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The Cumberland Islander Jun 22, 1928

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 See "The
Magic Flame"   j
\
Cufhberland Islander
^T with which Is consolidated the CumbwliMd Hewn.
if
Ilo-Ilo Theatre  j
This Week-end |
FORTY-SEVENTH YEAR—No. 25
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA       FRIDAY.   JUNE   22ND,   1928.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Ball Game Produces
Many Thrills for Fans
Courtenay Team in Lucky Win
on Home Ground
Hits and errors ran up a heavy score
in the ball game on Sunday afternoon
at the local diamond between Duncan
and Courtenay. It was, according to
all the rules of baseball, not a first
class ball game, but it provided plenty
of thrills for the large number of fans
who turned out to witness lt, and so
far as the Courtenay rooters were concerned had the satisfactory ending o.
the locals winning by 11 runs to sevei
and compensated for the defeat of tht
home boys by the visitors on the lat-
ter's diamond two weeks ago. In the
hits column the locals out-slugged the
visitors by one bingle and had one less
In the errors column. In their half of
the eighth Duncan tied up the score
but allowed the locals four runs In
their to bat. Halley Dixon carried off
the batting honors with three hits five
times at bat. Cummins, who is usually
very useful with the willow, had difficulty with Robinson's slow ball. One
pleasing feature of the game was that
the boys were on their toes all the time
and the errors made were more or less
of the hard luck variety, or through
over-anxiety.
Bono, of Cumberland, refereed the
game very impartially, although he did
have one or two altercations with
"Salty" Shepherd, the scrappy first
baseman of the Duncan team. But
"Salty" is a good sport at that.
The game by innings follows:
1st innings : Shepherd flied out to
McKay. Brown singled. Bonsai fanned
and Weks went out at first on an assist
(Continued on Page Four)
Good Practice
at Cricket
Six of the Courtenay Cricket Club
members turned up at the local ground
on Wednesday evening and in conjunction with a number of the members of the Cumberland Club, enjoyod
a good two hours practice. A regular
inter-club game will be held next
Wednesday and If possible will start
at 4:30 In the afternoon and continue
until 7:30 or probably a little later.
The Cumberlanders have been practicing very falthfullly and are ready
to engage In matches with outside
teams. A visit Is expected from a
team from the southern end of the
Island sometime next month, and If
lt ts at all possible, tbe Nanaimo club
will also send a team up, a composite
team to Journey to Nanaimo later on.
Member for Comox=Alberni
Sends Word of Work of
Parliament at Ottawa
"Firemen, Save My
Child" Very Funny
Wallace   Beery   and   Raymond
Hatton "Army-Navy" Duo
Reunited in New Farce
Wallace Beery and Raymond Hat-
ton, the greatest comedy team in motion picture history, have come back
to .tiie screen in a picture whieh is
said to outdistance both "Beblud the
Front" and "We're in tlie Navy Now."
This new laugh film "Fireman Save
My Child" will come to the Ilo-Ilo
Wednesday and Thursday, June, 27
and 28 along with Mary Aslor and
Lloyd Hughe" In "Sailors' Wives."
As uniformed laugh makers, Beery
and Hatton today stand without peers
in the fllm world. Alter appearing
In doughboy garb nnd then In naval
whites and blues, they have temporarily left the federal service. Tills time
they're wearing the lire lighter's garb.
What these two have done with lire
trucks, hose and water is declared to
keep the audience convulsed in a riot
of laughter from the opening shot to
the final fndeout. They find themselves inducted into the lire department wholly without their own volition ,and from the time they make
their first slide down the pole in answer to nn alarm, they proceed to
crash through regulations and tradition with such careless abandon that
they all but wreck one of the country's
finest lire departments.
Tom Kennedy, who was the hard-
boiled sergeant ot "Behind the Front"
nnd the equally hard-boiled "Chief
crow' 'in "We're in the Navy Now"
once more rules their destinies with an
Iron hand as the lire captain, finding
his offorls at disciplining bis rookies
more hopeless than ever.
Love Interest In the lllm Is provided
by Paramount's fasclnutlng new young
blonde leading woman, Josephine Dun
who scored so tlccisvcly In "Love's
Greatest .Mistake."
Twenty-two Pupils
Recommended for
High School
Nineteen Required to Write Examinations
In all, twenty-two pupils of the
Cumberland Public School Entrance j
Class are this year recommended for
High School, three of these, Cyril Da-
vis, Cazuko Iwasa and Nina Shields
writing tbe examinations for the metl-
al. Nineteen pupils are required to j
write the1 examinations.
The following is a list of the names J
of the recommended pupils, not in
order of merit:
Cyril Davis, Cazuko Iwasa, Nina i
Shields, Vlncen Auchterlonle, Harlet j
Horbury, Mary Hut ton, Victor Tom-,
assi, Lena Tomassi, Hlsako Okuda,;
John Combs, Hataue Matsukura. Doug-1
las Baird, Takeru Kawaguchl, Sheila
Conway, Norio Herose, Magnus Brown,
Nellie Jack 3011, Wm. MacNaughton,
Floyd McMillan, Joe Williams, Rosina
Thompson. j
I A. W. Neill, M.P., in writing to advise
{ us that he would not be home until
I the end of the month, gave the follow-
! ing resume of the season's activities:
j So far as British Columbia Is con-
I cemed, I would consider that the most
(important points weer ns follows:
1, The return of the railway lands
and the Peace River block to the provincial government. This is definitely
promised, and only waiting the arrangement of matters of detail. This
is of very outstanding advantage to the
province In many ways.
2. Negotiations have been, and are
still continuing between the provincial
government and the Canadian National
Railways, looking towards the latter assuming control and responsibility for
the  P.G.E..  and  providing  an  outlet
J into the Peace River. While negotia-
| tions are still continuing, the conditions
: look hopeful for a favorable result,
j 3. Regarding fisheries, two matters
• of great Interest have occurred:
j (a) The decision of the Fisheries
Department to curtail the operation of
purse seines .which they have done by
limiting the areas in which they can
be used, and also by restricting the
size of them.
»b> The decision of the Supreme
Court regarding the interpretation of
the Fisheries Act.
It has been decided that the Dominion Government have no jurisdiction
over canneries or other fish plants on
shore, but that their control rests with
the province, who will no doubt Issue
regulations somewhat similar to those
which have been hitherto enforced by
the Dominion.
Of far greater importance was the
Court's decision that under the Fisheries Act as at present, the Minister has
no power to discriminate between British subjects, whatever their origin. It
was decided that an alien could be refused a license, but that a naturalized
Oriental could not be.refused one. The
result would threaten to be very serious for the white fishermen of British
Columbia. The decision of the court
was by majority, four being in favor
and three against this ruling.
The court did not, however, say that
iContinued ou Page Two)
Successful Dance
The dance of tbe Cumberland Branch
of tbe Canadian Legion U.E.S.L. held
in tbe .Memorial Hall o nSatunlay
evening last was very well attended,
a most enjoyable time being had by
all present. In response to numerous
requests Ibe Veterans' will hold a
whist drive ami dance this Saturday
In the Memorial Mall, with Jimmy
Walker's .Maple Leafs supplying tho
music.
Mayor Maxwell
Is Bereaved
The Cumberland Tennis Club will
travel to Nanaimo tomorrow (Saturday) to play a series of friendly games
with Ihe Central sports Club of Nanaimo. The players representing the
local club are Misses 13. Dickie, P.
Partridge, D. Maxwell, H. Parnham,
and Messrs. T. Graham, P. D. Graham,
C. C. Graham, 11. Graham, H. Stacey
and E. Blckle.
Cumberland f8 Years Ago j
Mother   of   Chief   Magistrate
Passed to Her Reward
Thursday
Mrs. Jane Maxwell, mother of Mayor Alex. Maxwell and a resident of
Cumberland for a great number ot
years passed to her reward on Thursday of this week. The deceased lady
was seventy-three years of age and
had been in failing health for a long
time being confined to her bed for the.
past year. The funeral will be held
tomorrow (Saturday) at 4 p.m. interment taking place in the Cumberland Cemetery with the Rev. J. R.
Hewitt, pastor of the Cumberland United Church officiating. In addition
• j to her son. Mayor Maxwell, two
daughters, Mrs. Walter Hudson and
; Mrs. Haggart, of Vancouver, survive.
Candidates Both in
North Part of District
Returning Officers and Agents
Are Appointed
Both Dr. MacNaughton and Mr. J
W. McKenzie, the Conservative and
Liberal candidates, respectively, are
travelling and visiting the outlying
places of tbe riding. Mr. McKenzle
left last week end, Dr. MacNaughton
leaving Cumberland on Wednesday
afternoon. The northern trip Is reputed to be a most strenuous one, entailing travelling at all hours of the
night and ln all sorts of conveyances.
We are given to understand that the
conservative candidate will be away
from Cumberland for at least one
week. Dr. Sutherland, of Vancouver,
has arrived in tbe city to take over
Dr. MacNaughton's practise in the
meantime.
The various committees of both
parties have been busy organizing
and D. R. MacDonald has been appointed Dr, MacNaugton's agent and
campaign manager whilst P. P. Harrison Is Mr. McKenzle's agent with
Mr. P. L. Anderton campaign manager.
The conservative candidate visited
Denman and Hornby Islands during
the week and received a great ovation. From present indications tho
campaign In the Comox riding looks
like being one of the keenest for a
great many years.
■
Via Comox I^ake to
National Park.
The following is from tbe Alberni
Pioneer News of Saturday last:—
It has been promised to H. C. Hay-
son, government agent for the Alberni
district, that two qualified men will be
sent out from the Surveyor-General's
department at Victoria to discover a
line for a wagon road for Alberni to
Buttles Lake the reserve for a Provincial national park, by the way of Comox lake.
Mr. Rayson has for some time past
taken an active interest in this project
and made it a point to urge the merits ] on   t0  ext|ngU|sh   „   8mall  b|aM  on
Electrical Outfit for Surgery.
Although  the company  now  has a!
Miss Keennn had been camping at
the beach at Brytlou's camp for some
time.
Mr. Westfleld drove down to the|
camping grounds on Tuesday after- j
noon and bore his fair one away, like
a knight of old.
The happy couple boarded the "Olty
of Nanaimo," at Comox, thus leaving j
the showers of rice and good wishes
of their friends to await their return j
to Cumberland.
*   •   •
The fire department was called up-
of the proposition on both the minister of public works and the chief com-1
missloner of lands during tbe recent j
visit of these gentlemen to the district.
Tuesday last, when the roof of Mr.
Harry .Mounce's residence near No. 6
caught from a spark from the chimney.   The call was promptly respond-
The  government  agent   has  fceen | ed t0 80 that very mUe damug(J wa„
personally  over  the  proposed   route. done t0 tlle ll0Use
as far as Comox Lake and has made
observations and studied the topographical nature of the rest of the
territory through which the road
would pass. He is firmly convinced
of the feasibility of the scheme, and It
Is supported In this conviction by oth-
Sbowed Her Culture
A young lady of this city wont into
a dry goods store the other day and
I) lush Ingly asked the head clerk If he
"had any of those elastic bands, capable of being elongated nnd adjusted
Sunday School Class
Hold Jolly Party
A very Jolly party was spent at the
home of Mrs. Thomas on Saturday Inst
by the children of her class at Holy
Trinity Sunday School, thirteen children  being  present.
Tea was to have been served on the
lawn but owIiik to the unsettled stale
of the weather ten was served Indoors
Mrs. J. J. Potter assisting at the table which was prettily decorated with
purple and white flowers.
Outdoor games were greatly enjoyed
and special dances rendered by three
of the children. Those present were:
Evelyn Stacey. Levlntco Thoburn, Edna Thoburn, Margaret James, Gwen
Rutherford, Nan Rutherford, Betty
Shortt, June Endie. Gladys Wood,
Nettle Gibson, and Masters Weldon
Stacey. Robin Eadie. Jacltle Bennle.
era who have been over the country, j „, ploa8urUi anc, u90c] ov th8 feralnii)i
Mr. Rayson's idea Is to use U>» portion of mankind for putting around
Beaver Creek road in starting froni i th(, ,ower cxd^m^ of lna locomo-
Albernl, which Is already passable for I „ve 1IU,ml)ers t0 ,,,,,,„ ,„ ,lu. vrolmv
a distance of fourteen rallcs.From tho j,pB|t|on „ml Ule required altitude hub-
end of this there Is a good pack trail ] name„tl) of ,,,„,,. ni,|lls." The clerk
to Comox Lake, a distance of npprox- ] (> n(JW 0]| n B| ranch,
imately   fifteen  miles,   which   could a   a   a
easily be made Into a good wagon road A cans||jntnen1 of Mongolian Pnea-
From Comox Lake to Buttles Lake Is s„,|la iwn8 received by secretary Ac-
where the path finders would hnve to „„ (|f lhe Development League yestor-
exorclse their Ingenuity. Mr. Ray- (lax „„d vvm, turned on the com-
son believes that a pass could be found | panjr,B furm Thc |)|n|ll nn.|VC,i |n
by following either the Ash or Crulk-| „„,„'„„,,, cn„,mi„„ „„d It they escape
shank rivers but he favors the latter i ,ho gM|)B „r t]l(, |H|t |,unlers win „„„„£.
as being the shorter and easier. He L (|0 Bp](milwly |„ u,|s dlstriot.
estimates the length of a road from, Arm„g6ments havo been made hy
Comox lake by way of the Crulkshnnk (he Rutll0,.ltle!l tnr the protection of
at  12 miles. | lnea0 ml.n9 um| nl)v onc round trcs-
The total distance from Alberni to! passing on the company's farm herc-
Buttles Lake would he about forty nfjer wm i,e prosecuted. The co-op-
miles the country through which it, surgery that Is splendidly equipped
would pass is Interesting and nttrac- for the electrical trentment of dls-
tlve all the way, and there should he eaHGH nf „n kinds, these will be added
"JAZZ"
BS  the Rhythm  :£.-g'
About six hundred people listened
to some real dance music played by
Les Crane and His Canadians at the
Royston Pavilion last Saturday. It
was a treat to wach them do their
"stuff." They played "jazz" as it
should be played for they did not
blare away and try to "drown" the
performer of the solo sax. or boIo
carinet etc., as many amateur musicians do. Yes, it was a treat, and the
management of the Royston Pavflion
deserve credit for bringing such a
band here.
Ben Boekelman, world-famous musician, who 64 years ago came from
Vienna to play at tbe court of Max-
miliaii in Mexico, celerbated bis
ninetieth birthday recently. Here's
what he says: "While I see advance
in science, I do not see it in the arts,
Jazz is not music."    —Prom the Star
That jazz is not music is a atate-
ment which has been repeated over
and over again. It may not be music
but until such times as someone can
define what music is. tho statement
is irrelevant. Chinese music to thc
Chinese is wonderful but to us It is a
caciaphonous row. Yet what intelligent person would affirm that Chinese
music is not music? Further, the bagpipes to some people are noise but
to tbe Scotch they are divine. Jazz
to the last generation may not be music. The rising generation, however,
will worship It.
Nobio Hayashi,' the sensational Japanese athlete, an, a student at the
Cumberland High School, was thU
week presented with a silver cup by
bis admirers at tbe school, in commemoration of his wonderful showing
at the Upper Island School Sports
held at Courtenay on June 1st.
Mr. and Mrs. Dan
Bannerman Hosts
To Soccer Stars
•Mr. and Mrs. D. Bannerman entertained on Saturday evening, the members of the football team of the Public School who defeated Brechin In the
five-a-slde contest. These teams had
tied at Courtenay at the recent school
sports, Cumberland finally winning
on   Saturday  afternoon.
Ice Cream, Strawberries and Cream
and Cake, things dear to youthful palates were served In abundance while
all partoqk of "whistle" from the
trophy cup. Several budding public
speakers made their "debut", all expressing their appreciation of the
honor conferred ou them and their
thanks for the kindness and hospitality of the host and hostess. Mr.
Banerman who is well qualified to
speake ron soccer gave the boys
a fine talk and some good advice, so
that it fs safe to say that any challenging team will have to step lively!
to outscore the local five. The guests j
were: John Bannerman, Captain;!
Harry Westfleld, Goalie; John Davis,'
John Combs and Mamora Tahara.
no difficulty in striking easy grades.
A special meeting of the Holy Trinity W. A. hold at the Vicarge on Monday last made arrangements for a
congregational picnic to be held at
Oartley'B Beach on Wednesday, July
4th.
to shortly by the Installation of some
of the latest electrical appliances for
the treatment of nervous and other
diseases. .
The order lias just been placed for
an electrical sialic and higli-frequt'ii-
Wedding of Local Pair.
A very quiet wedding, so quiet ln
fact, that the news of its solemnization come as a complete surprise to,cy machines,
the bride's parents, on Wednesday While there Is hardly any limit to
afternoon, took place at Comox on the field in which these machines
Tuesday evening when Miss Maggie j may be beneficially used, they are
Keenan, of this city, became tho . especially effective ln the treatments
"Better half" of Mr. Jack'. Westfleld, of all kinds of rheumatic troubles,
also of this town. | lumbago, nervous diseases and some
eratlon of all sportsmen is solicited I forms  of paralysis,
in the protection of this splendid game      The apparatus probably will arrive
bird. ' In a month's time.
Entertains At
Bridge Party
.Mrs. H. Bryan entertained at four
tables of bridge on Friday evening
last, the party being In honor of Mrs.
lllcks, who is leaving Cumherlaud j
shortly on a visit to tho East of Can-!
arte.
Mrs. T. Graham was the prize winner for the evening.
Following a dainty supper, Mrs.!
Dick, president of tho bridge club!
called upon Mrs. Hicks to accept a
box of chocolates and a beautiful1
bouquet of Irises and roses from her!
friends, along with ull their good j
wishes for a pleasant Journey. Mrs,
Hfcks replied In a few appropriate)
words thanking her friends for their
gifts and kind  wishes.
Those present at the party included:
Mrs. E. K.. Hicks, Mrs. T. II. Mumford, Mj/b. G. K. MacNaughton, Mrs.
Plokard, Mrs. Conway,, Mrs. Win,-;,
Mrs. . Nunns, Mrs. J. Shortt, Mrs. L.
R, Stevens, Mrs. Cameron, Mrs. Graham, Mrs. Dick, Mrs. Robinson, Mrs.
Parnham, Mrs. Finch and Misses Uur-
I rows, Sehl and Tarbell,
Surprised On Eve
Of Motor Tour |
Mrs. J. D. Davis was a most surprised hostess on Tuesday eveniug
last when a number of friends am)
neighbors called unexpectedly to spend '
the evening. The unsuspecting hostess was found in the midst of pren-
arations for «. motor trip to Denver,'
Colorado, where she will visit her
parents. It was to wish her "au re-!
voir" that these friends came. When;
tA\ had regained their composure,
cards, contests and music were entered Into with zest, a merry evening
passing all loo quickly Card winners were first, Mr*. Murray, second,
Mrs. Gear, third, Mrs. Bell, consolation, Mrs. Jackson, while In the contests Mrs. Quinn was .successful, Mrs.'
Jackson receiving consolation. A de-!
Melons buffet supper was served after I
which a novel game known as "A
Motor Treasure Hunt" was Introduced. Guests, representing places to be;
visited by the hostess ou her Journey]
were stationed at intervals round the
room and as she slopped before each
the attraction of that particular place
were extolled In most amusing manner. Mrs. S. Davis as "Cumberland"
the beginning and end of the Journey
presented the hostess with a lovely
personal gift a Ha token or the friendship and best wishes of all . This was
accompanied by a lovely bouquet,
Mi's. Monks whii will accompany;
her mother on the trip was also presented with flowers.
Those present wore: W\rs Gear,
Mrs. Quinn, Mrs. K. Brown. Mrs. McNeil, Mrs. !•', Bond. Mrs. It. Brown,
Mrs. Covert, Mrs. Herd, Mrs, Young,
Mrs. Devoy, Mrs. Gillespie, Mrs. H.
Jackson, Mrs. Murray. Mrs. Ben
Brown, Mrs. Hudson. Mrs, J, Watson,
Mrs. S. Miller. Mrs. Morgan. Mrs. S.
Davis, Mr?. Saunders, Mrs. Somorvlllo.
Mrs. Whitehouse, Mrs. Bell, Miss Hunden and Miss Verna Murray.
Many at Funeral
of Geo. Johnston
Employee of Local; Club Borne
To His Last Resting Place
By Intimate Friends
George Johnston, of Windermere
Avenue, Cumberland, who collapsed
on Dunsmuir Avenue, ou Wednesday
June 18th, dying before medical aid
could be procured was Interred In
the Cumberland Cemetery on Sunday
last following a short but Impressive
service at the home. The Rev. J. R.
Hewitt, pastor of theCumberland United Church conducted the Hervlce at
the home and at the graveside. The
deceased was borne to his last resting
place by the following, all intimate
friends of the family: Messrs. T. H.
Robertson. R. T. Brown, S. L. Robertson, W. Brown. W. Whyte, and W.
McMillan.
Besides his widow, he leaves to
mourn his loss, two daughters Mrs.
A. Williams and Miss Jean Johnston
and one young son, William at home;
also a brother in Australia and numerous relatives In Scotland.
The deceased had been a resident
of Cumberland for the past sixteen
years and by his quiet and unassuming manner endeared himself in the
hearts of numbers of residents of the
city, a large number attending tbe
funeral to pay their last respects.
A number of beautiful floral tributes
were received as follows and are hereby gratefully aeknowedged by the
famly,
WREATHS: The Family; Father
and .Mother; Liz, Dave and Bud; Jean
ington; Brother BUI, Cadomin, Alber-
Edson, Alberta; George and Lizzie
and family; Pete and Nellie and family, Cadomin, Alta; Bob. and Jessie
and family, Ronald, Washington; Bob
and Lex and family, Aberdeen. Washington; Brother Bill, Cadomin, Alberta; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brown and
Billy, Royston; Literary and Athletic
Club; Ladies' Auxiliary, F.O.E. 1953;
Burns' Cronies Club; Mr. and Mrs.
L. Frelone; Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Robertson; Court Cumberland Lady Forresters; Mr. Wm. Whyte; Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Nicholl, Nanaimo; Mr. and
Mrs. Sid Foster. Nanaimo.
SPRAYS: Harllng & Ledingham;
Mr. and Mrs. F. Martin; Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Devoy; Mr. and Mrs. Coe; Mr.
and Mrs. Wtllfams; Mr. and Mrs. J.
Wilcock, Courtenay; Mr. and Mrs. R.
K. Walker. Mr. aud Mrs. S. L. Robertson; Mr. and Mrs. John Bond; Mr.
and Mrs. S. McLeod, Comox; Mr. and
Mrs. D. Bannerman; Mr. and Mrs. D.
Hunden and family; Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Beverldge, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. J.
W. Hill; Mr. and Mrs. S. Dtavts; Mr.
and Mrs. J. Westfleld; Mr. and Mrs.
R. T. Robertsson; .Mrs. Krancesclnl
and Mrs. Rajagno and family; Mr.
and Mr*. Lockart; Mr. and Mrs. F.
Smith. Courtenay; Mr. and Mrs. Bradley and family, Union Bay.
PILLOW: Mr. and Mrs. T. Carney
and family.
CROSSES: Mr. and Mrs. H. Grant,
Bevan: Mr. and .Mrs. Tom. Baird and
family; Mr. and Mrs. Paul Morrison.
Out of town visitors at the funeral
were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Nicholl and
Mr. and Mrs. Sid. Terrls of Nanaimo.
Mis*. Meldruni of New Zealand
Address*--*   Local   Tractors.
Miss Meld ruin, exchange teacber
from New Zealand, now teaching in
Nanaimo addressed the Cumberland
Branch of the B. C. Teachers Federation which Includes teachers from
Minto, Bevan, Royston and Union Bay
at the school house. Monday exenlng
of this week.
Miss Meldrmn gave u most hit resting and educational description of
Now Kealand. both of the North and
South Islands. She also described
the .New Sealand schools, which are
very similar to our own having the
same primary grades, Junior high
schools and technical schools.
Following the lecture tea was nerved In the Domestic Science Room.
Udles' Sewlwr Club Have Picnic
al   Little Itht't.
The Ladles' Sewing Club had a very
enjoyable picnic at Little River on
Saturday last at tbe beach residence of
Mis. T. Graham, it being In honor of
Mrs. Hicks. Members present at the
picnic were; Mrs. Hicks. Mrs. Mackintosh, Mrs. Frame. Mrs. Dick, Mrs.
Parnham, Mrs. Watson. Mrs. Nash,
Mrs. Ledingham, Mrs, Graham. Mrs.
T. Williams, Mra. Hewitt, Mrs. J. C.
Brown. Mrs, 1>  R. MacDonald.
Timberland Mine
Now Producing
No. 8 Mine of Canadian Collieries
Reported to Be in Good
Seam of Coal
Ladysmlth, June 16.—Production Is
proceeding at tlle new colliery, to be
known as No. 8, In the Timberland
area, by the Canadian Collieries (D.),
Ltd. This property was located about
two years ago, and extensive preliminary work has disclosed an eight-foot
seam, which is yielding well for a new
colliery. It is being worked in con-
Junction with the Extension mines
hence the numeral attached to lt, and
is on the Wellington seam, the same
as those collieries use.
About forty or fifty men are working at the property. Being accessible
by the Timberland Logging Line, the
carB are brought down on the logging
company's line, and transferred to
the Wellington Colliery Hallway for
shipment to Ladysmlth,
The seam is regarded as a promising opening of new ground, ln an area
which has long been known to be
well mineralized.
Local Man Qrand
WardenJ.O.O.F.
Large Gathering at Convention
Held at Chilliwack
Some 400 representatives were present at the convention of the Grand
Lodge of Oddfellows held at Chilliwack last week end. Mr. J. C. Brown,
of Cumberland, was honored by being
elected Grand Warden, other officers
being J. T. McDonald, Vancouver,
Grand Master; E. C. Cavalsky. Nanaimo, Deputy Grand Master; E. L. Webber, Vancouver, Grand Secretory; E.
E. Elliot, Vancouver. Grand Treasurer; J. H. Ashwell, Chilliwack, Grand
Representative; P. Clarke, Vancouver, Grand Marshall; c J. MInton,
Trail, Grand Conductor; A. E. Bent-
ley, Kamloops, Grand Guardian; M.
J. Malpln, Klmberiey, Grand Herald;
W. B. Bunt, Mission City, Grand Chaplain.
Messrs. p. McNiven and T. Conn,
of Cumberland were also present Mr!
Conn representing Union Lodge No.
11. whilst Mrs. J. Derbyshire also of
Cumberland represented Harmony Re-
bekah Lodge No. 22. The convention
was most successful, the Chilliwack
lodge as hosts provided excellent entertainment for thc many attending.
Thursday evening tbe convention ended with a magnificent ball.
Hike to Alberni.
Mr. Walter Hudson, Jr., Mr. Ben
Horbury and Mr. William Bennle left
Cumberland on Monday night on a
hike to Alberni via Comox Lake. The
'rip up the Lake was made ln Ben.
Horbury's boat. From the head of the
Lake they took to walking and as the
boys have been training up for such
hikes they were In the pink of condition, making good time and taking
in everything unusual as well. The
boys are now wondering why they
haven't made this trip before as the
scenery, they soy, was beyond description and the mountain air gives one
that "Kruschen" feeling.
N-O-T.It'.K
Commencing on Monday next and
every .Monday thereafter, the new
Fire Siren at the Cumberland Fire
Station will eb tested between the
hours of twelve and one o'clock noon,
two short blasts being sounded. Residents of the city are asked to take
notice of this fact and govern themselves accordingly.
25-26 W. H. COPE, City Clerk.
■Illllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Monday and Tuesday, June 25-26
Hoot Gibson
In
"THE BUCKAR00 KID"
and
Jean Hersholt. Alice Jolce George
Lewis and Jean Foster
in
"13 Washington Square"
Huh for tamo* Lake
A bus will leavo the Cumberland
Hole] on Sunday morning at 10:30 for
Comox Lake. Return fare: adults,
50c, children 2fie. Special rateB Tor
families. Return bun leaves lake at
8 p.m.
BIRTH—To Mr and Mrs. It. Ral-
llnson on Saturday, Juno 16th, at tbe
Cumberland General Hospital, a
daughter.
Wednesday-Thursday, June 27-28
Wallace Beery — Raymond Uatlon
in
"Firemen Save My
Child"
and
MARY ASTOIt - LLOYI)
HUGHES
"Sailors' Wives
Frlduy and Saturday, June 29-30
OLIVK IIOUDEN
In
"The Joy Girl"
also two-reel colored news
■IIP PAGE TWO
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY.   JUNK   22.N1),   1D2S.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,   JUNE   22ND,   1928.
COMPULSORY VACATIONS
A LAW has boon adopted in Austria providing
for milking an annual vacation compulsory,
the payment of wages during the period
being an obligation on the employer. Young
people under sixteen years of age are to have two
weeks of vacation, while older persons are to have
one week at least. Of the value of this from the
and, more especially, employer's responsibility,
and, more especially, employer's resuponsibility,
there should be no doubt. Superficially, and at
first glance, the innovation may appear to work
hardship and injustice to the employer of labor.
The benefit to the employee is renewed health and
vitality, with the consequent ability to work better and more productively, should amply compensate the man who pays the wages and probably
will do so. lt has proved to be so in the case of
the shortening of hours of labor and there is no
reason why it should not work out in like manner in respect of vacations.
It might be a good thing to extend the idea of
compulsory vacations to some people who never
seem to have any holiday at all. Wives and mothers, for instance, are people who seldom if ever
get any vacation. The true housewife is always
•working. "A woman's work is never done", says
an old proverb. The husbands of us must take a
holiday; the children could not survive without
one, but mother, oh, well, mother doesn't want
one anyhow, so she cannot need one. That is how
most of us men look at the question, of the housewife's vacation. A vacation for the wife, with
full pay, too, should be made compulsory. Probably some men would be glad of it—this is not said
cynically—it would mean a vacation for them to
have the wife away. But we suspect they would
be glad to have the "missus" back again.
is he."   Even the good Lord can not make a man
prosperous who is always thinking poverty.
If you want to be prosperous, think prosperity
talk prosperity; act prosperity. Live like the king
you are: Be generous; don't be afraid to give.
Spend freely; money in Circulation helps
everything. Money hoarded helps nobody. John
Smith owed his grocer ten dollars and paid it.
The grocer owed his tailor ton dollars and paid it
with John Smith's ten dollars. The tailor owed
ten dollars to the butcher, who owed John Smith
ten dollars. So when the tailor paid the butcher,
the butcher paid John Smith, and everybody was
paid and prosperous. Get the idea of prosperity
in your rrind and you will soon have the reality of
prosperity on your affairs.
BE FRIENDLY
AS A MAN THINKETH
WHAT IS TRUE OF NATIONS is true of individuals. A few years ago Canada was
thinking of itself in terms of blue ruin and
poverty. Result: poverty. Today it is thinking
of itself as prosperous. Result: prosperity. The
poverty was not real; neither perhaps, is the prosperity. But the sense of poverty was there and
now the feeling of prosperity is here. Can anybody doubt that it is best and wisest for a people
to feel prosperous rather than poverty-stricken?
What is said here is not said to point a political
argument. No political party has any monopoly
of prosperity. It is the personal application that
is intended. There can be no doubt that the surest way to prosperity for a man is to see himself
prosperous. By so doing he attracts things to
himself; friends, business, success, and all the
stuff of life worth having. It is not really the possession of money that makes us prosperous. Money
is but a symbol, after all. It is the thought of
prosperity.   "As a man thinketh in his heart so
BE FRIENDLY if you wish to have friends.
Nobody has friends who spends his time
making enemies. When you spend your time
making friends, you have friends, and the only
way to make friends is to be friendly. Be friendly
at home. Some men are the friendliest souls
outside their homes. They have pals by the store.
Everybody who knows them In business, or at
the lodge, or the club, will say, "What a friendly
chap he is". But at homo they may never have a
friendly word for the wile, while the children get
sour looks and harsh words, if they dare make the
least noise to upset his majesty.
Some women are like thai too. Hear them talk
on the telephone in honeyed phrases, or accom
pany them to the Sewing Circle or the Women's
Club, and their friendliness attracts other women
like sugar draws Hies in summer time. But when
the man comes homo tired and weary with the
day's struggle and needs a pal to understand his
mood, one who will lavish friendship and love and
understanding, often all she feeds him with is
complaints and grumbles, toasted. Only it's the
man who gets toasted. Not every man or woman
is like this, friendly outside snarling at home. But
too many of us are that way.
Be friendly. Cultivate friendship. In the garden of life friendship is one of t ho choicest flowers
that blooms. If neglected it will run to waste and
become a mere weed. Uncultivated, friendship
droops and declines. But nurtured it thrives and
grows more beautiful as the days pass.
Be friendly with your employees, if you are an
employer. Know them, be interested in them and
their families. If they're in trouble help them
out. Think of them as belonging to your family.
Invest friendship in them and see the dividends
you'll get back. If you are an employee, be friendly to the boss. Don't be hostile to him in thought
or word, or act. He's paying you, anyhow, and
while he may be making money out of you still
you work for him and should be faithful. Think
of yourself as working with him. Perhaps bye
and bye, you'll be a real partner: who knows?
Be friendly to animals, to little children, to the
unfortunate and lonely. It will all be repaid with
interest. And as a last thought, be friendly to
yourself. Look after yourself, your health your
condition, your home, your family, your business,
If you make a mistake, or even commit some
deadly sin, forgive yourself. If we ought to be
"tenderhearted one toward another, forgiving one
another," as the Bible says, we should also be tenderhearted to ourselves, forgiving ourselves when
we do wrong. Regrets are vain, remorse foolish.
Forgive yourself i nfriendly fashion and begin
again, profiting by your mistakes. Be friendly
to youreself.
Violin and !
Vocal Recital\
A very enjoyable concert was given
ln the Gaiety Theatre on Monday ev-1
ening by the young Nanaimo violinist,
Smyth Humphreys, assisted by Mrs. K.
W. Brankston, an accomplished contralto from the same city. These two artists, with Mrs. J. P. Humplireys as a
most efficient pianoforte accompanist,
furnished a programme of really excellent music and it seemd a pity that
the audience that assembled on the
occasion was not so large as the performances merited. The various offerings of the visiting musicians were
admirably rendered and evoked many
outbursts of enthusiastic applause and
had the programme contained a few
numbers of a more familiar and popular nature doubtless the concert would
have been still more keenly enjoyed.
Master Humphreys, who is only 18
years of age, is undoubtedly a youth
capable of attaining to high distinction
as a violinist as he grows in practise
and experience. Even nt his present
stage and although entirely locally
trained, as we understand, under the
tuition of his father, he manifests a
wonderful control over thc most difficult and perfect of all instruments.
His technique is remarkably brilliant
and clean and this was specially noticeable In the De Berio "Concerto" and
the "Perpetuum Mobile" by Ries. In
the quieter numbers his delicacy of
touch, expression and beautiful phrasing were admirable nnd gave his hearers exceeding pleasure. One remarkable feature of his performance was
the fact that every number performed,
including several well-merited encores,
was played from memory with scarcely
a single flaw.
We understand the youthful artist
will shortly proceed to London to con
tinue his studies under the auspices of
the Royal'Academy of Music and one
may safely predict that at no distant
date he will be hailed as one of the
outstanding violinists of Canada, If not
of the world.
As regards the contributions of Mrs.
Brankston, one may emphatically state
that every number was thoroughly enjoyed. The lady posesses a contralto
voice of considerable range and power,
her modulations were beautifully rendered and her softer tones were so entrancing that one could have been delighted to hear her in a few of the old
standard English. Scotch or Irish airs.
If she should again visit our city we
trust she will include in her programme one or two of the old favorite folk songs for which her voice is
so nicely adapted.
Headquarters
Mr. P. McCormack, of New Westminster, has been holidaying here dur-
The Infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  '"E the Past week-
X Morgan  was  baptized  at  Comox     Mrs. Holt, of Vancouver, arrived on
Church by Father Beaton last Sunday, Saturday on a visit to her daughter,
the name given being Margaret Ellen. Mrs. Arbeau.
RILEY'S TRANSFER
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
jg=     PROMPT ATTENTION     -^a
COAL     —     GENERAL HAULING     —     WOOD
of all descriptions
David Hunden, Junr.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 1 and 61  , Cumberland, B. G.
Mr. and Mrs. Larkin and Mr, and
Mrs, Willis and family were visitors
during the last week.
We are sorry to report that Mrs.
Armstrong has been confined to her
room during the past few days but
hope she will be about again soon.
The glorious sunshine of the past
few Sundays lias taken most of us to
the beach. Williams Beach, Oyster
River und Kye Bay seem to be the
favorites. May young and old alike
derive much benefit from the Invigorating air and fresh sea breezes.
Minto
The good weather has dried up the
hay and cutting is general over the
Valley. Tom Pearse got a good field
of clover hay into the barn on Wednesday.
Mrs. T. Haddcn, who has taken up
residence at Arden a^ain, Is visiting
Mrs. Carter for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. Wain and friends motored to Alberni on Sunday last and
report good roads.
Miss Harrigan is home from her
Normal course and awaiting with the
usual anxiety the results to be published.
Mrs. M. Piercy is expected home this
week, accompanied by her father, Mr.
Coombs, from Ronton, Wash.
Comox Jersey Ice Cream
.  Flavored with Your Favorite Fruit.    Each Spoonful
is a Positive Cure for "Dog Days."
You Can't
Resist It!
You won't be able to resist asking for another heaping
Dish of Pure  Velvety Goodness	
Obtainable at your favorite vendors
Hornby Island
Miss Ray Carmichael, of Victoria, is
spending a fortnight with her mother,
Mrs. J. H. Carmichael.
Mr. C. H. Beall has returned from a
fortnight's visit in Vancouver.
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton was present
at a well attended meeting on Monday
and gave his opinions on the political
question. His remarks were well received and quite a number of questions
were satisfactorily answered. Mr. D.
R. MacDonald. of Cumberland, also
attended and spoke a few words.
Many residents are protesting because the road between Goose Spit and
the Government wharf has been declared closed. This is a great disad'
vantage and we hope it will soon be
remedied.
TELLS OF WORK OF
DOMINION HOUSE
(Continued from Page One)
parliament had no power to amend the
Fisheries Act to grant powers to the
Minister to discriminate. I endeavored
to get the Government to amend the
law at this session, but it was so near
the close when the decision was given,
that the Government decided to take
no action at present, but meantime
they are appealing the case to the
Privy Council, and are to continue to
enforce the law as it was prior to this
decision, until the result of the appeal
to the Privy Council is known. This
will make no change in the licenses for
this year.
4. The action of the Government in
temporarily withdrawing the dumping
duties on fruit and vegetables has been
a source of much unrest, A ruling has
been given by the Justice Department
that the present legislation was not
valid.
So far as the egg question is concerned, it has been largely met by the
Government, without having recourse
to the dumping clause, but under another section of the Act, having placed
a value on imported frozen eggs at 45c.
per pound. This carries an ad valorem
duty of 17%%, which means that these
frozen eggs would carry a duty of about
8!.c. per pound, which should be sufficient to practically exclude them.
There are, at present, large importations of frozen eggs from the States
and also from China, where they are
produced under very unsanitary conditions.
If this regulation proves effective to
exclude imported frozen eggs, it will
allow our own lower grade eggs to fill
this demand, and keep the market clea
this demand, and keep the market clear
for our higher grade.
On the subject of immigration much
time and elouqence has been wasted
without any changes resulting. So far
as British Columbia is concerned, by
far the most important feature of the
subject was the statement made in the
closing days of the session by the
Prime Minister, which was practically
to the effect that he had abrogated the
Gentlemen's Agreement with Japan.
Formerly thc immigration of male
adults was limited to 450, which was a
tew years ago reduced to 150, but the
immigration of women was practically
unlimited, and produced bad results.
It has now been arranged that the
immigration of adult men will be limited to 75 per year, and wives and families to the same figure, so that the
tjtal Immigration of Japanese subjects
of every kind and description cannot
exceed 150 per annum, and possibly
less.
Another very desirable feature of the
rrrangement is that their immigration
Is to be handled entirely under our
laws and regulations, which gives us
control of the situation. Under the
Gentlemen's Agreement this was left
mtirely to the Japanese authorities,
\ 'ho interpreted it more or less to suit
I themselves, and we were bound to accept their recommendations. After
t his, we will handle the immigration of
Japanese as of all other races.
6. It will be of much Interest to the
(oal mining areas of the Eastern part
i f the district to know that the Gov-
t rnment agreed to equip a boat on the
I'aclfic coast with machinery and boil-
(rs to use pulverized coal, and if the
test is successful, it may lead others to
follow suit. It is not a thing that can
be started in a day, as the plant costs
between $15,000 and $20,000. A large
private company on the Atlantic coast
have recently equipped one of their
I oats and it is expected a report on its
operation will be received by the Department in a very short time.
7. So far as Labor matters are concerned, the House of Commons passed
an Act to amend the Naturalization
Act, which would make it less expensiv
I Act, which would make it less expensive
I lor people in remote parts of the Prov-
I ince to become naturalized.   At present
i the cost of attending a court and the
I uncertainty of knowing the date is a
j; Durce of great expense to would-be
i irltlsh subjects, and often means that
I ley neglect to take out their papers
i Itogether.
By amendments introduced into the
House, the Act was amended so that it
could not be abused by anyone, but the
Senate threw the bill out entirely. They
also killed the bill to amend the Crim-
iial Code changing the definition of
s-iditlon, which has been passed on four
or five occasions by the House of Commons. The House of Commons also
passed an amendment to the Immigration Act, striking out the clause by
which British subjects could be deported without, trial. Hitherto the Senate
has always rejected this bill, but on
this occasion, while they rejected it in
part, they substituted an amendment
which fairly well met the situation.
8. Regarding the Old Age Pension,
lt is very satisfactory to note that the
lead of British Columbia, in taking advantage of the Act, has been followed
by that of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and there is every reason to suppose that Ontario will soon be moving
in the same direction. This is a very
satisfactory showing, when one remembers the prophecies made at the time
it was passed, that it was absolutely a
gesture and would never be taken advantage of by any province.
9. The House adopted a resolution
that the question of unemployment and
sickness and Invalidity insurance should
be considered by the standing committee on industrial and International
relations, of which I was a member.
Wc had a number of sessions of the
committee and heard witnesses, and
reported that we needed further Information, as there seemed to be no
government methods of ascertaining
the amount of unemployment over any
given period. We recommended to the
government that this should be obtained and that some expert advice
should be asked for from Great Brit
ain, where they have had long experience with the Act, and have recently
re-organized It, and we also asked that
we be allowed to sit next year and investigate the subject again.
Heals Eczema
in 7 days or less
Here is a surgeon's wonderful prescription now dispensed by pharmacists at trifling cost, that will do mure
towards helping you get rid ot unsightly spots and skin diseases than
anything you've ever used.
Not only does this great healing
antiseptic, oil promote ra,pld and
healthy healing in open sores and
wounds, but boils, aboesses and ulcers that are discharging arc almost
immediately relieved and cleanly
healed.
In skin diseases lis notion Is little
less than magical. Thc Itching of
eczema Is Instantly stopped; the
eruptions dry up and scale off In a
lew days. The same Is true of barber's Itch, salt rheum and othor Irritating and unsightly skin troubles.
You can obtain Moone's Emerald
Oil in the original bottle at any modern drug store. It Is safo to use. and
failure in any of the ailments noted
above is next to impossible. All
druggists can supply you at any time.
Ships' anchors
foul
trans-harbor
cables
Ships' anchors are deadly
enemies ol Ulc two trail-
harbor cables which provide
(or all telephonic communication between Vancouver
City and North VanconTer.
Fire times during the past
nine 'years, one or the other
of these cables has been
fouled by the anchor of n
steamer. The resulting strain
on the cable causes the telephone lines in lt to go "bad",
and Interferes with service
between the north and south
shores.
Last April the 100-palr
cable was the victim, and until lt was repaired the smaller
Ii0-palr cable carried the bur-
den of trams-harbor calls.
B.C. TELEPHONE  CO.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN  DRIED FLOORINGS.
AND   FURNISHINGS
WR DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHON'FS J Nlsllt call*: 134X Courtenay
I Office:  159 Cumberland.
Our Big Mid - Summer
Sale is Now on for June 1
and July
at Special SALE PRICES.   You can rely on getting Real
Values from us. Look over, this list we can save you dollars.
For the Ladies
For the Boys
Bathing Suits. 100';.  Wool, ln snappy colors,
at   58.95
Bathing Caps   $1.00, 50c, and 85c.
Ladles' Summer Vests, Sale Special, at 25c.
Ladies' Bloomers at   45c. & 35o.
Ladles' Silk Bloomers nt   $1.00
Silk Hosiery, 95c, reduced to   75c.
Other lines in leading colors at .... 50c. 8i 51.00
Misses Summer Vests and Bloomers, on Sale
at   25c. & 35c.
Silk Hose for Misses. 8 to 9'i, at  65c,
For the Children
Coveralls and Play Suits at    . 50c, 75c, & 51.00
Children's Hose. Fancy Silk Tops at 	
  35c, 45c, & 50c
Shoe Department
BUY   SHOES   NOW   AT  REDUCED   PRICES.
BELOW ARE A  FEW OF OUR LEADERS,
Men's   Solid   Loathe.'   Work   Shoes,   reduced
to  .'.  53.95
Men's Tan Rome Slippers, regular $2.95, reduced to     51.95
Ladles'  One-Strap  Leather  Slippers   for  the
house. Comfort last, regular $1.95, now  $1.49
Ladies'  House  slippers,  leather  sole,  rubber
heel, Sale Special   95c
50 Pair Ladies' Fine Shoes, Straps and Tie Oxfords in Brown, Tan and Black in Patent and
calf, Values $4.50 and $5.50   $3.95
Men's Fine Dress Oxfords on sale at 	
  S4.95 and $5.95
Boys' sizes, 1 to 5, now   82.95 & $3.95
Boys' Solid Leather Shoes, Red Stitch at	
    $3.25   &   $3.75
Other lines in Misses' and Chlldrens' Slippers
and Oxfords from   $1.45
Boys' Knlcker Pants on sale at 65c & 95c
Bays' Khaki Shirts, Boy Scouts, at   $1.00
Boys' Summer Combinations In a fine balbrig-
gan, on sale   59c
Boys' Summer Sweaters and Jerseys at 	
  45c, 80c, and $1.00
Bib Overalls for Boys, 24 to 32, at $1.35 & $1.50
Boys' Fine Shirts nnd Blouses, in Prints and
Broadcloths at   75c it $1,00
Boys' Khaki Drill Long Pants. 24 to 32 	
    $1.35   4   51.50
Bathing Suits at  65c and 75c.
Boys' Braces from   25c
For the Men
Broadcloth Shirts (detached collar) plain colors of white and blue, tan and mauve or collars
attached, priced at   $1.50
Our leader ln Men's Dress Shirts in a large
range of patterns at   $1,25
Fancy Broadcloth Shirts, assorted silk stripes,
checks and figures (famous Strand Shirt) at
  $1.95, $2.45 and 52.95
Men's Combinations, in fine Balbriggan and
Nainsook, priced at   90c. and 51.00
No Button Style   $1.85
Undervcsts and Drawers at, per garment 	
  55c, 65c, and 89c.
Penmans 71 Undervests and Drawers at .... 89c
Suspenders, the Police Brace, priced at 	
  50c. and 40c
Men's Work Shirts, our two leaders in Khaki
Drill and Blue Drill  95c.
Blue Gingham, triple stitched, at   $1.85
Hose Supporters at per pair   85c
Men's Fancy Belts ln Silk and Leather, priced
at     35o„  75c, $1.00,  51.50
McKenzie & Partridge
The Manufacturers' Agency
Opposite Post Office — Cumberland FRIDAY,   JUNE   22ND,   1928.
CUMBERLAND* ISLANDER.   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE THREE
I?
He
He told himself it would be one of
the UiiiiKN he'd miss most when he got
home—tlie dink marble or floor ami
columns, tlie little balcony, with the
three-niece orchestra; the shabby, red
plush; the smell of coffee and pastry
and tobacco smoke, the groups of men
holding the papers clamped Into tlie
pieces or wood witli the long handle*,
the little round tables; the domino ami
chess playing, the babbies of voices.
Fortunes were made and lost in the
Continental Coffee House: friendships
were formed, novcr to he dlrupted;
news was passed from mouth to mouth
from friend to stranger, arguments
were heard, loud and hasty, ending In "another glass waiter," und
laughter. The place was packed with
life, wilh the almost tangible sense of
thought and hope and expectation and
Arndt never missed his hour there.
It was his club, so to speak, an Integral part  of his life.
The coffee house was more than ever astir these days. Tlie storm clouds
were gathering—very black, heavy,
pregnant with horror. And on July
28, live days after her ultimatum had
been sent, Austria-Hungary declared
war on Serbia. i
That was a great day in the Continental Coffee House. Arndt and Bruce
watched (he clustered groups. They
aaw I tie young actor, with the carven
face of a youthful Caesar, jump on a
table and send his resonant voice out
over the throng in the dramatic poem
called "The Young Lieutenant." There
were cheers and songs. The orchestra
swung into the national! anthemn.
There were men who stood bare-headed, the tears running down their
cheeks.
Oh, they'd expected It and tt had
come. Hut thexcieiucnt was In no
way lessened through certainty.
Going home the professor confided
half ashamed:--
"The mob spirit!   1 had to hold myself from jumping up on  the  table.
Bruce it's a terrible tiling—the herd-
hysteria."
Bruce said gravely;—
"It almost got nie too."
After a silence Arndt said: —
"Carl  will  go"—
They walked on thinking of Pauli.
Before they reached home the Pro-'
feasor turned to liis companion.
"I've an errand," he said, "1*11 join
you all  later."
He hurried off to a picture dealer
on the Hingstrasse. Money was very
tight in those days, investments on
which one had counted were being
swallowed  Up.
Bruce went on home. He looked
about tlie empty living room and listened. He heard Pauli's voice in the
kitchen, He smiled and sat down to
1111 his pipe. Prom tiie Professor's
study came the slow, steady tapping
of the typewriter keys. Carl at work
upon his play, and tonight Pauli would
copy what lie had done during the day
ln her more experienced fashion. Then
Bruce looked about the room again.
The sideboard tilled it up rather, in
place of the bookcase, and hooks lay
ou the sideboard, rubbing elbows with
china, and silver. The small table
stood in front of the great tiled stove
witlt the Winged  Victory on  it.
The doors to the bedroom were open
The new maple bed was between the
two windows, the room was bright
with new curtains and lamps, new
toilet articles on the dresser. Pauli's
wedding presents.
Bruce thought of the Professor's
words—Carl will go. He rose, sighed
heavily and went down the corridor
to his room. As he went he wondered
idly, what tlie Professor's errand had
been. He thought they knew of course
about the declaration—Carl aud Pauli.
I wonder how they've taken It?
But at dinner her eyes were dry and
lessor's mind hadn't been a little
touched. Fritz said—well, of course,
she was fond of Dr. Arndt and devoted lo Paull—but one couldn't be too
careful now. Still il would lie unpleasant to have to break with her
friends,    She  asked;—
"Are you coyplng from the Bible?"
He nodded.
"The most pacifist of alt lines—Thou
shalt  not kill."
Pauli came in, a drab bundle over
her arm—a uniform. She bad changed
since her marriage. Mitzi thought,
looking at her thai subtle tmliliVr-
ence—and her face showed marks of
aulety ami distress, which happiness
could not efface, however, the Bhin-
lllg happiness  in  her eyes, the curve
happiness itself, of her mouth.
Her father said to Mltzi.—
That line!     If a ni.ui uttered it on
tho street,  they'd  Jail  him."
Mitzi looked up at Pauli, her little
face puzzled.
"But that's different,   it just means
killing some one -murder, you know."
Tlie   professor   smiled,     lie   asked
ridiculously; —
"You,think ii was written for the
retail trade?"
"Oh. bother!" said Mitzi crossly,
"one can't argue with you—you're as
a lawyer .... or  a  journalist.    . .
Pauli here  I am back again	
. . . .listen. . . .isn't that more
music?"
She ran back to the window and
culled over her shoulder: —
"Pauli!   The   Hungarians.   .   .
Come.  Pauli!"
Pnull had sat down. . . had taken
a thimble and needle and thread from
n work bag. Tlie heavy stuff on which
she sewed dragged through her lingers.
"I want to fix Carl's uniform." . . .
"Do you think it will stay nice?"
Mitzi asked, catching her breath.
"I don't think anything will." said
Pauli in so hopeless a tone that Milzi's
kind little heart smote her. She said
quickly: —
"Prltz says they'll never get to him
and Carl."
Pauli looked over at her father. She
said appealing to that court which had
never failed her .... "Father?" but
Arndt   only   shrugged   his   shoulders
and puffed furiously' at his pipe, Pauli
got up and went to him rumpling his
hair with her hand;—
"You old locomotive.' 'she said.
Arndt took tiie hand and held It.
"Are you glad we were aide lo hurry the marriage?"
She stood there very straight and
slim. She said in a clear voice, a voice
that sang: —
"If they'll wait five days. I'll have
iiad a whole month of happiness." . .
She went back to her sowing.   Tlie
professor said.—
"Four nations against us!"
Mitzi spoke.
"Four?"
"With Belgium—that's settled now."
"They, none of them have cause,"
said  Mltzi.
"And we have, you think?"
"Of course."
"What is if." he asked her gravely
"The death of the Archduke.    How
can you pretend not to know?    Why |
didn't   they   remember   about   'Thou
shalt   not   kill'?     How   about   other
people  keeping  the commandments?"
The professor looked at her,   She
leaned back against the sill, blonde
and little and triumphant.   He said:—
"Perhaps tbe trouble with our religion Is il expects too much of human
nature.   If you 1 ell a man his health
depends   on   eating  moderately   he'll
very likely try.    But if you say 'eat
nothing.' bo will reply, 'Fine idea, of
eoure, but impossible!"
Mitzi   turned   back   lo  her   window
"No, but Hint's different. Wouldn't
everything be it' we preached Christ instead of Christianity? The simple
things. He taught instead of all the
torturous ways of theology? If we
hadn't spent centuries building up a
great hocus-pocus instead of a great
'truth.   Think of the words, for God
ml King!"
M it zi   said   over   her   shoulder:—
They were written on the Hungari-
n banners."
"Yes—and how many oLhers? Since   wl",jj0*'
we began  building palaces for blsh- '
ops and pyramids for kings—between
those words nnd us have come that I
crowd of exploiters who live by mum
of, sir?"
Arndt rose and  followed her.
answered:—"Of marble."
Baruska said:—"It's a pity it's broken."
The Professor smiled. He answered patiently:—"It's not broken, Baruska. That's the way the Artist saw
Victory, you kow—always mutilated."
Baruska sighed. Something in the
heaviness of her soul and body was
stirred by the slight of those great
wings—was lifted. She said wistfully:—"I'd like one."
The professor answered absently:—
"Well, why not. Borne day? There
are good copies in plaster. You could
earn one, if you worked on the farm—
your father's farm-^and paid off the
mortgage."
Baruska  looked at him  in  bovine
amazement.
"Seven thousand  crowns!    Not  in
a lifetime!    I'll stay here."
"We may not be able to keep you,"
Arndt Bald, in a lowered voice; "we
may have to have the interest money
instead. Between ourselves. Baruska
I'm in some trouble—but we'll say no
more now—not a word before Miss
Paull."
Ah he spoke Pauli left the bedroom
'it's terrible!" she said.
The music?" asked Mitzi following.
"No, Mltzi, the tramping feet."
Mltzi listened, she said:—
The song we heard at Ronacher's!
trtotlsm,    Oil. call  it treason, call it [     _       , ...       ,.      . ,, ,    ,
blasphemy, if you will. bu. I some-. *«■*» "tkl,n* *L*?9*  ffilMd
times  think  thai   the  two vast con-   her shrill voice: she sang heartily.
Piracies of history have been God and ,     ^feto A^JST'Sfc.
M
 very openly bored.
her mouth steady.   Above the small I    Pauli said:—"But there was nothing
talk which cloaked each person's in-   difficult about Christ's preachings?"
nor   preoccupation   they   could   hear j  ■     — — •■-.
tho cheering in the streets.   Carl said
gloomily: —
"That noise. I couldn't write a line
I was so distracted: and it's too hot
to shut the windows."
In the silence the storm clouds gathered,
Late in the afternoon of August 4
Mltzi Winckleman was leaning her little body out of Pauli's bedroom window in Ihe Arndt fiat. Tlie sound of
cheering, of marhcing, of bands, came
faintly into the rooms. Nearer the
sound of the unknown violinist's Instrument, playing un old marching
song. The professor was sitting at
the cleared end of the centre table In
the living room, trying to write with
a large book propped up in front of
liim. The other end of the taldo was
set for supper. On tho table with the
Winged Victory stood a tall kerosene
lamp. Electric light had gone, and so ,
had tlie telephone. On the walls where
a nude had hung, one of the Professor's best and most admired pictures,
there was a bright red space—unfad-j
ed, unmatching the color or the rest
of the walls. Once Arndt looked up at j
it, shook ..is head und sighed. I
Mitzi's small cheering stopped. She i
turned from the window and came'
down the room, pulled up a oliatr and
sat close to him. Arndt pushed back
his work and regarded her.
"I do wish our windows were ou
the street! Isn't it glorious! Not a
break in the line since early afternoon, Why don't they march up this
street, close? And where is Kurt?
I haven't been able to do a thing with
him. He runs wild on the street all
day long."
Arndt filled his pipe. Mitzi looked
at him in disapproval.
"How can you sit there so calmly
when the whole country is ablaze?"
"You'll all be calm enough in a year
or two." said the Professor . Mitzi's
mouth straightened into a tight red
■line.   She said almost angrily:—
"Your calm will get you into trouble
Fritz says,"
"How so?"
"The university. It's no time for
pacifists."
Arndt laughed a little picked up a
pencil and drew liis block of paper
toward him again.   He said: —
"Odd thing Mitzi. Once in war a
national spells reason with a T."
Mitzi looked at the book he had taken up.    She asked scornfully: —
"What's that—a pacifist book?"
"Yes the most pacifist of all, the
Bible."
Mitzi looked at him curlosly. She
was beginning to wonder if the Pro-
king
Pauli said, knitting her brows:—      I
"You believe we should—uncrown
our kings?" i
"Not all of them wear crowns," her
father told her, "and perhaps those
who ilo not are tlie worst."
Baruska came in with a supper tray
and a newspaper . She set the tray
down near the professor, too close for
his comfort. She said, as the music
from a passing band struck in through
the windows:—
"Oh, it's wondreful! See all the
beautiful soldiers!"
Pauli laughed and asked teaslngly,
"You spoke just that way about the
geese—witli their great round brown
bellies—go on, say the rest of It, Baruska!"
Baruska shook with laughter. She
picked up a carving knife and held it
pointed.
"Don't tease, Miss Pauli! When I
see the fiags and uniforms I could
whip those Roumanians—all by myself!"
Tho professor leaned back In his
chair and chuckled.
"Fine idea—very patriotic, Baruska
—you see we aren't fighting the Roumanians!"
Baruska'a face fell. She said, ruefully:—
"No? Well, never mind! I could
(light anybody!"
She dropped the knife with a crash
Arndt started and looked at her, Pauli
asked:—
"Where were you—about an hour
ago, Baruska?   I needed you."
"I went out to mail a letter—and the
I troops were going by. We ran along
after them—men, women and children—we had flowers—I snatched some
from some one as I ran—no one cared
Wc cried aud sang and shouted and
laughed—and kissed the men when
we stopped at a corner. It was won
derful."
Mitzi came from the window:—
"Come, Pauli, you're missing it all
-just come for u minute."
"i wisli I could miss it," Pauli said.
Her father looked at her.
"Go ahead," he said laugihingjly,
"or Mitzi will fling herself out in disappointment,"
Pauli sighed, got up and joined Mitzi, Baruska took a step forward, but
the Professor asked:—
"(live me the paper."
He opened it and tossed it aside.
"An early edition—and lies anyway."
Baruska looked up at the empty
space on tlie wall.   She asked:—
"Another gone? Where's the naked lady?"
"At the framer's," he answered,
looking toward Pauli anxiously.
Baruska laughed.
"She ought to be ashamed the hussy." She picked up some books and
look them to the table where the
Wing Victory stood, caught in her
marble. Baruska pointed at it with a
broad red thumb. "There," she said,
["that's the one I like—what's it made
said:-
"I wlBh we hadn't moved into the
dining room."
"You would never have fitted in
your own little room dear." ho told
her. "As tt Is, I suppose we'll have
soldiers quartered on us. They'll take
your old room and Bruce's when lie
goes, and even my study I'm afraid."
"I know. Oh, Mltzi, do come in and
close those doors!"
Mitzi obeyed sulkily. But in a minute it seemed as if the drum beats had
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come into the very house. The hall
door opened and Kurt marched in
beating his drum witli inexpert but
wholehearted   blows. «
Mitzi said, "For mercy's sake," and
took the sticks from her reluctant off- j
spring. And Kurt looked at her in
pained bewilderment. j
"What's a drum for?" be usked rea-1
aon ably.
Pauli took the child in her arms
laughing.
"Well, what if Bruce had given you
the sword?" she asked him.
The Professor, now that Baruska
had left him was reading his paper
Mltzi  looked  over his shoulder.
"Why don't you read Fritz's paper?"
she asked. "He writes things everyday that make you want to fight—any
body original too."
Pauli was back at her sewing. She
tightened a button and asked: —
"Is there news of England?"
"They warn us to keep out of Belgium. Sep, here is a bulletin printed
after the other news—the latest. We
have attacked Leige." the Professor
answered.
"Good!" cried Mitzi, and then in a
rather crestfallen voice Inquired: —
"Where is that?"
"In Belgium. The Germans invaded
It today."
"When is Bruce going?" asked Mltzi her eyes ou the picture of Gordon
still draped in  the flags.
"Monday."
"Strange of him to wait so long."
said Mitzi.
"He didn't know there would be tills
war," Paull defended him.
Mltzi looked dubious. 8c said, with
apparent lrrevelance: —
"Fritz says the country's overrun
with spies. You know the little Russian jeweller In the Kartnorstrassc,
well he wasn't doing any business, but
he stayed. A crowd broke in his shop
yesterday and found hundreds of letters ,In Russian. They wrecked tho
place and last night they found the
man—hanging.    He'd killed himself."
"Oh, Mitzi!" said Paull shuddering.
"Well, he was a Jew. Take my advice, tell Bruce to leave at once!"
"Nevr!"  said  Paull.
Mltzi picked up the picture. She
said:—"This is no time for English
fiags." *
Pauli looked at her friend more amused than angry.
"Little fire-eater, 1 put that there
.»ears ago.   Bruce is our friend."
"We have no friends—except Germans," saiti Mitzi, "aud if you're not
loyal to your friends you might be to
your husband."
Her voice shook tears of anger stood
in her eyes. Paull looked at her in
astonishment The Professor laid
down tiis paper.
"Come  children,"   he  said  gently,
"don't quarrel  like this.    As for the
little Russian, here's the news about
blm.
 Continued Next Week.
ROYSTON
The Women's Auxiliary to tho M.S.
C.C. intend holding a Garden Party
and Small Sale of Work in the gardens of Mrs. Grelg and Mrs. Watson,
Royston, on Wednesday, June 27th
from 3 to 6 p.m .
Clock Golf and other attractions.
Bran dip for the children, Strawberries, Ice Cream and Candy.
Son:   "I  think  I'll  take up  saxa-
phone."
Had: "Watch out, boy, or you'll want
to take up music next."
SCOTTISH
LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE LAUNDRY SERVICE
[3?=   Special Family Laundry Rate   "^J
also expert
DYERS AND DRY CLEANERS
A Trial Order Will Convince You.
Orders left at the Ritz Cafe, Telephone 150
Cumberland, will receive prompt attention
Telephone
Courtenay 226
Telephone
Cumberland, 150
BUILDS THE ONLY
GUM-DIPPED TIRES
woncis
treasure house/
TWENTY years' mining in British Columbia have yielded nearly
800-million dollars.   The last ten years have increased production
by 58.9 per cent.
The value of all Canada's production is S25.7II per citizen, British Columbia's production today, if distributed, would mean $111.96 per person annually! Our mined
and treated tonnage of metalliferous ores reached a record of more than 5-million
tons for l')27.
The value of thc mining Industry to thc
Province is in the distribution of money in
wattes, supplies, transportation services, etc.
And in this respect, l')27 wns a record year!
The 14,01(0 employees of thc mining industry
were paid wages totalling IS million dollars . ..
or nearly $1,700 each ... the highest average for
any Canadian Province.
During the year, distribution of eight million
dollars was made in dividends!
British Columbia mines approximately -10
million dollars worth of copper, zinc and lead,
a year . . . more than the rest of Canada. In
gold and silver, our production ranks second
... In coal, third; our total annual mining
r oductlon today being exceeded only by
Ontario.
Sound legislation, good mining laws and low
fees have encouraged this development and
stimulated growth. Although  the provincial
mining area has only been superficially prospected within the transportation belt, new
fields are developing, new roads and trails
constantly being built.
Chattering drills sink deeper and deeper
into the hills . . . heavy ores rumble through
the concentrators . . . fortunes come tumbling
from the treasure chest of British Columbia!
What was once only imagined about our mining
potentialities, is now proven knowledge. Mining
has become our third largest industry...
showing over 67 million dollars revenue a
year . . . proof that prosperity flourishes In
British Columbia.
Capital from Eastern Canada, the United
States, Great Britain, France.. .seeks Investment. Our great wealth of production, developing so steadily during the past ten years, has
established confidence and aroused keen Interest in British Columbia's mining future the
world over.
Read these announcements and understand your province's
progress . . . clip them out and send them tojriends. If you
desire extra copies of these announcements a note lo this
newspaper uill bring them. Advertise your Province!
Harling & Ledingham, Local Dealers
British Columbia's Progress PAGE FOUR
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JUNK 22uu, 1928
Sir Arthur Robinson 11 ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE — SALE —SALE — SALE —SALE ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE ~SALE —SALE —SALE —SALE —SALE —SALEI
31 JOHN The HATTER 6? CO.'S 1
And Australia
Eliminate  "Drought"   by   New
Irrigation Projects
Sir Arthur Robinson, former attorney general ol Australia ana director of the Ford Motor Company of
Australian Ply., Limited when interviewed by the press at the Home Office
of the Ford Motor Company of Canada
Limited referred to the activity in
agriculture that ia being made ia
■Western Australia, "This part or
Australia lias been noted for the production of gold," said Sir Arthur,
'•But with thc present activity fostered by the government it will become
the greatest wheat production section
in tho Commonwealth, irrigation projects In Victoria und New South Wales
are nt present underway and when
completed will enable thc farmers In
this section to show n profit in all
seasons. Tlie fear of crop failures
will be eliminated und the"drought"
so common to parts of Australia will
he forgotten."
"Australia is peculiarly fortunate In
the number of agrieullural colleges
that abound in every state. This effective unit for the training of agriculture is further enhanced by the
present Big Brother movement that
looks after the progress and training
of youths from the British Isles from
17 to 19 years of age who come out
to Australia to work on the farms."
At tills point the visitor spoke of the
effective use of the motor car hy the
people ln the outlying sections.
"Motor cars are universally used
throughout tiie length and breadth uf
Australia," he said. "We have one
automohile for every 13 individuals.
This splendid market for automobiles
has resulted in there being a greater
Tange of cars in Australia than in any
other country'. Canadian, American,
English, French and a few German
cars are in use. The fortunate standard of well being in Australia would
indicate that the market will continue
to improve. Tlie fact that motoring is,
enjoyed 305 days of the year is anotlr
<er reason for the motor car's popularity."
During his visit to the British Isles
on this trip, Sir Arthur observed the
efficiency of the London traffic police
men. "The only unfortunate circumstance of this system is that it requires too many men. The system of
electric lights and bells is very efficient and when properly obeyed Is
splendid. In Australian cities we use
traffic officers hut it is hoped that the
signal system will soon be installed.
Australia has its parking problem
In just as irritating quantities Canada, Efforts to entirely eliminate parking downtown areas had met with
opposition by business men but It was
pointed out that Australians' parking
problem was still a "problem."
"Business men in Australia realize
that thc present disparity in trade between Canada and Australia will correct itself in time because it is absolutely necessary for us to buy cor'
tain articles and products from other
countries when it is economically impossible to produce them in our own
country," stated Sir Arthur. "The
Ford Motor Company of Australia and
the Ford Manufacturing Company of
Australia have made the initial steps
in the motor car field hy investing
millions of dollars, This not only otters a saving to the consumer, but it
also furnishes employment for hundreds of men. Production of bodies
for the new Tord car is at present underway In the body plant at Geelong
and the reception of the new car
throughout Australia is a repetition
of the enthusiastic welcome gained at
previous showings in Canada, Great
Britain and the United States."
Commenting on tlie popularity of
the open car in Australia, he said that
tho present trend is toward the use of
the closed car In the cities and the
touring models for the country. At
the present time it was pointed out
that only about 30 per cent, of thc
cars were closed cars.
During his visit to England on this
trip, Sir ArUmr Robinson used a now
Ford Tudor and was more than de
lighted with hs performance. Oa this
his llrst visit to the Home Offices at
Ford City, be was surprised at the ex>
tent of the production facilities In the
Ford City plant where parts are manufactured to lie Incorporated In the cart
produced in Australia, lie concluded
the Interview with the statement that
he hoped at smile future date that an
equally large plant would he operating in Australia turning out complete
Ford cars Mid trucks.
Sir Arthur Hohinson will shortly
sail from New York to return to Australia via London, England,
Like a Thunder Bolt out of a Clear Sky comes this announcement John The Hatter & Co. Store goes on Sale SATURDAY at 9 a*m. SHARP.
THIS SALE IS FOR 7 DAYS ONLY AND EVERY  ARTICLE MUST GO.    TEEMS OF SALE SPOT CASH.
CLEAN SWEEP SALE
Clean Sweep Sale Prices
LADIES!
Some of the Bargains
Ladies' Hats priced CQc
from        Ut7
Ladies' Coats priced
from 	
Ladies' Dresses, figured silks, georgettes, flat crepes, all sizes to (PC AA
46, priced from      «pJaUU
Voile Dresses while they (PO OA
last         yL.Ld
Children's Hats OCc
from        Lo
Children's Coats (PQ /(Q
from      «P0.4ri/
House Dresses, only a *7Cc
few       It)
These are only a few of the bargains—See our windows for
further news.
Sale   starts   9   a.m.   Saturday
morning, June 23rd, and ends
Saturday night, June 30th.
(Closed Friday, June 22)
GIGANTIC SALE AT
COLOSSAL REDUCTIONS
It's an unusual Sale and delivers Sledge Hammer
Blows at High Cost Merchandise. Prices on all articles less than actual wholesale cost.
Every Department teeming with Bargains. Mark you,
not some things, but every article in the store.
There is much to say and so little time in which to say
it, that we've made up our minds to say as little as possible. By the time you read this everything will be
ready. Look for the RED PENCIL MARKS. You
want to see for yourselves—the opportunity is yours.
No fake sale here—every article must be sold and only seven (7) days to do it in. Our sole object is to clean
up our stock. The exchange of our merchandise for
your cash at prices very considerably under cost is our
loss and your gain. Buy with confidence—Everything
marked in plain figures.
This is a Genuine Sale. You can depend on that. We
have engaged extra help to give you every service, so
come early and come with the crowds.
Out-of-town customers will save time and money by
coming to this sale. We could easily fill the paper
with more about this sale, but we leave it to you. Come
and see for yourselves.
Ensemble Suits, while they last $9.50
No Fake Prices—Just Plain
Fact
MEN!
Some of the Bargains
Men's New Straw Boaters, reg. A(\c
price $2.75, while they last    4U
Men's Fur Felt Hats, new styles, roll
brim or snap brim, till sizes, fl»Q Qr
reg. price $5.95      «P«J.OD
Men's work shirts (untear- (PI HQ
able) all sizes, sale price     tPl.li/
Men's Dress Socks (PI A A
6 Pr. for     $!•""
Boys' Caps, while they Of»C
last  '   LO
Men's Caps, good cloths and QA(.
colors      OV
Ladies'  Stockings  and  Underwear  at
clean sweep sale prices-
Children's Rompers, Dresses and Underwear, Travellers' Samples, at clean
sweep sale prices.
MEN'S HAT SPECIAL
Men's Fur Felts (PI rn
reg- $3.95, for     «pl.DU
This Sale is running concurrently with our Nanaimo Clean
Sweep Sale and there is no
Junk—All new, clean stock—
No hot air—Prices talk.
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The Store the People Like.
CUMBERLAND
John the Hatter & Co.'s Clean Sweep Sale
| — SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE _ SALE — SALE — SALE —SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE — SALE |
HEALTH SERVICE
of the
Canadian Medical Association
Question concerning Health, addressed to the Canadian Medical
Association, 184 'College Street,
Toronto, will be answered. Questions as to diagnosis and treatment will not be answered.
Scarlet Fever Antitoxin.
During the past few yearB there was
Clclent quantity it not only cures but
prevents the damage which may be so
serious.
Those who are responsible for the
care of chidren should appreciate that
the life of the child, when attacked
by sickness, may depend upon prompt
treatment. Certainly, in two diseases
wear let  fever and  diptheria,   every
discovered a scarlet fever antitoxin; hour's delay endangers the life of tho
which gives the same satisfactory re-j child.
suits In thc treatment of scarlet fever I In Canada there were 362 deaths
as have been secured ln the treatment: from scarlet fever during 1926. This
of diptheria with diptheria antitoxin, i loss of human life is, of course, seri-
Scarlet fever is caused by a certain { ous. In addition, there is a much
disease germ which gives off a poison; larger number who recover, some of
or toxin. It Is this toxin -which, In j whom are more or less permanently
some cases, kills, and  which  in all j damaged.
cases does more or less damage to' Scarlet fever antitoxin, should be
the various organs of the body. ! made   freely     and   readily  available
The scarlet fever antitoxin counter- throughout Canada for the saving and
acts the toxin.   Given early and in sut-  conserving of human life.
Coming from
England to Fish
Island Lakes
Montreal, Juno 16.- Sir Wilfrid Law-
eon, Bart., nnd Dr. J. M. Bobla-Jou,
Spanish engineer, arrived today on tlio
C.P.Il. liner Monti ilin, Sir Wlltrlil
Btated that lie will fish In the Shawn-
Igon district Senor Bobla-Jou Is here
to Bturty Canadian engineering practice. Ho will spend two months ln
Montreal nnd proceed rifcht through
to the rnclflc const studying electrical nnd construction problems.
Put Trout in j
Mountain Lake!
Experiment in Fish Culture Is
Done Successfully in
Jasper Park
stocking of Mallgne Lake with trout
Is one of tlie experiments being made
here In glacial waters by the Dominion  Government.
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN   SERVICE
FltlMI M0NTKEA1
Jasper, Alta.. June 20.—After a jour-,
ney of at least two thousand miles the
largest group or United States Immigrants thai ever settled In Canada has j To  Bdfast-Lhcrpool-GIaigOYr.
established  Its home in  Jasper Na-! LetithUune 2!', July 27. Aug. 24
.,     , n   . (Andania July ii. Aug, 3, .11
tionai lark. Athenia July 18, Aug. 10, Kept. 7
During the week-end 200,000 Hrook. Antonla July 20, Aug. 17, Sept. 14
trout nngorlliiRs, all the way rronjiTe riymoutli-IlavrcLondoii.
Cresco Pennsylvania, were placed In, Auranla June 2!), July 27, Aug. 24
the  waters of Mallgne  Lake.    They
came t0 Canada last winter as eggs
and for months have been carefully
nursed In a hatchery especially con-
Btrueed here for them.   Herbert Da-1To Oowtutiroii nnd Liverpool.
vis, one ot tbe park wardens, whose I Franconla June 3»     Laconia. July 7
charge they were, watched them growl To l""1'™™ ''"" Southampton.
from eggs to tish, kept the cold water W^T^A^AIAl
running at the  proper  temperature, | AquiUnia July'i. Aug. 1, 22, Sept. 12
arid when they were big enough to eat I To Londonderry  mid  Glasgow.
fed them chopped liver.   They were]Cameronta June 30, Caledonia July 17
brought  from Pennsylvania,  to Jas- j To rjjn.oulh-Havrc.I.ondoii.
per by Canadian National express, and Canmla JulyG,        Tuscanla July 14
were transferred to Mallgne Lake by FK0.1I BOSTON
Pack horse wagon and automobile. T« Londonderry and Glasgow*
Open Air Dance I1 ison flied out to Weeks.   Three hits, i
The open air dance at the Tenuis I vo runs, no errors.
Court, Headquarters on Saturday June i    Gth innings:   Bonsai was safe on an
23rd is the talk of the district. Do
not mlBS it. lt will pay you to come,
bring your friends and make frienda.
Half of the proceeds towards tiie Native Sons of Canada Courtenay Assembly's Hall. Canary Club orchestra at their beBt. In case of rainy
evening Headquarters large hall will
take you all in. 24-25
BALL GAME PRODUCES
MANY THRILLS FOR FANS
Ascania July 7, Auk. 8, Aug. 31
Alaunia July 18, Aug 10, Sept. 7
Ausonla July 20, Aug. 17, Sept. 14
FHOM NEW VOItK
There was no difficulty, In these last
'■'■'• miles to keep the tins in which they
floated constantly moving, and they
made tho Journey without mishap.
The water of the Inke was tested before they were lowered into it, and
they ahowed themselves accltmlzed
immediately. Oliver Bright of the Dominion hatchery at Fort Qu'Appelle,
superintended operations and Warden
Davis kept watch over his pets until
he saw them la their home.     The
Caledonia JJy IS. Transylvania Aug. l:
To Queenstown and Liverpool.
Laconia July 8 Samaria July 22
AKOCND TIIE WORLD CKCISE
Franconla January 15, 1929
'Cells at Plymouth, Bastbound.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rateB. Full Information from local agents or Company's
Offices, 622 Hastings St. W„ Vancouver, B.C.
by Hunden.   One hit, no runs, no errors.
2nd innings: Cummlngs fanned on
Robinson's "slow ball." Dixon singled.
McKay popped out to Robinson. Downey hit to short who threw Dixon out at
second on a fielder's choice. One hit,
no runs, no errors.
2nd Innings: McDonald was safe at
first on a dropped fly by Stant. Chambers went out at first on an assist by
Cummins and Vldal singled, scoring
McDonald, but Hunden threw him out
trying to steal second. Shepherd claimed a balk but it was not allowed. Mc-
Kinney fanned. One hit, one run, one
error,
Stant made first on an error by Bon-
sal and Harris walked- Bobba fanned
and Hunden singled. Andy Robinson
made first on an error by McKlnney,
Stant scoring, Cummins connected to
Robinson and made first but Harris
was forced out at the plate. Dixon
singled scoring Hunden and Robinson.
McKay connected to Bonsai but was
safe when Shepherd dropped the throw,
Cummins and Dixon scoring. Downey
went out at first on an assist by McDonald. Two hits, five runs, three
errors.
3rd innings: Robinson went out at
first on an assist by Hunden. Shepherd
fanned and Brown went out at first on
a nasslst by Bobba. No hits, no runs,
no errors.
Stant was safe on a fly out to left
field when Weeks and Vldal both went
after it and collided. Harris was out
at first on an assist by Bonsai. Bobba
fanned and Hunden flied out to McDonald.  No hits, no runs, one error.
4th Innings: Bonsai fanned and
Weeks singled. McDonald and Chambers both struck out. One hit, no runs,
no errors.
Robinson went out on a base liner i Duncan
to Shepherd- Cummins fanned.  Dixon
drew a nice two-bagger but McKay was
out at first on an assist by Robinson.
One hit, no runs, no errors.
5th Innings: Vldal struck out as also
did McKlnney, Robinson singled and
Shepherd singled. Brown was out at
first on a liner to Dixon. Two hits, no
runs, no errors.
Downey singled and stole second.
Stant drove for two bags, scoring
Downey. Harris went out at first on an
assist by Bonsai. Bobba doubled, scoring Stant. Hunden fanned. Brown,
the visiting receiver, hurt a finger and
had to retire ln favor of Rogers.  Rob-
rror by Cummins and Weeks singled.
] IcDonald singled, scoring Bonsai,
chambers fanned and Weeks scored on
n pass ball. Doney, replacing Vldal
lonnected to Cummins but Johnnie
Ihrew wild in an effort to cut McDonald off at the plate, McDonald scoring.
McKlnney singled and Doney made for
) lome but McKay made a perfect throw
io the plate and Downey had the runner out by a mile and in turn made a
perfect peg to second cutting off McKlnney. Three hits, three runs, two
errors.
Cummins flied out to Chambers,
Dixon went out at first on an assist
by Robinson and McKay went out ot
first on an assist by Bonsai. No hits,
no runs, no errors.
7th innings: McKee went on the
mound for Courtenay, Hunden replacing Bobba at second. Robinson filed
out to his namesake and Shepherd
singled. Rogers fanned and Shepherd
was caught at second on another nice
peg by Downey. One hit, no runs, no
errors.
Downey was safe on an error by McDonald but Rogers threw him out trying to steal second. Stant singled and
Harries flied out to Weeks. McKee
fanned.   One hit, no runs, one error.
8th Innings: Bonsai was safe at first
on a wild throw by Downey and Weeks
was safe on an error by Hunden. McDonald singled, scoring Bonsai and
Weeks. Chambers fanned, and Downey went out at first on an assist by
lunden. McKlnney slngley, scoring
McDonald and Robinson walked. Shepherd's short fly to centre looked safe
for a moment but Andy Robinson made
'i beautiful running catch, perfectly
lined. Two hits, three runs, two er-
ors.
Hunden was out at first on an assist
ty McDonald. Robinson fanned. Cum-
•ilns walked and stole second. Dixon
vas safe at first when Bonsai dropped
■, high corkscrew fly, Cummins scoring.
.IcKay singled. Downey singled, scor-
ng Dixon and McKay and Stant walked. Harris singled, scoring Downey.
AvKci: was out at first on an assist by
IcKlnney. Three hits, four runs, one
rror.
9th innings: Rogers and Bonsai fan-
ied and Weeks filed out to Hunden.
$o hits, no runs, no errors.
Score by innings:
R H Si
.. 010003030— 7 10 0|
Jourtenay      05 00 20 0 4x^11 11 5
The teams were: 1
Duncan: Shepherd lb; Brown c;
Bonsai 2b; Weeks If; McDonald ss;
Chambers rf; Vldal cf; McKlnney 3b;
H. Robinson p; Rogers c; Doney cf.
Courtenay: Cummins ss; Dixon lb;
McKay rf; Downey c; Stant If; Harris
3b; Bobba 2b; Hunden p and 2b; McKee p,
Summary: Struck out by Hunden, 9;
by McKee, 4; by Robinson, 7. Hits off
Hunden, 7; off McKe, 3; off Robinson,
11. Walked by Robinson, 3; by McKee,
1; two-base hits, Dixon, Stant, Bobba.
Errors, Courtenay, 5; Duncan, 6.
$83,087,000
British Columbia Forests yielded products
valued at this huge sum in 1927
BEAR IN MIND
Such production can  only  be  maintained
in future years if fires are kept out of the
timber-lands of this province.
YOU CAN HELP!
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
WHISTLE! WHISTLE! WHISTLE?
Sing a song In the Garden of Lite,
If only you gather a thistle;
Sing a song as you travel along—
And If you can't sing—
Why, Just Whistle!
Drinks of all flavors,
Now that the hot weather Is here, order a case and
have it delivered,
GOLD STAR BOTTLING WORKS
Phone 161
Courtenay
■i
m FH1DAY,   JUNE   22NU,   11128.
CUMBERLAND ISLAMDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
11
PAGE FIVE
Cumberland Supply -- The Cash Store
CUMBERLAND — FACING POST OFFICE
You are protected on both Price and Quality when dealing at the Cumberland Supply.  Customers are coming to us from every district in our locality—Hence this advertisement.    Read what we have for sale and
then do as others—come and purchase.
Teas
Nabob Tea, per lb  75c.
Blue Ribbon Ten, per lb.   75c.
Salada Tea, per lb 85c.
Our  Special   Roval   Purple  Tea,  per
It,  70c.
Good Bulk Tea, per lb 65c.
Coffee
Nabob Coffee, per It), tin 70c.
Blue Ribbon Coffee, per tb. tin 70c.
Malkin's Best Coffee, per tb. tin, .. 70c.
Fresh Ground Coffee, per tb 60c.
Barrington Hall, Soluble, per jar, 55c.
Baking Powders & Sodas
Cow Brand Baking Soda, 1/2-tb pk„ 15c.
Magic Baking Powder, 12 oz 33c.
Magic Baking Powder, 2%-lb,  90c.
Royal Baking Powder, 12 oz 55c.
White Star Baking Powder, 12 oz., 25c.
Crisco
3-lb. .tin Crisco   85c.
Mb. tin Crisco   29c.
Soaps & Powders
White Wonder Soap,  4 for 25c.
Sunlight Soap, per pk 25c.
Life Buoy Soap ■  3 for 25c.
Lux Flake Soap  2 for 25c.
Lux Toilet Soap  3 for 25c.
Palm Olive Soap 3 for 25c.
Guest Ivory Soap, per box 55c.
Rinso, large   28c.
Rinso, small 3 for 25c.
White Swan Soap Powder 28c.
Royal Crown Soap Powder 28c.
Old Dutch Cleanser   2 for 25c.
Royal Crown Cleanser  10c.
Laundry Starch  2 for 25c.
Oats & Corn Flakes
Quick Quaker China, per pk 43c.
Quick Quaker, plain, per pk 33c.
Robin Hood Rapid Oats China 43c.
Robin Hood Rapid Oats, plain 33c.
Kellogg's and Quaker Cornflakes 	
  2 for 25c.
Muffets & Shredded Wheat, per pk, 15c.
Tillson's Bran, per pk 23c.
Pep (Kellogg's), per pk  17c.
Puffed Rice, per pk  17c.
Grape Nuts, per pk  17c.
Canned Goods
Heinz' Pork & Beans, flats, 2 for 23c.
Heinz' Pork & Beans, tall 17c.
Van Camp's Pork & Beans, small	
  2 for 25c.
Van Camp Pork & Beans, tall 17c.
Clark's Pork & Beans, individual size,
  3 for 25c.
Hamsterly Farm Tomatoes (large) ....
  4 for 60c.
Royal Purple Tomatoes, small 17c.
Quaker Peas, 2s 20c.
Pickles
Heinz' Sweet Mixed Pickles, per bot.
  45c.
Heinz' Sweet Mustard Pickles, per bot.
  45c.
Heinz' Sour Mixed Pickles, per bot. 40c.
Heinz' Chow Chow, per bot 40c.
Rowat's Sweet Mixed Pickles, large 65c.
Rowat's Sweet Mustard Pickles, large,
 60c.
Rowat's Sour Mixed Pickles, large 60c.
Heinz' Queen Olives, per bottle .... 35c.
Libby's Stuffed Olives, per bottle .. 35c.
Rowat's Pickled Onions, per bottle 35c.
Clark's Tomato Ketchup, per bottle 24c.
Libby's Tomato Catsup, per bottle 27c.
Heinz' Tomato Ketchup, per bottle 31c.
H. P. Sauce, per bottle 33c.
Libby's Mustard in bottle •. 20c.
Heinz' Mustard in bottle 25c.
Heinz' Worcestershire Sauce, large 45c.
Heinz Worcestershire Sauce, small 35c.
Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce ....
 75c.
Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce,
small   45c.
Heinz' Pure Malt Vinegar, 32 oz. 45c.
Heinz' White Vinegar, 32 oz 45c.
Heinz' Pure Malt Vinegar, 16 oz. 28c.
Heinz' White Vinegar, 16 oz 28c.
C. & B. Malt Vinegar, qts 40c.
Royal Purple Brown Vinegar, qts. 25c.
Miscellaneous
Good Serviceable Brooms, each .... 45c.
Monogram Pineapple, Special 19c.
Lemonade (Lemona) 25c.
Western Fancy Biscuits, per tb 45c.
Sesqui & Maple Leaf Matches, per pk.
 45c.
Molasses, 2-tb tins 23c.
Fry's Cocoa, VL>-It>. tins 30c.
Extra Good Quality Brooms 95c.
A large and varied stock of Strawberries, Plums, Bananas, Oranges, Apples, etc.
It is ratlm.ued 'hut 23,50(1,000
acres will be sown to crops this
year in the Wpst, an increase of
2,500,000  ai-rca  ovn   1920.
Canadians hold th« record for
eating egz* Th^ average Canadian
last year consumed 887—a record
'according tn Dr. J. H. Grisdale,
Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
Tobacco-growing is flourishing In
Western Ontario, und this year th«
•create will likely run to 45,000 or
double that devoted to the production of this plant in 1925. The crop
last year was valued at (6,000,000.
One of th« m"^t powerful radio
•tatloni it CV'.ln will be erected
at Red Deer, Alberta, in the near
future. Stut:np* will i>e operated In
Calgary and Edmonton by reraoto
control to the main station.
New Zealand will be officially
represented at the World's Poultry
Congress at Ottawa, July 27 to
August 4. R. W Mnwkc, one of tho
Island Dominion's best known poultry breeders, will represent that
country.
Re=:d * the game fish hatchery
which will be established by the Dm
itrnton Government in the Watenl
Lakes d strict in Southern Alberta,
a commercial fish hatchery will bo
established in the north. The latter
will also handle certain species of
game fish suitable to lake waters.
The Canadian 1'acific steamship
passenRer traffic through the port
of Saint John during the winter
season of 1926-7 was over 40 per
cent, greater than that of the previous season, and it is expected that
tbe summer traffic through the St.
Lawrence port will show a still
greater increase.
Cumberland Supply -- The Cash Store
Phone 155
CUMBERLAND
New Prices on
HOTPOINT
IRONS
FROM JUNE 18TH TO JUNE 30TH
we make a special offer on
HOTPOINT IRONS
6  lb  IRON complete with  d» A   P7A
Iron, with Ironing Board     (JJP  1 A
Pad and Cover  •JJtl.lV
Ironing Board Pad and Cover d»i   AA
Purchased Alone  »])Aovrl/
See Our Window
Cumberland Electric
Lighting Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vii-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Vancouver-Courtenay Transportation
Telephone 144
Co.
Mill St., Courtenay
Agent In Courtenay: Mr. A. B. Ball
CLOSED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOONS ONLY
Service and promptness still our motto.
TOWING & FREIGHTING — REGULAR FREIGHT SERVICES
Powell River, Alert Bay and all Way Points every Tuesday.
Courtenay, Comox and Way Points every Wednesday.
Tugs and Scows for hire.  Boats for charter.
Warehouses and Docks at Vancouver, foot of Bldwell Street, and
Courtenay, B.C.
Smokers'
Supplies
Pipes
Pouches
Cigarettes
Tobaccos
Cigars
also a full line of
High Grade Chocolates
at
A. Henderson's
HE DID IT IN ONE
Robin Bell-Irving, of Powell River, B.C., tlie first amateur tn make a
hole in one <m thc Jasper Park Lodge Golf Course.   He accomplished it
.- ;hi  fifteenth, whiih has a name that speaks for itself—the Bad Baby.
Incidentally, he is thu ft rat player, amateur or professional, to do the Bad
!i« in tine.—Canadian National Railways Phntntfrnph.
Parksville
Pastries that Please
the Palate
Whether it is just for your evening dessert, a climax to the picnic, or something really elaborate for a party or banquet, you'll
And it most satisfying here.
Mann's Bakery
"The Home of High Class Cakes and
Pastries"
Phone 18
Cumberland
Mr. A. Wallis spent the week-end
with his parents ln Victoria,
Mr. Brian Weld Is spending a few
days at home with his parents. Capt.
and Mrs. Weld.
Mrs. Blnty Davis has none to join
her husband at Stewart, B.C., where
they will spend the next few months.
Mr. Minto lias sufficiently recovered
to return home Trom the Shaughnessy
Hospital, Vancouver.
A dance was held at the Island Hall
on Friday last. The local residents
who attended were: Col. and Mrs,
Bourke, Mr. and Mrs. A. Wilson. Mr.
E. Moilltet, Mr. and Mrs, T. Hirst, Mr.
and Mrs. M. Hirst, Mrs. Western, Mrs.
Wingfield-Digby, Mr. and Mrs. Banton,
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Hirst, Mrs., Miss and
R. Roberts. Mr. and Mrs. McNeil, Mr.
and Mrs. Abernethy, Miss E. Butler,
Mr. Smith. Miss James, Messrs. <3. and
J. Strowteer, Miss Helen Adkin, Miss
Dorothy Cavil, Mr. G. Wagstalf. Messrs. Wilfred and Ronald Nicklln, Mr.
IKing George Hotel;
! good  service,  reasonable   charges.;
j Centrally Located!
Bert Taylor, W. and M. Shelly, Miss
and Mr. D. Donovon, Miss Feary, Miss i
A. Brltton, Mr. T. Robertson, Mr. Mc-1
Call, Mr. H. Jones.
Many Parksville residents went to j
Nanaimo last week to hear the West- j
minster Olee Singers on Monday were |
Mrs. H. K. Harrison, Eric nnd Stuart]
Harrison, Mrs. Beattie, Col. and Mrs.
Orclg, Mrs. and Misses Hlckey, Mrs,
and Miss Ruth Wilson, Mrs. J. and
Miss Hirst, Mrs. Ford, Mrs. A. Hirst,
Mr. and Mrs. P. Trill, Mrs. A. L. Smith
and Mrs. M. H. Mlddleton. Those who
went on Thursday were Misses Cheney,
Mr. N. Thompson, Mrs. Park, Mrs. and
Miss Pctttgrew and Mr. C. Pettlgrew.'
Mr. and Mrs. Parfltt, Mrs. Percy Wilkinson, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Brtsco, Mrs,
Thwaites and daughters, Mrs. Popham,
Miss Park, Mr. and Mrs. H. Rushton,
Mrs. Percy and Miss Alice Rushton.
Mrs. H. Pettigrew, Mrs. and Miss
Gwen. Dick and Tiny Harrison, Mrs.
Wlngfleld Digby, Mr. and Mrs. Banton,
Mr. and Mrs. Wilcock, Mr., Mrs. and
Miss Marks, Mr. and Mrs. Abernethy,
Mrs. T. Hirst, Mrs. and Miss Gertrude
Ponsford, Mrs, R. H. Wilson, Mrs. Wilcox, Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Molliet.
< umberlniid Brunch of the Canadian Legion, B.E.S.L. will hold a whlnt
drive and dance tn the Memorial Hall
prices and usual good time.
WESTERN CANADA HAS
LARGEST SEEDED
AREA SINCE 1921
In the province of Sakatchewan last
fall one million acres more land were
prepared tor wheat than ln tbe previous year, and reports from the
the previous, and reports from the
West indicate that the prairie province sas a whole have a larger area seeded to wheat this spring than baa been
the case since 1921. In their first general crop report for the year the Manitoba Free Press states that 909i of
the present wheat crop throughout
the west was planted before May 18
as compared with the same percentage
at the end of May in 1927. The weather was particularly favourable In Manitoba and the 90% level was attained
in that province by May 10. In general, then, the wheat seeding for this
year was ten days or two weeks ahead
of last year; by the end of May lt had
been planted and in most sections was
well up and seeding of coarse grains
was under way.
Tractors have been in more general
use than for several years past, the
dry weather during planting permitting them to be used to special advantage.
The report of the Canadian Pacific
Railway at the end of May includes
the following statement, "Generally
speaking, there is sufficient sub-soil
moisture in the ground, but rain would
be welcome in practically all districts
In the West." Since this report was
Issued there have been general rains
throughout the West.
In Ontario farm work 1b now well
advanced considering the late start,
because of the Ideal seeding weather
which prevailed during a large part
of May. The condition of fall wheat
and clover has improved, and though
these crops were severely damaged
during the winter, their appearance
Is much better than a few weeks ago.
In contraat with the dry weather In
the West, the East has experienced a
late spring, particularly ln Quebec,
The demand for Maritime potatoes
eased off during the month and the
price is now 50c per bushel compared
with $1.00 a bushel last year. In spite
of the retardotlon of terming operations by ban" weather, preparations
have been made for Increased acreage.
Excellent weather has prevailed In
British Columbia. Seeding has been
generally completed, the crops appear
to lie in excellent condition and tbe
first cutting of alfalfa has commenced
Blossom on the small fruits is over
and the set is up to expectations.
Thc acreage value of arable lands
In British Columbia last year was estimated at $89 per acre, an increase of
$9 per acre as compared with the previous year.
Eggs to the number of 1,080,000
were shipped from Vancouver, via the
Panama Canaal, to Glasgow on April
17th. This was the first record of
shipment of eggs to Great Britain from
the Pacific Coast.
While It is tar too early to predict
the harvest of 1928, yet the weather
The last addition to the chain of
Canadian Pacific hotels is tha
"Hotel Saskatchewan," located at
Regina, opening on May 24. It is
one of the finest of the chain of a
character in keeping with the importance of the capital city of the
Province which furnishes 50 per
cent, of the Dominion's wheat output. Tht- hotel is 12 stories, containing 2Ifi bedrooms with bath, and
many beautiful public rooms and
administrative  offices.
The Canadian Pacific Railway
Company reports from Winnipeg
the marketing of grain at the present rate of 180,000 bushels daily, as
compared with 1211,376 for the corresponding season of last year.
Manitoba'? 180,000 compares with
Saskatchewan's r>:!.,.,]nil and Alberta's U66.827 Loadings are also
above Inst year's record with 220
cars  daily.
The greater portion of the bells
forming the carillon to be ii,stalled
in the Victory Tower, at Ottawa,
were shipped from England on May
7 by the Canadian Pacific steamship
"Balfour." The carillon, consisting
of 53 bells, is regarded as the finest in the world, and have been cast
at the famous hell foundry at Croydon. The bells are a portion of a
national memorial to thousands of
Canadians who laid down their
lives in the Great War.
The Province of New Brunswick
is rising in importance as a fur-
farming province. The report on
the fur farms of Canada just issued by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics shows New Brunswick at
the head of all the provinces in the
matter of the yearly gain in the
number of fur farms. These increased by exactly 100 in the year
ending March, 1920, nearly doubling the number of the year before
and standing in the later year at
200. Prince Edward Island still
leads the Dominion in the number
of farms, having 570 out of a Dominion total of 2.283. the latter
figure comparing with 2,130 the
year before. The provinces rank as
follows: Prince Edward Island, 570;
Ontario 495; Quebec, 450; New
Brunswick, 200; Nova Scotia, 192;
Alberta and British Columbia, each
120; Manitoba, 53; Saskatchewan,
42, und the Yukon Territorial, 20.
throughout the West has been favorable during the spring. A large
acreage has ben prepared and present Indications give promise ot a
good year. In tho East, a very late
spring has been responsible for undue
delay.
M TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
Charlie Dalton
Gtmfberlaijd
J Commercial
; HiaJijUarltn
Hotel
Ram     ;
Kaat.Mbla ;
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Boons Steam IlMtod
YT. MEBBIFIELD, Prop. PAGE SIX
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY.   JUNE   22ND.   1928.
For the Warm Days ..
Hatchways Underwear—No Buttons to bother about,
just the desired garment for these days price $1.50
per suit, sizes from 34 to 44.
No Button Underwear—Forsyth's no button Combinations gives good wear, per suit $1.00.
Boys' Merino Combinations—a good assortment for
the Hoys, most sizes at 89c per suit.
-Men's Bathing Suits—All wool, Penmans make, guaranteed, $2.95 to $3.95.
Ladies' Bathing Suits—A good selection of the newest
in Ladies' Bath Suits, see our selection.
Boys' and Girls' All Wool Bathing Suits—A good variety to choose from at popular prices.
Ladies' Voile Dresses—Several nice designs, and a fair
assortment of colors, prices $2.95 and $3.95.
Ladies Spun Silk Dresses—In a variety of colorings,
price $3.50 each.
Ladies' Summer Undervests—In white and pink. Price
35c or 3 lor $1.00.
For a good assortment of the leading lines in Ladies'
Underwear, ask to see some of our new numbers.
SUTHERLAND'S
Cumberland Personals
For the Hot Days
For the Hot Days that are sure to come you would be
well advised to try
COLD MEATS
as put up by the
CITY MEAT MARKET
They are well known throughout the district and have
gained such a reputation for us that if you have not
already tried  them you are missing a real treat.
TOMATO SAUSAGE
We Specialize in Tomato Sausage . . . We have been
told they are the finest flavored Sausage in the district.
TRY SOME TODAY
City Meat Market
"The Store That Appreciates Your Patronage"
Telephone 111        WE DELIVER       Telephone 111
Automobile Side Curtains Repaired
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Also Harness Repairs
E. L. SAUNDERS
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
\ijiltts txUm thought (at jout cotntoit
" and convetumnos is wnM
in this
Miss Evelyn Carey and Miss Mary
Walker students or the Provincial
Normal School. Victoria, returned to
Cumberland on Saturday last, after
completing the term's work. Miss
Carey and .Miss Walker were both
successful  in  obtaining certificates.
Miss Edith Hood accompanied by
her class went to Puntledge l.ake on
Monday afternoon of this week on
a  combined  nature  tour  picnic.
Mrs. H. Keeler entertained at the
tej hour on Tuesday and Wednesday
of this week. Her guests included:
Mrs. Fraser Watson, Mrs. Shorit. Mrs.
Robathan, Mrs. Clinton. Mrs. Parnham. Mrs, M. Watson, Mrs, Bryan,
Mrs. Pickard, Mrs. Cameron, Mrs.
RIchardBon, Mrs. Devlin, Mrs. Treen.
Mr. and Mrs. Robathan and family
moved in their beach residence at Royston ou Wednesday afternoon of thU
week.
Mrs. E. It. Hicks left for Vancouver
on Sunday last to spend a few days
In that city.
Miss Irma Knowlton, of the nursing
staff of the Cumberland General Hospital left ou Sunday last for Victoria
where she will spend a two week's
vacation,
First and second year High School
broke up the school term on Friday
with a hike to fourth dam.
■       *       •
Miss Deen Baird returned last week
end after having spent a few days
holdlay in Victoria,
Mrs. Acton of Hornby Island was a
visitor   during   the   week,   being   the
guest of Mrs. T. E, Banks.
•       *       *
Mr. and Mrs. A. Davidson were visitors to Cumberland last week end.
Whilst here they were the guests of
Mrs. Walter Hudson.
* *    *
The girls' gymnastic and drill class
had their photographs taken during
the week, posing in their various
clever stunts, Miss Aspesy being in
charge of the class.
* *    *
Miss Isabella Herd left this morning for Duncan where she will spend
a few weeks holidaying with her aunt
Mrs. F. Payne.
* •   •
The physical culture and gym. clas-
83s will close next week. All classes
v:ill be resumed In the fall.
ln the recent report of the sports
held on the Athelttc Grounds the same
of Mr. L. Thomas was Inadvertently
omitted, Mr. Thomas Is assistant
Instructor of the physical drill classes.
Winners Announced in
Hospital Drawing
The people of Comox Valley once
again showed their generosity when
yesterday t Wednesday t they turned
out en masse to attend the annual gar
den fete held on the beautiful grounds
of St. Joseph's Hospital. The business
of the day began shortly after three o'
clock when sweet strains of music were
heard to come forth from the instruments played by nineteen members of
Mrs. Carey's Pan Pipes Orchestra.
After the first selection, Mr. Carthew.
chairman of the Hospital board of directors, briefly outlined the work done
by the hospital during the last year,
also the improvements added to it.
During the year six hundred patients
had been treated, with only eleven
deaths. Eighty-five X-ray pictures
were taken, two hundred major and
minor operations were performed and
thc births amounted to eighty-five.
The real business of the afternoon
then progressed, all of which was made
more enjoyable by the music supplied
by the orchestra. The total proceeds
amounted to twelve hundred nnd fifty
dollars, as nearly as can bo a ^c stained
at the present time. The raffles which
(were run by Mrs. Liddle brought in
about eight hundred and fifty dollars
| of this amount. Shortly after five o'-
■ clock the numbers were drawn and the
'■ lucky winners were:
I Gentlemen's gold watch, iNo. 357).
: held by Miss Gwen Noel; ladies' gold
j watch, (No. 807*; cedar chest, No. 2464,
I held by Mr. P. J. Staghall; standard
l lamp. No. 1517. held by Mrs. G. E. Hewitt; four-piece silver-plated tea service,
No. 68. held by Miss Jervis. A handsome dressed doll, donated by Mrs.
Ramsay, was won by Miss Bond with
ticket No. 421.
The Lady-of-the-thousand-pockets.
so successfully characterized by Mrs.
Capes, was easily located by the following of children. In connection with
this branch of the bazaar the general
manager of Woolworth's stores, Vancouver, is to be thanked for his generous response of twenty-five dollars
worth of merchandise in return for a
fifteen dollar cheque.
Mr. H. S. Baker's lusty voice, assisted by Mr, D. T. Steel's lesser one could
be heard throughout the grounds inviting one and all to visit his housy-
housy stall and get "something for nothing."
In the corner near by, if one could
wedge through the crowd, was to be
found the ice-cream stall in charge of
Mrs. Briggs, Mrs. Morson, Miss Bond.
Miss M. McKee and Miss M. Downey.
Not only Ice-cream, but soft drinks
and strawberries could he procured as
well, all of which were very appreciable on such a hot day.
The adjoining corner was occupied
by the candy stall under the supervision of Mrs. B. Harvey, Mrs. McGin-
nls, Mrs. W. McKenzle and Miss Catch-
pole. These ladies found no trouble in
disposing of their wares to both child-
(ren and grown-ups.
; The miscellaneous stall contained all
! that In former year loaded down the
linen, children's and apron stalls, with
many other things as well. Mrs. Mc-
Auiey and Mrs. Geo. Cllffe capably
managed this.
From the rush around the tea tables
it was evident that the hot day had
caused manv parched throats. Even
with Mrs. L. R. Cliffe and Mrs. Ellis
as conveners, assisted by Mesdames
Carthew. Corker. Hiles, Anderton, Hudson, Graham, Falrbalrn, J. Cliffe and
R. Cliffe and Miss Church it was found
almost impossible to keep pace with
the demand for the sociable cup of
tea.
After these various places had been
visited there remained the last but by
no means the least part of the day's
enjoyment, the supper. The wide
choice of meats which had been so
temptingly cooked and prepared by
Mrs. C. C. Plercy were as perfectly
carved by Mr. W. Cooke. Mrs, Pineo
and Miss A. M. Wood turned out lovely creations of green, red, yellow and
white which upon inspection were
found to be delicious salads. The
many pies, cakes, jellies and tea and
coffee were prepared for serving by
Mrs. Downey. Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. McKee and Mrs. Stevens, while those
serving were Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. W. J.
Edwards, Mrs. W. A. Edwards and the j
Misses Graham and Church. I
Courtenay Locals
Miss Mary Sutton returned from a
visit to Nanaimo on Friday last.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Blunt, of Nanaimo, were in Courtenay on Friday last.
Mrs. R. Bowie left for Naunimo on
Friday and returned on Saturday.
Mrs. G. Van Heniert with her two
children returned to Courtenay on
Tuesday, accompanied by her mother
and father. Mr. and Mrs. Steele, of
Everett.
! ' The teachers and pupils of the Cour-
I tenay High School held a very enjoy-
i ble picnic at Kye Bay on Saturday nf-
] terrioon.
i Mrs. Pidcock gave a concert for her
! I indergartcn children last Friday af-
j tsrnoon consisting of closing exercises,
' children's dances, etc.
I Professor Walter Richards is spend-
I i:ig a vacation at Forbes Landing.
! The many friends of Mr. and Mrs.
; Jack Paterson will be interested to
i learn that they have gone to the Flin
I Mon mining district in Northern Man-
i i .oba. Mr. Paterson was discharged
; from the Ninette Sanitorium recently
: and has gone into the life insurance
I business. He Is also doing some maga-
; /.ne writing.
Miss M. G. Smillie. of Victoria, is
j spending two weeks' vacation as the
j i uest or Mr. and Mrs, W. J. Smillie.
j l.nion Bay Road.
SYNOPSIS 1)1
i LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
PltK-OmONS
j Vacant, unreserved, surveyed Crown
j lands may be pre-empted by British
subjects over IS years of age and by
i [.Mens on declaring intention to be
come British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation and improvement for agriculture purposes.
j Full information concerning regula-
; lions regarding Pre-emptions is given
I in Bulletin No. 1, hand Series, "How to
j Pre-empt Land," copies of which can
j be obtained free of oharge by address-
ILO ILO THEATRE—
£§<*W VILMA
IBANKY
ivFvtlACilC
i.ig the Department of Lands, Victor'
ia, B.C., or to any Government Agent
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is not timbered,
i.e., carrying over 5,000 board feet per
acre west of the Const Range and 8,000
leet per acre east of that Range.
Applications fur pre-emptions are to
\ be addressed to the Land Citnmisston-
i er of the Land Recording Division, in
I which the laud applied for is situated,
; und are made un printed forms, copies
' of which can be obtained from the
; Land Commissioner.
i Pre-emptions must be occupied for
! live years and improvements made to
I value of $10 per acre, including clear-
j ing and cultivating at least live acres,
j before Crown Grant can he received.
j For more detailed information see
1 the Bulletin "How lo Pre-empt Laud.
PURCHASE
| Applications are received for pur
chase of vacant and unreserved Crown
I lands, not being timber land, for agricultural purposes; minimum price oi
| first class (arable) land is $5 per acre
I and second class (gmzlng) land, $2.50
; per acre. Further information regard-
! I ig purchase or lease of Crown lands
; is given in Bulletin No. Ill, Laud Ser
| ies, "Purchase and Lease of Crown
, Lands."
j    Mill factory or Industrial sites ou
j t'mher land,  not exceeding 40  acres
i my be purchased or leased, the con-
I ( itlons including payment of stumpage
HOllKSTKAl) LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
' acres, may  be  leased  us  homesltes,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected in  the llrst  year,  title  being
cbtalnod after residence and improve.
i lent conditions are fulfilled and land
l.as heel) surveyed.
LEASES
!    For grnzlng and Industrial purposes
I ureas not exceeding 640 acres may be
| I .used by one person or a company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province
I h divided Into grazing districts and
Ithe range administered under a Crniv
II ;g Commission,  Annual grazing per-
I Hi Its  aro  Issued   btued   on   number
i ranged) priority being given to estah-
I l.died ownern. Stock-owners may
! f'iriii associations for range manage'
ment, Free, or partially free, permits
i arc available for settlers, campers and
HENRY KING
CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late George Johnston tender their heart felt thanks'to
all those friends Who did their utmost
to lend assitsance to a loving husband
and father during his last moments;
Thanks are also exten-lcil for tho
many floral tributes received and
to friends for the use of the cars on
the occasion of the funeral.
ing division would have beer licenses
or not and it went "wet", the vote being 61 for nnd 50 against, with one
.spoiled ballot.
Alert Bay Goes Wet
Corporal R. Matthews, officer in
charge of the Courtenay Police Division, returned from nn inspection trip
to the north on Tuesday. While at
Alert Bay on Saturday last a plebiscite
was conducted as to whether that poll-
The Liberal Organization
Liberal committee rooms and offices
have been established In the McPhee
Block with thc secretary, Mr. Thorold
D. Smith in charge. Mr. P. P. Harrison has been appointed official agent
for the Liberal candidate. Mayor McKenzle and Mr. P. L. Anderton Is the
campaign manager. Mayor Maxwell,
of Cumberland, and Mr. Smith went
down to Nanaimo at the week-end to
get a demonstration on the absentee
ballot. Mr. McKenzle is at present in
the north but Is expected home In a
day or two.
1$ r. ■; iVei>- York
\"l V,'-, World .<.■>■<■
ty:'-   ...       ■■■
fciT.,^On« of the love*
ii«tf rrost brilliant
pica™ of dramptir-
'.ling 'i<*' I«ave Hotly-
:virood\i.i * year."
Novel•— surprising-— thrillim: romance
with the screen's most romantic lovers
aniidr.t thf swirl *^f the circus rirtp and
thc spleiidor of •rr.jcstic setting."..
He fcns a clown—*-et Iw pilec* a nation. She
WW beautiful and ruled Mm.
Released by UNITED AP.TISTS CC.".?CRATIOI
Friday and Sat'day, June 22-23
EAGLE BRAND
LANG'S
Cream of
Lilies
is the finest preparation on the market for Sunburn.
Per   OUC    Bottle
"Pal"
BLADES FOR GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR
Small Packet 36<>
Large Packet 89«?
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Old Drury Coffee. . .
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE
per It)	
65c
Old Drury Tea...
THE BEST OBTAINABLE and used
by all Discriminating People QA„
per It)  OUL
Seasonable Fruits and Vegetables
The Pick of the Market
Mumford's Grocery
Phone 71 Cumberland
"IF YOU GET IT AT MUMFORD'S—IT'S GOOD!"
Union Hotel
Cumberland, B. C
Electrically Heated
Throughout
Our Service is the BEST
It. YATES, Proprietor
Phone IS Phone IS
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
IP. P. Harrison, M.LA.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay            Phone 258
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone   Hull  or  24
KOlt SALK-FOUR ROOMED COT-
Uge at Puntledge Lake. Phone 180,
Cumberland for further particulars.
Cumberland Branch of the Canadian Legion, H.K.S.I.. will hold a whlst
drive and dance In the Memorial Hull
prices and usual good time.
Keep Cool!
Summer Drinks
Lemonade Powder, Per tin   25«?
Lime Juice Cordial, quarts, each  50<?
C. & B. Lemoncup, Orangecup and Limecup 40<>
or 2 for 75<*
Hire's Ginger Beer, Root Beer and Ginger Ale Extracts
SPECIALS
Swat the Fly
Fly Tox   1 Fly Tox Sprayer @ 50c; lBottle of Fly
Deal      Tox, large; Value $1.25. fl»-1   A A
Fly Pads 3 for lOi?
Rubber Fly Swats, long handle, each 25f
Full stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Bing Cherries, Plums, Apricots, Peaches, Pineapples
Cantelopes, Water Melon, Bananas, Oranges, Lemons,
and Grape Fruit, etc.
New Spuds, Fresh Green Peas, Tomatoes, New Carrots
Turnips, Green Onions, Lettuce, Cabbage, Cauliflower
and Onions, etc.
LOCAL STRAWBERRIES
"Leave Your Order Now"
for
PRESERVING BERRIES, 151t> and 251t>       10/»
Pails, cleaned, all ready to be canned, per lb 1.U t
MATT BROWN'S GROCERY

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