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The Cumberland Islander Apr 12, 1924

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER1
Provincial Llbrarv     TnnllM ^S$jjH '..^f
i w
Provincial Library     Janl;23
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland Sews.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 15.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
IS YOUR FAVORITE LEADING MAY QUEEN CONTEST?
Draw Is Made
For First Round
Connaught Cup
——
At a meeting of the B.C.F.A., held
Saturday   night   in   Vancouver, the I
draw for the first round of the Con-1
i
naught Cup was set to be played on
May 10, two games being schedule:!
for that date as follows:
St. Saviours vs. North Vancouver
Elks.     South Hill vb. Ladysmith.       i
Other games were drawn aB follows :
Nanaimo Vets vs. Vancouver Elks. ■
Kerrisdale vs. Cumberland.     Nanaimo
City vs. Hotel Vancouver.     St. An.
drew h vs. Northfleld.     Victoria Vets '
vs. Nationals.
Winners of St. Saviours-North Van- j
couver Elks  game  to play Shelly's.
Winners of South Hill-Ladysmith I
game to play Davenport. !
No transfers are to be recognized j
before April 19, the next meeting of'
the B.C.F.A. to be held at the Travelers' Hotel, Ladysmlth on April 10.
It was decided the draw game at
Vancouver last Saturday between St. j
Andrews and Ladysmith be replayed at
Nanaimo on April 19 with Mr. Stokes
as referee, the linesmen to be selected
by the Up-Island Association.
In connection wlUi thc defaulted
Davenport Shield game between Cumberland and Nnnalmo City, the B.'.
F.A. on Saturday night decided contrary to cup-tie regulations in refusing Cumberland's appeal for additional expense money as the Davenport
Shield was being played on the cup-
tie system and under this system Cum ■
berland was entitled to actual expenses.
The meeting suggested to the Up-
Islond Association that they considered the playing of this defaulted
game on some future date.
BOOST TIIE  SCHOOL CANDIDATE
FANNY STRACHAN
Crucifixion To
Be Given Sunday
At St. George's
Stainer's Crucifixion will be rendered by the combined choirs of Holy
Trinity, Cumberland and St. John's
Courtenay, assisted by members of the
Presbyterian and .Methodist churches
of Cumberland, at S.30 on Sunday
evening, April the 13th in the (it.
George's Presbytorlan Church, Cumberland.
A hearty invitation Is ex'.eudel to
all. Mr. C. W. Slllence, of Royston
will be the conductor.
Exhibition Soccer
Game On Sunday
This week end, the local soccer team
being minus an engagement are staging an exhibition game on the Recreation Grounds, Sunday at 1 p.m. Tho
teams will be designated "A" and "B"
teams and will line up as follows:
"A" team—Blair, Stewart and Mon.
ohan, Hitchens, Mortimer and Brake,
Heyland, James Izakk. Horne and
Plump.
"B" team—Beveridge, Mitchell and
Wilkinson, Gough. Farmer and Jones,
Deluce, Turner, Graham Milligan and
McDonald.
BUSINESS MEN
OFFERED TROPHY
At the last meeting of the Upper.
Island Baseball League In Nanaimo
last Saturday, the Cumberland delegates offered the league a trophy to
be presented to the winners of the
league.
Mr. William Wain of the Royal
Candy store and Mr. Gordon Cavln
of Cavin's Shoe store were responsible for the offer. These two aggressive business mon were prepared to
put a trophy to the value of $50.
However, a cup has already been put
up and has been played for In the
past few years by Upper Island baseballers. ThlB is the Oranby Consolidated Mining Co. Trophy.
Inspector Of
Electricity May
Be Appointed
The attention of the regular meeting the City Coucil with a full Board
present, waa directed towards the appointment of an electrical Inspector to
avoid any further inspection trouble.
Aid. Mumford requested permission
to Introduce an Electric By-Law whicli
will provide for the appointment of
an electric Inspector. It was suggested that Mr. Edward Hughes be
asked to act in the meantime. On
motion Aid .Muml'ord's request was
granted.
Aid. John J. Potter, chairman of the
Board of Works, who guards the expenditure of that department, reminded Uie Council of Aid. Mordy's remarks In connection with the 1923
audit and stable accounts and wanted
to know why it had Increased The
chairman of the Board of Works produced the necesary figures in a comparative statement of stable account.
1922
auditor's  report
Stable expenditure for year as
per auditor's report  $448,47
Stable accounts unpaid for 1922 153.01
Total expedllure for 1922 $001."il
1923
Stable   account   disbursements
as  per  Auditor's   report $647.95
Outstanding stable accounts for
1922 paid   153.04
Total   $494.91
Stable expenditure for    1023    was
$106.60 less than in 1922.
Statement of outstanding Stable accounts paid in 1923:
1922
June  29th   to   Dec.  7th.  A.   It.
Kierstead  $ 59.01
Nov. 10, Can Collieries Oats and
Hay      48.i:>
Bee. 27, Can Collieries Oats and
Hay  ...:    43.51
Dec. 5th. W. Gordon 1 sack bran     2.00
Total   $153.01
Thomas Richard was present in
connection with the sale of tin* corner lot ImmedlitVely opposite Holy
Trinity Church. He failed to see
tbat the disposing of the lot would
cause a depreciation in the assessed
value of the land ln thnt portion of
the City and did not see any reason
for Aid. Mordy's restricted By-Law.
Mr. Richards, from what ho hud heard
said he thought the sale had some re
flection upon him as a law-abiding
citizen of Cumberland.
His Worship the Mayor assured Mr.
Richards that lt was nothing like that
and the By Law up to the present hud
not been Introduced.
Last Whist Drive
Of The Season
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Cumberland Branch of the G.W.V.A., announce their laBt whlst drive and
dance of the season whicli will be
held ln the Memorial Hall on Monday.
April 14th. Whlst 8-10. Dancing 10-
12. Refreshments served. Admission 50c.
Easter Treat For
Veterans' Kiddies
The Ladles Auxiliary of thc G.W.
V.A. will give their anniiul Easter
treat to the children of ex-service
mon, in the Memorial Hall on Wednesday, April 23rd from 3 to 6.
Anyone desirous of donating refreshments for this annual children's
celebration are requested tn get in
touch with any member of the auxiliary.
THANKS!
BOOST THE SCHOOL CiNPHUTI!
FANNY STBACHAN
The School Candidate's Campaign
Committee wish to thank all those
who donated candy and assisted in
making the sale a success. Over 3000
votes were cast In favor of the School
Queen. A further opportunity to
boost the School Candidate Is offered
tonight (Friday) In the Whlst Drive
and Dance ln the llo-Ilo. Come and
enjoy a good time. Help the Hospital—Boost the School Queen.
Plea To Conserve
Timber Along The
Island Highway
The tourist season is again with
us. That is easly discernible because
of the reawakening of the sentiment
that has prompted us in the past to
usk authorities at Victoria to take ac.
tlon to conserve a narrow strip of
timber along the Island Highway iu
sections where it hns not already been
cut or burned out. There have been
many arguments adduced pro and
con. A few days ago a discussion
of this subject took place and It' is
reproduced for the persual of those
interested in saving tlio appearance
of the landscape for the benefit of
tourists between here and Campbell
River.
The advocate of the idea had one argument, the inducement lt would be
for tourists to visit our district. Instead of looking at myriads of burned and blackened stumps the visitors
to our Valley would enjoy a trip over
a road boardered on each side by
stately Ill's and other evergreen. One
man ridiculed the proposal—not for
the sake of argument alone, but, he
mid, it Is Impractical and gave as hiu
reasons:
1. A narrow strip of timber along
the road would not stand—It would
be blown down. Trees grow ill large
tracts and in this way give each other
protection against storms.
2. The timber left standing would
probably have to be purchased as It
now belongs to private parties who
are not likely, to let it stand for sentimental reasons and would, ln case of
sale for the purpose, ask compensation
lo the full value of the timber.
3. The life of tlle fir tree is between one hundred and one hundred
and fifty years. Many of the trees
iu our forests are now rotting at the
tops. Would it not lie better to do
away with them and eliminate an e..e-
sore as distasteful to the eye as the
blackened stumps? This does not
mean that all the trees In our forests
are rotting, no one Is foolish enough
to think that.
4. The removal of the timber is Inevitable; therefore would It not he
easier to beautify the present wane
spaces by planting maple trees and
shrubs along the Island Highway. A
shrub that lends itself to this scheme
most admirably is the English Broom,
that will grow almost anywhere and
which will not become a pest, because
the seed does nol fly and cannot he
blown across country by the wind.
Nothing could be prettier than a hedgi
of broom along the Island Highway
with a maple tree every few yards
The broom seed would have to be imported to the district from Victoria or
elsewhere but there Is an ample supply of maple trees for the purpose.
The scheme is a feasible one and If
this district is to benefit to any great
extent from the tourist traffic, something of the sort will have to be dope
or the blackened stumps will remain
an eyesore from Merville to Oyster
River and farther. There seems to
be only one remedy for what has ill-
ready happened and that Is to find
something to take the place of wluil
"has gone before" and something that
more than likely will lu time be even
more beautiful than the tall standing
timber. it will never be done If we
sit down and write letters asking
others to do It for us. II can and
will be done only by community effort and a move made by those directly Interested.
OFFICE STAFF DANCE
The Office Staff of the Canadian
Collieries are holding a dance In the
llo-Ilo Ilnll on Tuesday April 15. The
proceeds will be used In connection
with the election of their May Queen
Candidate for the benefit of the Hospital. Everybody welcome. Gentlemen 75c. Ladies 25c.
Baseballers Plan
Big Parade For
Opening Game
Plana for a raffle and dance for
May 2 and a parade for the opening
league gome in the Upper Island
Baseball League May 11, were just a
few of the things discussed by the
Senior Baseball Club last week at its
two meetings.
As usual, the merchants of the city
have freely contributed to the raffle
and as a result over $110 has been
collected  in  prizes.      There  are  31
prizes  altogether  a  detailed   list  of
which is adverUsed    In    this    issue.!
Three teams are out in a race to see
which can sell Uie most tickets. J. W.!
Tremlett, who is chairman of the raffle committee has one team and Joe
Kirkbrlde  and  A.   S.   Denholme  are I
j the captains of the other two teams, j
I It is going to be a mighty race.     It
| may be worth mentioning here thut
| the proceeds of the raffle are expected to buy uniforms for the team.
May 2 has been set as the date for
the club's dance. It was tho original intention to hold a novelty dance
on this date but owing to tie Moose
Carnival May 7 this Idea was dropped
In order not to conflict with this fra-
ternal organization. Dave Richards
has been appointed floor manager for
the dance while Messrs J. Bono, Joe
Kirkbrlde and Jack HIU will act as ,
a gate committee. The fact that the
raffle tickets will be drawn at the |
dance should help to make lt a bump-
er one.
Saturday games are not practicable ,
here for several reasons so the Ilrst
league  game  falls   upon   a  Sunday. |
Secretary Deholme was instructed to
communicate  with  the  City  Council
for permission to hold a parade to pre-
cede the opening game.     It will be n
big feature and  added  attraction  to i
those ln the outlying district .
In the past with the exception of thc
.last two years it has been customary
to hold a baseball game at the May
Day Sports. Messrs Joe Kirkbrlde
and Alex. Denholme were appointed as
a delegation to attend the next meet-
of the 1924 May Day Celebration conl.
mlttee to try and arrange If possible
for a boll game at this year's sports.
Thc entire baseball club will attend
the meeting to assist the delegates in
their mission.
Royston Lumber Japs and Cumberland will shake the cobwebs off in a
practice game on the Recreation
Grounds Sunday at 3 o'clock. Complete arrangements have not been
made yet but it is known that Dave
Hunden will throw against the Japs.
KEEN COMPETITION
FOR PREMIER HONORS
IN LOCAL  CONTEST
CANDIDATES AND THEIR CAMPAIGN  MANAGERS ARE
PLANNING GREAT ACTIVITIES FOR COMING WEEK
MISS GLADYS  DANDO LEADING
The May Queen Contest is now fairly well under way, and in
about two weeks we expect to be full steam ahead.
During the week five of our candidates, for some reason, became discouraged and dropped out of the running. The remaining six girls aspiring for May Qieen are selecting their committees and campaign managers and expect to be down to real work
during the coming week.
Tonight (Friday) the supporters of Fanny Strachan, the
combined candidate of the Public and High Schools are holding a
whist drive and dance in the Ilo-llo Dance Hall in order to raise
funds for the purchase of ballots.
On Tuesday night April 15th the Office Staff of thc Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited are holding a dance in the Ilo-llo
Dance Hall, the proceeds to be used in connection with the election
of their May Queen Candidate.
On Thursday. April 17th thi friends, committees and managers of Florence Sehl, the Garni date of the Cumberland General
Hospital will give a midnight matinee at the Ilo-llo Theatre. It
is known as a riot in three act:;, by high grade artists from Nanaimo, including Miss Jean Pattsrson, the famous singer, Doug.
Manson, the comedian, Ossie Wardell and a chorus of Nanaimo's
prettiest girls. Those who know, say its a screem. This is to
boost the candidate from the hospital.
The end of next week we till expect to be ready for the fray.
The Islander takes a neutral stand.      For  lhe satisfaction of those that
Wc are supporting all the candldatea  «''« curious the ballot box Is securely
in the field in an effort to raise an
much money as possible for the Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland Gen
cral Hospital.     30,000 ballots are ills
fastened to an electric light polo ill
front of Lang's Drug Store, the key
being hold by the auditors of the campaign.
In the presence of the auditors, the
trlbuted   among   the   candidates   und   ballot  box   was  removed    from    Its
selling at ten cents each, If sold, will  stand to the office of the Manager of
total S3.000.
The ballot box established on Thur i-
day,  April   3rd,   was   opened   by   the
ilie'C'nnadinn Bank of Commerce and
opened, the ballots were removed care
fully sorted, scrutinized and counted
managers of the Royal Hank of Can-   hy one of the auditors and checked and
ada and thc Canadian Bank of Commence on Thursday. April loth.
Speed
Sale Of Work
End Of Month
'   EASTER HOLIDAYS
Most of Cumberland's stores will
close on Good Friday and Easter Monday, taking their usual half holiday
on Wednesday afternoon nf next week
and the week after, remaining open
on Thursday, the 17th April until 8
p.ni.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Anglican Church are holding
an afternoon tea and sale of work in
the church hall on Wednesday, April
30th, from 3 to 0. A feature of the
afternoon will be the Home Cooking
Stall. Vou are cordially Invited to
be present at the Hall on Wednesday,
April 30th.
HOSPITAL BALL
EASTER MONDAY
The Hospital Ball, under
auspices of the Women's Auxiliary to the Cumberland General Hospital will be held on
Enster .Monday from 9.30 p.m.
to 2 n m„ In the Ilo-llo Hall
Tickets 12.00 per couple, extra
lady 75c. Refreshments will
be served.
ing Car
Turns Over On
Royston Road
Pure luck wns the only thing Hint
saved a party of five boys from what
might hnve resulted in a very serious;
accident last Wednesday night when
thc Chevrolet enr in which they wero
riding, turned turtle on the junction
of the Royston-Cumberlaml road and
the Island  Highway, spilling its occupants in  the ditch on the side of
the road.
It appears  that Campbell  Morgan.
of Minto, hnd come up to Cumberland
in his father's car and had here picked  up four of his companions. Jack
.Marsden. James Adamson and Turn
i and liill Stanaway. whom he took tor
la short ride down the Royston rom'.      By easily trimming the Cumberland
On arriving at   Itoyston they derided   Junior.; in a replayed Allan Cup game
I to go out on the pier and turn their
. car but on second thought they turned
Lhe sharp corner with the intention of
going to Courtenay.
As he was speeding the driver lost
( control of the car nud swung, when
it wus too late, for the pier road with
the result that tha auto turned down
verified liy the other. The ballots
taken from tlio box have been placed
in a sealed canvas bag to be held for
future   reference if necesary.
Result of First Week Content
Balagno,  Josie      61S0
Dando.  Gladys     14010
.Mitchell, Beatrice     6730
Piketti.   .Mary    7710
.Sehl, Florence      3630
Sheppard,  Louisa      1120
Strachan,   Fanny       7SMJ0
Wilson,  D. E    2730
8 spoiled ballots.
Total Votes 50,180.
Kate Bono, Jessie Maxwell, Margaret Mossey. Louisa Sheppard and Dru-
sella 13. Wilson are not in the campaign for May Queen, having withdrawn during the pnst week.
Rangers Play
South-End Again
Ion the Recreation Grounds last Saturday by the score of five to nil the
! Bevan Rangers won the right to again
meet the South-End team of .Nanaimo
here this Saturday.
Don't miss this game as tho Inst ono
wus  a   hum-dinger    and    this    one
I slum hiu I   turn  oul   to be any  excep-
the steep  bank  at  that  part of the : tlon.     The kick-off is scheduled for
road and turned a complete somersault before it finally came to rest
: right shle  up ut  the bottom  of  the
4.80 o'clock so be sure to be on hand
to help the home boys on to another
victory and they wlll appreciate yur
hill.     To use the words of one of the | support  as  the Nanaimo aggregation
occupants,  when  they    wakened     up   is bringing up quite a crowd of fans
they   found   themselves   lying  in   the  to help them on. 25 cents admission
.grass around their wreck which had   will be charged at the gate.
ONLY A RUMOR
been a perefectly new car a few minutes before . All were lucky enough
to get off with a few bruises the only
serious case being a broken nose sustained by Bill Stanaway. The cutis now lying in Blunt's Garage, Courtenny. where it will have to be provided with a new top, windshield.
three new mudguards ,a new hood nnd
Five io one cleurly indicates the
trend of last week's play, all in till
winner's favor except for a few minutes al the beginning of the second
half when the Juniors bucked up for
a little while ,but it was only for n
little while. Micky Mitchell wns missed from the loser's line-up but it ii
probable that if he hnd been present
A rumor haa been going thc rounds
the last few days that Miss Beatrice
Mitchell has withdrawn from the Cumberland May Queen Contest. Th'.H
is quite erroneous as Miss Mitchell
and her supporters are working harder than ever to head the poll and respectfully solicit your patronage.
two lamps before it will be ready for I the winners would have been the same
the road again.
This ought to teach a lesson to the
speed maniacs that try to see how
many the old car can do but in this
case the road is partly to blame for
it Is the worst corner In the district
and ought to be fixed, for more than
one accident has happened there.
BOOST THE SCHOOL CANDIDATE
FANNY STRACHAN
ROOST THE SCHOOL CANDIDATE
FANNY STBACHAN
BOOST THE SCHOOL CANDIDATE
FANNT STBACHAN
a It bough the score may not have been
so large. Campbell, Watson, Marshall and Strachan did all the scoring
and everyone was a sure goal, being
placed exactly where the scorer meant
It to go. Taking the series nn s whole
no doubt remains that the best team
finally won out and Saturday's game
— ■  I clearly showed that when it comes to
BOOST THE  SCHOOL CANDIDATE  honeM-to-goodiim football the Haig
FANNT STBACHAN j ers nre there wltk the reeds. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL  12.  1924.
News Of Campbell
<i   River
PLANES PASS OVER
CAMPBELL RIVER
CAMPBELL   RIVER,—The   American Aeroplanes which are attempting
a (light around the world, left Seattle
on Sunday morning last, on the second lap of their journey, pastng over
Campbell Kiver about 11.30 a.m. The
next base being established is Prince
Rupert. It was really a most impressive sight, the huge planes flying
fairly low and the marking on the
machines being quite visible.     Three
\m
s:
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastry
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired palates and awaken sleepy appetites,
Fresh every clay.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Doughnuts
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Our Cream Cakes and Rolls are Delicious.
Hot Pies
Once you try them you always prefer them.
Hot X Buns
Place your order now
and don't be disappointed.
passed together, the fourth following
about half an hour later.
It is not an uncommon sight to
see planes at Campbell River, as the
Forest Branch make constant use of
sea planes from the Jericho Beach
Station, both for tire protection purpose and timber inspections, and tbe
planes frequently laad at Campbell
River during the summer months; but
these American planes are the largest
that have yet been observed from here
Prince Rupert will be used as a
base for the British planes on their
round the world flight, and no doubt
it will be possible to observe them
also when they pass on the journey
to Vancouver,
GIRLS STAR ON
SOCCER TEAM
CAMPBELL RIVER.—Saturday, tbe
5th April will be long remembered In
the minds of the young people of
Campbell River as the day of tbe
keen football contest between Campbell River School and Merville. The
result of the game was 3-1 In favor
of Campbell River. Reg. Masters
was  referee.
One feature of the game was, that
owing to lack of boys, two girls, Janet
McKenzie and Merla Glanvllle. played
for Campbell River, in the position o!
backs and proved themselves a defence that the Merville boys, who were
altogether heavier than thc Campbell River boys, could not break down.
Ralph Haigh, Arnold Wickstrom
and Reggie Pidcock scored the three
goals for Campbell River and Captain
Shaw scored the goal for Merville,
The game was fairly even and the.
combination displayed by both sides
was good. .Merville, however, was
weak in defence aud also missed two
penalties, one in the ilrst five minutes of play and tbe other in the last
few minutes of ihe game.
Lome Higgins distinguished himself as goal-keeper for Campbell River and had it not been for his good
play, tbe score might have been much
different.
The Campbell River team entertained the Merville players to dinner
at the Willows Hotel after the game
aud arrangements have been made for
a return match to be played at Merville in two weeks time.
MAY OPEN CLAIMS
AT BUTTLES LAKE
CAMPBELL    RIVER,—Mr.    .lames
Cross left for Vancouver oil Wednes
day morning, where his attendance
has been required by certain internationally known mining Interests In
connection with certain claims in the
vicinity of Cutties Lake.
It is reported that the sum of $ir>,-
(lOQ.OO will he spent this summer III
development work, and lt the result
warrants, a concentrator will be constructed and the mines, which comprise Gold, Silver and Copper, will
be fully worked njid a large number
of men employed.
lt lias been often stated that tlio
mineral resources ot British Columbia
have only been scratched at, and It
would seem that th© truth of this
statement Is amply bourne out by
recent developments. At nny rate
It is welcome news to know that almost unlimited capital is available
for the development of mineral claims,
which are located almost right at our
door.
IS TAKING WELL
EARNED HOLIDAY
CAMPBELL RIVER,—Mr. Jack 011-
Us, mechanic with the International
Timber Company is taking a few
days of a well earned holiday. Mr.
Gillls while coming from the "only
Island there is." is a.u old timer In
these parts and has a host of friends.
Jack has the reputation of being one
of the best locomotive engineers on
the const. He also at one time held
the swimming championship of his
home town .where he ls affectionately
known as "Suffering Cats,' and it
might also be mentioned that ho is
an expert at the tricky art of handling a canoe. Jack reports the waters
of the Lower Campbell Lake as a little chilly for the time of the year.
STAGE LINE
CHANGED HANDS
- fflgMBMBBiaiBlBiiDIBI
atT~~"
a^rggfibitjEgafjiaiEHBri
THEILOILO
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 11-12
"THE
BUZZARD"
See the most remarkable scene ever taken,
of a herd of Reindeer in a mad stampede.
that
mm>
*   *THE BLIZZARD"*
WILLIAM FOX special protiKCfiot
Extra 4 Reels
Of Comedy
The leader of the herd is seen stepping gingerly
into the icy waters of the river then striking out
with the vast herd following him, then terrified
by the blizzard they break and run.
A powerful story, a raging blizzard and a terrifying snowstorm make this one of the outstanding
pictures of the year.
including Extra 4 Reels
"SLOW AND SURE" Of Comedy
Al St. John Comedy
"GETTING  GERTIE'S GOAT"
and a novelty reel which is a modern version of several old favorite songs.
MATINBE
SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
 DANCE	
SATURDAY NIGHT
9.30
MATINEE
SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
-NEXT MONDAY AND TUESDAY—
"THE  DRIVING   FOOLw
Here is one of the fastest pictures ever screened. You will   see Wally Van in a mud
dash from Coast to Coast to save his Father's fortune.
You will see him come face to face with the hazards placed in his way by the crooks
who try to keep him from accomplishinghis purpose.
 Extra I Reels of Comedy	
NEXT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
Charles .lone* Last Chapter
in of
"CUPIDS FIREMAN" "THE RADIO KING"
—NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY—
'ROB    ROY"
MAY 5.6-7
For love of a woman and to save a friend
"SCARMOUCHE"
MAY 5.6-7
m
New
Shoes
At   New
Prices
Men's Solid Leather Work Shoes   $4.50
Men's Miner Pit Shoes, new price $1.50 and .... $5.50
Men's Fine Dress Oxfords, in Brown, a nice easy fitter,
and good wearer     New price  $6.50
Men's Fine Dress Bals, in Black or Brown, in the new-
toe.    Priced to sell at $6.50 and $7.50
Boys' Strong Solid Leather School Shoes—if you want
value for your money, here it is at $2.95
The same thing in Youth's sizes, 1 to 5's $3.95
Boys' Fine Calf Shoe in Brown Calf, priced at $3.75
and  $4.95
Ladies' Oxfords, Brogue style, low heels, suitable for
Misses and Ladies' Z'.'.i to 7's $4.50 and $5.90
SEE OUR WINDOWS FOR OTHER LINES
AND PRICES
Frank   Partridge
THE  CASH    CLOTHING   AND   SHOE    STORE
Cumberland Opposite Post Office
CAMPBELL RIVER,—The new proprietor of thc Campbell River-Court-
cnay Slagc Line took over the business on Saturday last.     Andy Flawso
will remain on  the Job with Mr. R.
Ritchie.     The people of this district
will  certainly  miss  Frank  and  Mrs.
Lalonde who for several years have
operated the stage line, and who by
their never failing courtesy and many
kindnesses hove endeared themselves
lo everyone.     The best wishes of thc
whole community go  with  them  for
their future success.     Frank was al-
[ ways on the job.     Thc only time he
ever missed the trip to Courtenny was
. the  winter  of  1922   when  thc  snow
J was so deep it was physically Impos.
: slble to make the journey, although at
. this time one trip wns made that took
thirteen hours and another that took
eight hours. »,
TOURISTS ALREADY
CAMPBELL RIVER.--Thc hotel at
Forbes Landing Is now open and several visitors have already registered
there, one party of tourists from Toc-
oma Wash., and another party from
Vancouver having arrived this week.
It is expected that there will be large
Influx of tourists this season and
every preparation has been mado at
Forbes for their reception.
Mr. R. L. Cobb, Superintendent of
the International Timber Company
returned from Vancouver and Seattle
on Wednesday. He reports that the
lumber market la showing signs of
Improvement and it Is expected thnt
conditions will be normal again In the
very nenr future,
"STAR"
The 27   Feature   Car
TOURING CAR
ROADSTER
COUPE
SEDAN
Taking the "Guess" out
of Automobile Buying
In the past most cars hnve been bought
blindfolded
Paint, sidewalk reputation and glib salesmanship sold cars—and sold is the word-
as many a motorist secretly acknowledges.
To-day the man who buys a car wants
facts—definite facts, comparative farts,
proven facts—ond he is entitled to them.
Proof?—Walk Into any Star Denier and
just say: "27 feature reasons," and you will
be In for the most instructive ond profitable
ho If hour you ever spent.
Facts? Yes—27 and more, and every one
of vital interest  to the man  whose motor
purchase hns heretofore been largely a matter of guess work.
Built lo this Idenl—the Lowest Priced
High Grade Car iu the world—The Star
Car—with Its characteristic handsome
lines, its distinctive radiator design—plus
its 27 feature reasons—is the logical buy
for the man of modest income, whose motor
investment must pny satisfaction dividends.
To-day—step Into a Star Show Room—
and a Star dealer will quickly show you
how most of the "guess" In automobile buying ls eliminated lu purchasing a Star Car.
Meredith Bros, and Bell-Irving
Phone 182
Day or Niffht
"STAR" DEALERS,  COURTENAY
Box 121 SATURDAY. APRIL 12, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
le.
v
PAGE THREE
PHSISIHISiaiBMHBJiM
Pure Beer—
AND
U.B.C. Beer
WE MAKE FREE DELIVERIES TO YOUR HOME.
WHY NOT ORDER A CASE?
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This sdvertleement ls not published or dlsnlnyec' by the Liquor Control
Bosrd or by the Government of British Columbia.
Deeds Speak Louder Than Words
The following is one of many unsolicited testimonials received:—
Gentlemen ;—
Re Policy No. 6572.
Your cheque for $521.00 was duly received last
week, and please accept my best thanks for same. I
also have appreciated the very liberal addition that was
made to the face value of the policy.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) Walter Needham.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
. Waterloo, Ontario.
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
SIDE LIGHTS AT OTTAWA
CHINESE  IMMIGRATION
'. In June last an act was passed entitled "Chinese Immigration Act 1923"
It was Intended to be a practical Act
of exclusion ot Chinese; all Immigration was restricted, except coming
under these heads:
1.   Members ot Diplomatic Courts
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite llo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBEKLAKD,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKRK1FIELD;    I'lvurinior
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, D. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine —
For reservations Phone 10.
K. YATES. Manager.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
Olllce: 159 Cumberland
'—f—iml
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, 0. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuts,
day
medical wm »ra»Bir.
Hours: 1.80 to 6.80—7 to 6p.m.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confactlona arrive ever/
two weelei, emurlng freih goods
all the time.
Henderson's
!    SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTMNDMENTS
PRCIMmONS
Vftua-ut, tmr«terv«4, »urvtytil
i.'rwwu ittntio mil}' b* |tr*-*mpt«d by
British tubjwti ovsr it >•»« of «f«.
in* by ulleiii on dtulai-tt.f Initiation
to bttwin* Biltidh •ubjtt:te, eenftl-
i ii'Mftl upon r«iid«!io«, eouup»t.#n.
*u4 inprerernvhi tv*r »g lioulturil
purpotM.
Kuil  Infoi'mallei. aouctrnlm regu
arfunt   rewarding    pr*-«mpUoaa    la
I'Usn In BtilJeriu N«. 1, hand Sarlw.
"How  :« I'ra-nmiH L*ml."  nopUi of
rvhirli can bt obtaintil tree ot obarfft
-r ai.di-aialnf rh« Dapartmsnt of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any 0»v-
i ninaiit Afsnt.
Rtiortl* will ba irantaa uovarlng
• >nly land lultabla for agricultural
i.urpoiti, and winch la  not  MrAbtr-
*m1,  ..«., carrying over u.000 board
faat par aer« waat i>f tha Coaat fUage
and  ».!»»«  l>*t  par aoro *m%\  of thai
Kanga.
AMplltailom  for  jut-anipilon* ara
11 ba addifstfd to tha l*und Com-
rilaakmar of tin* l^iui IWoiding Dl
lil'tn, In which tha land app.la4 lot
la altuatod, and ara mad* on prtotad
forma, cupiti of which uan ba ob
»in#fl fi'oni tha Land ('ommiisionar
Pra-empttona muKt l»* m-'-jpfad tot
flva jcmi'i anil Impnn anuMita m*d«
tu vaiuc of |nt per aero, including
<laarliig and oulttvatlnf at taaat live
aorta, haf on* •> Crown Orant can b«
♦calrad.
For mora dauilad Information aaa
ha Huinrnii ".low to Pra-ompt
La* it."
PUROHA«
Applicatluna ara racalvad for pur-
uhaaa nf vacant and unraaarvod
Crown landa, not bain* ttmbarland.
for agricultural purpoaaa; minimum
prloa of fjrat-olata (aimblo) land la |l
par awa, aud aacoi.d-claaa (graiing)
iand fa.fin par aura. P'urthor Information ragardlng purohaao or Laaaa
Of Crown landa la flvan In Bullotln
No. Lo, Land Harlao, "Purohaao and
Laaia nf Crown Landa."
.Milt, taotory, or Industrial oltaa on
Mmhar land, not oxcoadlng 41 aoroa,
may ha porobaati or laaaad, tha eon-
lit ious Including paymant of
alumpagt.
HOMMITB LIASES
l naurvayad araai, not oxoaadlng 10
aoraa, may ba laaaad aa homaaKaa,
cr.udlrtonal upon a dwolllng balng
aractad In the Aral year, title balng
obtainable after realdanue and Improvement oondltlona aro fulfilled
and land haa bean surveyed.
LEASES
For graaiug and industrial purpoaaa araai not exceeding IO aoraa
may be leased by one person or a
company,
GRAZING
Under tha Uraxlng Act tha Prow
luce la divided Into grazing dlotrlcts
and the range admlnlaterail under i
Orating Commissioner. Annual
grating permits are iMiird bated on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stnok-owntrs
may form association* for range
instalment. Free, er partially free,
permits aro available for aettlers,
oaaaara  aad   travellers,   up   te   ten
nnd their servants, and Chinese born
hi Canada.
2. Bona tide .Merchants.
3. Students.
There was a clause in Section 9 of
the Act by which the Minister could
authorize admission of any Chinaman
without being subjects to tho provt-
lions of this Act
There was also a provision In the
Act dealing with any Chinese landing
in Canada within throe months of the
passing of the Act, that they would
ome in under the old Act, paying the
usual Head Tax; this was provided for
Chinamen who might beVni their way
.hen the Act came into force.
It was asserted by the opponents
jf tho Government that the Bill was a
nitre eamothige, and was deliberate!,
drawn in such a loese way ns to admit a lttTKe number of Chinese, and
'hey specially pointed to Section J),
saying that under this Section tho
Minister could bring in any quantity
of Indentured labor, regardless of the
fact that a similar clause has always
been in the Act to take care of a few
very exceptional cases.
What are the facts?
In reply to questions asked by A. W.
.,'eill in the House on March 6th., the
.Iovernment stated that four hundred
nd  fifty-five  Chinamen  had  entered
Canada since the 30th of June last
,vhen the Act came into effect.
Of these however, four hundred and
thirty eight came In under the olu
Act within three months of thc passing of the new Act; of course, this
will never .occur again. This only
leaves seventeen to be accounted for
under the new Act.
Of these seventeen, ten were Chinamen returning to Canada who had
been residents here. One was admitted as servant to the Chinese Consul.
Five were admitted as students going
to attend the University, and one was
admitted under Section it referred to
above. The facts concerning this
one are, that he was a Chinaman being
educated at Berkeley College, California, and wa.s coming here for
few months, to study some point In
connection with our Canadian Universities; he could hardly qualify as
a student as he was not going to attend regularly any University, therefore he was allowed in under the provisions of Section !* for a limited period and left again in about five months
later.
So that under the new Act since tho
Siith of June last, only six Chinamen
have really entered Canada, five of
whom arc students and must return
at the etui of their college period, and
tlio other one is attached to the suite
of the Consul and must return with
him. This looks like genuine Chinese exclusion. The only matter for
regret is that the word "Oriental" was
not used in place of "Chinese" so ns
to include the Japanese. The question of their immigration will he
dealt with in a later article.
CHARGING HERD OF
REINDEER FLASHED
FOR PICTURE SCENE
NOTICE DIFFERENCE
IN WAY YOU FEEL IN
14 HOURS OR LESS!
Make thin test! End suffering from
Indigestion, Pimples, Pains ill Dack
and Sides, Constipation, Headaches
and tired, rundown condition, due to
Self-Poisoning because of sluggish
liver and clogged Intestines at this
time of year.
Take a pleasant spoonful of Dr.
Thacher's Liver and Blood Syrup afler
the next two meals. In less than 14
hours notice quick difference in way
ou feel. Contains pure vegetable
ingredients  approved   by   Physicians.
.Helps nature cleanse and tone your
liver—strengthens your digestive organs—soothe lhc tired and overtaxed
nerves, brace up your system anil purify your blood. It has helped thousands feel return of strength, vigor and
energy again. You. too. must be satisfied, or no cost.
Dr. Thacher's Is sold and recommended by Lang's Drug and Book
Store In Cumberland and by lcadiim
druggists in every city and town.
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYOH.S TO
HIS MAJESTY
KING OEOK.GE V.
Reputation Cannot Be Assumed.
It Must Be Earned.
ft
gHADIAtf (Big,"
WHISKY
have been popular in Canada
for over half a century.
They are the same in quality
today as they ever were.
They are thoroughly matured in Oak Casks.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram walker & sons, limited
WALKERVILLE - ONTARIO
Montrttl. Que.
Distiller, of Fine
Whiskies, ince 11S8
London. Eng.
New York, U.S. A.
This advertisement if not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government ol British Columbia. w ,
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
Broken Antlers and Bleeding Heads
Prove Realism uf "Shots" In
Fox Drama
Broken antlers, smashed off at the
base, leaving bleeding stubs. Indicate
thc realism of the reindeer stampede
scene in the William Fox production
"The Blizzard." which comes lo the
Ilo-llo Theatre, Friday and Saturday.
The picture is an adaption of the
story by Selma Lagerlof. Swedish winner of the Nobel prize for literature,
called 'The Story of a Country House.'
One of the most remarkable scenes
In the production Is that of a blizzard in l.apland, during which a great
herd of reindeer stampedes ln terror.
Origlnatally, this "shot" was caught
for the news cameras, but It so lilted thc story that It was Included as
part of the picture.
.Mary Johnson, known ns the "Pick-
ford of Europe," has the leading role
in "The Blizzard," in which she Is
supported by a cast of talented Swedish performers.
Iu the stampede scene, the milling
reindeer crash into underbrush, Interlock horns and in their terror ,pile In.
to a half frozen stream, one upon the
other, while the cameras catch every
movement of their progress.
VVALLY VAN MEETS
MANY HAZARDS IN
CROSS COUNTRY RACE
In "The Drlvln' Fool," the scheduled
six reel feature coming to the Ilo-llo
theatre on .Monday and Tuesday,
Wally Van, Ihe star .makes a cross
country automobile drive from San
Francisco to New York. Many times,
while going over the snow-topped
Rooky Mountains, Wally, with the
help of Horatio St. Albans, his dusky
partner from a south sea isle, was
forced to cut his way through heavy
snow drifts which had completely
covered the road. This, of retiree,
was a great disadvantage to Van as
he was out io set a record for the trip
as well as for the picture. While on
Ihe Lincoln Highway, about the half
way mark, Wally was bumming along
between fifty-five and sixty when just
he., ond a turn In the road he spied a
hay wagon which made 1! .mpcsslulu
for him to pass. It was useless to
apply the brakes and Wally's only alternative was to drive off the road.
He did, bul he didn't notice a ditch
and a few hours later, when Van and
Horatio regained their senses and
started their journey once more, they
found the same hay wagon "filling"
thc road some hundred feet ahead of
them, We feel safe in- saying tliat
Wally waited for It to turn off the
highway before he attempted to pass
It again.
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer
see
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 167, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR  NEEDS   WILL  RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting iih Boat at Union Bay
every Sundi.y Morning. Leave Cum-
b'rlnnd Hotel, 8 o'clock.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Pricea to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office MM Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
DR.  R.  B.   DIER  AND  DR.
W   .BRUCE   GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Ofllee:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite llo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 12,  1924.
INTERNATIONAL
BROADCASTING
RADIO ENGINEERS
Westinghouse and Metropolitan-Tick.
ers Engineers In Greatest Modern
Time Achievement
Marking an epoch in the history of
radio  engineering,  world  wide  radio
broadcasting   was   achieved   on   the
night of December .11. 1923, when H. I besides being transmitted on a wave-
P. Davis, Vice President of the Weet-   length of 326 meters for local rec-;;'-
inghouse Electric and Manufacturing
Company, transmitted New Year's
greetings that were heard in many
lands from KDKA, thc pioneer broadcasting station of the Westinghouse
Company at East Pittsburgh. Pa.,
U.S.A.
For the first time in history' It was
possible by means of the spoken word
that such a message be sent to the
peoples of so many nations. This
marvelous achievement was made possible through radio broadcasting repeating.     The message from KI/KA,
B.C., The Good Roads Province
KNOW HCW To     )
lUnjitoMis y
IN B.C'
IWwH-
tlon, was Bent out on a wavelength of
100 meters and was picked up, amplified, aud repeated by the Metropolitau-
Vtckers Electrical Company's radio
station at Manchester England and by
the Westinghouse repeating station at
llastiags, Nebraska, U.S.A.
Mr. Davis in his message said;
"That the means of communication
have been greatly advanced during
the past year is liily shown by ihe
fact that I am able to speak directly
to you, the great masses of population
of other nations across an intervening ocean. This achievement wlll
ultimately result In making America's
dally events known to you und your
every day happens known to us.
"A year ago such an achievement
seemed beyond belief. With such
advancement In the radio art an es-
i tahllshed ract ,no man dare predict
j what developments will take place
before another New Year.
J "It Is a wonderful thing for tho
■ world,—this achievement which en-
1 ables the peoples of one continent lo
! listen in' on the activities of tho
i peoples of another continent,—for the
! friendship of nations is founded on
I closer understanding among the var-
< Ious peoples and in no way can dif-
! ferent nations understand each other
I and become more closely in touch with
; each other than by Improved means of
; rapid and accurate communication.
! "It Is also fitting that Westinghouse
j station KDKA. the pioneer broadcast-
: Ing station of the world, should be th?
! first station to develop a means for
1 the repeating of Its programs to you.
1 the peoples of other continents, for it
i was here, and by this Btation. from
which I am now sending this message.
I that radio broadcasting was first un-
' dertaken. This feat Is only another
I progressive step ln the development
j of this great utilltv."
T
ii
Wsy Urn! PrwdominatM
Many Reasons From Many Users
If you were to ask the next fifty
Ford owners you meet why they
prefer Fords, you would get a
wide variety of answers.
Some would say, "Because they
seem never to wear out j" others
would answer, "Because they
cost so little." Many would reply
"Because I can get service anywhere;" and just as many,
"Because it is the only car I can
afford to own."
All would tell you, "Because they
master a bad road inany weather,"
a woman driver would respond,
"Because I can drive it so easily."
From the fleet-owners you would
hear, "Because I can buy two or
three or four Ford Trucks for the
price of one big truck.
Wherever you might inquire you
would hear expressed these basic
reasons why Ford predominates
—why, year after year, Ford sales
equal the total sales of all other
cars combined.
See Any Authorized Ford Dealer
CARS   -   TRUCKS   .   TRACTORS
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
W. T. GOARD
PIANO Tl'NKH
From
9
sum
to
11
p.m.
25
From
11
p.m.
to
J
a.m.
22
Ask for Geo. Maton.
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co..
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
1 J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTOBIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
an Vancouver leland. We Clean or
Oft all kinds of Ladles' anil dents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work  and   Serrlce
WIU Please You i:    it
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
V1CTOBU, B.C.      -      Phone SJO*
The Passing of Coal and Bunk
goes, yet ever changing, ever new.
There are still some among us, grey
haired men they are, who remember
the clipper ships whicli years ago
forced the galleon from the sea. and
the grea' four-masted barques that
are now seen only in island trade on
souther* seas, but these men are
the privileged few. Except for a
few schooners which ply the fishing
banks, Ihe sailing vessels have gone
the way of all things, and in their
place we see the steam driven vessels, gigantic, palatial, and so differed in almost al! their aspects
from the wind propelled vessels as
tn almost belie their origin. There
came eoai. Goal revolutionized the
shipping industry. As the marine
engine was improved upon and developed, this commodity became
more and more in demand until it
became a necessity. Larger ships
were designed and operated than
ever befure; they became more spacious, commodious and faster than
ever before. Cabins were improved
upon, the sleeping bunks could be so
arranged as to ensure privacy lor
the occupant; the state room was
evolved
And sn the shipping world goes
on. Oil is nnw coming into its own.
The navies of the world are converting their older war ships into
oil burning vessels and designing
many of the additions to fleets for
the use of oil; and for some years
past the steamship companies of all
nations have been turning their attention te oil as well as lo coal supplies and resources.
The Canadian Pacific Steamship
Company early appreciated the advantages offend by oil, and the
'a lest conversion to be announced bv
IOP LEFT-A COST PRIVATE SITTING-ROOM ON THB "EMPRESS 0»
FRANCE." RlfiHT-A CORNER OF THE ROYAL SUITE ABOARD THB
VESSEL, WHICH IS SEEN ABOVE BEING ASSISTED INTO HER BERTH AT
QUEBEC.    RIGHT—A  CONVERTED  CABIN.
had two berths are now rooms with
s single bed. Many of the rooms
that are equipped with the bedsteads
have also an ingeniously arranged
berth which folds into concealment
on the wall, thus affording accommodation for an extra member ot
desired.
Prance
the Company is that of the Empress
of France. This great liner has for
some time held the record for the
fastest voyage between the St. Lawrence and Great Britain, and it is
anticipated that the time made on
the record trip will be beaten by
the Empress after her reconditioning.
Another important change is thc
ipi
replacement of all sleeping bunks on
the ship by regular bedsteads and
mattresses and the conversion of the
cabins into rooms similar to those
one finds in up-to-date hotels. Rooms
which were formerly four-berth
cabins are now equipped with two ,
brass bedsteads, while cabins that]"?'
the family party  when so c
This ship, the Empress of
has been chosen to cruise around-
the-world in 1925 under the Canadian Pacific management.. It will
sail eastward from New Vork on
January 27th and during its five
months itinerary will be the only
object in many an ancient port lo
exemplify the last word in modern-
Women you envy
have only this secret
You, too, may employ it to keep the
radiance and bloom of youthful skin
Radiant, with the charm of
youth still theirs, millions of
elever women are admired—and
envied 1—today.
Yet they have no difficult, hidden secret—no great gift.
Only ftis simple method—
which is for you, too. To give
you, as well, the charm you envy
in them.
for tne week do this
Cleanse the skin regularly, au-
V.lurnt aud
efficiency
produce ISc
quality for
thoritics say, to keep your complexion lovely, radiant, youthful.
But beware of harsh cleansing
methods. They injure skin.
Wash thoroughly with
Palmolive Soap—each night before retiring. Rub the creamy,
foamy lather well Into the tiny
pores. Rinse — and repeat the
washing. Then rinse again.
Then—if skin is dry—apply a
little cold cream. That is all.
Skin so cared for is not injured
by cosmetics, by wind
and sun, or by dirt.
The simple, correct way
t You cannot find a more effective beauty treatment. Because
Palmolive Soap is blended of
rare palm and olive oils—famous
for mild but thorough cleansing
qualities since the days of Cleopatra. And it is inexpensive, to
that thousands now nee
Palmolive for the bath.
Make sure that you get
Palmolive — which is never sold
unwrapped. All dealers have it.
(jet it, and try for one week this
simplest of all treatments. See
how delightfully and how quickly
it benefits vour skin.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA,
LIMITED
Winnipeg Toronto Montreal
Palm and olive oils—nothln/ else-tin
Naturt't treen color to Palmolive Soap
MADE IN CANADA
GARDENERS REQUIRE
PERMIT TO IMPORT
With  thc arrival of the seed and
now in
bulbs catalogues the amateur begins ]'">«>• whereby all Importers of plants
to make his plans for the gnrden and! from any country are required to se-
groundB and to prepare a list of j cure a permit to be presented to the
plants thnt he intends to buy.
the shipment is cleared. Permits are
required for the Importation of trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, greenhouse
plants, roots, perennials, eornns,
bulbs, etc. Copies of the regulations
aud information regarding permits
may he secured by writing to the Secretary, Destructive Insect and Pest
Act Advisory Board, Department of
Collector of Customs at the port where  Agriculture, Ottawa.
order to avoid disappointment ln securing the prompt delivery of shipments of plants from the United
FOREIGN STOCK | gtatea „,. othel. countries, he is reminded of the regulations SATURDAY, APRIL  12.  1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W BICKLB
SATURDAY,  APRIL  12,  1924.
HAIL, GENTLE SPRING
The miracle of Spring ls again at
hand aud happiness abounds tor most
of us, if only we wlll open our hearts
and invite her In. Hut humanity Is
all too, prone to grouch, lo grumble,
to complain, to rail al what lt terms
Injustice and evil fate.
Murder, vice, greed, provorty, sor-
row -these are abundant symptoms
of social disorder, but the world Is
gi.od and tiie Spring is at hand. Let
u.i wander alter the birds; let us go
lit search of blossoms.
'Ihere Is more health than of disease, more of comfort than of distress, more of beauty than of ugliness, more of kindness than of cruelty, more of laughter than of tears.
We live in the greatest age tho
world has known. Tho average man
In the street, with his present knowledge and experience, would have been
accepted us a god ln any other age.
We rend at night by the soft glow
of scientific sunlight; we go to the libraries and get the best the world affords in literature; we listen to tho
harmonies of the great masters reproduced by the phonographs In our
own homes; education ls ours for the
asking; we drink pure water drawn
from a faucet In the wall; we cat pure
foods put up In clean cartons and
brought to the kitchen door; we call
our [ilends through the telephone and
listen to eerie minstrelsy caught from
the wireless currents of the air; we
hnve learned much of the story of the
stars, the rocks and the flowers and
in this knowledge we receive a new
revelation of God.
And still we complain, Let
us turn to the beauty and fragrance
of the coming buds and blossoms Let
us start ln the morning and listen
for the song of the birds. Let us go
through the day to thc calm and solemnity of the twilight, with Its Invisible orchestral harmonies, on to
night, und thc dreams of night with Its
"sleep, that knits up the ravell'd
sleeve of care."
It ls a good world to live ln, and
through the brave pursuit of happiness we can make It ever and ever a
better world; for each houI that walks
wltll happiness, at last, becomes a
guide to some other soul, who, lu
turn, wlll Bhow another the beauty
nny Joy of the birds and the blossoms
at this happy time of tho return of
Spring.
gets as large n fee for calling on a
patient and writing a prescription as
he would If he dispensed his own medicines. He has the advantage of hospital service for his more serious
cases, and in the beginning he can get
along without a private conveyance,
or nt most with a cheap runabout,
because his driving is only on paved
streets. He has more leisure at Ms
command, and also the advantage of
consultation  when he desires it.
The country doctor Is a slave to his
profession. He must carry much in
the way of medicine. He is subject
io calls nt all times of the day and
night which necessitate long drives
over roads which sometimes are almost Impassable. His hours are |
long, and If he has any sort of practice, his life Is a strenuous one. Ilo
is dependent upon his own resources.
.Moreover, country practice lacks the |
glittering promise of great financial
success, although a liberal income and
an ultimute competence nre practically assured.
Despite   the  disadvantages   attending country practice, It would appear
that the young doctors who shy away
from It are making a mistake.   There
are other  than  financial  rewards  lu |
this life, and man., of these go to the
country doctor,     lie ls assured of a j
commanding social position and of a i
lite of usefulness, which endears him
to  hundreds  of families.      Ho faces
middle life and old   age   with   the
knowledge thai the friendship, conli-'
deuce and love of his fellows, will be
his throughout a   wide   community;
that he wlll always be a welcome addition to any circle;  that, he always
will be an honored guest at any fireside      (Ireat  wealth and wide fame
will not be his. but his comparative
financial and social standing will ho'
assured.
Ad. taken from The Hook—"All live
people read The Hook."—They surely
would not expect a dead one to read
It.
Epitaph: "He didn't have time to!
stop at the crossing; he has plenty of
leisure now."
THE COUNTRY DOCTOR
The tendency toward specialism in
medicine ls a matter that Is causing
grave concern among the residents of
rural districts.
The cities are congested with doctors, the majority of whom struggle
along with scant practice Into middle
age, but always buoyed up with hope
of great success and prosperity ln
their later years. In the city tbe
doctor Is relieved from the necessity
of carrying a full stock of drugs.   He
vfl\pmim
+ EYES Xft
IRRITATED BV ^*k\ '
SUN.WIND.DUST&CINDERS
JUT0MMINDIP iWlU tf DRUM I IIS t> OPTICIAN!
««»■ (01. (Ml If! CAM MSR  MURIMI MMlfMMU
gjGJJllfiiO&lc^^
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DEJITI8T
Willard Block
Phone 116 Cumberland
Res. Phone 70L Courtenay
sale!
SALE!
SALE!
MACARTHUR
in charge!
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
.'HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDBR
i
PAGE FIVE
JjOJZD, varied, colorful, effective and smart —
All compelling and irresistible are the Easter coats,
suits and dresses.
You've heard about the new style themes for 1924—
the sauve slenderness of the new silhouettes, the rich
smartness of the new materials, the latest interpretations
of the Parisian tailored vogue— ZNjnvyou can see them!
You will discover that this collection comprises an
infinite variety of trim tailored suits for Madame and
Mademoiselle, and coats and frocks of more formal
attributes, too.
And, your pleasure in the new tnd authentic spring styles will be actually
increased by the richness of material and the modest prices set upon them.
CAMPBELL'S
HOSPITAL     BALL
TO  BE  HELD
Easter Monday
In the Ilo-llo Hall, Cumberland
$2 per couple
Extra Lady, 75c.
KEEP   THIS   DATE   OPEN
J PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. APRIL  12,  1924.
igi!giHM(yiHHtaiaCiyisly.H ~—	
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
COURTENAY GOLFERS
TO PLAY QUALICUM,
COl'RTENAY,—The last two games
In the team competition were scheduled for last Sunday but only one was
played, being that between Mr, P. L.
Anderton and Mr. Joseph Idiens.
The former won. Dr. Briggs default
fit to Mr. George Tarbell. These results did not change the standing of
the two teams, that captained by Mr.
W, Shilcock retaining the supremacy.
An invitation has been received
from the Qualicum club asking the
Courtenay Golf Club to Bend Bit players to officially represent that club
on the links at Qualicum next Sunday.
Needless to say the invitation hai
been accepted and thc following players will Journey to the Beach summer
resort this week end: G. Pldcock,
president; Wm. Shilcock; Chas.
Drown; Dr. T. L. Butters; J; Steven
son and O. Tarbell. The links wlll
he thrown open to any other members
of the Courtenay Club who care to
take advantage of the Invitation. The
Qualicum Golf LinkB enjoy the enviable reputation of being one of the
finest on the Island and those who
avail themselves of the opportunity of
playing there next Sunday will have
nothing to regret.
The officers of the Courtenay Club
are In communication with the golf-
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
Made    from    Pure    Jersey
Cream.
IF ITS JAM
INSIST ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made from fresh fruit ln the
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
used In Its manufacture.
IF IT'S POTATOES
DBMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Grown in the District and
graded according to Govt,
regulations. "Look for the
tog on the hag."
IF ITS EGGS
OCRS ARI
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled and graded in accordant!* with the New Egg
Act.
OUR MILK DEPARTMENT DELIVERS MILK AND CREAM DAILY
Battery and Electrical
Repairs Is Our Speciality
Come To Us JVhen You Are In Trouble
Your Battery and Eleetrieal System should be looked after by an expert on Automobile Electrical trouble*.
We are Battery and Electrical Headquarters.
&225S
PHONE 99
Willard
PHONE 99
Sparks Co. (Courtenay) Ltd.
COURTENAY. B.C.
WILLYS-OVBRLAND AND WESTINGHOUSE   RADIO   DEALERS
ors at Powell River .who recently have ,
extended Uie course at the paper mill ;
town and it Ib likely thnt In the near
future some Inter-town games will be
participated ln.
The first games of this season tor
the Mutrie Cup wlll be played on Good
Friday the ISth at the Courtenay
Links. This course Ib in better shape
than last year and keen competition
is bound to be the order. The draw
resulted as follows:
The draw for play for the Mutrie
Cup has been made by the committee
and resulted as follows: The contestants wlll be P. Booth vs. Andrews;
Cooper vs. Moncrieff; Brown vs.
Brock; Dick vs. Briggs; Idlens vb.
Baker; \V. Booth vs. Field; 0 Brleu
vb. McPherBon; A. Aitken vs. Mc-
Ivcr; Shilcock vs. T. Graham; Burnett vs. Marshall; Anderton vs.
Hames; ABton vs. Sutton; C. Qraham
vs. Filberg; Pldcock vs. G. O. Graham;
W. R. Cooke vs. Sutliffe; Butters v.i.
Mutrie; Stevenson vs. H. Cooke; C. C.
i Graham vs. Hughes;    Pottlnger    vs.
I Dunbar; J. Aitken vs. Hornby; 7.
Heyland vs. Tarbell; Dundas vs. McLeod;   Holmes  vs.  competitor to he
| chosen. Play will start almost Immediately and thc officers request that
; competitors  get  together  and  make
' arrangements accordingly.
j    An  Invitation  has    been    received
| from the Nanaimo Golf Club asking
players of the Courtenay Golf Club
to visit them on Good Friday, the
18th instant. It ls more than likely
that some of the Courtenay members
will make the trip.
Three Native Soub of Canada, were
hosts at a whlst drive on Monday
night in Booth's Hall, when seventeen tables were required to accommodate the guests who had come to participate in the card party.
Winners of prizes were: Mrs. Lance
Berkley. Mrs. E. L. Macdonald anil
Miss Beasley in order named among
the ladies while Mr. Samuel Watson,
.Mr. W. McKnight and Mr. T. C. Woods
carried oil' the honors for the men.
After cards, refreshments were served
and a dance was enjoyed for an hour.
CITY COUNCIL HELD
A BUSY SESSION
1 COURTENAY.— Last Mondny night
the City Council held a regular rneet-
■ ing with the following members pre-
I .sent: The Mayor. Aldermen Fielder,
' Embleton. Pearse, Cooks, and Haft-
arty.
The reconnecting of the east and
west sides of the river water system,
replacing the hose that has been used
since thc washing out of the pipe line
ill thc river last autumn waa left in
abeyance.
The matter of extensions to the electric light line to Nob Hill, Comox, was
not discussed although lt was mentioned in meeting.
Two lots on Courtenay Avenue belonging to thc city were Bold to Mr.
Dnuncey .the purchase price being one
hundred dollars, to which Is added the
Increase In trades licenses for the
taxes for the current year.
A letter from .Mr. A. H. Lomas, Indian Agent, re a park site In the Indian Reserve was referred to a joint
committee of thc Board of Trade and
: City Council, who will report on the
subject.
Alderman Cooke brought before the
meeting tho proposal to widen Puntledge Avenue to allow free access to
traffic. Part of this road had been
fenced by Mr. Cokely who owned the
property. It was decided to follow
the original street line.
Mr, Charles Shannon, an enthusiastic worker on the comraittee.'haviiig
In hand the heautlficatlon of the school
grounds waited on thc council with a
request for the use of a team and
scraper for one day. The request was
granted.
A report of the city clerk showed an
first half of this year over thc same
period last year. In 1922 the amount
had been $565 and In 1923 the amount
collected had been $810. This showed a healthy growth In the business
'. section and there was no doubt that
the total receipts for the year will be
very substantially in excess of last
year.
The city constable was Instructed
to prepare a report re an open drain
on Anderton Avenue.
Mr. Spence Teed was appointed to
the position of road superintendent
by the committee of public works and
| will operate and have charge of tho
new truck, which it was stated is now
read.,  for use.
A discussion took place re the sat-
I ary of thc night policeman. Formerly the arrangement had been that the
1 council  paid  ten   per  cent,   and  the
, business houses the other ninety per
cent.     It waB reported that some of
■ the business houses had refused further payments.
A report was submitted of the visit
of Mr. Johnson, of tho General Co.i-
structlon Company ln  regard lo tha
■ paving of streets In the city. Mr.
I Johnson  had  gone  Into  the  subject
very thoroughly and would return to
the city in the near future and bring
figures of the cost of such work, based
on his observations when here last
week.
ST. GEORGE'S DAY
TO BE CELEBRATED
COl'RTENAY,—A meeting of the St.
Georges Day celebration committee
was held on Monday afternoon In tho
office of the secretary, Mr. R. U. Hurford. The toast list for the banquet
was arranged and includes the following: "The King," "The Empire," "Canada." "St. George and Merrle England"
and "The Ladles." Besides the banquet there will be a program Including Old English Folk dances, two
scenes from Shakespeare and nine
vocal and Instrumental numbers. Besides this Moody's orchestra will he
one hand to render music during the
banquet hour.
PAVING OF CITY
STREETS DISCUSSED
COURTENAY,-On Friday afternoon last a consultation was held b;
the mambers ot the city coucll and
business men of the city, with Mr.
J. Johnson, representative of the General Construction Company, of Vancouver, on the subject of the paving
of streets. This is a question that
has been In the minds of aldermen for
several years and is one that some
day will have to be solved. Mr.
Johnson went Into the subject very
exhaustively, advocating a road covering of asphalt concrete mainly because of Its economy and because of
Its wearing qualities. He cited a
portion of road ln the Point Orey section, where ln 1910 a mile of asphalt
had been laid and from that time not
one dollar had to be spent ln repairs. It will bt remembered that
last year there waa some talk of paving Union Bay Road and Union Street.
No action was taken but tho Information given by Mr. Johnson will be
rtry valuable when the time comes
to have the work done.
INGWALL BAGLOW
TO BE INTERRED
IN SASKATCHEWAN
COURTENAY.-Tho body of the
late Ingwall Baglow, who was killed
last Saturday at the camp of Messrs.
Lamb Bros., loggers of Menjlea Bay,
was brought to Courtenay and sent
hut Sunday to Buchanan, Saskatchewan, where his wife and seven children and parentB reside.
Baglow was struck by the butt of
a falling tree while at work. He was
thirty-six years and eight months old
aud had been nt the camp for only
a short time. Two brothers are employed at the same camp and another
brother resides at Vancouver. Funeral arrangements here were In tho
hands of John Sutton.
Visiting From Powell RItot.
Mr. 0. Russell, a former Courteu-
alan, now resident of Powell Rim,
was a visitor to Courtenay this week. SATURDAY, APRIL 12.  1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEX
<4
|!araH3iaEiajsiaiai?MaaEJfflaaraKi^^
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
"COUGAR" SMITH
AND W. STEWART TO
HUNT PANTHER
COURTENAY.—Cecil, well known
as "Cougar" Smith, aud Ronald Stew,
art, Provincial Game Warden in Ihe
Comox District, left on Monday morning for Campbell River where they
will board the Steamer Princess Beatrice and proceed to Nimklsh River
to hunt panther under the direction of
the Provincial Game Board. The two
experienced hunters and trappers wlll
be away for at least a month. Cecil
is not strong on publicity, so the following paragraph taken from a dally
paper printed on May 26th, 1918 will
be interesting to residents of the district:
"The town residence of Sir Robert
Borwlek, at 16 Berkeley Square, West
London, will he adorned with a huge
cougar or mountain lion, a victim of
his unerring aim during his recent
shooting and hunting trip to Campbell
River, Vancouver Island. Sir Robert
who recently arrived here from Japan
on a tour of the world, returned Sunday from the north. He enjoyed splendid sport and Is enthusiastic about tha
Campbell River District as n sportsman's paradise.
"He was fortunate in securing the
services of "Cougar" Smith, a noted
local guide. With the nid of dogs a
femnle cougar wus finally treed and
Furniture
Repairs and
Re-Upholstering
shot. After a search next day her
three cubs were tracked and captured,
but not without a struggle as the little ones scratched and fought with
vigor. They were brought to Vancouver. Two of them have be:n pre- {
seated by Sir Robert to thc zoo in j
Stanley park while the third will bo.
given to Victoria. Sir Robert stated
that he never enjoyed better trout j
lishlng In all his life than he oxper-1
ienced at Campbell River. He added I
that this country's diversified attrac-j
tions have only to become known to
become the rendezvous of sportsmen '
rrom every clime. Sir Robert's guide
shot a black bear on the recent hunt".'
From the foregoing It will be noticed
that "Cougar" Smith has generally
beeu successful In bringing In his
quarry. It i-; a certainty that If there
aro as many panther in the Nimklsh
country as has been reported there
will be more honors fall to the lot of
Air. Smith as the result of his present
trip.
Grand Council, Native Sons of Canada
wlll be held in Courtenay the first
week in June when It Is expected that
delegates from the twenty-three assemblies that have been organized ill
the Province will be in attendance.
Asseni lilies are now being organized
in Alberta and It Is hoped soon to ha\ e.
the whole Dominion organized .
FIRE LOSS HEAVY
That more than $1600 of a net loss
was sustained by Thomas Ecclestone
when IiIb home on Trent River road
was burned to the ground Is shown
after the visit of insurance adjusters.
in all branches
Old furniture made like new.    No job too small or too
large.    First class work at reasonable prices.
Pictures framed, Furniture repaired, Re-upholstering
W. Emeric
MASONIC BLOCK, COURTENAY
P.O. Box 2 Phone 177
NATIVE SONS
ELECT OFFICERS
FOR YEAR 1924
COURTENAY,—At the regular meet
lllg of Courtenay Assembly No. 3, Native Sous of Canada, the following
officers were elected to serve until the
lirst day of April 1925.
President, A. Cleland; 1st Vice-president, II. Radford; 2nd Vice-president,
] ii. Embleton; Secretary, Chas. E.
Beasley; Treasurer. C, S. Wood; Segt.
'■ at-Arms. Chas. Shannon; Inside
Guard, Walter Prltchard; Outside
Guard. M. W. Downey.
Tlle    annual    convention    of    the
*   McBRYDE'S BAKERY |
Try our 100 per cent Whole Wheat Bread, the only Q
«>      physical culture loaf. <$
X Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from -
X      which you know.
|
<$><S*S>;
f
Firat Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for
Bread   Making   guaranteea   the   quality.
NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD
The Holding-on-to Quality Shop.
The Courtenay Tea Room
LEADERS IN THE PIKET ELECTRIC
FISHING COMPETITION
SALMON COMPETITION
April 6, Harold Cliffe, age 14 14 lbs
TROUT COMPETITION
April 6, F. Dack 21bs, 12 oz.
HEADQUARTERS FOR RADIO SETS AND  PARTS
ALL BATTERIES KEPT IN STOCK-
UP-TO-DATE STOCK OF FISHING TACKLE AND LINES TO
SATISFY   ALL   YOUR   REQUIREMENTS.
SEE  US  ABOUT  YOUR  ELECTRIC  WIRING,  RANGES   AMI
PLATES FOR TIIE COMING SUMMER.
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Hox
71
USED
CARS
We have several used caw
still on hand, and we are
pricing these at very low
figures. Every car had
been gone over by first
class mechanics, and we
guarantee them to be as
represented.
Chev. Touring .... $275.00
Ford Touring  $220.00
Ford Touring  $300.00
Chev. Touring .... $300.00
Chev. Superior   ... $650.00
BLUNT and
EWART
LIMITED
Phone 61 Courtenay
D. PATTISON HEADS
VALLEY FRUIT GROWERS
COURTENAY,—The second annual
general meeting of the Comox Valley
Fruitgrowers' Association was held
on Tuesday night at the Agricultural
Hall, and was fairly well attended.
It had been expected that representative of a Vancouver firm would have
been present to discuss with the meeting the disposition of the local output
this season. However a message had
been received In the morning stating
that lt would be Impossible for representatives for the firm mentioned lo
be present.
Mr. II P. Allberry took the chair,
and after stating the reason for holding the meeting suggested that the
election of officers he proceeded with.
This was acted upon with the results
that the following members will govern the association during 1924: President, D. Pattlson. Merville; Vice-President, Norman Prltchard, Comox;
Secretary-Treasurer, E. Felix Thomas
Directors: F. G. Llddle, J. Lupton, A.
E. Narroway, R. E. .lames and A. Macdonald.
Mr. PatUson, the newlly elected
president, then took the chair. On
motion of Mr. II. p. Allberry. seconded by Mr. W. J. Andrews, the
membership fee was set at one dollar
per year. Mr. Norman Prltchard
brought up the question of allowing
Orientals to become members of the
association and Mr. R. I.'. Hurford,
was ol the opinion that the admission
of Japanese growers to membership
would materially increase the volume
of fruit and make the acquisition of a
cannery much more likely. Air. William Duncan said thut be wus sure
the Coniox Creamery would do all lt
could to help the growers.
No concrete proposals were forthcoming from the members so on motion of Mr. Norman Prltchard, seconded by Mr. Mantle, it was decided thnt
the directors should meet the Creamery directors on Monday, the Mill Instant at nine o'clock p.m. with the
view of making necessary marketing
arningeiuents. [n reply to a question by Mr. R. E. James, the manager
of tiie creamery said there is still a
quantity of last season's product in
stock, but that as the season has arrived when stocks of this sort move
quickly, he was sure that the remainder on han dwould soon be disposed of.
.Mr. C. 1). Magglora, of the Gold
Star Bottling Works, addressed the
meeting on the manufacture of Loganberry juice and wine. Mr, Magglora showed a thorough knowledge
of the manufacture of wine but
thought lt would be hard to finance a
project of the kind at present owing
to the uncertain conditions prevailing.
.Mr. Hugh Stewart spoke optimistically
on the cultivation of Loganberries in
the B.C. coastal section but thought
the growers would do well to wait n
year or two when the subject could
be more thoroughly gone Into when
conditions would undoubtedly be better and the subject could probably
be taken up with the Liquor Control
Board.
At this point Mr. Norman Prltchard.
to get some action on the Japanese
question, moved tliat Japanese be eligible to Join the Coniox Valley Frail
Growers' Association. His motion
was seconded by Mr. Ed. Clark, and
much animated discussion took placa.
Mr. Merle Halllday was absolutely
opposed to anything of the kind.   He
f urged the elimination of the Japanese
as members.     .Mr. Kirby thought that
I if thc Japanese were admitted there
i soon would be no white growers.
Berries grown on swamp land by
Japanese would spoil the market.
The secretary said that the consumer
being the ultimate judge, would demand the best berries nnd that poor
quality  fruit   would  realize    a    low
' price. Last season's experience bad
proved that.     The matter was finally
i left to the directors for decision.
CERTIFIED MILK AND
BUTTER FAT RECORDS
COURTENAY,—Following is a list
■ of eows ill the Coniox Valley Cow
Testing Association that completed
their lacatlon periods during 1923
. and qualify for Certificates of Production:
No. X 222—Nora of Aveleagh, 0117,
p.h. Jersey, ft years old; milk 8,967
pounds; fat 4.S8 per cent; fat 437.6
pounds; days In milk 321. Owner,
G. Hornby, Sandwick.
No, X 223—Betty; Jersey; 9 years
old; milk 7,776 pounds; fat 5.59 per
cent; fat 435.0 pounds; days in milk
365. Owner W. A. Urquhart, Courtenny.
Nn. X 224--Beautiful Marjorie,
13662, p.h. Jersey; 3Vi yepjrs Cfltl;
I milk s.370 pounds; fat 4.441 per cent;
fat 372 pounds; days In milk 365.
Owner W. A, Urquhart, Courtenay.
I No. X 225—Fern's Beauty M. 12370,
i p.h. Jersey; 5 years old; milk 6,783
| pounds; fat 4.67 per cent; fat 316.6
! pounds; days In milk 316.6. Owner
j It. Williamson & Sons, Cumberland.
Moved To Fanny Buy.
.Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Hellen have
moved to Fanny Bay where they will
make their home for some time.
*   *   *
Mr. S. Ritchie, who purchased tlle
Lalond-Campbell River Stage Iidne,
has taken over his new possession and
is operating the stages on the same
schedule as during Mr. Lalond's time.
(OIRTEXAY NEWS OX PAGE 11
I
Edwards and Orr
m    P.O. Box 62
Phone 17    '=
AGENTS FOR
"Murray Made" Roofings,
Wallboard,   Wall Felt,   etc.
WE SELL
Lumber, Doors, Windows
Shingles, Lath Glass, Hotbed
Sash, Portable Greenhouses,
Sonatile, Gold Seal Congol-
eum Rugs, Fir Veneer, Cottonwood, Hardwoods, Pelnts,
Whltelead and Oils.
BUILDING   MATERIALS   AND
WOOD-WORKING SHOP
Brick. Lime, Plaster, Cement, Sand
Gravel.
Courtenay, B.C.
AGENTS FOR
"Barretts"   Roofings,   Slate-
surfaced Shingles, etc.
WE MAKE
Windows, Frames, Doors,
Built-in Effects, Flower
Boxes, Lawn Swings, Store
and Office Fixtures.
Anything ln wood.
Phone 17 at our expense and
get our prices.
Liberty
God's Great Open Space.
Equality
SERVICE
Fraternity
Over 7,000,000 have bought before YOU
Corfield Motors, Limited
Phon. 46 COURTENAY, B.C. PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL  14,  1934.
Cumberland School Report
Number  of pupils  attending 473— Honor Cards
Boys, 253. Girls 220. |    Leading pupils In March Entranco
Percentage Attendance 93.3 per cent   Examination.
Savings Bank  (Pupils) $66.65. j Helen   Parnham     85
Shield for attendance won by Div. I Beryl Hudson  75.6
1. Mr. Murray. ] Archie  Dick   74.4
Receipts from Spoiling Match   (for   Kate Robertson  74
sports)  $24.45. Jessie Grant  73.S
Do yon get the fullest use of your telephone? Of
course, you use it to call up a friend, or place an orcter
with a tradesman, but do you always thinks of it wh >n
you need to do something personally? How many
times would the telephone save you time? If a business man, how much money would the telephone save
you? Many trips could be saved, if the telephone
were used instead.
The telephone gives direct and prompt communication with that personal touch- which brings both
parties to a conversation close together. That is why
it has become one of the greatest factors of business
and social lite.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
LAMPS
ELECTRO-AUTOMATES
■ (AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS)«
NO BATTERIES! - NO ACIDS!
) <
WILL   LAST   A   LIFE-TIME*
«PU.UUWnI      tA«T     A      ril7lT.'riMi;«PO.UU
Practical, Durable, Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Klectro Automate ls an Electric Lamp made in France without a battery or refills, and of a new conception. It ls a perfect
machine; the result of yenrs of luBt ln the plants of the manufacturers ln Switzerland and France :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces.     It Is putented in all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent magnet, based on new methods,
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, and
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lamps Is very carefully carried out by
skilled Swiss slock aad scientific Instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps art tight and dust-proof. They can be used
in all climates, Including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving n clear white light, without fear of the bulb burning out or the generator booming
warm.
All Electro Automate Lamps are guaranteed for six mouths, conditionally that they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
<ost.    Lamps are provided with a pocket for extra bulbs.
ThlB lamp ls especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, automoblllsts, dairymen, in fact everybody.
They are indispensable on Ufc-bouts und rafts, where a light is
needed that will not be extinguished by wind or wave :: Every
mine should be provided with one or more of these lamps at Its
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or oflicial
whose work takes him ln and nut of the mine at irregular intervals. It is the cheapest and best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate ln their
engine room, lt saves them from the annoyance aud loss of
lime occasioned by tht unreliability of battery lamps when thty
wish to loctte trouble or find something ln a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lumps because they ure always standing
by ready aud able to do their part in any and all kinds of
weather. They ure hardy little fellows and will stand any
amount of knocking about, even to tbe bulbs, which are superior
to any others on the market :: .Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps In preference to others, because they give a
never ending light and add less than a pound of weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and tbe snow or wet can
not short olroutt them.
DIRECTIONS
Tht working of this stlf-generallug lamp is vtry simple. Pull the
lever completely and sharply with the lingers and let go, allowing
it to open fully In order to take another tull stroke. strokes
should he even and sharp for best results. This lamp is the
only one of its weight that will give a perfect light. The hearings of this lamp should be oiled about onot a mouth.
SOLD LOCALLY BV
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vs" valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
Isao  Abe   73.2
May Hughes  72.0
Thelma  Gray  72
Walter Hughes  71 6
Lillian   Banks    71 4
Jean MacNaughton  71.1
Geo. E. Apps, Principal.
Division 1.
Percentage of Attendance 98.81 per
cent.
Perfect Attendance—Lilian Banks.
Irene Bates, Wm. Bennie, Mary Conn,
Alma Conrod, Archie Dick, Norman
Conim, Beryl Hudson, Jean McNaughton. Helen Purnhnm, Kate Robertson,
John Strachan, May Taylor, Gordon
Walker. Robert Yates. Norman Bateman, Sam Davis, Wm. Devoy, Tatsumi Iwasa, Fred Leversedge, Victor
Marlnelll, Geo. McLellan, Josie Plr-
ozinni, Marguerite Struthers, Junet
Damonte.
II. E. Murray. Teacher.
Division 2.
Number on roll, 801 Percentage Dili
Number of lutes, I.
Names of pupils having perfect attendance—Isao Abe, Evelyn Carey.
Ella Conn, Leslie Dando, Charles
Franclsoll, Joseph Frelonl, Lena Ual-
liazzl. Jessie Grant. May Hughes, Walter Hughes. Alastar McKinnon Dorothy Maxwell, Ruth Oyama, Margaret
Richardson, Ednu Smith, Jean Smith,
Charles Walker, Margaret Young.
Tessle A. Galllvan, Teacher.
Division 3.
Number on roll. 35; Percentage.
93.88; Lates, 1.
Perfect Attendance—Tsuneto Abo.i,
Annie Beveridge. Lena Bogo, Victor
Bono, Andrew Brown, Agnes Bruce,
Edna Cawdell, Mary Clark, Edna Con-
rod, Eleanor Davis, Joseph Ducca,
Kathleen Emily, Jack Sweeney, Norman Hill, James Home, Margaret
Hughes, Shlgeo Kawaguchl, Lily Leversedge, Annie Mann, Dick Marpole,
Sarah Oyama. Norman Parnham, Emma Picketti. Margaret Shearer, John
Auchterlonl.
Honor Roll—Annie Mann, Margaret
Hughes, Norma Parnham, Emma Pl-
chettl, Lily Leversedge. Progress-
Jack Sweeney,
Miss Marjorie Mordy. Teacher.
Division 4.
Number on roll, 36; Percentage,
93.2; Lates, 2.
Perfect Attendance—Fred Cawdell,
Robert Colling, Edna Davis, Norman
Frelone, Jean Johnston, Klshio Kaga.
Lena Merlettl, Alex MacDonald, Chas.
MacDonald, Jack MacLean, Bert Mac-
Lellan, Mary Sweeney, Annie Walker.}
Jack Watson, Alko Yoshikum, Helen i
Hamilton. Louis Bnrtoldl, Sukavo Su-
gimon.
Honor Roll—Edna Davis. Norman
Frelone, Jack MacLean, Kishlo Kaga.
Mary Sweeney. Low Leng.
II. I. Harrison. Teacher I
Division *>,
Number on roll, 38; Percentage,'
94.42; Lates. 2.
Perfect   Attendance—Rena   Bonora.
Hugh   Braes,    George  Brown,    Jenn
Brown, Beatrice Cavallero,  Reta  De-!
voy,  Hazel  Gibson,  Dorothy Gordon,
Sadako Iwasa, Mary Jackson, Yosblo I
Kawaguchl, Mildred Lockner Margaret t
McDonald, Kathleen O'Brien,    Tasku
Oyama, Charlotte Stant,  Mlnoru Ta-1
hara, Victor Tomassi, Violet Williams,
Vincen   Auchterlonle,  Alven   Frelonl,
Willie    Mcintosh.    Jean    McWhlrter,
Kitty Prior,
Grade V A Honors—Beatrice Cuval-,
lero, Mary Jackson. Dorothy Gordon,
Kathleen  O'Brien,  Isabel  Brown.
Grade V. II Honors—Vincen Audi-1
terlonle, Jean McWhlrter Alven Fro-'
lont.
Annie R. Gatz. Teacher.
Division B.
Number on roll, 40, Percentage. 92 5 I
Lates 1.
Perfect Attendance—Matsuljo Abe,
Andrew Bates, Rudl Bonora. Annie
Brown, Josie Burghiner, Klmeyo tin-!
ga, Willie Shearer, George Strachan,
Rosina Thompson, Tom Tobacco, Lenu
TomasBl, Nellie Walker, Elsie Water.
field, Harry Westfleld, Annie Young,
Irene Davis, Norls Herose. Cazuko
Iwasa, Hlsako Nakano. Audrey Povah, Muriel Purl ridge.
Junior Fifth Honor Roll -Josie
Burghiner, Rudl . Bonora, Bessie
Nicholas. Lena Tomassi, Willie Shear-
rence, Muriel Harrison, Hiroshi Oltti-
do,     Progress—iHelen Morrison.
Vivian Aspesy, Teacher.
Division 8.
Number on roll, 39; Percentage 90;
Lates, 2.
Perfect Attendance—John Burgheimer, Chow Chee, Marion Combs,
Clinton Harrison, Masalu Sora, Alice
Taylor, Joe Whyley, Kiyoko Abe, John
Bannerman, Annie Cheung, Mary
Ilasscl, Shlgeura Kujona, Willie McNaughton. Bryson Parnham, Chrissie
Robertson, George Salto, Muriel
Thompson, Shigeura Vagauchi.
Sr. Ill Honor Roll—Audrey Hamilton, Willie MacNaughton, Chrissie
Robertson.
Sr. IV Honor Roll—Audrey Gear,
Irvln Banks. Joe Whyley.
I. McFadyen, Teacher
Division 9.
Number on roll, 38; Percentage,
94.0; Lates. 4.
Perfect Attendance—Bills Bonortt,
Mary Graham, David Marshall, Bar.
barn Martin, Jessie Robb, William
Slaughter, Cheyako Suglmorl, Willie
Borne, Masaki Kaga Susumo Kawaguchl, Juckic Morrison, Sylvia Mutters, Tnhoshi Oknli Heromitsu Sulto,
Alex Sommerville, Echlro Shi, Edith,
Taylor,  Margaret  Westfleld.
Jr. Ill Honor Roll—Alex Sommerville. Sylvia Mutters. Improvement
-Harold Hughes, Preston Bruce.
Sr. Ill Honor Roll—Harvey Herd.
Albert Drew. Improvement—Barbara Martin.
Miss C. Carey, Teacher.
Division 10
Number on roll 11; Percentage,
36.85; Lates, nil.
Perfect Attendance—Richard Botes,
Billy Cloutier, Jackie Hassell, Willie
Johnson. Willie Tobacco, Thelma
Waterlleld, Leland Bannerman, Peter
Bono. Willie Braes. Willie Combs,
Gertie Dnvls, Margaret Drummnud,
Jean Dunsire, Mitsuo Hayaskl Shou
Kiyonaga, Marguerite Larlgan, Sheg-
Ima Marlya. Richard Marshal, Yaeko
Obara, Willie Prior, Muriel Shortt.
(Robert Walker, Rhoda Walton, Geo.
Nunns, Audrey Phillips, George Foley,
Pommy Ferryman.
Honor Roll—Rhoda Walton, Jeannle
Dunsire, (.Madge Bryan and Peter
Bono) Muriel Shortt. Improvement
—Richard Bate, Billy Braes.
Miss J. E. Robertson, Teacher
Division 11
Number on roll, 35; Ijorccntage,
015; Lates, 3.
Perfect Attendance—Owen Abrams.
Bruno Merlettl. Gladys Miller, Alice
Brown. Leslie Coe, Elizabeth Mai-
liass, Margaret Marpole, Billie Merrilleld, Kujoski Okuda, Gordon Robertson, Wardena Thompson. Yasushi
YnJiiasahl.
Grade Jr. Number in Grade 35.
Honor List—Margaret Marpole.
Uosle Mah, Owen Abrams, Ada Tos.
Hnrry Mordy. Improvement—Mat-
garet Williams.
Pearl Hunden. Teacher.
Division 12.
Number on roll 37; Percentage 8.8.8,
Ixites, 5.
Perfect Attendance—Arnold Bonora
Harry Choe, Jimmy Choe, Gee Doon.
Irene Gomme, Jackie Graham, Michl-
ho Isonaga, Quon Jack, Hiroshl Kawagauchl, Moyshi Kimoto, Kcjhl Kiyonaga, Haron Nahana. .Mabel Sommervllle,  Daryl  Thompson,  Willie Conn.
Honor Roll—Lem Ho, Kejhl Klon-
agJ, Mary Balrd, Isuglo Iwasa, Quon
Jack, Tommy McMillan.
Miss  C.  Richardson,  Teacher,
Division 111.
Number on roll, 35; Percentage,
91; Lates, I.
Perfect Attendance—Irene Bonora,
Douglas Chandler, Cleo Gibson, Dor.
othy Swteeney, 'Margaret Beveridge.
Douglas Davis Margaret Home, Mu-
saho Iwasa, Kitljoku Kujona . Rose
Marrocchl. Hugh Miller. Hugh McWhlrter, Iluroshl Ogakl, Aklrn Saito,
Lily Tobacco, Ilidehn Tsuroho, Margaret Waugh, Billy Westfleld.
Mrs. Eva Drader, Teacher.
er.
Junior Fifth Honor Roll Caiuko
Iwasa, Nina Shields.
Edith Horbury, Teacher, ]
Division 7.
Perfect attendance; Percentage.
95.5; Lates, 4.
May Brown, Olga Bonora, May Beveridge, Edith Cavallero, Quong Ohonrj,
Alden Francescini, Donald Graham,
Dorlno Galleazi, John Hoffhelnz, Dor-
Is Hannay, Takeru Kawaguchl, Low
Hong, Hatsue Matsukura, Second Merlettl, Toklo Nakano, Tommy Robertson, Willie Sweeney, Helen Saunder.i,
Edna Watson, Tommy Conrad, Muriel
Harrison, Alfred Jones, Jennie Lawrence, Helen Morrison, Bennie Nicholas, Hiroshl Okuda, Lily Picketti,
Mamoru Tahara. Malla Tomassi,
Archie Welsh.
Junior V Honor Roll—Alden Francescini, Second Merlettl, Donald Oraham.
Progress, Helen Saunders.
Senior IV Honor Roll—J«nnl« Law-
HEIRS WANTED
Missing Heirs ure being sought
throughout the world. Many people
are today living In comparative poverty
who are really rich, but do not. know
lt. You may be one of them. Send
for Index Book, "Missing Heirs and
Next of Kin." containing carefully authenticated lists of missing heirs and
unclaimed estates which have been advertised for, here and abroad. The
Index of Missing Heirs we offer tor
sale contains thousands of names
whicli have appeared in American,
Canadian, English. Scotch, Irish
Welsh, German, French, Belgian,
Swedish, Indian, Colonial and other
newspapers, Inserted by lawyers, executors, administrators. Also contains list of English and Irish Courts
of Chancery and unclamed dividends
list of Bank of England. Your name
or your ancestor's may be In the Hat.
Send $1.00 (one dollar) at once for
book.
INTERNATIONAL CLAIM
AGENCY   DEPT,
PITTSBURGH, PA. U.S.A.
BritishEnpire Exhibition
London England Apm Octobers
THR0U8H RAIL AND OCEAN
B00KIN6S
See Ui For
FARES
SAILINGS, ETC.
E. W. Bickle, Agent, Cumberland. B.C.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
F o r
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone l.'SIM Courtenay Exchange
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
Proven beat
Since 1857
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED        I
i
i
l'leiisc  leave  your orders at  office,
.lira. King's Stationery Stere
PhtM it.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Or Phone IS Ciilot, Hotel
CUMBERLAND  TRANSFER
A. A. Bruits
time tested
babyfood
FREE BABY BOOKS
Write to the Borden Co. Limited,
Vancouver, for Iwo Baby Welfare
Books.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   - -    Proprietor
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir  Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered te All I'arlt tl Dlitrlti.
leal, Wood and (inodi ol Any lie!
ASHES REMOVED
MOUKIIATE CHAHOKS
TKI-KI'IIONU
53
TKI.Bl'HONB
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS .HADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    -    Cluutlng    •    Repelm
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. V.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Rosd
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Ordtrt at
Tommy's Hardware Store
1 SATURDAY. APRIL  12,  1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
u
(
PAGE NINE
Cumberland's   First  Queen  of  the  May Contest-
Help to make it a success—Read the following Rules:
1EEEKHBKESBBKBBBBBEHEteK^HBKS*
niii»i! ■ mm
i^l'llii;.';1^,::!!!;;!, :::;l!^:iv^ i,'    :■!!;;!;,. 'li!:,,,,,;:;,:"'
VICTORIA DAY
MAY 24, 1924
CUMBERLAN D'S
PREMIER
VITCORIA DAY
MAY 24, 1924
QUEEN OF THE MAY CONTEST
Under auspices of Cumberland General Hospital Ladies' Auxiliary
Object of Contest
A few days ago a few of the prominent business
men of the city met and discussed a suitable way
iii whicli funds could be raised whereby extra
comforts for the patients at the hospital could be
given. In short, the object of the contest was to
make the suffering patient more cheerful.
With this object in view, the Auxiliary of the
Cumberland General Hospital were approached
with the scheme outlined, and they have decided
to act upon it. Each and every member is anxious that it should be a success, so by helping
to put this contest over, you help in a cause that
is second to none.
P>e a booster for your town. Be a booster for
the hospital. Be a booster for Cumberland's
First May Queen Contest.
NOMINATIONS
CLOSE APRIL
15, 1924
CONTEST
CLOSES   MAY
17, 1921
CUMBERLAND'S
MAY QUEEN
CONTEST
RULES OF THE CONTEST
THE BALLOT
Each ballot is being sold for 10 cents and represents 10 votes for the
candidate's name that appears thereon.
These ballots have been printed and are now on sale at Lang's Drug
Store. A ballot box has been placed in front of the store, in which the
ballots may be deposited after the name of the candidate whom you wish to
vote for, has been Written thereon. This box will be opened once each
week (Thursday) and two official auditors will count the ballots, crediting
each contestant with the number of votes that appear for them. The
names of the different contestants and their standing will be published
each week in The Cumberland Islander.
THOSE WHO MAY COMPETE
The contest will be open to any and all ladies between the ages of 15
and 50 years of age, residing in and around Cumberland.
If you have a favorite, you may vote for her and she automatically becomes nominated as a candidate. Boost her, by getting others together
anci keep her at the head of the competition. April 15th will be the last
day on which any new candidates can be nominated.
At the close of the contest, the votes will all be counted and the lady
receiving the highest number of votes, will be declared Queen of the May.
The two ladies receiving the next highest number of votes shall be Maids of
Honor to the Queen. These three ladies will be required to attend the
sports en May 24th, when the crowning ceremony will take place at the
sports grounds. , „..
CLOSING DAY OF CONTEST
Saturday midnight, May 17th, 1924, has been set as the closing
day of the contest. No ballots can be received after this date. Auditors
will then count the ballots and declare the winners. The following week
will be used in making preparations for the dressing of the Queen nnd
Maids of Honor.
Prizes Awarded
The prizes being awarded the winners of the
contest are as follows:
First Prize—Queen of the May—$100.00 in
gold. A dress, suitable for the occasion, will also
be supplied to the Queen by the Ladies' Auxiliary
of the Cumberland General Hospital.
Second Prize—First Maid of Honor—$25.00 in
gold.
Third Prize—Second Maid of Honor—$25.00 in
gold.
The Maids of Honor will also be dressed to till
their positions by the Auxiliary. All three
ladies will be given every attention and honor
that can possibly be given, to impress upon the
Queen and her subjects an everlasting memory of
Cumberland's First May Queen Contest.
NOMINATIONS
CLOSE APRIL
15, 1924
CONTEST
CLOSES   MAY
17, 1924
CUMBERLAND'S
MAY QUEEN
CONTEST.
^^^^^^^HH iiiIiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Report and Accounts for the
year ended December 31,1923
FEBRUARY 14, 1924.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
I beg to report that I have audited the accounts of the Board
of School Trustees, Cumberland, B.C., for the year ended December
31,1923.
I append hereto a statement of Receipts and Expenditures
for the year 1923, together with the corresponding statement for
the Night School, duly certified.
There is a balance in hand at December 31, 1923, of $3,738.33
on General Account and $107.35 on Night School Account. I
have assumed, for the purpose of the statements herewith, that
all accounts between the City and the Board were balancd up to
December 31,1922.
It has been the custom, hitherto, for the banking transactions
of the Board to be conducted through the City General Account,
but this is now being remedied, and a spearate account opened,
through which all the banking business of the Board of School
Trustees will, in the future, be transacted, as provided by the
Public Schools Act.
All outstanding accounts at December 31,. 1923, as far as I
am aware, have been included in the expenditures for 1923, with
the exception of a balance of $75.95, owing-on a pianoforte, purchased for school use, in the name of the principal. I understand
the teachers propose to discharge this liability.
In my opinion, the statement submitted herewith, sets forth
a true and correct statement of the treatment of the Board of
School Trustees for the year ended December 31, 1923, according
to the information and explanations given to me, and as shown by
the books and records.
Statement of Receipts and Expenditures for the year ended December 31, IS23
RECEIPTS
Real Property Tax Levy 1923 	
Poll Tax 	
Government Grants:—
General   21.tl59.99
Special        350.00
Trannportatlou         60.00
Liquor Profits (proportion)      634.17
Donations:—
Parent Teachers' Association   90.00
Boy   ScoutB     111.60
Girls' Club   3.00
Piano Account   100.00
Pictures Account   10.00
EXPENDITURES
6.192.61 j Current Expenses: —
3,851.75 '        Salaries:    Teaching Staff
Janitor   	
Medical Officer
Secretary  	
23,004.16 ■
314.60
Total Salaries 	
Bchool Supplies  	
Fuel   	
Electric  l.lKlitiiiK and  Water 	
Fire Insurance 	
Itepalrs, .Maintenance nnd General Expenses
Itoyston Transportation 	
Subscription to School Trustees' Association I Convention   Expense   	
Improvements: —
New Furniture  670.66
Grounds     1,082 mi
Playground  Equipment    170.38
Payments on Piano   118.10
Electric Wiring                                   . 395.90
Total  Expedituros  	
December 31, 1923 Balance lu hand
Wilis, p.'.
21,178.00
2,100.00
200.00
150.00
23.628.00
774.61
1.1198.1.0
226 I:
90.00
1,184.64
205.00
80.00
27,187.25
J.487.64
29.624.7U
8,738.36
s.'i.'i.:iit:i.L'
Frank Porter, Auditor
Night School Accounts
RECEIPTS EXPENDITURES
Government Grants      196.60 , Teachers'  Remuneration     270.00
Students' Fees      241.60 ; Janitor    "-„ „,
Sundry Expenses   In - ,
Total Expenditures    380 75
 -.   December 31, 1923 Balance In hand   107 "ii
* 4S8.KI  : _
Signed on behalf of the Board: « 188.10
E. F. BANKS, Chairman. Audited and found Correct:
A. McKINNON, Secretary.                                                                     FRANK PORTER. PAGE TEN
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APIUL 12,  1924.
$1.89
The Greatest Sale of all times is right |
here! ! !    The whole store a sparkle j
with Super Bargains
—Men's Working Shirts—
I
Men's Khaki Heavy Drill Working
Shirts, all double stitched throughout
all sizes in the lot fl»-|   (*Q
Sale Price «pl.UOj
Men's   Extra   Heavy   Khaki    Drill!
Working Shirts, all sizes
Sale Price	
Men's Khaki  Drill Working Shirts, j
in all sizes, the very best, extra heavy
drill, all well cut, extra d»Q  Q/l !
large body. Sale Price... ty&.O^X
Men's Blue Heavy Denim   Working |
Shirts, two pockets, double stitched,
every seam, all sizes   in (PI    Af)
this offering. Sale Price   «P A »TtO
Men's Clack Heavy Denim Working
Shirts, the very best Denim fast color, made by one of the leading Canadian Shirt Makers, all d»1 A J?
sizes. Sale Price  «PA«»/t)
Don't let a thing keep you away from
This Great Sale.
A. MacK
THE ENTIRE STOCK OFFERED FOR THE NEXT
YOU—DRY GOODS, FURNITURE, LADIES' AND
MEN'S AND CHILDREN'S SHOES, CROCKERY, E
BABY CARRIAGES AND BABY BUGGIES, THOUS.
CURTAIN GOODS, ETC., ETC. ALL PRICES SLA
FACT IT IS A GOOD OLD TIME BARGAIN SALE
MAKE YOU BUY.     A. W. MacARTHUR IN CHAR
CUMBERLAND
The Sale that has started
with a merry rush
15 DAYS AT PRICES THAT WILL ASTOUND AND ASTONISH
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND READY-TO-WEAR, LADIES',
NAMEL WARE, LINOLEUM, RUGS AND CARPET SQUARES.
ANDS OF YARDS OF DRESS GOODS, GINGHAMS, PRINTS,
SHED TO A FRACTION OF THEIR FORMER PRICINGS—IN
—DON'T MISS IT. THE PRICES JUST ABSOLUTELY JUST
GE FOR 15 DAY'S—AND 15 DAYS OF REAL BARGAIN GIVING
Ladies' Novelty Waists—Only about
Twenty-live in the lot—Prices Slashed to clear them out
—Ladies' Crepe de Chene Waists—
I Ladies' Crepe de Chene Waists, in all
j shades, including Pink, Cream, Rose,
! Peach, novelty trimmed, just into
stock, assorted sizes
'Sale Price now 	
$3.25
Ladies' Novelty Tricolette Waists,
, in all the very latest colorings, trim-
j med in the very newest styles, all
| sizes in the lot
;SaIe Price	
$3.58
Ladies' Crepe de Chene Waists, regular values up to $10.00 and $11.00,
very newest styles, all the very new
color effects, all sizes
Sale Price	
$6.48
; Ladies' Knitted silk Waists, in the
very newest 1924 spring colors, all
i the new styles, all sizes. Come in
i and see them, they are ind»ry PA
'all sizes. Sale Price  «D I .Ut/
LOOK! Everything on absolute Sale--APPR0VED CREDIT 0N ANY LINE
MEN'S   DRESS  SHIRTS—OVER  350  SHIRTS
ON ABSOLUTE SALE
Men's fine domestic fast colored dress shirts, in
the newest striped or fancy, all well cut garments,
all sizes.     Sale Price  $1.50
Regular $2.50 Men's Dress Shirts, in all the very
latest mattresses, and fast colored imported prints
all Tookes well known makes, all sizes.     Sale
Price  $1.89
Regular $2.75 and $3.00 Men's Dress Shirts, in the
very best chambrays, also fancy and plain madress
Tookes well known makes, all coat styles, attached
or detachable collars,   all   sizes   in   this   line.
Sale Price $2.10
CHILDREN'S SERGE DRESSES
Girls' All Wool Serge Dresses, assort- (PO QA
ed sizes.    .Sale Price «D-£»»'t7
Girls' All Wool Serge Dresses, assort- (PO OQ
ed sizes.    Sale Price «pO»Ot/
Larger sizes in Girls' All Wool Navy (P A   1 A
Serge Dresses.     Sale Price «J) *»l-»/
Boys' Navy Serge Reefers, assorted sizes, made
from all wool heavy serge, the very thing for
spring wear                                        (PJT Q/2
Small size.    Sale Price iDtl.OO
Larger sizes                                       (P/? /?C
Sale Price «PU.U«J
GINGHAMS, PRINTS AND DRESS GOODS
10,000 yards of Ginghams, Prints, Dress Goods,
and Curtain materials, with prices cut to a fraction of their former pricings.
All Enamel ware, all Tin ware, Wash Boilers,
Crockery, etc—placed on absolute sale.
This is indeed the greatest sale ever placed before
the Cumberland and district'residents—You can
buy all your spring and Easter needs at prices
That You Can Afford To Pay ! ! ! !
MEN'S GLOVES, CAPS, UNDERWEAR, SOX,
Etc.—At prices that beggar description and
Stagger belief
Men's Heavy Cotton Canto Gloves           01 /»
Sale Price per pair  •wJLC
Men's Cotton Gloves, extra heavy make, A "J _
Men's heavy weight Socks for spring wear,QA_
all sizes.    Sale Price per pair UtJ\,
Men's Fine Merino Socks, all sizes            Ql /»
Sale Price per pair di.v
Men's heavy All Wool Socks, all sizes      \\n
Sale Price per pair f4r4C
Men's Working Suspenders, good, strong A A-
make.     Sale Price tcttC
Men's Fine.Suspenders, very good wear- (iQ^
ing.     Sale Price DOC
Men's Fine Dress Suspenders.                   FT A _
Sale Price  I^C
Boys' Suspenders, per pair  22c
Youth's Suspenders, per pair   36c
Regular $4.50 Men's Fine Silk   Striped    Dress
Shirts, one of Tookes best selling lines, well washing materials, all sizes here.     Sale Price     $3.19
Regular $5.00 and $5.50 Men's Silk Tricoline dress
shirts and nice popular light tan shade, Tookes
I            make, the very best tailored shirt on the market
1            today, all sizes.     Sale Price         $4.19
1            If your credit is good, you can buy at sale prices,
and have them charged for awhile.
MacARTHUR IS HERE-^,I%^e^«.?..on NOW! NOW!
ALL FURNITURE PRICES DASHED TO SMITHEREENS
Baby High Chairs
Sale Price 	
Surface Oak Arm Chairs and Rockers
Sale Price 	
Here's a Bargain Morris Chair, in solid oak, solid   leather upholstering, spring
cushions, worth twice this price.     Bargain Sale Price	
Full sized Enamelled Bedsteads
Sale Price	
Full sized Satin finished Brass Bedsteads
Sale Price	
Rattan Chairs, the very thing for verandas
Sale Price 	
$3.19
$4.69
$22 50
$9.10
$18.75
$9.35
I LOOK!  LOOK! !  BARGAINS FROM ALL OVER THE STORE—PRICES SHOCK YOU
, Glass Tumblers, assorted shapes.    Sale Price, each   7c
Pie Plates, Egg Turners, Potato Mashers, Strainers, Jugs, Etc. all go at  17c
! Toasters, Cups and Saucers, Large Plates, Butter Dishes, each Sale Price  22c
! Pudding Bowls, Salt and Peppar Shakers, the best kind of Cups and Saucers and twenty OQ
|   other lines, all to go at Sale Price  CtUKt
Five only, 22-piece Tea Sets, regular values up to $6.00 nice neat designs.    Sale Price $3.98.
To larger size 42-piece at  $10.98
i Aluminum Dippers 1 A« Aluminum Pans, from
Sale Price
10c
Sale Price
Fine Painted Vases, Ash Trays, Cream Jugs, Bon Bon Dishes, large assortment, all one
price Regular values up to $1.25.    Sale Price	
29c
62c
Mattresses, Springs—all the very best makes go on sale here,
sale at a well cut sale price.     Now is the time to buy! ! ! ! !
Nothing reserved, everything on!Tea Pots at Sale Prices 49c. up to $2.36
,and 5000 other lines that we have no space to mention at slaughter sale price for the next 15 days.
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S SANDALS
All Regular Prices Cut to the Core
Children's Non-rip Sandals, solid leather soles, sizes
7i;. to IM o.     Sale Price	
Misses' Non-rip Sandals, with a solid leather sole, well (P-|    A Q
wax stitched, all sizes from 11 to 2.     Sale Price <PX*~Z(3
Peter's Sundals,    combination colors of natural and red,    solid
leather asbestol tanned soles with a low rubber heel,
sizes H to 10.     Sale Price     	
Peter's Sandals, same as above only sizes 11 to 2
Sale Price    	
$1.29
$3.09
$3.59
Ladies' Sandals, a combination of natural and paddy green, all
sizes from 3 to 01 £>, solid leather soles, and low rubber
heels.     Sale Price   	
Children's Patent Leather Sandals, the very best Patent Colt
Leather, solid leather soles with a low rubber heel, (PO AQ
nil sizes 8'j to 101:..     Sale Price per pair «J)aW.Ui7
BARGAINS FROM ALL OVER THE STORE
Look Here at Random—This is the Place that Saves You Dollars
Colored Turkish Towels, good size OA_i*
Sale Price  &lxL
Honcycotmb Towels, with red borders, very absorbent       QQ|»
Sale Price  OOK,
Large size Colored Turkish Towels, good heavy make CO „
Sale Price  OtatL
■'■'$3.84
Large Size White Turkish Towels made from heavy Terry
Sale Price 	
69c
Colored Guest Turkish Towels, in combination colors of Blue and
White, Pink and White, and Light Green and White, (Pi i Q
good large size.     Sale Price  fPX.l.*/
ALL YARD GOODS SELLING AT PRICES
Should Compel Speedy Buying
Colored_Silk Striped Ratine, double width, in colors of Rose, Pink,
 74c
Heilo, Deep Sky, a lovely material
Sale Price per yard 	
The new material for undergarments—Plisse Crepe—very soft
weave, in all the very new colorings, 31 inches wide, shades of
Pink, Sky, Flesh, Cream, White and Peach, Etc.
Sale Price now per yard	
Curtain Scrim, double width
Sale Price 19c. per yard to	
Madrass Curtain Scrim in all Cream shades, all double width material, assorted patterns.     The sale prices are
42c, 55c, 69c, 93c
Tickings, Sheetings, Shirtings, Etc., all at greatly reduced prices
69c
69c
A. MacKinnon
WITH   MacARTHUR,   THE   BARGAIN
GIVER IN FULL SELLING CONTROL
—FOR   15   FULL   SELLING   DAYS-
SAVE NOW! !
Cumberland u
SATURDAY,  APRIL  12. .11124.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE ELEVEN
The Mercantile Store Co.
G. H. WYCHERLEY
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE—PROVIDING YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY AND
SOMETHING TO OFFER, WORTH WHILE.     WE HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY.
AND SOMETHING TO OFFER.
Ba'Ka'aMataVJalJaTJaTJaVataVaTJMaVJaTaVJaaaB
Groceries   -—   Dept. No. 1
HAVE YOU BEEN IN OUR GROCERY DEPARTMENT? WE ARE JUSTLY
PROUD OF IT. WE HAVE BEEN TOLD MANY TIMES "IT IS THE NICEST
AND CLEANEST ON THE ISLAND. COME AND GIVE US YOUR FIRST
ORDER TODAY, IT WILL REPAY YOU.
A Few Specials
Clarks Pork & Beans, largo 15c.
Van Camps Tomato Soup 10c.
Del-Monte Pork & Beans,   1 lb tins 15c.
Tomatoes, 2'/o's, 2 for  25c.
French Peas, per tin  15c.
Singapore Pineapple   20c.
Cowans Cocoa   25c.
Grahams Biscuits, Special $1.25
Jtlly Powders, 3 for 25c.
Malkins Best Marmalade   80.;.
Apples! Apples! A Special Buy, Only $2.50 Box
SiajSMWCMaTMaaiSi.-S-i.'al
Boots and Shoes Dept.
No. 2
We have a large stock of Gent's
Brown Oxfords to choose from.
Priced from $1.85 up to $8.50
Gent's Black and Brown boots, at
per pair $4.85
Gent's "Leckie" "English K" and
"Astoria" Shoes, at $8.50 and $9.50
Ladies' Patent Sandals, per pair$2.95
Ladies' White Kid Sandals .... $1.75
Ladies' Sport Shoes in various colors, per pair from  *  $4.50
Boys' and Girls Leckie School Shoes,
in all sizes.
Babies' Shoos and Slippers, in man;'
styles and colors.
Aiino Shoes, per pair from
$3.9."
WE ARE READY FOR THE SUMMER TRADE IN  ALL KINDS OF RUBBER
FOOTWEAR.      BROWN AND WHITE TENNIS AND RUNNING SHOES.
Gents Furnishings Dept.
No. 3
A special in Men's Blue Bib Overalls,
per pair, only   $2.00
Men's Work Socks, 3 pairs for ... $1.00
"Casey Jones" Work Gloves, pair $1.00
Men's Grey Work Shirts, only  $1.75
Black Pant Overalls  $1.75
JUST IN—NEW TIES, DRESS SHIRTS,   SUMMER  UNDERWEAR,  COLLARS,
FELT HATS CAPS—EVERYTHING FOR MEN.
Dry Goods Dept.
No. 4
Ladies' Worsted Dress Goods, per
yard   $1.05
Scotch Ginghams, Now. Prints, Ratines, Mulls, Cretones, Cottons, Silks
and Satins.
Ladies
Wear
No. 5
Dept.
We cannot describe the beautiful
articles we have on hand. We invite you to call and see our New Sporl
Coats, Ladies' Suits, Ladies' Hats,
Ladies' Silk Hose and Underwear.
Ladies' Princess Slips, silk, in colors.     Priced at      $3.25
We can dross
up in silks.
you  from  the feet
New   Dept.   House   Furnishings   and   Hardware
BABIES WHITE CRIB COMPLETE WITH MATTRESS AND PILLOW $15.00
WE HAVE PUT IN A USEFUL LINE OF KITCHEN HARDWARE TO MEET THE
DEMANDS OF OUR OUT OF TOWN CUSTOMERS—POTS, PANS, KETTLES,
WASH BASINS, WHITE GRANITE WARE LINES, MATTRESSES, CLUB BAGS,
SUIT CASES AND TRUNKS.
The Mercantile Store Co.
PHONE 133
Cumberland, B.C.
B.O. BOX 100
Courtenay News
ELECTION OF THEED
PEARSE POPULAR ONE
COURTENAY,—Tho annual meeting of the Courtenay-Comox Board of
Trade waa held in Booth's Hall on
Tuesday evening last, the most Important business transacted being the
election of ollicers as follows:
President Mr. Theed Pearse, who
has I.Pen vice president during the
past year, and who before that time
was secretary, and under whose direction the Board made steady progress.
The election is a popular one in business circles. Vice-President. Mr.
William Douglas. .Mr. Douglas' election to the office of Vice-President
should work to thc bencllt of the
Board, for. ever since he became a
member more than a year ago. hardly
a meeting has been held that he did
not attend and he has established a
record of proposing a new member
on nearly every meeting night. The
secretaryship was awarded to Mr.
Eadle, tinder whose careful handling
of tho finances during the past year,
Ihe Board is lu good condition. The;
year closed with a balance to the j
credit of the Board of $151.
A discussion took place on the dif-'
ference   between   the   export   freight
rato  and   the   local   freight  rate   on
Wheat,     This was led by Mr. Paull, j
of  Little  River.      This  was  on   ac-
count of a resolution that had beeu
received from the Associated Boards !
of Trade and was referred back to that'
body for further information.
The retiring president, .Mr. J. \.
McLeod, made a verbal report on the
activities of the Board during the!
year in which he stated that much
good had been accomplished. The
report was received with applause.    '
In preparation I'or the masquerade |
ball to be held on April 24th the foi-
lo«ing committees were appointed:
General—P. L. Anderton. W. J. C
Hannah, W. M. Kennedy. Advertising—A. II. Herd. Ben Hughes, E. L.
.Macdonald. Prizes—Wiliam Douglas, R. U. Hurford. .1. N. McLeod. Refreshments—Theed Pearse. F. R. F.
Blscoe, W. Beard, F. Field. Decorating—Mayor McPherson. F. Dack, W.
Eadle, C. Slmms, M. Blunt, W. t:.
Stubbs.
A discussion took place ou the operation of the Board under the bureau
system.     The debate in favor was led
by P. L. Anderton. After many members had expressed themselves on
the matter, it was decided to carry on
under a modified bureau svstem, as
a reversion to the old committee, system would mean that au amendment
would have to be made to the by-
la ivs.
Alter the business of the meeting, I
refreshments were served under tho I
direction of Mrs. Emblton and Mrs. W.'
McPhee.      Masters Ililbert and Ray-j
mond McLeod, sons of Mr. and  Mrs. I
Samuel  P. McLeod. rendered several'
violin and cornet selections a.nd were '
accompanied  on   the  piano  by   Miss.
Pearl Hunden. William Duncan gave
an Impromptu address on prohibition.
W. \. Kennedy and associates Messrs.
F.   McPherson   and   W.   Eadle  entertained   with  acrobatic  stunts on   tit?
floor.     ('. D. Magglora gave an exhibition of physical culture.     The meeting broke up nt twelve o'clock.
Mr. It. B. Dixon, of the Riverside
Hotel made a business visit to Vancouver this week. He returned with
a cook and waitress who will occupy
positions at tiie Riverside Cafe wlhch
Mr. Dixon hns taken over from Mr.
N. H. Bravender. who has operate!
ihe Riverside Cafe and popularized It
for the past two years. Mr. Bravender has not decided what he Is going
to do.
*    t,    t,
Mr, O. W. Smith. Provincial Government Engineer, returned on Wednesday from a trip to Powell River.
The paper company is preparing to
ilo considerable development work, Including the building of a new wharf
and the raising of the dam twelve
feet.
.       U       //
Mr. Robert Semple. Island representative of the Metropolitan Insurance Company, wns in Courtenay this
week arranging for the transfer of
Mr. F. C, Pearce to another district.
Mr. Ninlan Shlrlav. of Victoria, will
succeed Air. Pearce in Comox District.
SALE OF WORK
REALIZES 1150.00
Miss  Vena Macdonald
friends iu Victoria.
visiting
Mr. Alex Cleland was nursing a bad
cold this week .which kept him in bed
a  couple of days.
*    *    +
Mr. Wilfcrt, of the Wilfcrt Lumber
Company. Campbell River, was in
Courtenay on Wednesday on business.
COURTENAY,—Tbe Ladles' Aid Society of the St. George's PNtfeyterian
Church held a most successful spring
bazaar on Thursday ln tbe basement
of the Church. It was opened at 2.30
by the Rev. W. T. Beattle pastor of
the church who in a appropriate address, eulogized tbe work tbe ladles
of the church had done and are doing.
Various booths had been arranged
and decorated from wblcb sales of
useful homemade articles were sold.
These booths were aa follows, with
their sales lady:
Miscellaneous booth — Mesdames
Herbert Smith, J. Cairns and H. F.
Loggie. Home Cooking booth—Mesdames TV. J. Cairns and J. Rogers.
Apron booth—Mesdames II. Morrison
and W. Brown. Beddlngout plants
booth—Mesdames A. J. McKenzie and
W. Hudson. Fish pond—Mrs. V,
Duck. Candy booth—members of the
C.O.I.T.
Afternoon tea waa served by Mrs.
ton. Mrs. H .McQuillan, Mrs. O. Davis
F. W. Kerton assisted by Mrs. E. Ker-
aud Mrs. Chas. Taylor.
At Intervals during the afternoon
music was played by a phonograph
kindly loaned by the Marshall Music
Co., which was thoroughly enjoyed.
There was a splendid turnout from
all parts of the district and as results
of thc bazaar the treasury of the
Ladles' Aid Society Is richer by a sum
approximately $150. nearly all of
which will be given to tbe funds to
help liquidate the debt on tbe church.
Mr. Robert Duncan wbo went to
California last year after selling out
here .has returned to Courtenay. He
states that California Is alright—for
Americans—but conditions there are
not what they were represented to be.
The Sparks Company, Union Bay
Road, have erected a nitty looking
gas station at their place of business.
The Dove Creek school Is rapidly
asumlng shape, construction having
proceeded to the lathing state. It I*
noped that the building will be ready
for occupation by the first week In
.May.
The committee in charge of the
beautiflcation of the public scbool
grounds have had a team and scrapper at work this week, making preparations for the planting ot trees
and shrubs.
DON'T FORGET THE
Midnight
MATINEE
AT THE
Ilo-llo   Theatre
ON
THURSDAY, April 17th
Doug. Manson
THE COMEDIAN
A RIOT IN THREE ACTS BY HIGH GRADE ARTISTS FROM NANAIMO
INCLUDING
Miss Jean Pattison
THE FAMOUS SINGER
OSSIE   WARDELL
AND A CHORUS OF NANAIMO PRETTY GIRLS
DOORS OPEN 10.30 P.M. PERFORMANCE AT 11 P.M.
BE ON TIME—THE CROWD WILL BE THERE
Don't Miss it—It's a Scream
Admission 50c.
Admission 50c.
J PAGE TWELVE
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 12,  1024.
PS ilKW m
\
Siui, J4 to 46 imhei     S»», isutti inchei     >..- ,
buir, »nj ii ... ;j bull.  Price 40c. bun  Pri« 4JI
jreirt. Price 40c.
STYLES THAT ENTICE AND INTRIGU1 m featured in these
PICTORIAL Rl VII « PATTERNS, 1 i ' PH TOl HAFinrluded without extra cost. You should try ill rOf.RAF! It is the last word
in dressmaking     irtsl   Ex| :riei led -1      nonie   and chil-
ilren can successful!} make a dres< ■ nh rl aid cf ihe P1CTOGRAF.
Ir relK vou exactly >vha< to hi . bow to ru' and hov ro make ir,
The PICTOGRA1   a .ara 1      1 id style 1 f PARIS
TRY A III rORIAI. RET li      I    ITERN TODAY WITH THE
A  VERY SMART RANGE OF LADIES'  DRESSES  HAVE  JL'ST ARRIVED
AND ARE ON VIEW.     WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION.     THE NEWEST
STYLES AS WELL AS THE MUCH   WANTED NEW  MATERIALS.     OUR
PRICES FOR AMOVE  PRESSES ARE VERY   REASONABALE,
Local Briefs
HOLY   TK1X1TY   SERVICES
Services at Holy Trinity Anglican
, Church for Sunday April 13th will he.
1 Holy Communion 11 a.m. Sunday
School 2.30 p.m.     Evensong 7 p.m.
Mrs. T.  Moody will not  receive on
Monday nor again this season.
Mrs. Matthew Drown left for Van-
1 couver on Monday where she will
visit friends tor a week or ten day.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
CHILDREN'S
Fancy   Dress   Ball
Under auspices
LADIES'   AUXILIARY   COMOX   AGRICULTURAL
ASSOCIATION
Easier   Monday,   April   21
AGRICULTURAL HALL, COURTENAY
PRIZES AWARDED FOR
Host  Canadian  Costume
I   Hoy I  Girl
Rest  Flower Girl BeM "Topsy" Rent Nursery  Rhyme
I   Roy 1 Olrl
Rest Comic
Best Advertisement  for Courtenay Store)
Best   Easter Costume Best Red Cross Nurse
Best Highland Costume
1 Hoy I Girl
Best Japanese Costume
FROM 7 TO 10 P.M.
ADMISSION
Children to 10 vears   25c.
All Others  50c.
EASTER MONDAY
| CUMBERLAND SKNIOIt  BASEBALL
(LIB
PRIZE DRAWING
j Hay 2, 1921 Ilo-llo Ilnll
$100.00
IX PRIZES
Tickets 25c 31 Prlaes
;   1 Campbell Dros. value  $9.00
2 Royal  Candy,  value    6.0.)
3 J. Cameron, value   5.00
;   4 C. H. Tarbell, value   5.00
i   5 Matt.  Brown, value   5.00
;   (i mercantile Store, value   5.00
7 Edward TV. Bickle, value .... 5.00
8 Alex  McKinnon. value   4.00
:   0 J. Sutherland, value   4.00
' 10 T. Nakanlshl, value   4.00
11 B. Marlnelll, value   4.00
; 12 Geo. Cavln, value   3.00
i 13 TV.   Henderson, value   3.00
i 14 L.  Frelonl, value   3.00
', 15 Cumberland Hotel, value   3.00
10 Union Tailors .value   3.00
17 Lang's Drug Store   3.00
18 Cumberland   Tailors     3.00
19 Mumford & Walton, value .... 3.00
20 Marshall Music, value   3.00
21 Marrocbi Bros., value   3.00
22 J. T. Brown, value   3.00
23 King George Hotel, value .... 3.00
24 T. Rickson, value   2.50
25 Mann's Bakery, value   2.50
20 TV.  P.  Symons. value   2.50
27 R.   Syltall,  value    2.50
28 J.   Ninaltl,  value     2 25
29 Y. Nukagami, value   2.00
30 I,. R. Stevens, value   1.50
31 S. Davis, value   1.1)0
Tickets  will  be  drawn  at  the
dance being held in the Ilo-llo
Hall
MAY 2, 1924
Plumps Orchestra Music 9.30-2
$1.25 per couple
"Get Behind Our Team and Boost!"
We take this opportunity of expressing our sincere appreciation to the
above merchants for their hearty cooperation in contributing prizes towards the raffle.
CUMBERLAND  BASEBALL
CLUB
COMOX NEWS
F. H. Studebaker ol' the Garford
Motor Truck Co., waa in Comox on
business lor his firm. Mr. Studebak r
was a member of the 2nd Btt. stationed nt Comox.
The Charmer is now back on the
Coniox Powell River run. She has
been relieving tho Princess Pat on
Lhe .Nanaimo trip. Capt. Perry Rogers Is In charge. Capt. Boyce is at
present on the Charlotte.
Tom Moore is now back on the
Charmer   .
Percy Smith has finished his contract clearing for Eugene Croteau oa
tho King Casey Subdivision.
Malcolm Sarel of the B. C. Hotel
and Janitor Supply Co., was In town
on business. He reports the hotel
business good all over the Island.
Jeo. Ruse!, formerly of Comox, now
at Powell River, was In town on Wednesday.
James Stevenson of Vancouver was
in Comox on Wednesday on business.
Leo. Anderton who has charge of tho
King Casey Estate is reported to havo
disposed of several tracts lately.
Among the purchasers are R. J. Kil-
berg Supt. of the Comox Logging Co.,
and Len Harding, foreman of Camp 2.
Ronald Stewart, game warden for
Comox district nnd Cecil (Cougar)
.Smith left by way of Campbell Riv«r
for Nimklsh River to hunt. Cougara
which have been reported as very
troublesome this year.
The prosepcts for the N'ob Hill rest-
dents yetting telephone and electric
light service seem much brighter at
present.
W, L. Clarkson of Mackoy, Smith .t
iJluir Vancouver, is In town to dee
Mr. A. B. Ball.
Zed Pearse and K. U. Wilson visited
Comox on Sunday.
Herb Roy of the Marshall Music
Company has been busy placing musical instruments in the district.
Pat Whelen who left for Washington some time ago has returned to
Little River. Put soys there is no
place like B.C.
Just Arrived
Crosse  and Blackwell's   World
Famous Line of Pickles
Unequaled Quality at Reasonable Prices
2 sizes at 50c. and 75c. per bottle
Including Sour, and Sweet Mixed Pickles, Sour and
Sweet Mixed Chow Pickles, Sour and Sweet Gerkins,
Pickled Walnuts, Small White Onion Pickles, English
Relish .
BISCUIT SPECIALS
Choice Mixed Cakes, per lb 35c, 3 lbs. for $1.00
Crisp Ginger Snap»( 2 lbs  , 45c.
Graham Wafers, per lb  25c.
Lemon and Orange Biscuits, per lb 40c.
Soda Biscuits, large package, each   25c.
6 lb boxes, each $1.00
Soda Biscuits plain or sweet, 8 lb boxes $1.15
Fancy Mixed Biscuits, per lb. 50c and 60c.
Full stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables.
Sunkist Oranges
3, 4, and 5 Dozen for +... $1.00
Large, per dozen  85c.
Sunkist Lemons, per dozen , 35c.
California Sunkist Grape Fruit, 3 for 25c.
Florida Grape Fruit, large 2 for   35c.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
FIRE CAUSES LOSS
OF NEARLY $3,000
COURTENAY,—Shortly   after   two
| o'clock   thin   afternoon   (Friday)   tbo
[ arge barn of Capt. G. R. Bates on the
f -leadquarters  Hoad about  five miles
j :rom Courtenay, was completely de-
[ -troyed by a fire of as yet unknown
jrlgin.      A   team  of  heavy    horses,
).hlch had been working In tho field
ill morning and bad just boon taken
to the barn, were unable to be resiled and were burned to death. Cup.
:aln   Batea   .who   was   formerly   the
Supervisor of the Soldiers' Settlement
Board,   estimates   his   loss   at   $3000,
part of which is covered by insurance.
FOR SALE
m
■ B p-MTJ,»a*ait*wiWM-a^»"
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
ffiEisisisMa&iiaiaEJEiaBiEiaiS
SEEDS THAT GROW
All guaranteed germination 80 per cent.
Many Specially Imported.
See Our Windows
EASTER NOVELTIES
Many are now lakiii},r advantage of our large assortment and reserving their
Easier Eggs, Baskets, Novelties
Reserve Yours Now
Our stock is the most  complete in the City.
Lang's Drug Store
IHE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"II I'AYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
K j*-,,^! ^aj—^TJaTiaaaiaCTi-i:^^CT'.^a aa—"
HOUSE    FOR    SALE-CONTAINING
seven bedrooms, parlor, dining room
kitchen, etc., heated by furnace-
two open fireplaces. Also wash
house ond garage. A snap for anyone going into the boardiugbouse
business. Terms If required. For
further particulars apply to Mrs.
V. Marlnelll, Derwent Avenue    A.19
HATCHING EGGS FOR SALE—BAR-
red Rock and S. C. White Leghorns;
pens headed by splendid male birds.
Select your own pen, $1.50 and J2.00
per setting. Stalker, Happy Valley,
1'hone 92M. A-12
FOR SALE—CHEVROLET TOURING
thoroughly overhauled, new battery,
new radiator, tires all practically
new. Price $1125.00. Easy terras.
P.O. Box 343. Cumberland.
"PROVINCIAL   ELECTIONS   ACT"
Comox Electoral District
NOTICE is hereby given that I shall
on Monday, the 19th day of May, 1924,
at the hour of 10 o'clock in the forenoon, at the Courthouse, Cumberland,
hold a sitting of the Court of Revision for the purpose of revising the
list of voters for the said electo: il
district, and of hearing and determining any and all objections to the re-
'ention of any name on the said list,
■>r to the registration as a voter of any
applicant for registration, and for the
other purposes set forth ln the "Pro-
'inclol Eelectlons Act."
JOHN BAIRD
Registrar ol Voters, Comox Eleo
oral District .
Dated at Cumberland this 11th day
of April 1924.
Spring    Cleaning
and when you commence, go to
TOMMY'S Hardware   STORE
For Wall Paper in all Qualities and the Latest Shades
and Patterns of 1924.
For Bapco Paints and Varnish.
For House Furnishings.
For decorations of all kinds and description, don't forget
TOMMY'S   Hardware STORE
Cumberland, B. C.
I
FOR     SALE—THE     MAPLES     ICE
Cream Parlor and Tea Rooms, Royston Beach.     Price $2800. Terms— '
$1800   cash,   balance  arronged.   W.
Ogllvle, Royston Beach.
WANTED—TO   HEAR   FROM OWN-
er of good Farm for sale. State
cash plrce, full particulars. D. F.
Bush.  Minneapolis  .Minn.
SHILOH STOPS
THAT COUGH
Your grand-parente uied it. Safe,
•ure and efficient. Small dose
meana economy and doei not upset
the ttomach. Qet Shiloh, at all
dealers 80c, 60c and $1.20.
=p The pupils of Mrs. Oliver and Mrs. Finch will present a
I 3-Act
Jf OPERETTA
| "GOLDILOCKS  AND
| THE THREE BEARS"
H In the
I ILO-ILO THEATRE, CUMBERLAND
H on
| Thursday, April 24 th.
Uf at 8.15 p.m. sharp
IllllllliiiiinilPiii:
 iiiimi iwiniii ■ =
LOST-OR TAKEN FROM CHEV.
Car, parcel containing drygoods.
Reward on return to Alex Don-
holme.
LOST—A PAIR OF KLEINE PLIERS
on Dunsmuir Ave. Finder please return to II. C. Telephone Co. Cumberland.
Brew This Fine
Spring Tonic Yourself!
Brew a cup of this gentle and effective
remedy and take it at bedtime three
timet a week for three weeka.
Celery King
It will purify the blood, make yeu feel
vigoroui and healthy at a eost ef only
a few cents. Give It to the children,
too. Everyone needs a spring tome—
(Oe and (Oe, at druggiste. I
•aaaaaaa^aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaajaaajaiBaaaaBajBjBaaaaa
Admission 50c. Reserved Seats 75c.
Seat plan at Theatre Box Office
Proceeds after deduction of expenses to be donated to
the G.W.V.A.
I   BOOK YOUR SEATS EARLY j
lliHHiilHillffilllli

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