinics operated ly tin
Department s. c. it.
"YE OLDE FIRiME"
HEINTZMAN
AND COMPANY
A few choice specimens of
Heintzman Pianos may be inspected at S. Davis' Shoo Store
and at McKinnon's Furniture
Store.
Mr. Hicks, of Victoria, will be
in the city for a few days to
welcome patrons.
GROCERIES
SERVICE
QUALITY
In buying your Groceries here you are assured of
getting the best in QUALITY at MOST REASONABLE
PRICES. We do not advertise bogus comparisons
showing how much you can save or how much you
should put in the bank! Neither do we advertise goods
at low prices and not have them in stock.
Our motto is a fair deal to all.
EXTRA SPECIAL
10-lb. tin Rogers' Syrup '.* $1.85
1 pkt. Robbie Burns' Pancake Flour 30
Regular price $2.15.
Special for	
$1.75
American Sodas, 35c pkt 3 for $1.00
('ream of Wheat, pkg 30c
Lowney's Breakfast Cocoa, (A-lb. tin 35c; 1-lb. tin 65c
Hulk Tea, per lb. 45c
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 1, per lb. (!0c; No. 2, lb. 50c
Clark's ami Davles' Soups, all flavors 2 for 25c
(Junker Pork and Beans, tin 10c
Delmonte Pork and Beans, small : 2 for 25c
Large size tins, 20c 6 for $1.10
King's Quality Flour, the Best-49-lb. sack  $3.40
Whole Wheat Flour—49-lb. sack $3.25
Graham Flour—49-lb. sack $3.25
Libby's Pickles, Picnic Size 25c
Sweet Mixed,  Sour Mixed,  Sweet Chow, Sour
Chow, Gherkins and Sweet Relish. Bottle 25c
Pacific Milk, baby size, 10c tin 12 for $1.00
16-oz. size, 15c tin 7 for $1.00
Maple Leaf Milk, 16-oz. size, 15c tin 7 for $1.00
Oranges, dozen 35c 3 dozen for $1.00
Cooking Apples, per lb 10c
JAM PRICES REDUCED
Cherry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.25
Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Raspberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Blackberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Apricot Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Plum Jam, 4-lb. tins 95c
BUY POTATOES NOW—IT WILL PAY YOU
Yakima Netted Gems, guaranteed the best.   100-lb.
sack for $2.75
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38.
Limited
Royal Insurance Company
Limited '
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
* LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets , $156,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
II. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
Leaves Vancouver ;,|,*, p, m. Dull)'.
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
PORT ARTHUR
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
Connections for all points ln Canada nnd United States.
Comportment Observation Cars, Standard and Tonrlst Sleepers.
EDWARD W. BICKLE, District Agent.
Canadian National Railways
Half tho fellows you  see who  ure |    Thc man who falls In love with hlm-
dressed fit to kill aren't worth killing. I self never has any rivals.
..     i

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