BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Islander Jul 15, 1916

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0224764.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224764.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0224764-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0224764-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224764-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0224764-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0224764-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0224764-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0224764-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0224764.ris

Full Text

 *%t
(fi
The Newspaper with the Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VII.. No. IG
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JULY 15. 1916.
NEVER BETTER
That the riding of Comox will
remain in the 'Conservative column after the forthcoming election, and the majority, this time
will be even larger than last, is
the declaration of Mr. Michael
Manson, Conservative candidate
who has represented the constituency since 1909. Mr... Manson
arrived in Victoria, yesterday
says the Colonist of July 11th.
"The electors of Comox," Mr.
Manson stated, "have no desire
to repudiate a government which
has, throughout its administration, placed in the forefront of
its policy the development of the
natural resources of British Columbia, and give their support to
a party which is without any
• definite policy and the whole
stock-in-trade of which has been
its ability to heap slander upon
its political opponents, misrepresent the Government's policies
and seek, by innuendo and half-
truths, to mislead the people on
the vital issues of the day.
"In Comox, the outlook for the
Conservative party has never
been better. I am confident that
at the coming elections the Government will be supported in the
most whole-hearted manner. I
have just been in Vancouver and
there the situation is equally favorably for the Conservative
candidate. The discloures made
during the investigation at the
last session of the Legislature in
to wholesale "plugging" done in
the interests of the Liberal candidate at the recent by-election
has'arotised public opinion. The
better element among the Liberals make no secret of their disgust and their determination to
show their disapproval of such
malpractices."
Discuffcing conditions in his
riding, Mr. Manson stated that
the legislation passed at the last
session of the House, especially
in respect to the assistance to the
loggers in the shape of' not enforcing the customary tax at once,
but instead, permitting the operations of logging to proceed to a
point v here the logger's returns
are in sight before enforcing him
to meet the Government's charges, has had a most satisfactory
effect on the operations of the
loggers and much work is being
done, Then, too, the Government's measure in aid of the shipbuilding industry will mean much
for thelumberindustry in Comox.
The great tumble has been lack
of bottoms in which to export
lumber to the markets of the
world. But since the Government's shipping policy was put
into concrete legislation, the results are excellent. In '"ancou-
ver, three keels of vessels to be
engaged in the lumber trade have
been laid, and in  Victoria  work
will shortly start upon more vessels. These evidences of coming
shipping facilities have brought
great encouragement to the lumber interests in Comox. Another
government measure which has
greatly assisted the loggers of
that section is the permission for
the continued export of logs in
the unmanufactured state.
The longshoreman's strike at
United States' Pacific Coast ports
has had some effect on the logging industry on this side in that
it has tied up the export lumber
business of the mills in Washington, to some extent. A strike in
the Washington shingle mills has
also interfered somewhat with
the shingle business in British
Columbia, but, generally speaking, there is a feeling of confidence among the lumbermen
which is indicative of the improved conditions at present
compared with those in the Comox district, recognize the successful efforts the Government
has made and is making to im
prove the situation.
CELEBRATE TBE 12TB
The members of the Mt. Horeb
Lodge L. 0. L. No 1*676 assembled in the lodge room last Sunday evening and marched to
Divine Service at Grace Methodist Qhurch. Rev. Bro. H. Wilson
was the preacher and he based
his remarks from the text,
"Whatmean Ye by these stones"
which was greatly appreciated
by the members. On Wednesday
July 12th the lodge celebrated
the Battle of the Boyne. Instead
of the annual customary procession an entertainment and social
evening was spent. The meeting
was called to order by W. M. Bro
J. Taylor. Speeches were delivered of an inspiring nature.
While the Orange association do
not oppose any religous belief
whatever, we strongly oppose
special concession to any particular church. "Equal rights to
all and special priveleges to none
Our God, Our King, and Our
Country," is what the Order
stands for. The loyalty of the
Order is seen in the fact that
over 40,000 members in Canada
have answered their Country's
call.
Songs and recitations were
given by members and friends
which were highly appreciated.
Refreshments suitable to the
season were served in abundance
The committee Bros. Robertson,
W. Dunn and Loggie worked hard
and did their work well to make
the evening enjoyable. The singing of the National anthem
brought the enjoyable evening to
a close and the226th anniversary]
will not soon be forgotten in
Cumberland.
Poster:—"The Call of Duty to the Absentees.1
Great Britain.
It is being used in
CUBS GO CAMPING.
" The Inevitable is Happening in Europe,"—By the artist of the
British and Colonial'Press,
the Cubs returned home last
Saturday after having spent a
most enjoyable week camping
at Royston. They had a great
time and everyone looked brown
and well. The following|account
of the camp was written by Cub
Howard Carey, age 11:
"We left Cumberland on Monday morning on the train in
charge of Cubmaster Mr. Bischlager, and our camping outfits
were taken to camp by Joe Willard. As soon as we got to camp
we made our beds out of boughs
broken off the trees.
We then got our dinner and it
tasted good we were all so hungry; we then walked around our
camp and was then ready for
another meal, At nine o'clock
came prayers, and then to bed,
camp beds are not as nice the
first night as the on'js at home
because we could not sleep, was
up at three in the morning.
At breakfast Cubmaster Mr.
Bischlager sat on Jimmie Hali-
day's loaf and Mr. Bischlager
said, "It was well pumped ^up."
I think it wag because we all got
fat on Mr. Haliday's bread.
We had lots of nice games of
football thanks for the ball lent
by Patrol leader Merrifield. We
also played Royston boys baseball
and we were beaten four to one,
but look out Royston next time.
We had-lots of fun swimming
and catching billheads from under the rocks.
We went on a visit to Toney
beach and Mrs. Hood gave us a
fine tea:
The Cubmaster' gave a prize
for the neatest partol in camp,
the French Patrol' won.
At last the happy week came
to an end, with orders to pack
our kits for home, but the cubs
all say, "Our cubmaster is the
best yet. "And we all hope he
will be with us to camp another
year.
HOWARD CAREY.
FROMJTHE FIRING UNE
Special to-rday, Ladies White
Pique Skirts and Middies and
Misses Middies and Middy Suits
at Campbells.
W. K. Hancock has resigned
the position of manager of the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co Ltd., and leaves on Wednesday for Southern California,
The following is a letter from
Albert F. Grant, chauffer to Mr.
J.'K, Lockard previous to joining
Overseas Forces and addressed
to his former employer:—
Somewhere in Belguim,
June 23rd. 16
Dear Sir.—-As I have a few
moments to spare I thought I
would scratch a few short lines
to say "Hello; and let you know
I am perfectly well and happy.
I have just finished a meal of
bully beef and biscuits which
takes the place of roast turkey
and is enjoyed fully as much when
you are real hungry. Mr. Lockard, please excuse this awful
scribbling, and also this writing
pape- as I am sitting in a "dug
out" and using a sand bag for a
desk and this paper which I am
using I found in the dug out, so
you see (this is real Active Service Conditions). I dropped you
a card about a week ago telling
you that I had met Eddie Jackson, and that he was a Sergt. in
the Engineering Corps to which
we were attached helping to rebuild trenches and so forth. Well
this time Mr. Lockard, lam very
sorry to*elate that I am writing
to tell vou that 1 saw Eddie get
killed yesterday. We were all in
the trench together and Fritz began shelling us, of course we took
cover as best we could, and a
shell broke about ten feet from
us and a piece of flying shell hit
Eddie in the neck and he died in
a few minutes. I felt very very
badly on account of knowing him
so well, but I suppose that is olie
of the fortunes of war, and you
never know when your time is
coming. He is being buried today, but I am not able to be present at his burial, as I do not belong to his corps and there is as
little as possible fuss made over
those things here, as they arc so
common. I watched a most interesting fight in the air yesterday
just above our heads. There
were two enemy planes and two
of ours. One of our planes was
brought down I am sorry to say,
but the Germans both beat it. It is
an awful sight to watch a plane
falling from a height of 14000 ft.
I have seen three fall at different
times. Well Mr. Lockard, I can't
think of any more of interest to
you so I guess I will ring oil'
trusting .you and all the family
are enjoying the very best of
good health. Remember me
kindly to Mrs. Lockard.. Edith
and little Dick.
Best Regards,
Albert,
TBE BOY SCOUTS
ASS0C1ATIQN0FBX.
Tlie following is the result of
the Tenderfoot Examination held
at Cumberland, B.C.:
REAR PATROL P.L. L.H. MORDY
Scouts: 45 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 1 wrong decision,
1 no answer or no decision.
HOUND PATROL P.L, G. BROWN
Scouts; 41 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 1 wrong decision.
4 no answer or no decison.
FOX PATROL P.L. MONT.  HOOD
Scouts; 38 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 5 wrong decisions,
1 no answer or no decision,
KANGAROO PATROL P.L. G. MORDY
Scouts; 37 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 0 wrong decisions.
4 no answer or no decision.
WOLF PATROL P.L. C. WILLARD
Scouts; 36 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 6 wrong decisions.
5 noansweror.no decision.
PANTHER PATROL P.L. D. BATE,
Scouts; 33 out of a possible 50.
Leader; 3 wrong decisions.
9 no answer or no decisions,
wolf cubs:—It would be unfair to make any attempt to mark
them, as the questions were properly beyond their present status.
It is sufficient to say that they
appeared to knoW all what they
should know; .and a great deal
more besides. They made an excellent attempt to give right answers to questions on the flag,
and their efforts to master the
Knots did them infinite credit; in
fact I should judge that many of
the Cubs would make a better
showing than some of the Scouts
on the Knot Tests, and on my
next visit I shall be inclined to
have J Knot Competition between
Cubs and Scouts.
The Bear Patrol did very well,
and I am very well pleased with
the work of both the Leader and
his Scouts. The Hound Patrol
also did well, but the result was
the work of the only one Scout
under Leader Brown. The other
Patrols did fairly well, but must
do better., next time, and their
leaders must not give so many
wrong decisions. 857" marks
should be obtained in this very
simple examination. The Leader
of the Kangaroos gave no wrong
decisions but he was not backed
up by his Scouts. I once again
heartily congratulate the whole
Subscription price, $1.50 per year
troop on their very practical application of ihe 2nd Scout Promise; and also on having a Patrol
Clubrpom system; and on havihg
by their example and work won
for themselves official recognition
liy their city, i hope lhat they
.vlll still further advance in the
respect of all with whom they
■ ■ome in contact. 1 hope to visit
them more often in the future.
T. R. Heaneage,
Acting Chief Coin, for B. C.
MISEFUISTO
San Francisco, July 12. With
$350,000 subscribed for its "open
shop" fight, the San Francisco
Chamber of Commerce was preparing today to take further definite action toward breaking the
longshoreman's strike and moving the great quantities of freight
that congest the wharves. The
Chamber of Commerce estimates
that $2,500,000 worth of shipments were held up in June and
•10,000 tons of merchandise is still
tied up on the docks, according
to the Harbor Commision.
In view of the withdrawal of
all compromise or mediation offers by the Waterfront Employers'
Association, there was little likelihood that the day would bring
any hope of settlement, though
Henry M. White of Seattle, acting as federal mediator, is endeavoring to get the opposing
factions together.
As yet organized labor has
made no move to meet the declaration of the Chamber of Commerce or to combat the efforts of
its law and order committee.
The Portland Chamber of Commerce, at a meeting last night
followed the suit of the San Francisco body in organizing for an
"open shop" cam paifyi. It also
endorsed the present scale of
wages being paid to non-union
stevedores. . .
Acts of violence occurred yesterday or last night in nearly all
of the larger ports where the
longshoremen are on strike. The
most serious was reported at
Seattle, where a negro strikebreaker was beaten into unconsciousness by a gang of strike
sympathizers \vho boarded the
street car in which he was riding.
The number of special police paid
by the Seattle employers for
strike duty was increased to 250.
" The Battle Line."- By Fred Buchanan in Today. TWO
THE ISLANDEK,   CUMBERLAND, ft. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER:
Sin* Jtaltrntor
Published every Saturday by tlie Islander
Publishing Company al Cumberland,
,C, Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Sub* riptlon: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c, Foreign subscriptions
in countries in Postal Union, SH.iiO
SATURDAY, JULY ir.Ui. 1916
Deaf and Dumb Picketing.
Judge Tallman, Superior Court
Judge of King County, makes
union labor votes, when, in a
decision handed down the 10 inst,
in a case wherein plaintiff prayed
for a restraining order against a
defendant, members of organized
labor, who are picketing his place
of business because he employed
a man who did not belong to the
union. The plaintiff made it
very plain to the court that such
picketing was destroying his
business, reducing his receipts,
and that he felt, under the liberty of the American Government
as guaranteed each individual by
its Constitution, he wanted protection, but the court could not
disrupt at this time the possibility
of a few votes for the fall election, and proceeded to give said
plaintiff no protection, allowing
organized labor the right to destroy a merchant's business, one
who pays taxes and rents to do
business in a country where the
Constitution guarantees.the lawful protection in conducting a
merchantile business.
Judge Tallman, as Superior
Court Judge, has in this decision
permitted himself to be a co-partner with a class who, when operating as a court has permitted,
become a jiriviliged class; and
every man and woman within
this court's district should know
exactly what he has become a
partner to' Judge Tallman said
that in his judgement there was
no law preventing quiet, speechless picketing if it is void of any
force or violence.
"These defendants may put
not to exceed two pickets in front
ofeachof'thisdefendent'sstores."
said the Judge, "if they wish to.
These pickets may have a badge
or scurf with words like these, or
to this effect: 'This place is unfair to organized labor.' They
may put them on if they wish to,
but nothing more; no such words
as 'Don't go in this man's store,'
or anything of that kind."
It appears that the court is
willing to destroy a man's business, provided it can be done
without violence, and the court
no doubt is honest in his decision,
but even honesty, wrongfully applied, has no place in this country,
ii having been a system of organized labor, or the mob division of
organized labor, lo apply the boy
colt privileges exercised by them
against a court when coming be
fore the people for re-election, if
thai court has failed lo give them
I lie advantage of decisions wherein organized labor is involved
This itself is the one and only ex
cuse that the courts of (his country use as an excuse for such unjust decisions from the bench
It is a question that the general
public does not seem to be greatly
concerned about, but when a free
country, as the American Government boasts of, becomes so saturated with injustice handed out
to a legitimate and lawabiding
merchant as has been done this
plaintiff in question, by a Judge
of the Superior Court, it is certainly time that the general pub-
P*'.'"'*
'■■.ty
CIC a la Grace 409
A general putpote corset, made in
heavy Coutil. suitable for average
to stout figures.   Slightly curved at
waist.    All materials guaranteed.
Price	
CIC a la Grace 6!7
A new and very popular model, made in
fine French Coutil, medium bust, new
length skirt, suitable for medium to-full
figures.   Fully guaranteed.    Price	
tgfr
CIC a la Grace 369
Corset made in Coutil, for average
figure. Medium bust and newlength
skirt.   Four heavy hose supporters,
and steeis that will not rust.
Price	
d
Another shipment of Ladies' Middies
and Wash Skirts to arrive shortly.
HI
:*'*y;*v/4..."*.r.v.;yA-.*^
lie was investigating to see. why
and where a court contracts a
diceased mind, that a judge will
publicly permit a minoi ity, chronicled as organized labor, to, under
his own instructions, do a thing
that is positively prohibited by
the laws and the Constitution of
our country.
The plaintiff explained to the
court in this case that he had lost
in receipts more than twenty-five
per cent of his business, through
the unlawful picketing by the
Unions, and yet the court stipulates a condition whereby the said
Union may make that loss greater
in percentage than defendant has
already experienced; through the
good will of the court and the encouragement that the unions get
from the court, it is no doubt that
this man's receipts will soon drop
to fifty per cent. Now, under
these conditions, it is plain that
the court has united and become
a partner to a crime that has for
its purpose and its accomplishment the destruction of a lawful
and legal business. What would
be the result of one of the same
court's decisions if said defendants in this case were to use violence and break windows and
destroy property of this merchant? He has plainly stated that
they would be punished as criminals, yet can there be any difference between the destruction
of a man's property or taking it
by violence? That question is
very plain. There cannot be.
Yet the court is blinded to the
extent that he can see that it is
lawful to destroy a man's business one way, and unlawful lo
destroy it another way, and the
whole regime, boiled down to one
thought, is the pure and simple
fact that the court is afraid to
exercise the powers granted to
him, when an election whereby
he is a candidate to succeed himself, is approaching over the
horizon.—Pacific Coast Mechanic.
Our Business is * Growing/
Ornamental Trees and Shrubs,
Fruit Trees and Small Fruits.
NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD,
EVERGREENS - ROSES - RHODODRENDRONS
♦
Descriptive Nursery and Bulb Catalogue on request.
Dominion Nursery Company,
2184 4th Ave., W„ Vancouver, B.C.
One Episode Each Week  of The
Great Circus Serial
"Peg 0' The Ring"
ILO ILO THEATRE
Once every week.   Admission 10c.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.. LL.D. D.C.L., President
IOHN AIRD, Genenl Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits ol $1 and
apwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, -.vith-
iraw.tls to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S!60
OUMBKRLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
r
Wallr»a•*->***•***.   Beauty may be only skin deep;
" <*ll|i<*pci a   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, I C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
If yoa want reliable nursery
stock for fall planting, roses,
trees and shrubs that grow, see
A. H. Peacey, Cumberland, local
representative for the Dominion
Nursery Company, Vancouver
B.C.
THE   B. C.   GARAGE
JOHN THOMSON, Proprietor.
Local Agent for the
CHEVROLET
Model Four-Ninety.
Price $775.00.
Gas Engines, Supplies and Repairing
Q
ueen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
. . ....%-r-r._v^   ill   i-wBM
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion,    lt is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance,   Drink beer
and be temperate.     Always ask for Queen Beer.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd,
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[established 24 years.] 4
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Get Your
Spring Sewing
Done NOW!
And let the
Singer Sewing
_ Machine   Co.
Help You.
We will sell you a Singer Sewing
Machine on very easy payments,
and no interest. We will demonstrate thoroughly each machine sold,
and will give the Guarantee of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.
NEEDLES,   OIL    AND   ALL   ACCESSORIES
See Our Windows at==—-
Mrs. Alex. King's
Ice Cream Parlor and Candy Store
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has been renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
in every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Silver Spring Beer
Contains backbone and
stamina, and gives you
back the appetite that
you have lost. Drink the
Beer that's pure at the
UNION HOTEL
Cumberland,   B. C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or  peddler;  my business is
Cleaning, Preuing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
vour clothes in perfect condition :il a low price.   We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury,
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Are.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on •  the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop:
First Class in Every
Respect    :   :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland,B.C.
Synopsis ol Coal Mining Mediations
COA-u mining lights of the D<miuiui
in Manitoba, Siukstcheffsn ap.l Alberta
'lie Yuki.n Territory, theN rthweitTe I
'fries-ind in a portion - f ilie Province u
Briti.li Columbia, may he .eased for a tern
■t twenty-one years at   n annual ren'al <
$1 an aure.       N.l  more 'ban 2,uOO-.cre*
will be leased loulie applicant.
Applicatii.il tor a lease must be made b;
lie-tpplicant in persun to the Agent i.rsul
.gent uf tlle district in which the rights
.pplied fur are situs'ed.
Ill surveyed tenitnry ihe land must In
i.-crilied hv lMltioua,t*r)PI('.lsubdi*ts.iMlf
I .. c'niiis, tnd iu un u veyed ernt-.r)
In* rat* applied Inr shall ''o ntulc-d ut b)
liuapii icint hitiHolf.
K eh ai.plio.iii.u must he ace-iiipauiei
by a fee -.f$5 a hich will be refunded if thi
it his applied lurare nut av illab e, but nn
tlierviie. A royalty shall bo paid nu 'In
• i.TeliautaUo   u'put uf the mine at lh>
rath uf live centa per tun.*
The person < p.rating the  iiiinn  slial
furnish ibe Agent with s #"rii rutilrusac
ountinu fur the full quantity -.f merch
nimble coal mined and pay lhe royalty
horeon,       If   the catiuiniag rigllta are
'i .. being nperated, such re' urns shall be
.ri isheil at least-.licea vear.
The 'ease will include tl.e cnal minin
'igbts.inly, but thel ssee may he permit
rd tu purchase whatever available uur
face tigMs may be considered necessary
i >rtfie working uf the mine at the rate ot
flO.OOatiacre.
Fur full inforniation applicatiun should
be made tu the Secretary of the Department nf Ihe Inteiior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent ur Sub-Ait' nt i fDominiou Lauds.
W   W. CORY, -
Deputy Miuistoruf theliiterior.
N. B- Unau'hnrised puhlica'iun of this
advertisement will not be paid-for.
Hip Animal Food
A fashionable lady has a pet parrot
ot whloh she ia very fond. A few day)
ago her husband was monkeying with
the parrot, when he suddenly cried
out in anguish and danced round the
room holding his Bnger in his mouth.
"Good gracious! What's the matter, Charles?" eald the lady.
"That parrot," ejaculated the suffering man.
"I hope you haven't hurt the dear
bird."
"No, but the dear bird has bitten
a piece out of my linger."
"Great goodness! I hope lt didn't
bite lt clean out."
"Yes, it did."
"I wish you would be more careful,
Chark-B. The man I-bought that bird
from told me not to let lt taste meat
under any circumstances."
THOS. t: BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 87
Agent for lhe
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Heiler.ioii, Proprietor
Estimates and Design*) furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI  RROS
Grocers aad Bakers
Airfiits fur Pilsener Beek
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Speoialty
West Cumberland
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.  1915.
READ   UP
Sal.
Fri.
P.M.
4.:i5
P.M.
7.35
4.10
7.10
4.05
7.05
4.00 j 7.00
3.55 ! 6.55
3.50 j 6.50
3.45 6.45
3.30 ; 6.30
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.05
7.05
^.05
4.00
7.00
4.00
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.30
6.30
3.30
Mon.
Sun.
P.M.   I    A.M.     P-.M.
4.35 !   9.35     3.35
4,10
4.05 |
4,00
.1.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
9.10 3.10
9.05 3.05
9.00 3.00
8.55 2.55
8.50 2.50
8.45 2.45
8.30 2.30
STATIONS
Cumberland
Bevan
Puntledge
(f) Lake Trail Road
(f)Courtenay Road
(f)    Minto Road
Royston
Union Bay
READ   DOWN
Sun.
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
7.25 1.25
7.30 1.30
7.35 1.35
7.40 1.40
735 1.45
7.50 1.50
8.00 2.00
Mon.
A.M.
10:30
10.55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Tues.
P.M.
2.00
2.251
230
2.35
2.40
2.45
2:50
3,00
Wed.
A.M.
10:30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Thurs
A.M.
7:00
7:25]
7:30
7:35
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
Fri,    Sat.
A,M, ! A.M.
10;30    7:00
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
7:25
7:30
7:35
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
The Challengo Accepted
An Irishman In France had been
challenged to a duel.
"Sure," he cried, "we'll light wltll
shillelaghs."
"That won't'do." cried his second;
"as the challenged party yoc have tho
right to choose the weapons, but
chivalry demands tint you should decide upon a weapon wllh which
Frenchmen are familiar."
"Is that so?" said tho generous
Irishman; "then we'll light it out wltll
guillotines."
The Most Useful Book
"Tou have quite a number ot books,
I see," remarked the visitor, glancing
round the room. "Which do you think
ls the most helpful to you?1'
"Webster's Dictionary, without a
doubt," was the prompt response ol
Mrs. Brown.
"Tou don't really mean it!" ex.
claimed the visitor. "May I ask In
what particular way?"
"Certainly. The baby sits on lt at
table, and lt saves the price of a high
chair."
Hops
Vlsltor—You look very much Ilka
your mother, only her hair is golden
and yours ls dark brown.
Mary Jane—Yes*m, but hers was
just like mine till last year, so prob-ly
mine wlll change, .too, when I grow up.
A Trick of ths Trade
"StopI" thundered the client at the
barber, who was    cutting    his balr.
Then,  he continued,    ln    somewhat
milder tones:
"Why do you Insist! upon telling me
these horrible, bloodcurdling stories
of ghosts and robbers.while you are
cutting my hair?"
' "I'm vary sorry,t sir," replied the
barber, "but, you. see, when I tell
stories like that to*-my clients, their
hair stands on. end,.and lt makes it
ever so.much easier*to cut."
A Good  Story
It happened at a-school where the
children were hopelessly Involved ln
miscellaneous Rubjf*:t8, such as grammar, physiology, etc.:
Teacher: "What are^the principal
parts of the body?"'
Sharp Pupil: "Tlie body)|Conslsts of
three principal parts—-tho*\head, tlm
chest, and th'3 bowels, of whV'h there
are Ave: a, o, 1, o, u,iand! sometimes
w and y."
The latter, doubtless, thgkappendlx,
4\^w? &•* V\
\\
JjL^&I; ^» ■
M>^&2mJTfti
IjY t
/™^^^^T^» • rnm *m****wtr
m
Hf-MuT* BwW|H
1
W*\M
I
The Leading Man..-
\.i
Will  Not Worry
Wife: "To be frank withiyou.llf you
were to die I should centainljnjrmarry
again."
Husband: "I've no objjes-tlon. 'I'm
not going to worry abou* (he trotfblea
ol * fellow whom I sball*r/eTer know."
One Calf—Thirteen Children
A certain Welsh lawyer ls the proud
father of thirteen children. On one
occasion he took his whole family out
to a country fair. After strolling over
the grounds he decided to take ihem
into a side show, which had a seven-
legged calf on exhibition. Approaching the ticket-collector he asked for
tickets for himself, wife and thirteen
children.
"Are all these your children?" uslted
the man, surveying th? crowd.
"Yes," replied the solicitor.
"Well, wait a infante," said the
Bhowma'i, "and I'll bring the calf out
to see them."
Adventures of Johnny Monte
' Not What She Meant
Mr. Titus was travelling In Italy
and one morning was quite surprised
to meet some people from Ills native
town.
"Why, Mrs. Clarke!" ho cried.
"How do you do? You are the last
person I expected to Hee ln Italy."
"If It isn't Mr. Titus!" exclaimed
the lady, In surprise. "Yes, we are
spending the winter here. You must
call on ua often. You know Just how
lt is—persons we never think much
ot at home Beem like dear friends
when we meet them in a strange
country."
Enough   Said
An Irish priest preaching to his
congregation  Inquired of Ihem:
"Whut Is It thai makes ye hate your
wives?—Whisky. And what is it makes
ye shoot at your landlords?    Whisky."
Then, Boreamlng with excitement,
hn cried: "And whal Is It makes you
miss them?—Whisky!"
"Oh, hoys," he concluded, "what
more can I say to convince you nf the
evils of drink?"- Birmingham Gazette.
Following  Example
While playing wllh a pair or shears
ilttlo Laura Beverfld one nf the prettiest of her golden curls.
"My dear child, why did you do
that?" asked Aunt Mary, who came
to call soon afterward.
"I wanted 'em so I could lake 'till
utt and hang 'em on the bureau," explained the little girl, "just like
mamma docs."
I
Parting With  Money
11- Howard: "A fool nnd his money nro
loon parted."
I   Mrs. Howard (clapping her hands):
L "Oh, John!    How much are you gnlnr;
I lo give mi''.'"
Didn't  Lose
II Millie: "So you loved and lost, did
I you?"
I .   Willie:   "Oh,  no, indeed!    She lis.
jlirned all my presents." FOl'K
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN     TOPICS
The balance of our   stock   of
' Millinery at reduced prices    at
Campbells.
Tin' Cily Council held their
meeting on Monday evening and
gave the New Electric Lighting
System additional consideration
ninl decided to cull a public meet-
ing of llie rate payers in the City
Hall on Monday evening next.
A Lite shipment of Ladies Silk
Sweater Coats just arrived.
These will be put on sale at
Special Prices to clear. These
come in Melon, Gold, Kelly, also
in Combination Colors: Black&
White, Melon & White, Copen-
hagen & White Etc. Caps to
Match.   CAMPBELLS.
Sergeant Evans of the Canadian Engineers is expected to a-
riivein this city on Monday accompanied by Alex. King who
has joined the Engineers on a recruiting campaign.
John Sutherland, Manager of
the Big Store, left for Ladysmith
and Victoria on Sunday. He returned on Friday.
Joseph Hunter, of Victoria,
Chief Engineer of the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd. was here
on official business on Tuesday.
During the camping season A.
H. Peacey's Drag store will close
every evening at six o'clock with
the exception of Tuesday and
Saturday. On Tuesday the store
will close at 1 p. m. and remain
open as usual on Saturday.
The Vicar of Cumberland will
hold service in the Schoolhouse,
Royston, on Sunday, July 23rd,
at 8.30 p. m.
Tenders will be received by T.
H.Carey, Secretary of School
Board until Saturday, July 22nd.
6 p.m. for kalsomining two rooms
in the new school. For further
particulars apply to any member
jof the Board. Key may be obtained from W. W. Willard, Esq.
Mrs.Elizabeth Canterill died at
the home of her daughter Mrs. P.
S. Fagan on Tuesday, July 11th.
The deceased lady was in her
56th year and came here on a
visit some time ago. The funeral took place on Thursday. Mr.
William Canterill, of Chemainus, a son of the deceased lady
arrived on Wednesday to attend
the funeral.
r
FOR SALE
White Wyandotte pullets (some
laying).  3  for $5.00,   Cockerels
112.00 each,  yearling hens  from
$1,50 each.   Heavy laying strain.
J. G. Randall, Royston Station.
Vancouver Island.
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that
the reserve existing on Lot No.
1187 Rupert District, by reason
of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on the 27th
of December, 1907 is cancelled
for the purpose of the sale of
same to the Colonial Lumber &
Paper Mills, Limited.
R. A, Renwick,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C.,
June, 22nri, 1916.
RIGHT AT THE  BEGINNING OF SUMMER GET
YOUR
11 COLUMBIA "
Don't let another Summer
season commence without
providing yourself with a
Columbia. It is the one incomparable musical instrument for every outing event
and for the Summer entertainment of your family and
guests. There are Columbia
models made to suit every
taste and every pocketbook.
COLUMBIA  GRAFONOLA
" FAVORITE "  at  $75.00,
Complete with 12 double-disc Records of your own choosing, is particularly adapted for Summer use.
Write us im- information about the
"FAVORITE" today. Terms of
payment can be arranged as easy
$5.00 down  and ,$5.00 per month.
THE   BIG   STORE
For Girls:
Girls' Middies in white drill, with blue collar; also in all white.    Price 90c. each.
White Muslin Dresses for girls from 2 years to 10 years,   daintily  embroidered,
and very tine quality muslin.    Prices $1.75 to $3.50.
Girls' Summer Undervests in all sizes, from 15c. to 25c. each.
Girls' Summer Hats, a special knock-about hat for girls from 8 to 12 years, 25c.
Girls Hats, in letter quality, from SOc. to $1.50.
Girls' Parasols for the Little Tots, 25c. each.
Girls' Corsets, new style, in sizes to suit every girl.   Price from 65c. per pair.
Girls' Rib Hose-in all sizes, good quality, 2 pairs for 35c.
For Boys:
Boys' Summer Pants, splendid
weni ing quality, dark stripe,
the best pant for the least
money. All sizes, $1.00 pair.
Boys' Khaki Drill Shirts.heavy
quality, splendid for wear,
sizes 12 to 14, 95c. each.
Boys' Heavy Cord Pants, all
sizes.    Price $1.75.
Boys' Light Stripe Waist Shirts
of best washing material.
Price 65c. each.
Boys' Suits bought before the
great advance in price, all
wool, first-class values.
Boys' Belts 20c. each.
Boys' Strong Cotton Hose,hard
wearing, and good color.
Price 25c. per pair.
Boys' Sneakers, all sizes in
stock, at right prices.
Boys' Caps and Hats in great
variety, at moderate prices.
Specials:
Ladies' Holland Skirts, medium
width, can't be beat for hard
wear, six only, regular price
$2.25.   Now 95c.
Ladies' Summer Dresses, regular values to $6.00, medium
width in skirt, to be cleared
at $1.95 each.
Ladies'Pique Skirts,full width,
double flounce, wide rib, regular $4.50, for $2.35. Only a
few.
Ladies' Summer Undervests,
splendid values, short or half
sleeves, 15c. each.
Beautiful Voile, with large
dots, 15c. .per yard.
Ladies' Corsets, our leader is
D. & A. Corsets. For a
cheap, popular line, try a
a pair.     Price per pair 95c.
Household Requirements:
We carry a very large stock of Kitchen Enamelware, including all sizes, pots and
pans, teapots, pails, etc.   We buy direct and can offer special prices.
A brand new stock of Flour Tins, bread tins,  wash boilers,  in copper, tin .and
nickeled.   Ask our prices.
For Crockery you will find we can show you a very good selection,  considering
how hard it is to get today, and the prices are right.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
WHY
THE GREAT-WEST LIFE
Assurance Company
has for nine successive years written
The Largest Canadian Business
of all companies operating in Canada.
ITS PREMIUMS JRE THE LOWEST
ITS POLICIES JR6 THE MOST LIBERAL
ITS DIVIDENDS ARS TH£ HIGHEST
' Investigate for yourself before insuring elsewhere.
VANCOUVER ISLAND BRANCH OFFICE
J. Burtt Morgan, Manager.
109 Union Bank Building, Victoria, B.C.
THOMAS MORDY, Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
G. A. FLETCHER MUSIC Co.,
"Nanaimo's Music House"
ii Commercial St., NANAIMO, B.C.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality,    very
pair guaranteed.
Fon'fiirther information apply lo
Mrs.   JOHN GILLESPIE,
Wat Cumberland.
LESLIE J. ASTON
DUNSMUIR    AVENUE
I
Shoemaker
REPAIRS NEAT and PROMPT
Prices in Line with the Times.
fl      FIRE   INSURANCE      j
Usance Compa„y, I
0 0
5        (Fire and Automobile,) and        j
§ National Fire of Hartford, 0
	
FOR  RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO
EDWARD   W.   BICKLE
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BUG.,
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND
Price $3.50
GUARANTEED  FOREVER
"Ask the woman who owns One."
For sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
—5
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7,30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
,   "Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev, Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 4th Sunday after
Trinity:
No Morning Service. Vicar at
Sandwick.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evening.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load. Cash or. Delivery. Phone
95 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphopliones
Novelties, Toys, Etc
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
0»Oi>CK»OI<OHOIIO<«OI)O>)Ot.O(«OS)OIIOtlCXIOl!O!)O>lO!.-----* ****9
Many Hands Handle Your Calls.   I
Capable hands, but human. Sometimes, not often,
something goes wrong. We want to hear of it.
We are satisfied only with a system second to none.
The B.C. Telephone Company's shield is the sign
of superiqr service.
You can help to keep it so if you will. It is your
service, and prompt reports from you concerning
any defect in the apparatus or service are essential,
and are welcomed.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd  j
OW(soi«o>io<tos-o<»osta)Oiio.io<x*iotio<xxio.-a>!c*iOs.ota

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0224764/manifest

Comment

Related Items