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The Cumberland Islander Nov 10, 1923

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 H   *
!«E CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Wl
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Witt which ls eeiselMsM the Camberlaod Newt,
FORTY-SECOND YEAR — No. 45
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA,   SATURDAY,   NOV.   10th,   1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
/
I   o
LEAGUE LEADERS
DEFEAT LADYSMITH
Fust Cnnie on Sunday Last on Local
Grounds—Brilliant Display of Goal
...Tending by Both Goal Keepers.
The fastest game of soccer on the
local grounds was the one played last
Sunday when the Ladysmith eleven
paid a visit to Cumberland. The locals had two new men in their line-up,
Graham and Turner,t playing centre
forward and inside right respectively.
Milligan took the right half position,
Hitchens going to the right back position, James and Gough being given
a rest. This switching round of the
team came in for a great deal of criticism from the tans, and on the play
of the team In the first half, it was
justified.
Reteree A. S. Jones had the players
facing one another right on time, and
from ihe centre kick the visitors made
tracks for Blair, who was early called
upon to save punting up the fleld with
a hefty kick.
The locals re-organized forward
line, made valiant efforts to get going,
but owing to a lack of understanding
amongst them, some good passes were
spoiled. The visiting forwards were
combining nicely. Anderson at outside right having a glorious chance
to score, kicked past when in a good
position. Right from the goal kick,
the visitors made tracks (or the Cumberland goal, Blair being applauded
for a couple of good saves. The homesters at this stage of the game began
to settle down, enjoying more of the
game as a conequence. Boyd the visitors' goalie was called upon to save
a hot shot from the right wing and
In lesB than two minutes stopping one
from the left. Play was quickly transferred lo the other end, Blair bringing the crowd to their feet with a
marvellous Bave, tipping a fast one
over the bar. The resulting corner
kick waB easily cleared, the home forwards swarming around Boyd, who
saved in masterful style, the ball going out to Bannerman, who, with a
right-foot drive bulged the back of
the net, giving Boyd no chance, the
goalie going.full-length ln an effort
to 'save. With only about six or seven minutes to go, the pace became
faster, the visitors striving for the
equalizer and the homesters endeavoring to Increase their lead. Halt-
time arrived with Cumberland leading by the odd goal. The first half of
the game produced some good football with Ladysmith having u slight
edge.
Hot Pace In Second Half
The second half opened up at a
fast pace with the home team forcing
the play, Boyd being called upon to
save a hot one. End to end play followed both goal-keepers making some
splendid saves. The two old Cumberland players, Boyd and Campbell,
were playing a great game for Ladysmlth at this stage, Boyd saving his
side repeatedly. Ladysmlth tried advancing on both wings In turn, but
they were of no avail, Stewart and
Hitchens transferring Deluce and
Turner ln the home right mode
spectacular run, rounding the
full back with ease, Deluce centering
accurately, which Graham gathered
sending In a beautiful shot which
Boyd saved on the ground, with Plump
charging heavily, both players needing a little attention. During the la.it
fifteen minutes the visitors made valiant efforts to equalize, forcing the
homesters to play on the defensive
for a time. Both teams in the closing
stages were beginning to feel the effects of the hot pace, the last few minutes being fought out ln mid-field.
Cumberland emerging winners by a
score of 1—0.
The feature of the game was the
superb goal-tending of Boyd and Blair.
Both these stalwarts played ln faultless style, saving the side repeatedly.
McCormick, right-half for Ladysmlth
played a sterling game, being about
the best man on the fleld. The two
new men on the Cumberland line-up
gave a fair account of themselves and
wlll no doubt Improve when they get
better acquainted. "Toots" played
his usual consistent game, Deluce and
Bannerman making two exceptionally
fine outside men. The half-back lineup was a little weuk, with Sackl easily the pick.
Christmas Tea
December 12th
The Ladies Auxiliary of Holy Trln.
lty Church will hold a Christmas
Tea ln the Anglican Hall from 3 to
6 on Wednesday, December 12th.
There will also be a stall ot Christmas novelties,'and a Novelty Stall, at
which Christmas puddings and mincemeat will be sold. Make a note of
the date, Wednesday, December 12th.
"MASTERS OF MEN"
Big Sea Slory With the Naval Battle
of Santiago, and Destruction of
the Spanish Fleet
"Masters of Men" by Morgan Robertson, the world's most noted writer
of sea stories, is to be shown at the
Ilo-llo theatre Friday and Saturday.
Critics have unanimously acclaimed
this picture as the greatest sea story
ever screened. The picturlzatlon by
C. Graham Baker has retained loyally
the atmosphere of the novel by America's master teller of sea storels,
and Vitagraph, who offers it, has provided a lavish production, with an all
star cast.
"Masters of Men" tells the story ot
an American boy wbo accepted the
shame of another's crime that he
might protect the girl he loved from
humiliation. Branded In his home
town as a thief the lad runs away and
jonis the United States Navy. While
on leave he is shanghaied and suffers
the brutality accorded to men before
the mast on board a four master sailing the Spanish Main. How he effects
his escape and aids ln the destruction ot the Spanish fleet at Santiaga
provides a thrilling drama which holds
Interest throughout every foot of the
screening.
There are four principal parts, as
the story involves the love affairs of
four young people. Earle Williams,
one of the most popular stars on the
screen, plays Lieutenant Breen, the
officer who assists Dick Halpin (play-
by Cullen Landis) to win back honor
and manhood. Pretty Alice Calhoun
who has been starred ln many Vita-
graph productions and Wanda Hawley,
long a popular star, play the chief
women's rolea.
lt ls a picture of types and of vivid
realsm. The selection of types ls
said to have been perfect, particularly
of those actors who play the brutal,
hard fighting men who comprise the
crew of the "Mary Earl," Dick Sutherland and Jack Curtis, who play the
mate and captain of the four-master,
are known to fans as the most brutal
looking actors in motion pictures.
They give realism to Morgan Robertson's description of the brutes who
made life a hell for men before the
mast.
"Masters of Men" should provide
excellent entertainment at the Ilo-llo
theatre.
Automobile Hit
Train-2 Injured
Courtenay, B. C, November, 9th.—
Mrs. W. W. Moore and Mrs. H. S.
Baker were badly ' shaken up and
bruised on Thursday evening when a
motor car driven by Mr. Baker came
into collision with the E. & N. railway
train at the crossing near the depot.
Mrs. Baker is at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. W. R. Cooke with her back hurt
and other injuries. Mrs. Moore was
severely cut about the head and the
face. Fortunately the train was slowed down approaching the station, otherwise the accident might have resulted fatally.
SPLENDID BASEBALL
PICTURE COMING
The feature pictute at the Ilo-llo
nalf | Theatre on Monday and Tuesday la
"Trifling with Honor" a dandy base
ball story, a picture that is 100% en.
tertainment. Some of the big base'
ball stars are seen in action In this
big feature.
Tom Mix ls coming on Wednesday
and Thursday. Mix will be seen in
his latest picture "Stepping Fast."
SILENCE PERIOD TO HONOR THE DEAD OF THE
EUROPEAN WAR
His Worship Mayor Charles J. Parnham requests that
a twowiinute silence be. observed throughout the City at
eleven o'clock on the morning of Sunday November 11th,
which is Armistice Day. This is in accordance with arrangements made for a similar commemoration throughout
the world. Church bells will have stopped rinsing, congregations will remain standing, and during the two minutes
from eleven o'clock the City Fire Bell will toll eleven times.
Prizes, Money, Fun nnd Frolic—Nov.
20th, Agricultural Hall, Courtenay.
Close Call For
Mr. William Orr
Courtenay, B. C„ November, 9th.—
On Thursday night Mr. Wm. Qrr,
janitor of the Candlan Bank of Commerce was shot In the hand, the result of foolish playing with a gun in
the hands of the boys working there.
The boys it seems were examining
the gun, one of them took the shells
out of it and laid tt down, the other
took the gun up and loaded It, not
telling his mate what he had done, ln
a jest the gun was pointed in Orr's
direction and when the trigger wos
pulled, to the surprise of the lad it
went off. Mr. Orr is nursing a sore
hand and certainly had a miraculous
escape.
CONCERT AT ST. GEORGE'S WHIST DRIVE AND   DANCE
VERY SUCCESSFUL WELL ATTENDED
Memorial Service
Armistice Day
Sunday November Uth, being Armistice Day the citizens ot Cumberland
and district are invited to join with
the Cumberland Branch of the G. W.
V. A. In commemorating the Fifth Anniversary of the day upon which the
armistice, that brought hostilities in I    Suggestions  thnt ships coming  to
the Great ^ar to a conclusion wus j Vancouver for grain and other car-
WHAT'S THE MATTER
WITH VANCOUVER
ISLAND COAL?
Welsh Coal May be Shipped to (oust.
Lon  Rule Possible   on    Vessels
Coming for   Grain    Arouses
Interest.
signed. ' A memorial service will lie
held at Holy Trinity Church, when
the local branch ot the G. W. V. A.
will attend as a body. Service commences at 10:45 a.m., and the two
minutes silence will be observed it
11 a.m. Comrades attending are asked to wear a poppy, medals and decorations.
After service the Veteraus will parade to the Memorial Arch, where
wreaths wlll be placed by the Church
and other Societies. Anyone who desires to place a wreath on the Ann
are asked to be at the Hall at 12 noon.
POPULAR YOUNG COUPLE
goes from the old lnnd should be put
into service carrying Welsh authru-
cite coal for sale In the west Is meeting with approval of a number of the
shipping men.
It is pointed out that a number of
ships have come across the Atlantic
to Vancouver to carry groin with light
cargoes or entirely In ballast.
It is believed that ships would be
willing to pick up coal as as distress
cargo and give o low rate making it
possible to sell the cargo in Vancouver in competition with coul of B.C. at
present prices. The Welsh coal Is anthracite of high quality and, It is stated, would find o market here even If
Lhe prices were higher than the coals
UNITED IN MARRIAGE | of b. a
Investigation of
St. George's Presbyterian Church Th, whlst Dr,ve and Da„ce held in
Concert held on Tuesday evening was i the llo-Ilo dance hall on Wednesdoy
very successful. There was a very' evenmg mder tne ausp|ce, of 8t.
good attendance, and the receipts of John.a Ambulance Association, Cum-
the evening were a little over flfty j berIand Centrei wa8 a huge 9ucce9B.
dollars, and the program was all that; The members and their trends were
could be desired. The following art-. al, preBent t0 tne number of some
ists took part, Miss Fulcher. Mrs.; tnne hundred. The decorations were
Lowe, Miss Howard, Mrs. Ledingham, j beautiful, which were partially pre-
Mr. Murray, Mr.Splttal, Miss Hunden, pared by the mieg of the Canadian
Miss Bennie, Mrs. Baxter, Mrs. Blair,, Collieries staff for their dance to be
jjttr. Goodall, accompanist Mrs. Finch. | heW „„ Friday evening.
The piano for the evening waB loaned
by the Marshall Music Co.
ARMISTICE DAY
Mrs. A. Thomson met with a painful accident during the week, cutting
her hand severely. The Injured lady
was taken to the Cumberland General
Hospital for treatment and is progressing favorably.
Prizes, Money, Fun and Frolic—Nov.
20th, Agricultural Hall, Courtenay.
Next Sunday, November 11th, there
will be a church parade of returned
men from the G. W. V. A. BuildliiK.
Courtenay, to the Memorial Calm,
where service will be held. Those attending are requestd to assemble at
2:15 p.m. dressed In civics and medals.
Mr. William Duncan and Colonel
Warden wlll lead the parade.
Every returned man ls requested to
make an effort to attend.
Dean Coleman To
Address Meeting
A public meeting will be held ln the
auditorium ot the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Society at 8 p.m. on
Thursday evening. Dean Coleman of
the University of B.C. and A. C. Stewart of Victoria will address the meeting-
This Is the first item on the program
of the Comox District Teachers' Institutes second annual convention,
which will be held In Cumberland on
Friday November 16, ending with a
banquet and dance in the G. W. V,. A,
Hall.
Football Notes
Games for this week end are as
follows:— Davenports vb Cumberland
at Nanaimo; Ladysmlth vb Northfleld
at Ladysmith; G. W. V. A. vs Nanaimo
City at Nanaimo.
The Cumberland football team will
visit the lively Davenports on Sunday
and no doubt there will be plenty of
excitement for the paid attendance,
as both teams are playing good football at present. The Davenports who
last week beat out the Vets are a
bunch of young, aggressive players,
wbo are to be watched tor the full
ninety minutes, as they are full of
fight from start to finish. It was these
fast-stepping Davenports who were
able to hold the Dominion Champions
to a draw ln the early stages of the
league and they have made some remarkable improvements since then.
The locals, however, are taking no
chance as the management has selected a strong eleven for Sunday's
game and fully expect they will be
able to do a little better than hold
their opponents. The team will line
up the same as last week with the exception of Gough, who will replace
Hitchens at full back. Hitchens has
decided to take a day off as his knee
is still giving him a little trouble and
he wants to have It at Its best again
as soon as possible. Gough, however,
Is no stranger to the (ull back position and ts always able to give a good
account of himself.
The management ot the junior
teams contemplating entering for the
O. B. Allan Cup, emblematic of the
Junior Soccer Championship of the
province, have commenced to line up
their talent as games are to be commenced as soon as possible. The
Cumberland Juniors, present Cup
Holders, are gathernlg together a.
strong aggregation. Bevan have already got their eleven lined up and
say they are prepared for the best i i
B.C. The Junior Constitution has no
age limit, which allows teams a large
scope from which to gather material,
consequently some good games should
be provided. The Cumberland boys
are not giving anything out as regards their players, but say they have
a surprise in store for the fans. Bevan is relying on the following to carry them to the championship: J. Walker, J. Robertson, W. Marshall, T. Herd
J. Weir, W. Keenan, H. Strachan, G.
Burns, R. Aitken, W. Walker, D. Watson and R. Strachan and D. Lockhart
as reserves.
St. John's Ambulance Association
has made rapid strides during the
last twelve months, this was visible
at the annual whist drive and dance
on Wednesday evening.
James Quinn, President of the Association in bis opening remarks after
those present had indulged In a good
game of whist announced the ending
of a successful year, and In an able
address stated 42 candidates had passed the recent examination. He said
great credit was due Dr. MacNaughton and Dr. Hicks and A. J. Taylor,
lecturers to the classes, and it was
due to their untiring efforts that the
Association had attained such a high
standard. He also spoke of the generosity of tbe management ot the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
who In rendering financial assistance
to the Aasociaton made It possible
for them to carry on this great and
noble work, and extended a hearty
Invitation to all present to' become
members. The president then called
upon Mr. Charles Graham, General
Superintendent to present the prizes
to the successful candidates. Mr.
Graham upon coming forward in a
few well chosen remarks congratulated the officers and members of the
association In such a splendid showing. He also mentioned, and gave
praise to the efforts of tho lecturers,
and then proceeded to distribute the
prizes to the students making the highest marks in the various grades.
First year male class: 1st J. Kit-
bride, military brushes; 2nd W. Wood,
Gold pencil. Second year male class.
1st Sidney Hunt, kodak; 2nd W. Taylor, military brushes. Third year male
claas: 1st Charles Nash, Kodak; 2nd
J. D. Davis, Safety Razor; Fourth
year male class; R. Reid, Club Bag;
Fifth year, male class; A. J. Taylor,
Berry dish and spoon. Juvenile male
class; Master William Brown, Fountain pen; Master George Brown, Fountain pen. This brought forth considerable applause aa the two brothers
marched up to receive their pens.
Female First Aid Class.
Female First Aid Class: 1st Mrs.
J. Hunden, cut glass cream and sugar,
2nd Mrs. George Shearer, jewel bo.<.
Female Juvenile First Aid Class. Special prize Miss May Hughes, manicure
set. Female Home Nursing; 1st. Mrs.
W. Hudson, cut glass fruit dish, 2nd
MrB. F. Covert, Jewel box. Beautiful egg sets were presented to Drs.
MacNaughton and Hicks and a clock
to A. J. Taylor, as a mark of appreciation for services rendered, the retiring secretary, Mr. J. D. Davis also received a 14k. gold fountain pen. Danc-
ng commenced and dainty refreshments were served by the ladles.
Two of Nanaimo's best known ami
most popular young people were united iu the bonds of holy matrimony
this morning at 11:30 by   the   Rev.
Father Heynen at the Rectory, Wallace street, the ceremony being witnessed by immediate relatives and a
few close friends of the contracting I
parties.    The principals in this most J
interesting event In the lives of two
young people were Mr. Gerald Berry,,
a well-known member of the Powers
& Doyle staff, and    Miss    Kathleen
Merrilleld, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
George  Merrilleld,  Victoria Crescent.
The bride, who looked charming In
a beautiful gown of white beaded
georgette, wearing a silk seal cloak ,
and pale grey hat trimmed with os-1
trlch feathers, was given away by her
father and was attended by Miss Constance Pollock of Nanaimo, attired in
a beautiful creation of pale green shot
tafetta with picture hat to match, and
by Miss Mary McFadden of Victoria,
attired in a handsome gown of crepe
de chene and wearing a picture hat to
match, the groom being supported by
Mr. Stanley Jemson.
At the close of the marriage ceremony the wedding party retired to the
home of the bride's parents where an
  the   proposal   to
bring anthracite coal from Wales Is
proceeding at tlle Vancouver city hall.
This was one of the propositions that
Aid. Pettipiece has brought forward.
The merits of other proposals, including the taking over of the output
of anthracite mines in the Interior,
are also being looked Into, and Aid.
Pettipiece expects, witli the assistance
of mining engineers, to be able to
place a definite project before the
council at an early date.
The Alderman has been assured that
Welsh cool could be sold in Vancouver for $15 a gross ton whereas anthracite is now selling in the city at about
$26.00.
B. of T. Special
Meeting Tuesday
The Cumberland Board of Trade
will bold a special meeting In the
Council Chambers on Tuesday evening at S o'clock. Every business man
should be present and others who arc
interested In the welfare of the city
and district.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ It will be an important meeting, inelaborate luncheon was served and a i »ofar as Cumberland is concerned,
reception held, Mr. and Mrs. Berry re- [ We understand several local matters
ceiving many beautiful and costly will come up for discussion. Fuel oil
wedding gifts, attesting in silent but as " effects the cool Industry of this
no less eloquent manner the popular-1 ,s'and will be shown in all Its stages.
lty the young couple enjoyed throughout the city and district in which they
are so well and favorably known.
The newly married couple left on
the afternoon boat for the Mainland.
It is absolutely necesnry thot you be
there.
It is contended that if thc Provincial Government now in session can
place a sales tax of three cents per
the bride's going away dress being of I gallon on gasoline for the purpose d£
amethyst chamoisette cloth trimmed ! having paved roads through the prov-
with fur nnd wearing her wedding ['"<*• tuen why "ot l>lace the same tax
hat and cloak.      " i °" '"el u" for tne benefit of the coal
Miss Kathleen Merrilleld Is a nelce ! mlllers ot the Island who corn their
of Mr. and Mrs. W. Merrilleld of this i lljl"6 '»' digging coal and Hint they
city, and during her periodical visits ■ >"*>' »aT0 stea(lv employment
to Cumberland made a host of friends, '    The Associated Boards of Trade will
 ! meet lu Vancouver on Thursday Nov.
15th. It Is said the convention wilt
Inst three days during thnt period
several matters wlll be token up effect-
this Island and the province. One of
the most important will be a duty on
fuel oil.
At Tuesday's meeting it will lie necessary to select a strong delegation
Come And Meet
Harold Lloyd
lated Boords of Trade, and place our
case very vividly before the business
men of this province, in the hope that
we mny get some reliet' from the
Provincial or Federal Government.
Other platters that will be token up
ot the convention ore Personal Property Tax, rood construction, and some
other twenty-five subjects. Every
Hoard of Trade In the province will
represented, ATTEND TUESDAYS MEETNO. IT IS TO YOI'K
INTEREST. TO HE THERE,
Come and meet the Happy Couple
of Fllmdom—Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Lloyd.   Yes, they are no other than
the spectacled comedian. Harold, and '10 aU™u ll.le convention of the Assoc
his pretty little leading lady, Mildred
Davis,
Harold and Mildred are coming in
the Gaiety theatre, Courtenay in the
seven-reel Pnthecomedy, "Safety
Last," and the big event in their live i
took place shortly after the completion  of  the  production.
This delightful romance of the sll-
versheet began about three years ago
when Mildred joined the Hal Roach ! be
forces and made her first appearance
with Harold In the two-reel comedy.
"From Hand to Mouth." A warm
friendship sprang up between the
young people resulting In merry wedding bells. And "Safety Last" by the
way, is the last picture in which Harold and Mildred wlll be seen together.
for Mrs. Lloyd Is to star in her own
right In feature pictures.
It is a fitting thing that "Safety
Last" tells one of the most charming
love stories ever presented in picture!
As the Boy, head over heels In love,
Harold gets into the most trying difficulties, In fact, Lloyd climbs the side
of a twelve story building, and runs
Into more hair-raising situations thnn    	
anyone could Imagine.     But his   re- j	
ward ls winning the love of his screen I A letter received from A. Mlchie.
sweetheart, The Girl, and, Incldcntly. I Ladysmith, re Mr. A. S. Jones, nt*t-
Mrs. Harold Lloyd. Come and wish I tude in last week's soccer gome Is
I them loads of happiness! |held over until next Saturday.
Victoria Nov. 9—There was an increase in soles of Crown timber during the first nine months of the present year of 112 pur cent, over that recorded for the corresponding period
In 1922. The first nine months of 1922
showed 111 sales valued at $40(1.1114.96,
as against 024 sales valued ol $1,1.11.
00.S9 for the same period of this year.
Total soles for the year 1922 amounted to $862,888.49, composed of 671
parcels, showing an increase of $268.
142.20 in this period as against the
Whole of last year. PAGE TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th,    1923
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
COMOX  VALLEY  COW TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following' is o list of cows that gavefifty pounds or more of Butterfat for
Owner
October.
Name of Cow
Lucy
Bunny
Spot
Spike
Strawberry 2nd.
Strawberry 1st
Buddy
Fern of Sandwick
Marie
Beautiful Margery
Breed   Milk
lbs.
Gr. Jersey 1563
Gr. Jersey 1170
Gr. Jersey 1269
Gr. Jersey 939
Gr. Jersey 630
Gr. Jersey 1002
Gr. Jerseyll76
Reg. Jersey 1428
Gr. Jersey 930
Reg. Jersey 834
T.
Fat
lbB.
68.7
67.8
63.4
61.9
59.2
58.0
54.0
51.28
51.1
50.0
Mrs. McMillan
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
Wi A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
Geo. Hornby
Prltchard Bros.
W. A. Urquhart
A. Menzies, Supervisor
LEAVES FOR
MOUNT VERNON
Mr. Patrick Whelan, who a few
days ago sold the stock and Implement of his farm at Lazo, left on
Sunday for Vancouver, from where
he will go (o Mount Vernon, Wash
ington, where he will in future make
his home, Mr. Whelan has taken
position with Mr. Allen, one of the
pioneer loggers of the Paclllc Coast,
who at one time logged ln Comox
Valley, but Is now located south of
the line.
MEMORIAL SERVICES
NEXT SUNDAY
Next Sunday at Sandwlck a memorial service will be held by the G. W.
V. A., in which Col. Worden will take
part. Other leading personages will
also be present at the memorial
cairn.
DENMAN-PIONEER
LAID TO REST
Last Sunday most of the population
of Denman Island and a large number of people from other parts of the
district paid their last respects to
one who has been a resident of the
Island for many yenrs when they at-
RE
ROYSTON POST OFFICE
PHONE 70 X
C. W. SILLENCE
ROYSTON'S QUALITY GROCER
THE BEST FOR LESS
ALL OUR GROCERIES ARE SPECIALS
We carry no inferior makes, but all Quality Merchandise and one price to all.   The lowest possible.
Del Monte Pears, 2&s per tin 50
Del Monte Peaches, 2Ws per tin 45
Del Monte Sliced Pineapple, 40
Del Monte Crushed Pineapple 30
Our Own Blend Tea, 1 lb. pkts 60
Our Own Blend Tea, 3 lb. pkts    1.75
Empress Marmalde, 4 lb. tins  80
Empress Strawberry Jam, 4 lb. tin     1.00
Beach-Eakins Loganberry Jam, 4 lb. Tin  75
Beach-Eakin Strawberry Jam, 4 lb. Tin 90
Royal Household Flour, 49 lb. Sack    2.00
Royal Standard Flour, 49 lb. Sack    2.00
Purity Flour, 49 lb. Sack     2.00
Sunlight Soap per carton     .25
Pels Naptha Soap per carton  90
St. Charles, Pacific, and Carnatio nMilk, 7 for ....    1.00
Oranges, 3 dozen for     1.00
V. M. Rolled Oats, 20 lb. Sacks     1.00
BUY BY THE BOX
Apples per box, Kings, The King of apples     CI (LK
for eating and cooking   «JX«Ui»
Hours of business 8:30 to 6:30. — Saturday 8:30 to
10:00 p.m.
WE   DELIVER
Results HIGHLY Satisfactory
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Nov. 8th, 1921
Dominion Life Assurance Co.
Waterloo, Ont.
Dear Sirs:—
In the matter of my policy No. 6121, which matures on December 1st, of this year, I beg to inform you
ee in your offered options.that I prefer the first choi
This is the cash of $1,415.00.
1 also beg to say that I can't help but consider that
the result of this policy is highly satisfactory, and I
only wish that other policies I had, had been in your
company.
I am,
Yours very truly,
(Signed)     G. A. RIX.
THE  DOMINION  LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Waterloo, Ont.
His Master's Voice
Records-Latest November
Numbers are now in stock at
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
J "It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
McLeod's Store
Be WESTERN!
STETSON HATS
New Styles in
Blue — Black — Iron-Grey — Brown
These Hats are selling very fast.   Come in early and
get a good choice
J. McLEOD
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Courtenay. B,C.
tended the obsequies of the late Mr.
John Wood. As noted In the columns
of the Islander last Saturday Mr.
Wood passed away at the Comox Hospital on Friday, the 2nd Inst, aud the
funeral was held at Denman Island
lost Sunday. From Sutton's Undertaking Parlors, Courtenay, the body
was taken to Union Bay and across
to the Island under direction of members of the Native Sons of Canada, of
which organiation the- late Mr. Wood
was a member. They were relieved
of this duty at the Presbyterian
Church where Island friends of lhe
family acted as pall-bearers. The
Hev. Andrew Walker conducted an
impressive service nt the church, extending the sympathy of Uie entire
community to the bereaved family
and feelingly regretting the loss ot a
valued member of the congregation.
The pallbearers were Messrs. Howard
McForlane, John Scott, James Swan,
James' McNaught, Jiuiics Street nnd
Edward Oraham.
The Into Mr. Wood wus born on
Fourth of July, 1883, at Eden Lake;
Plctou County, Novo Scotia, but had
lived In Western Canada the greater
portion of his life, operating a form
and being interesetd In logging ou
Denman Island. Besides his wife
there are ieft to mourn his passing
six children.
LEAVES FOR
ABBOTTSFORD
Last Sunday while chopping wood
Mr. II. V. Collins hod tho misfortune
lo almost sever the index finger of
his left hand. First aid service rendered by Mrs. Collins and medical care
by Dr, Butters save the linger.
Last Friday night at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. John Grieve, Sandwick,
a farewell party was tendered Mr.
Thomas Menzies, who has been transferred by the Department of Agriculture to Abbottsford where he will
carry on Uie work of supervisor of
the Cow Testing Association.
Mr. .Menzles has been eminently
successful as supervisor In Comox
Valley and he has gone to his new
field carrying the good wishes ot his
friends in all parts of the district.
About^ forty guests were assembled on
Friday night and during the evening
he was presented with a gold watch
as a mark of the esteem in which he
lias been held. The presentation was
made by Mr. Peter McLauglin of
Headquurters. ThlB preceded a sec.
ond presentation, three members of
Courtenay Assembly No. 3, Native
Sons ot Canada taking Mr. Menzios
completely by surprise when they, on
behalf of their brethern, handed him
a gold watch chain as a token of appreciation for the work he had done
in connection, with the local Assmbly.
Mr. Menzies feelingly responded, and
thanked his friends for their appreciative remarks and the gifts bestowed
upon him. The party continued until the wee snia' hours after having
bid farewell to the gucBt of the evening.
Prizes. Money, Fun nnd Frolic—Nov
30th, Agricultural Hall, Courtenny.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, November 9th and 10th
NEVER A SEA PICTURE LIKE THIS
"Masters of Men"
men whose veins run
—A thrilling story of he-men,   ^^^^^^^^^^^
hot with fighting blood.
—The Sea! The flavor of salt in the nostrils, the odor
of pitch in the air, the snapping of wind-swept canvass
cracking like a machin gun, the creaking, singing wood
straining as she rides the high waves.
—All the magic and lure of adventure, the Spanish
Main and adventure.
—And then the Climax! the naval battle ol' Santiago
and the sinking of the Spanish Fleet.
EXTRA ATTRACTIONS— SUNSHINE COMEDY AND OTHER SHORT FEATURES
MATINEE SATURDAY 2:30 p.m.
DANCE SATURDAY at 9:30 p.m.
PLAY   BALL!
NEXT MONDAY AND TUESDAY "PLAY BALL" —See the greatest of all baseball
stories "TRIFLING WITH HONOR" an 8 reel   SPECIAL   AT   REGULAR   PRICES
NEXT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY TOM MIX IN
"STEPPING FAST"
DEMPSEY-FIRPO FIGHT PICTURES
Coming MONDAY and TUESDAY NOVEMBER 19th and 20th, the DEMPSEY-FIRPO
FIGHT PICTURES AND THE BIG SPECIAL "MAIN STREET"	
ON BIG GAME HUNT
Messrs. John Sutton, L. It. Cliffe,
Walter Cliffe and Ted. Cliffe have
gone north In .Mr. Sutton's gasboat U
spend a few days hunting big game.
BEVAN JUNIORS
ELECT OFFICERS
The Bevan Juniors at their annual
meeting decided to change their name
and will now be known as The Rangers. The election of ofllcers resulted
in R. Walker becoming manager, J.
Weir, secretury-treasurer; W. Waugh.
trainer; Jas. Drummond and T. Robertson, Committee.
The Rangers will meet Cumberland
in the first league match on Sunday,
Nov. 11th on the Cumberland grounds.
Courtenay  '
Auto Painters
Bring your cars In for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN~
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
UNION   HOTEL
(I'MHKltl.ANIl, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
20  rooms, electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
It. YATF8, Manager.
33
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Caurtenay, B.C.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Off ce:   Cor. of Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite   Ilo-llo  Theatre
^     CUMBERLAND, B. C. SATURDAY. NOVEMBER  10th,    1023
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
PAGE thre:
'HREEf   I
V
It's Very Simple
A CAMEL has an easy job making her getaway through the
eye of a needle compared with the fellow who tries to get
results from poorly printed advertising matter. Ous. staff
is composed of specialists in their respective lines who will be
glad to help you get results worth while.
PHONIC
3-5       The   Cumberland   Islander
DUNSMUIR      AVENUE,    CUMBERLAND
SAVE HUGE SUM ON WHEAT
SHIPPED VIA B.C. COAST
S. DAVIS
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
—AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue 1
ojeKJgSJSIeKK
"bee
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
COURTENAY
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting with Boat at Union Boy
every Sundi.y Morning. Leave Cum'
berland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Victoria, Nov. 9— What has been
accomplished by British Columbia's
agitation for equalization of freight
rates, and more especially in respect
of some reduction in the cost of transporting grain to Pacific Coast ports,
ls best understood by the fact thot on
over 20,000,01)0 bushels of wheot ship,
ped to the British Columbia coast
there will be a total saving in freight
of |l,020,00D.OO. This has been
brought about by the reduction of 6
cents per 100 pounds to which effect
was given in August 1922, and the 2ft
cents tier 100 pounds which went Into
effect recently. Last year 20,000,000
bushels of wheat were shipped
through British Columbia ports and
it con lie taken for granted that in
view of the various considerations
which are already entering Into tlle
transportation of Canadian grain this
season, at least double the volume can
be expected to pass this way 'during
the present season.
While the reduction that has been
made by the Board of Railway' Commissioners In relation to grain does
not affect in any way the more general principle Involved iu the equalization of freight rates, It is felt by
the Government of British Columbia
that a signal success has been achieved Inasmuch ns the reduction so far
sanctioned is tantamount to a recognition of tiie justice of the wider,principle involved.
"We are entitled to the reduction
as we paid for it under the terms of
union and we are outto get it" was
lhe expression of view given by Premier Oliver when discussing this matter recently.
MUNICIPAL REVIEW
OF CANADA
The current Issue of "The Municipal Review of Canada" marks another
annual milestone in its life. Prom
1905 to 1917 lt was a power in thc
land, and since a complete re-organization took place last year it nas
been coming back strong, and rendering valuable service to the municipal
interests of tbe country.
The October issue is the best effort
made by the present management and
includes the Official Report of the
23rd Annual Convention of the Union of Canadian Municipalities. This
be called "tor early In March and the
first round matches played off duriug
that month. The semi-finals and finals could be run off by the end of
June.
| This proposition has been looked
upon with favor by a number of the
I B.C.F.A. officials and it will "come bc-
! fore the governors at the next meet-
! ing for action.
1    Two important resolutions adopted
! by ihe Dominion football Association
have been brought to the attention of
the B. C. body. The first is that a
former Old Country professional must
receive a permit from his association
i before playing in Canada.
...           ,         .,.,.., i    Tne other states that o player re-
body which pre-dates the Municipal    ,•    ,-..,.. .„ : , -. ,    ,      '
„    ,       .      . ,   . Z  Z.  \ turning to his distr ct is the property
Review  by  two  years, selected  th is I   - ,.    ,     ...      "       '     '•"•"'•'!
,  .. „„, , , i of the team with which he last play-
paper to represent them as Otfic a L,    „ „ ■...        . ,        '    '
. .. .     .   .    „      ed.    If a player who was transferred
organ and Ib read throughout the Do-   ,„„„, '   . ..      ,
from one team to another In the district moves away and later returns io
that district he is the property, not of
j of the second.
INVESTING FOIt TIIE FAMILY
minion.
Included ln the contents are many
live contributions, such as a splendid i Ik" ,r'r,*',"V'    „      ..
.. , ... „.. - ^ „, „ lhe "rBt C|UD' as "'c °'d low rood, but
article on the City Budget; Fire Prevention, Parole System In Ontario.
The Fundamental Plan, and a number of other Interesting features. The
number is profusely illustrated and
is altogether a splendid contribution
to the municipal cause.
Future issues as announced in this
issue are Snow Removal In November,
Municipal Who's Who ill December,
composed   of   lists   of   the   principal
Royal Candy Co.
.    'Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons —, Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   >  -    Proprietor
  L: . 1.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MANE TO ORDER.
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN TIIE HEAD,
AND NASAL CATARRH.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
♦       ■   ■
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
-   Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Pressing    •     Cleaning
Telephone 1.     •     I*. 0,
Repairs
Box 17
CUMBERLAND, II. C.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
Delivered to All Parts of District.
Coitl, Wood und Goods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
MANN'S
BAKERY
FOR BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection — See our Window
HOT PIES A SPECIALTY
Once you try them, you always prefer them.—Order
early and do not be disappointed.
Wedding, Christening and Birthday Cakes to Order
— Phone 18 —
DUNSMUIR AVE. CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
The new Continental remedy culled
"Ii A It M A L E N E" (ltcgd.) -
Is a simple harmless home-treatment
which absolutely cures deafness, noises In the head, etc. Nn Expensive Appliances Needed for this new Ointment, Instantly operates upon the affected parts with complete nnd permanent success. Scores of Wonderful
Cures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Urn. K. Wilkinson, of Slud Itond,
Stroud, writes:—"Please could I
trouble you to send mc another box of
the Ointment. It is not for myself, bul
for a friend of mine who Is us bad as
I won, nnd cannot get any rest for the
noises In the head. 1 feel u new woman, and can go to bed now nnd get a
good night's rest, whicli 1 had not
beeu able to do fur many months, lt
Is a wonderful remedy und am most
delighted to reconinicndc It."
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Whlteliorse Roud,
Croydon, writes:—"I mn pleased to
tell you thnt the small tin of ointment
you sent to me at Ventuur, lias proved
a complete success, my hearing ls
now quite normal, nnd the horrible
head noises have ceased. The action
of this new remedy must be very re
workable, for I have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years, nnd have had some of the very best medical uilvlcc together with
other expensive ear instruments all
to no purpose. I need hardly say how
very grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an entire change."
Try one box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for $1.00. There is
vNotlilng Belter nt nny Price,
Address orders to: —
THE "LARMALENE" CO.,
10, South  View, Wutllng St.,  Dart-
ford, Kent, England.
.Mayors In Canada, and the January j
Issue will feature Municipal Finance,
and the opportunities offered by our
various municipalities tor Immglrot-
ion and Industries. This number will
be published with the object of attracting people in Britain end the
United States toward our municipalities, and should accomplish a great
deal as no similar work has so for
been attempted,
Abraham Lincoln humorously said
of u poor neighbor's assets, "He has
a wife and two children, which I
should think were worth thirty thousand dollars to any man."
The family is the greatest wealth
of every member of It, the first groat
concern of the individual or of society.
It is a golden investment and needs
the same protection and care thut
any investment requires.
One of its best safeguards is good
reading: one of the things that puts
lt ill jeopardy is bad reading. The
Youth's Companion hns always been,
In the matter of supplying good reading, what a United States bond is to
the Investor. Its principle is guaranteed, and its interest is paid with every issue. Try this Investment tor
your family.
The 52 issues of 1924 wil be crowded with serial stories, short stories,
editorials, poetry, facts and fun. Sub.
„.,..„,     ,. ,     , scribe now and receive:.
British Columbia may be the scene ,   „k   „   ,.,   „ , —. ,
' 1. The Youths Companion—52 Issues
of the 1924 finals for the Connaught      |n 1924.
Cup, emblematic of the soccer champ-   2. All the remaining Issues of 1923.
ionshp of Canada, if plans of the sec-   3-   The   Co)mpanlon   Home   Calendar
retary and president ot the Dominion      'or 192*-
Football   Association   are  carried   to  *• 0r include McCall's Magazine, tho
fruition. j monthly authority on fashions.    Both
The finals in 1922 were ployed In   Publications, only $3.00.
D. ¥. A. LEADERS FAVOR
VANCOUVER FOR 1924 DOM
INION   .SOCCER   FINALS
Play-offs  May  Be   Advanced—Resolutions tlovemlng Players Explained
THE   TOUTH'S   COMPANION
Commonwealth Ave. & St. Paul Street
Boston, Mass.
New subscriptions  received at  tne
Islander office.
CRANBROOK NOW
CENTRAL POINT FOR
NEW POLICE DISTRICT.
Toronto and last year ln Winnipeg, so
that It is the West's turn to entertain
the teams which meet in the culminating struggle of the series.
Last season Nanaimo and Cumberland protested that the inter-provincial playoff between British Columbia
and Alberta should be staged at the
Coast since it wns held by Alberta the
year previous.
Their protest, though viewed in a
favorable light by the D. F. A. officials come too late to permit of the necessary change, but from it evolved
the suggestion that B. C. be the scene ! quarters at Cranbrook
of the finals next year.
President John Boston and Secretary Sam Davldsrai have expressed
themselves in favor of the suggestion
and officials of the B. C. F. A. will
press for such action. Such a move
would be a great boost for soccer In
the province and there Is no doubt
that a record-breaking crowd would
attend the games. It is probable
that the Interprovincial playoff ln the
first round would also be staged In
British Columbia.
Secretary Davidson has also suggested to the B. C. F. A. that there
should be more than five entries from
British Columbia in this important
series. He considers that entries for
the Connaught Cup competition should
Annoucement has been made of tlio
forming of thc new provincial police
district in East Kootenay, with heod-
wlth Chief
Constable Mortimer in charge. The
new district will comprise the stations at Creston, Yahk, Moyie, Cranbrook and Klmberly, nil of which previously, with the exception of Creston,
were attached to the chief constable
at Fernie, and Creston reporting to
Nelson.
The big developments nt Kltnberley.'
particularly, as well as Yahk, Is responsible for the change, these points
being unhandily located to Fernle for
efficiency. At the first of the month
too, another change wns effected In
the service by transferring Inspector
Dunwoody to Nelson, from Fernle,
giving him a more central locution for
supervising the constables In both
East and West Kootenay.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING   MATERIALS,   MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT LOWEST  PRICES.
We Deliver lo Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges. >
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
$450
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. I Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—131-X  Courlenay
SPORTSMEN
SEE US ABOUT YOUR SUPER—X,— IMPERIAL
LONG RANGE, CANUCK, SHELLS, IN 12—lb—20
GUAGE, AtL SIZES SHOT.
Carbide Lamps for the Camp, with convenient Carbide
Containers.
Flash Lights and Batteries of all Kinds
Hot-Shots — Unit Cells — B. Batteries
,   RADIO SETS AND PARTS IN STOCK
Latest Radio Handbook
You are invited to call and "Listen In" to the R2000
with loud Speaker, any evening.
Everything Electrical
WIRING CONTRACTING
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71 ^     !
PAGE FOUR
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th.   1023
PEACE   AND   THANKSGIVING
November 11th, 1918. Peace! Peace at lost!
In the few days preceeding that eventful day, those
of us who bad been spared to "Carry On," the
question was on everyone's lips, "Have you heard
anything yet?" At last the day dawned, November 11th,
the word travelled far and wide, the length and breadth
of the firing line, with the speed of shell fire, clear down
to the French coast, to the hospitals, where hundreds of
brave men lay battling for life. At first lt was laughed at.
We had heard it too often. But as the day wore on, officers, almost hysterical with joy, confirmed the news, that
Germany, defeated, was humbly suing for peace. Nurses
in the different hospitals and clearing stations conveyed
the news to their patients. Some shouted and sang shoit
snatches of popular songs, others smiled happily, but had
little lo say, others again were grave and silent, overwhelmed by a tremendous sense of relief.
In tbe hearts ot all there began to rise a passionate
longing for home. Just a few hours ago it had seemed so
far away from the frightful noises, the shocks and horrors
of the battlefield. To many the thought ot home brought
with It the thoughts of the comrades who would not make
thc return journey.
Peace at last! In the great hour of peace the memories of the fallencomrades come to those of us who remained, like sweet and tender echoes of sacred and unspoken thoughts. The new era that the end of the war
was to usher in, would be all the brighter because of the
flower of manhood that had been garnered to make tt so.
The gallant hearts of whom lt could be said:—"In the
glory of their manhood they fared forth in a great adventure, their hearts aflame with the desire to keep Freedom inviolate and unsullied. They feared not death, and
meeting it they won the victor's crown."
"In Flander's field the poppies blow
"Between the crosses, row on row,
"That mark our place and in the sky
"The larks still bravely singing fly
"Scarce heard amidst the guns below.
"We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset's glow,
"Loved and were loved and now we lie
"In Flanders' field."
From "In Flanders Field"
"Rest ye in peace, ye Flanders dead,
"The fight that ye so bravely led,
"We'll not forget and we will keep
"True faith with you who be asleep-
"With each a cross to mark his bed
"And poppies blowing overhead,
"Where once his own Life's blood ran red,
"So let your rest be sweet and deep
"In Flanders' field."
From "America's Answer"
THE toil of the summer is over, the crops have been
garnered, and it is right and proper low that we
should stop for a few months and turn our thoughts
and render our thanks to the Great Olver of every
good and perfect gift, for bounties we enjoy and the general prosperity of theCountry. We would be very Indignant should anyone accuse us of being ungrateful tor the
favors accorded us; but there ls a law of nature that decrees, that If man will not use a faculty or power, he shall
not retuln lt, and the spirit of thankfulness la not exercised as much as it should be. In this excited and feverish race of lite, we simply snatch its many blessings
without stopping to think of the source trom whence they
come, and we are slowly, but surely, losing this principle
of gratitude, and as the general prosperity Increases, we
ore withdrawing more and more Into the little circle of
self. As we become more and more Independent of each
other, we become more and more selfish, exacting and ungrateful not only to the Lord but toward each other.
Thangsglving Day!
It comes also to mark a day, a day that stands out
above every other, In the history of our Empire, when the
whole world awakened to the realization that the years
of warfare bad ended in the vindication ot the right 'of
mankind to live in freedom. To many It will bring with
increased poignancy the thoughts of the loved ones who
died that Thanksgiving Day might hold all of Its true
meaning for those they left behind. They fought and
died tor the Canada of tomorrow as much as that of today.
It ls ours to prove that their sacrifice was not in vain.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
t'nbllshed every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th,   1923
FUNERAL FLOWERS
A prominent church official ten
years ago started a national movement to abolish the sending of flow,
ers to funerals. He said, "Take the
roses ond put them, not on a coffin,
hut in thc lopel of the coat of the laboring ninn on his way to work."
The gentleman did not succeed In
abolishing a custom thnt ls essentially beautiful. A love for flowers is a
sign of refinement, native or acquired. A flower Is a symbol of joy. In
lis living texture Nature concentrates
nil the glow of sunlight and the spark
le of the stars. There is an appealing tenderness ln their friendly faces,
that has made them seem appropriate
gifts to bereaved friends.
But sometimes the custom of seeding flowers to funerals is so overdone
as to constitute a heavy tax on families that can ill afford it, tor lt has
come to the point where people frequently are called stingy for not doing tt.
The sentiment of love and sympathy
ls often more eloquently expressed
In the little bunch of blossoms plucked by a lady from her own garden
than it is In the blanket ot roses sent
by the fraternity to which the deceased may have belonged. And those
who grieve for their dead know th.s
to be true.
GOING UP
The human elevator Is continually
going up or down.
Greater Values in Many
Lines of New Goods
Ladies' Dresses in Flannel and Homespuns in newest
designs and colors.  A full range of sizes at each
$11.95 ....— ....$9.45 ....— ....$7.95 ....— ,...$6.95
Girls Surge Dresses, nicely trimmed and well made,
sizes 8—10—12 and 14 years at $6.95 and $5.95
For the little girls, 3—4—5 and 6 years, Blue Sense
Dresses, with Bloomers, nicely trimmed, $3.95 and 4.95
Ladies Waists, in many new designs and color combinations, just what you have been waiting for and
priced at$3.95 — $5.95 and $7.95.
We have just opened out a consignment of slippers for
Ladies in black and natural seal, smoked horse and
brown fur-lined moccasins, very suitable for Xmas
presents and priced at $2.95 — $3.00 — $3.95
Ladies Hosiery Specials—A special in fine black cashmere, sizes 814 to 10 at 75 cents per pair.
Ladies' fleeced lined hose, very serviceable at 50c a pr.
We are constantly adding new lines of goods and invite
your inspection.
Some men rise.   Others fall.
Fate?    Nix!
Predestination, according to some
theologians, may send a man to hell,
but lt won't send him to either a capitalist's chair or a pauper's cot ln this
life.
Luck? Certainly!
To commencement orators and other philosophers of the country, there
is such a thing as luck. Luck ln birth
and luck all the way through life.
How else can you explain why that
fish-faced fool is riding in that red
automobile instead of you? How else
can you explain why your boy broke
his leg and you simultaneously got a
boll where you couldn't talk about It,
while your neighbor's crusty old aunt
died and left him a legacy.
Of course there's luck. But all
men do not rise by lt. Well, what Is
the cause?
Opportunity? Yea! It hammers lis
knuckles bloody on some men's doors,
and it never even passes down other
men's streets. Opportunity is as uncertain as the hind leg of a mule and
rankly discriminates—usually against
you and me, and favors the other fellow.
Friends? Influence? Full?
Rarely, and moreover infrequently!
Once In a while a man Is boosted to
a good thing by friends, but more often his friends step on his face to
reach the good things themselves. No,
we're not cynical—merely observant.
Well, what's the matter? Why does
the human elevator take some men
up?
There Is no cause or explanation.
Various reasons for various cases.
However, mark this: The man who
rises is unusually read. He Is pro-
pared. He has fitted himself for the
bigger job.
The best recommendation for a big
job is a little job well don.e Pickle
that thought!
Do your best today and you'll be
fitted for eomethlng better tomorrow.
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BI'ILDINCI
Special Showing
 This Week
BLANKETS—
Guaranteed Pure All Wool White Bankets, m ade in England, special value
Full sized Grey Blankets at    $7.50   —-  $9.00  —.
COMFORTERS
$11.50
and $10.50
Cotton Batting filled Comforters from   $3.50 to $6.50
Eiderdown Comforters in best Quality Art Satin with Satin Panels from $12.50 to $27.50
KIMONAS—
Ladies Kimonas and Bath Robes and Children's Dressing Gowns in Plain, Plaid and Figured Patterns. Also a large range of Beacon Cloth and Wrapperettes.
isstjiBisiBiBiajsiEiaa^^
BOUDOIR SLIPPERS BATH MATS
Just received a large assortment of Art Needlework, Stamped   Night     Dresses,  Pillow
Cases, Bureau Scarfs, Linen Crash Buffett Scarfs, Table Centers and Cushion Tops.
SPECIALS IN GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Toilet Paper, 5 Rolls for 25
Broom Special, 4 strings    .65
Egg-o Baking Powder, 2Mb Tins 90
Silver Gloss Starch, 6s. Tins   1.00
Netted Gem Potatoes, per sack  1.85
Canned Corn on Cob, large tin 3 for.1.00
Argood Mince Meat, 4s Tins  95
Early June Peas, 2s tins 2 for    .45
Van Camp's Pork and Beans 3 tins for .45
Pearline, large packets  35
Pure French Castille Soap, 5 cakes     .25
Brown Beans 3 lbs. for  25
Bulk Sultanas, extra good quality, 81b. .50
Bulk Cocoanut per lb	
Pure Jams, Gooseberry, Plum and
Green Gage, 4s tins	
Lamb's Tongue 14s in glass 	
Blue Label Ketchup per bottle
Rolled Oats, 6 lb. Sacks 	
.25
.90
.50
.50
.40
Crisco, McLaren's Cream Cheese in Jars
Kraft Swiss Cheese, Roasted Peanuts, Co-
coanuts, Popping Corn, Grapes, Bananas,
Grape Fruit, Pears, Sweet Potatoes, Salt
Cod, Kippers, Kippered Black Cod, Finnan
Haddie.
Masks for The
Masquerade at
Hours: 1.80 te 5.80-7 to 9 p.m.' Lang's   Dl*Ug   Store
"A WONDERFUL WOMAN"
A remarkable picture Of a wonderful woman whose life story provides
chapter after chapter of astounding
heroism, extraordinary self-sacrifice
and almost miraculous achievements,
is, we hear, to be given free to each
subscriber of the Family Herald and
Weekly Star of Montreal. The life
story of "The Wonderful Heroine" can
also be obtained cost free by sending
a post card to the Family Herald and
Weekly Star.
■eHMM^MBM SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th,   1923
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
PAGE FIV
ft
Cumberland    Lodge
L.O.O.M.  No.  1662
WS@IGffl8ltWMiB&lWleWffl>EffliWMW&!
ANNUAL
CARNIVAL
DANCE
THE CHILD OF TODAY
AND HIS EYES
By lt. Kiiplunsky, Opt. D.
The eyes of youth have come into
their owu. Forgotten, neglected aud
abused tn the hustle of life a generation ago, the eyes of our coming men,
and women are today receiving the
care and consideration they deserve.
Painful experiences of neglectful
parents whose children grew up with
crossed eyes, with vision In but a
single eye, or with increasingly de-
fectivs sight, have driven home the
importance—in fact, have established
the imperative necessity of caring for
eyes while they are still in the formative  period.
Lessons learned by the thousands
of parents too late, have been the Inspiration for the endorsement by the
Parent-Teachers' Association of tho
activities of tlle League for the Conservation of Vision, the Eyesight
Council or Aiuerlcn, the Visual Welfare organization sponsored by lending Optometrists and Opthalmologlsts
of Amorlcii, Canada and Great Britain.
These organizations are endeavoring to remove the handicap of defective vision that tens of thousands of
Industrial workers are struggling under. The amazing high percentages
of defective vision found In Industry—
from 40 to 70 per cent, noly one-third
of which ls corrected by glasses is
found to a lesser degree, but equally
alarming, among unattended school
children.
Knowledge is Safety
For an other reason, a cdmplete
knowledge of the visual condition of
every doubtful student Is a vital piece
of information to have. Sub-normal
vision, commonly known as "weak
eyes," is in most instances the result
of Irregularities in the size ond form
of the eyeball. When not present in
earliest childhood, certain of these defects (such as myopia, or neur-sight-
ness) can be acquired during childhood and are the result of Inherited
tendencies or the over-use of susceptible eyes for close work.
Such reasons make lithe parents'
duty to be positive that the child's
eyes nre right. The facts call lie accurately determined only by lhe opio.
tnetrisi or the refracting bpthalmolo-
glst, or occulist.
The Vital Fuels of Vision
To be certain that the youngsters
eyes ore normal u great deal more
must be known than the fact that lie
can rend the blackboard from the
rear of the room. Furthermore, his
ability to read the lower line on the
standard test chart does not Indicate
lack of eye-strain The following
points must be considered:
How well does he see?
Are both eyes alike ln visual acuity?
Can he use his eyes for near and
far without discomfort?
Does he frown, squint or complain
of headaches?
Does studying, etc., make him irrit-
uble, nervous or upset?
Does one eye ever turn out or in
from its normal position?
Defective vision, undiscovered cr
uncorrected, can retard a child's entire progress. He has practically no
menus of comparing his vision with
standard vision. He may believe he
is seeing perfectly, and he may enjoy
normal faculty of vision at the expense of excessive nerve energy. Satisfactory vision is often obtained in
just this manner—and when more
than the normal amount of nerve energy Is required by the cyese to over-
ome u'vlsuul defect the energy mui.l
be drained from other parts of tho
nervous system. In such cases the
Immediate result of eye-struln may be
in another part of the body—a remote
section, such as the stomach.
However, lhe consequences are usually felt III or around the eyes.
Arc Eyes Worse Today 1
Many thinking persons ask, "How
can the eyes of the race be worse today than Ihey were fifty years ago.
when glasses were comparatively
rare?" The Inference Is that the eye
defects are increasing. This Is not
the case. But there nre many more
trying tasks for the eyes today, much
more sustained close application of
the eyes, so that even slight detects
cause annoyance and eye discomfort-:,
(aesthenopla.) Motor cars, motion pictures, fast-moving cars, and trains,
increased reading of newspapers, magazines, books, powerful lighting dis-,
plays, automobile headlight glare, etc., j
have put new and greater strains upon the ocular system.
Were we living in the past genernt-
ion, only the most extreme, visual' dc-1
fects would require the constant use J
of glasses. |
The Child Pays.
The pitiful phase of the situation is
that thousands ot children will pay
the penalty for their parents' Ignorance and neglect. The child will nev-
"grow out of it" without glasses,
and sometimes (if considerable muscular deficiency is present) ocular ex- j
ercises as well.
With the correct lenses, the child's ]
eyes might possibly improve to a
marked degree. Without them, the
defect tends to grow more bothersome.
Many students who have "eye-trouble"
and who hesitate to adopt glasses for
relief might gladly do so if they were
advised that at the conclusion ot their
student years, they could dispense
with lenses, l£ their defects are not extreme. ,
When the school examiner sends
the boy or girl home with a" request
for eye attention, every mother asks
herself, "Why didn't I think ot this
before?"
With eyes an ounce of prevention is
worth a pound of cure.
lt is very difficult to wear glasses
after years of neglect. There Is only
one sensible time to stop eye-strain,
and that Is before It "amounts to anything."
SCOTCH MINERS
VOTE TOWN DRY
There's ut Least One   I'lace   Where
Coal Diggers Ito Not Drink
L«CTMND1NT!»
"Wonderful Indeed is the power of the voice.'
The power of the voice is the success of the telephone. It was in the endeavor to transmit sound that
the telephone was invented, and the great factor of its
development into an article of very common use is that
direct conversation may be carried on.
Because it enables one's personality to be sent is
the reason that the telephone promotes friendships
and intimacy, and brings about closer relations between those in business. The pleasure of hearing the
voice you know makes long distance the casual practice
of every one.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Have You Ordered Your Xmas Cards?
See Samples at the Islander Office
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Ask for Geo. Mason.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 202(1 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTOBIA, It. ('.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Er tab Hull ment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Suther-
land, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will Please You ; :     t :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKvS
VICTORIA, B.C.      -      I'lione 1808
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands niit;' be pre-empted bj
British subjects over 18 years of age,
und. by .aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
und improvement for itgiiculturni
purposes,
l-'till information concerning regulations regarding pre-emptions 1/
given in Bulletin No. l, Land Series.
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies oi
Which can be obtained free uf charge
by addressing the Deportment oi
I .nods, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-"
•rnment Agent.
Records will  be granted covering
only   laud  suitable   foi'    agricultura' ]
purposes, nnd which is nol  timber
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board .
[eet per acre west of the Coast R&ng*
n iici 8,000 feet per acre cast of thai
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
io  be addressed  to the  Land Com- f
mlSSlonOr of the Land  Recording Di    i
.'Islbn, in Which the land applied foi
in situated, and are made ou printed ;
forms,   copies  of  which   can   he  ob
(ained from the Land Commlsslonei
Pre-emptions must be occupied i<
five years and improvements madi
lo   value   ot   $10   per  acre,   ji.ludin    !
clearing and cultivating at least flv<
acres, before u Crown Grant can • •
received.
For more detailed Information wee
lhe Bulletin "Mow tu Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for pur
chafe ui" vacant uud unreaerved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land li $5
per acre, and iccond*class (graving)
land t'i.u-i per acre, further Information regarding purchase or leas-
of Crown lands in given In Bulletin
No. io, Land Series, "purchase and
Leas>' of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on ;
limber bind, not exceeding 4" acres,
may bo purchased or leased, the conditions      including      payment       of
stupipage.
HOMESITE LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased us homes!tes,
conditional jtpon n dwelling beltu,
erected In the first year, title being
. obtainable after residence nnd im
provemeni conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
I'or  grafting  and   Industrial     purposes  areas  not  exceeding   640  acres*
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under tin- Gracing Aot the Province is divided Into grazing district!
Hnd the range administered under i
Graving      Commissioner.      Annua!
gracing   permits ale Issued  based or.
numbers ranged, priority being give:
to established owners. Stoi k-ownei
may  form   associations    for    rang'
management.   Free, or partially free
permits are available for settlers
campers and travellers, up lo ten
head.
Glasgow,— One of the places in
Scotland where you can't get a drink
Is the mining town of Kilsyth. Englishmen may not believe it possible
for a Scottish miner to vote himself
dry, but the miracle has been accomplished, and the fact remains that a
town within a few miles of Glasgow,
went dry under the Scottish Temperance Act in 1920, heas been dry ever
since, and will probably vote dry
again at the December polls.
The first novelty noticed by a visitor to the town was that the railway tavern had been converted into
a dressmaker's establishment. The
mammoth mirrors advertising somebody's whiskey still remain, and
doubtless come in useful when a customer tries on a frock.
At the old Cross Keys you can buy
nothing stronger than pears and ice
cream. The "Wee Maut Still" is a
confectioners' shop, and other public houses have become bootshops,* a
fried fish and chip shop and a Unionist club. Three years ago there
were some 15 licences in the town;
today there is not one.
NEW LAMP
BURNS 94% AIR
Heals Electric or (las
A new oil lamp that gives an amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the U. S. Government
and 35 leading universities and found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps.
It burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, is simple, clean,
safe. Burns 94% air and tsr/c common kerosene (coal oil.)
The Inventor, J. B. Johnson, 579 Jfc-
Dcrmot Ave., Winnipeg, is offering to
send a lamp on 10 days' FREE trial,
or oven to give one FREE (o the first
user In each locality who will help
him Introduce it. Write him to-day
for particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
$250 to {500 per month. —39-47.-1923.
DONT
00 -
THIS!
Use
LEONARD
EAR OIL
IT DOES RELIEVE DEAFNESS
and HEAD NOISES. Simply rob
it in back of the can and Insert
innoitrlU.
Speelal hutneteeu b, a aeteel
ear epeeiaJUt la me. packece.
MADE IN CANADA *
Deeeripfive circular mat em ngutmj
A. O. Leonard, Inc.
t» Fifth Areoe* New fork
r'.ir sale III  Clinihcrlllllll    ll)
Limit's    limit   Store    I   all
Hellahle  Urnititlsls.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
(MIS II.C. Permanent I.imii Bldg.
PHONE am     VICTORIA, ».(. THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOV10JI BER. loth,    1023
Private Greeting
Christmas Cards
Order Early at The Islander Office
NOTICE TO
THE   PUBLIC
The Comox' Creamery Association hereby giv<?s
notice that only its employees are authorized to sell
milk or cream in bottles stamped with the name of the
Comox Creamery Association, and that all such bottles
are the property of the Association.
Hereafter proceedings will be taken against any
person improperly using any such'bottles or in whose
possession they may be found.
R.U. HURFORD, Manager
The Choice of Thousands
iTitBeerYilthoutaPeer
AND
U.B.C. Beer
Because these are the products
of the most hygienic, sclentlfic
brewery on the Pacific Coast —
brewed right, bottled tight, under
conditions of scrupulous cleanliness.
FREE HOME DELIVERY	
ORDER A SUPPLY TODAY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This ndvortisoinent is nol published or tlinplnypd hy Hip Liquor
Control linn ill or by the. flovci'niTioni nf llrilisl> ('nlniiiliiii.
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
LEARN AUTOS
and make
BIG MONEY!
If you cannot come to a Hemphill School, Hemphill will come
to you. If circumstances will
not allow you to Ret away to
tattfiui one of Hemphill personal attendance schools, the
Hemphill new
Home Study Course
makes it possible for you to
learn right at home in your
leisure hours. Take up the
work as fast or as slow as
you wish then later on attend
any one of the Hemphill Practical Schools, at 1311 Granville
St., Vancouver, B.C.; 228 Ninth
Ave., E., Calgary, Alta., Cor.
ofPike and Melrose, Seattle,
Wash., also many other cities
in Canada and U.S.A. Write
nearest Branch to you.
Mail this Coupon
News Of British Columbia
The fourth session of the fifteenth
Legislature ot British Columbia opened auspiciously last Monday with
the promise that before lt is finishod
many very important issues will have
been dealt with. Liberal party caucuses were held Friday and Saturday
and practically all government business was ready when his honor, Lliu-
tenant-Govemor Walter C. Nichol, declared the House open.
Many warm fights are anticipated,
but it is conceded in legislative circles
ln Victoria that the government en
ters the session stronger than ever before. The Independent members are
practically all supporting the Oliver
administration, a support which will
ensure sufficient strength to pass an.'
legislation the government may bring
down.
It is understood that plans have
been made to introduce a colonisation
programme, which will provide i'or
the better settlement of provincial
lands. The ministers of lands, agriculture and railways have all been
preparing their plans ln this regard,
Prize List
G.W.V.A.1
MASQUERADE
-:    BALL
•—
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
MONDAY,  NOV.   12th.
ILO-ILO HALL
$250.00
IN PRIZES
$250.00
ADMISSION—GENTS, Masked, $1.00 — LADIES 50c.
SPECTATORS — 50 Cents
BEST DRESSED LADY, CASH $25.00
BEST DRESSED GENT, CASH   $20.00
BEST NATIONAL LADY, CASH $10.00
BEST NATIONAL GENT, CASH $10.00
BEST SUSTAINED LADY, CASH $7.50
BEST COMIC GROUP, 3 or more, CASH $20.00
BEST SUSTAINED GENT,.CASH .....$7.50
BEST COMIC LADY, CASH $5.00
BEST COMIC GENT, CASH $5.00
BEST CLOWN, CASH  :. $7.50
BEST HOBO, CASH  $5.00
BEST ADVERTISING CHARACTER, CASH $7.50
BEST CHARACTER ADVERTISING
POPPY DAY, CASH $7.50
BEST FLOWER GIRL, CASH $5.00
Prize Waltz $10.00
50 Cents Per Couple Entrance Fee For Prize Waltz
Spectators Tombola Prizes
 ■ *>*■     ■ ■»•» •»   Art r. J_l_        TT-1  d»0    CA
First, Value  $15.00
Second, Value $5.00
Third, Value   $4.00
Fourth, Value $4.00
Fifth, Value,  $4.50
Sixth, Value.  $3.50
GRAND MARCH 10:30.
Seventh, Value, .... $3.50
Eighth, Value $3.00
Ninth, Value  :. $3.00
Tenth, Value   $3.00
Eleventh, Value .... $2.00
Twelfth, Value, .... $2.00
-DOORS OPEN AT 8:30
and Hon. Dr. Sutherland, minister of
Public "Works, will concentrate next
year on building settlers' roads.
It is also expected that an announcement will be forthcoming regarding
the P. O. 15. Railway. Tho government declares lt is anxious to complete the line to Prince George just
as soon as finances will permit. Thoy
hope to be able to proceed with this
work next Hummer.
Important amendments to the Game
Conservation Act will be introduced,
so that the preservation ot a very im\
portant provincial asset may be assured.
A gasoline lax of probably throe
cents per gallon will be introduced
by the minister of finance. This is
expected to result -in a decrease In
motor licenses and provide more
funds for highway construction. Tiie
agricultural Industry will not im affected, insofar as [arm machinery ls
concerned. Also, Ihe tax will not apply to tiie fishing industry.
A redistribution hill will he an Important topic of discussion and Premier Oliver states that when the bill
Is passed every electoral district in
(he province will have thc fairest
measure of representation which can
he  provided.
SMALL (AI1S  IN   I.IIKAT  DEMAND
HEMPHILL TRADE SCHOOLS. LTD. {
Headqu.rtere:
5S0   MAIN   STREET.   WINNIPEG j
how  you  teach  by  mail  Auto Tractor, I
(las   Enuineerini:  and  Electrical  Igni- :
tion Work. •
NAMK  	
AI'.DRESS
"8.6:   j
Inder  Nov.   Miimigeitieiit
Hotel Douglas
When in Victoria, why not make
this hotel your home?   It is in
every way a strictly modern  fireproof building
nud you wlll like
the service.
HATES
Outside  rooms  with  private  bath
—per day *2.00—
—per week $10.00—
Nice airy rooms without hath from
—per day $1.00—
—per week $4.00—
Free Bus meets all boats anil trains
PHONE WOO     '
:   ,1.  II.  KIII.K K,  Proprietor—I
For Results Try
The Islander
We Give the Best	
Electrical Installations
There ls no doubt about It.   We are here to prove It.
On the 19th ot May 1921 we received from the Provincial
Inspector ot Electrical Energy a set ot Rules and Regulations
governing the Installation ot Electrical Wiring were immediately adopted and have been lived up to In every .smallest detail. m
We carry the largest and most complete stock of any
Company or Arm of its size In B. C. and so can take immediate
care ot your Job without subjecting you to any annoying delay
waiting tor special material, etc.
We gladly invite Inspection b ythe highest Electrical
Authorities of any Installation we have made since the Provincial Regulations were Inaugurated and our most convincing
argument as to why we should do your wiring is the fact that
of the Jobs we have had inspected ALL have been pronounced
perfect. And then we have tbe knowledge ot Electricity acquired through many years of experience an dthls should
surely count for something with you when you are selecting an
Electrical Contractor.
A man may know how to drive a nail precisely, but he is
a dangerous man unless he knows the effect of the driving
upon the material Into which the nail enters and so it ls ln the
Electrical Contracting business, tt ls not only necessary to
understand the practical Installation of wires, switches, fittings, etc., but lt Is doubly necessary to be able to make the
calculations that will ensure maximum safety, economy of
operation, and the.proper functioning of the Electrical Energy
for which the wires, switches, etc., are meryly paths.
It you want High Class Electrical Installations, go to the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Looming up largo as one ol' the Important, factors contributing to_ the
Improvement ot traffic conditions, not
only in metropolitan centers but un
main travelled highways where congestion develops particularly on week
ends and holidays, is the increasing
tendency toward ttie use of the small,
light ear.
Personal convenience, thc element
which enters strongly into the lives
ot all of us, appears au the principal
incentive back of tiie growing swing
of sentiment toward tho more compact motor car unit.
The public, quick to respond to
things which insure further ctmifott
and safety in motoring, lias been observant of the advantages the small
car has in the traffic line, its ability
io stop quick, the ease with which it
gets in uud out of parking spaces and
its general flexibility.
The response is appeal in the constantly growing demand for the small
car, a demand which has been unusually heavy since the first of the present year and which is further ox-
pressing itself as the enclosed car
buying season approaches.
Men whose business keeps them on
the move about town all day were not
long iu discovering the exceptional
facilities afforded by the small car
and they were quick to adopt it as
their standard motor car equipment.
Owners of large cars finding their
movements more and more restricted
as traffic congestion increases, aro
rapidly reaching the conclusion that
as an auxiliary motor transportation
unit the small car is an essential business convenience.
Another interesting feature is tho
partiality which women drivers aro
showing for the smaller car. They
find it more convenient and less fatiguing to operate, affording them a
quick and convenient means of transportation for tiie shopping tours, for
little trips lo market, for afternoon
calls aud for meeting other family requirements.
And new buyers, profiting by the
experience of others, in investigating
the merits of the small car, find it
meets all modern motoring demands
.with the additional advantage of easier handling in traffic lines, therby
effecting a greater element of safety.
Short wheelbaso, small turning radius, case of steering, the impossibility of failure to accomplish gear shift
aud do it noiselessly, positive brakes
aud a motor noted lor its dependability are features of the Ford which
have contributed largely in making
It making it the most popular of all
small cars.
And a much higher degree of owner
satisfaction has been effected in theso
cars by recent Improvements iu both
open and enclosed typos, resulting In
bettor style and greater riding comfort.
Celery King Is the thing
to stimulate the liver, cleanse the
bowels, purify tbe blood, banish't
headaches ana make you feel the
joy of better health and strength.
Nature's own laxative and tonic
roots and herbs In Celery King.
30c- and 60c packages.
Are You Coughing?
Why not relieve it thin very day 1
A few drops of Shiloh banishes that
ticklinfrin the throstthntmaddens
you. A.few doses heul up the tore
and inflamed tissues in tlio throat
and really banish that cough. 30c,
60c and IJ1.20.   All druggFsta. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th,    1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
If
FORD
CARAVAN
COMING   TO   COURTENAY
NOVEMBER   THE   13th
Practical demonstrations, will be made of all Ford Products, including:—Plowing, Road Grading with a Wehr
Road Grader and Maintianer, and Heavy Hauling with
a Ford Truck equipped with the Ruckstell six-speed
axle.
These demonstrations will be of great interest to every
person in this district and all are invited to be present.
Tq be held at Courtenay all day Tuesday, November 18,
Corfield Motors, Ltd
FORD   DEALERS
PHONE 4fi
COURTENAY,. B.C.
Speaking of-—
FIR VENEER— For the living room or den there is
nothing to beat the fir veneer panelling; the beauty of
the grain is always a pleasure to behold. It makes the
room look rich and cosy.
WALL BOARD— A splendid substitute for plaster:
especially do we recommend its use for the shiplap
house, or the house where foundations will not carry
plastered walls. We sell the "Murray Made Wall
Board" which is not susceptible to weather conditions.
PLASTER— Always plaster your house if possible,
for, while substitutes are used, our experience has always been that a well plastered house on a good found?
ation is one ofthefewthings that we can truthfully say,
that is the best as well as the cheapest inside finish.
SHINGLES— There are many substitutes for shingles
on the market today, extensively advertised and used,
but we maintain that shingles are still the best roofing
material and make excellent finish for outside walls.
SIDING— Proportioned with the shingles on outside
walls, angle rustic siding holds first place, we think so.
TAR AND BUILDING PAPER— A most necessary
material for all buildings. We venture to say that it
is not used as liberally as is necessary in the construction of buildings. A building of any sort requiring two-
ply of lumber should always have one or two ply of
paper between.   It saves the fuel bill.
EDWARDS & ORR
Builders' Supplies and Woodworking Shop
Dealers in Rough and Kiln-dried Lumber
Express delivery anywhere Charges Reasonable
PHONE  ONE-SEVEN
UNION   BAY   ROAD
Opposite Corfield Motors
OLD
COUNTRY
for
CHRISTMAS
AND NEW YEAR
fanndlnn   National   Hallways
Will Operate
SPECIAL TRAIN
—To Ship's Side, Halifax, (or sailing of
Ss. "Doric" to Liverpool
.   December 9,1923
Ss. "Ausonia" to Liverpool
December 9,1923
Ss. "Pittsburgh" to Southampton
December 14, 1923
Ss. "Canada"   to Glasgow
and Liverpool
December 15, 1923
Ss. "Andania" to   London
December 16, 1923
Make  your   reservations   early
E. W. BICKLE
Agent
Cumberland B.C.
SMOO AUTOMOBILES
B.C. REGISTRY
Victoria, Nov. 9—Some Idea of the
increase in the prosperity of the people of British Columbia is reflected in
the fact that there are at the present time 39,000 nutomobiles hinder
provincial registry. This ls all the
more striking when it Is considered
that even as recently as 1916 there
were very few more than 8,000 automobiles. This compilation of statistics recently completed by Dr. Suthei-
land, minister of public works, Indicates that there is about one motor
car to every 13 people in the Province.
There is surely no whisper of death
in this liberal sign of prosperity. Nor j ant States of the Union.
must it be forgotten that were the | One indication of the greater facll-
roads of the province not as good or I itles offered to the autornobilist by
as numerous as this automobile own- < the completion of various highways
ershlp would denote, there would be i ot a connecting nature, and the ini-
an exceedingly different tale to tell j provement of other roods throughout
In the amount of automobiles owned , the Province, can be understood from
and operated. After several personal ! the fact that In 1917 It required the
Inspections  of the  highways  of  the i best part of two days to go by road
Province Dr. Sutherland is naturally
seized with the Importance of preserv-
from Nelson to Trail, whereas it Is
now  possible to do the Journey  by
Ing good road surfaces in order that  automobile in two and one-half hours,
there may be a greater interchange of
visits between people in various parts
of the Province, and also a larger Inducement for the automohtllng tourist to come to this part of the country
from adjoining provinces and from thc
various neighboring and farther dlst-
EXPECT IIECOKIi YEAH
OLD   CITY   MONUMENT  (RASHES  TO   DESTRUCTION
One Solitary Alderman Bids Farewell
Victoria, Nov. 9th—According to
Ilgures complied by the Minister of
Lands, the amount of timber scaled
in British Columbia for the nine months ending September 30th, amounts
to 1,672,195,000 board feet, as against
1,215,595,000 for the same period In
1922, au Increase of 37%.
Mr. Pattullo states that the figures
for Ihe first nine months of this year
exceed the total for tlle whole of 1922
by 25 million feet, and it Is fully expected that 1923 will be a record year
in the timber cut of British Columbia.
Thc foregoing figures indicate to-
j some  extent the activity  which  has
On Monday, September 26th, In spite of long service rendered to' the
citizens of this city, Cumberland's Bell Tower was completely demolished,
and'that, without pomp or ceremony on the part of either our city fathers
or any of the public-spirited bodies of our city.
Cruel and deadly were the blows wielded hy one city stalwart, as the
big tears rolled down the cheeks of hut one solitary city alderman who was
heard to murmur as the last blow, which spelled destruction, was struck.
"Only remembered by the shifts I have missed."
Gone, we hope forever, and in your stead we confidently look for better I bce" gradully increasing in tiie lumb
times, ,wlth plenty of work and a lull lunch pall.     This picture, with the ! er industry of the province during the
fact that Cordon ls offering hlghclass merchandise at prices which surprise ilast eighteen months,
even the most suspecting mind presents a bright outlook to our city and \    Victoria, Nov. 9th—ln a statement
district. • . j issued by Mr. T. 1>. Pattullo, Minister
Just think of the saving In men's underwear alone. Garments that will i oi Lan(is, the overseas shipments of
cost 12.75 anywhere can be bought nt Gordon's for J2.00. You can buy timber for the first six months of Wi
men's heavy, handmade, solid leather work shoes at $6.50; men's rubber pit jtotnl 220,824,894 hoard feet, as against
shoes at $5.00, and for the girl's, solid leather high-top shoes priced at 153.25.1 i42,028,779 for the corresponding per
In our grocery department we are offering the very best creainery
butter at 45c per lb; Burn's pure lard at 5 lbs. for $1.05. Our bulk tea at
60 cents compares favorably with any package ten at 80c. We have just
received a shipment of California oranges, which we are selling at' 3 dozen
for 11.00. In fact, all through the long and varied stock of groceries, dry
goods, boots and shoes, you can save real money. Gordon's policy; of
course, Is not how much he can charge, but how much he can sell, the more
business he does the cheaper he can sell. ,
Special attraction this week for the children. Come and see the P.
Railway In operation with Oliver Bowser at the throttle, driving us al
the same place as the old Bell Tower.
GORDON'S, Cumberland.
NOTICE
The Annual General meeting of the Comox Agri-,
cultural and Industrial Association will be held at the
Agricultural Hall, Courtenay, on Tuesday, November
20th, at 2:00 p.m.—Business, Election of Officers and
other important matters. ,M
The Ladies' Auxiliary will serve refreshments.   ,
The Prize Money and Special Prizes awarded at
the 1923 Fair will be PAID IN FULL and presented
prior to the "FUN and FROLIC" CONCERT to be held
v at 8:00 p.m., on the same day. jr
KEEP THE DATE OPEN
iod In 1922. It wlll be seen that these
figures represent an increase of 78,
196,115 board feet, or 54 per cent.
It is to be noted that the greatest
increase in the foregoing is represented by shipments to the Atlantic seaboard, via the Panama Canal, namely,
90 millions this year as against 15
millions last year. In this connection Australia has taken 43 millions
as against 25'& millions, and California 28 millions as against 16 millions.
These represent the most important
Increases lu the turnover.
NEW HIGH SCHOOL FOR
WEST  VANCOUVER
Victoria, Nov. 9—While the term
"Superior School District" may not
signify much to the average ndlvidual
the community which is able to progress to this status naturally teels It
Is at least putting itself on the map.
Of this proud distinction Parksville,
on Vancouver Island, now reasonably
and Justifiably boasts.
In this particular district two years
of High School will now be carried on,
and It wlll be understood, of Course,
that this ls always possible In any
district hnvng a minimum of eight
pupils who have passed the High
School Entrance examination in attendance.
Dr. MacLean, Minister of Education
has just announced that a new High
School is being established at West
Vancouver. This is an indication in
itself of the gradual educational progress of an important tributary to
the larger centre of Vancouver proper.
Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay
NEXT Friday and Saturday
NOVEMBER 16th and 17th
Harold Lloyd
IN
"SAFETY  LAST
**
EiaBisiBiBfflsiaisraBisi^^
SEE THE PRINCE OF SKYLARKERS IN HIS LATEST HURRICANE     J
OF HUMOR FILLED WITH FRILLS, SPILLS, CHILLS AND SURPRIS-
ING SENSATIONS.   THE SKY'S THE LIMIT ON LAUGHTER.
ALSO   A   GOOD  COMEDY
Next Friday and  Saturday EIGHT
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10th,   1923
News From Sutherland's
Navy Serge Dresses, long sleeveB,
bound silk braid round collar, with
two silk tassels. A really smart and
attractive dress, made of a good quality serge, sizes 16, 18 and 20, only
S11.5U.
Al Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
Very fine serge dress, two panels,
(mc  down  each  side,   trimmed  with
black  braid,  long sleeves,    size    40.
Pries  S17.50.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
.Navy serge dresses made from all
wool fine serge, long sleeves, braided
down L'ront and un    cuffs,    size    38,
Price $12.50.
At Sutherland's Dry (inods Store.
Brown crepo de chene dress, pleated
at both sides, trimmed with silver
bows and waistband of silver, a very
pretty, as well as a useful and sytllsh
dress.
Al Sutherland's Dry (loads Store.
Grey flannel dress. % sleeves, designed on smart lines, trimmed navy,
in size 16 only, price $10.50.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
New assortment of Waists Just arrived.
Sand crepe-de-chene waist, pleated
down  the front, full  length  sleeves,
round collar piped with paddy green.
A smart waist.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
Local Briefs
Crepe de chene waist, in sand, accordion pleated down one side and
around the collar, % sleeves, with accordion pleating around halt of tbe
sleeve. Something new and smart.
At Sutherland's Pry Goods Store.
Black   crepe-de-chene   waist,   full
sleeves, trimmed with Oriental trimmings round neck and waist, a very
pretty combination.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
Ladies heavy winter coats, made of
all wool velours, in shades ot Brown,
Fawn and Taupe, fur collars and
fully lined, price $23.50.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store,
Ladles heavy  winter coats  lu  tho
leading colors, made of fine all wool
velours,   smart   and   attractive.   Fur
collars.   $25.00.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
The weather for blankets is here,
and you would do well to call and
see our range of REAL AYRSHIRE
BLANKETS, blankets that are guaranteed to give you satisfaction ln every way, prices, $9.50, $10.50, $12.50
and $15.00.
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
Real Eider down Quilts, combining
warmth and lightness, Just what is
wanted for the cold nights, see them
At Sutherland's Dry Goods Store,
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY TRY
SUTHERAND'S
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
i
r*
Eg   I p
ANNOUNCEMENT |
Mr. and Mrs. Matt Plercy, Minto, au- J
nounce the engagement of their eldest
daughter, Eva May, to   Mr.    Samuel
Gough, ot Cumberland, the  wedding
to take place on December 5th.
Contrary to the opinion of most people, the
mastering of many of
the smaller musical
instruments is comparatively easy. Take
the Saxophone for' instance, many people
without any previous
knowledge of music
have been known to
play a scale in an hour.
Decide today — Now,
to master an instrument, then make your
choice from our large
stock of the following.
VIOLINS, BANJOS, UK-
ALELES, FLUTES, COR.
NETS, MANDOLINS, BC-
GLES, FLUTES, ..SAXOPHONES, DRUMS, ..ACCORDIONS, ..CLARINETS,
GUITARS, TROMBONES,
AUTOHARPS, ETC. ETC.
Any Mail Orders Receive our Prompt and Careful
Attention
B  G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
LIMITED
"Nanaimo's Music House"
Tl COMMERCIAL STREET NANAIMO, B.C.
.1. WESTOVER,     MARYPORT AVENUE
District Representative
The third annual dance of the Cumberland Badminton Club held on Friday last in the Anglican Hall turned
out to be a jolly affair. There was
not as large a crowd present as the
promoters had hoped for, owing, no
doubt to the inclement weather. Dancing commenced at 9 o'clock and terminated at 12, Plump's orchestra supplying the music,
The Busy Bee Club, composed of
the Juvenile members ot the Holy
Trinity Church, met at the home of
their president, Miss Carrie Richardson, on Saturday afternoon to arrange for the Winter activities.
Mrs. J. R. Butler will receive on
Wednesday November 14th.
Mr. R. S. Baker of Victoria was the
guest of Rev. aud Mrs. J. R. Butler
during  the week.
Mr, Gordon T. Cavin has purchased
the residence of Mr. J. W. Tremlett,
opposite the Telephone Exchange.
Mr. T. Tapello is spending a few
weeks with his parents.
Charles Graham and Robert Brown
motored to Nanaimo on Thursday, returning the same day.
Thomas Graham, General Manager
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Lmlted, accompanied by Morton, Thomas and Pierce arrived on Friday and
wlll spend the Thanksgiving holidays
at Cumberland.
Mrs. William Whitehouse left for
Victoria on Thursday.
Mrs. Charles Graham left for Victoria on Thursday.
Mrs. James Pinfold has left for
London, England.
Robert Robertson returned on Wednesday evening from a six month's
visit to California and Mexico.
Mr. and Mrs. William Mordy have
left Vancouver and are now residing
ln San Francisco.
With The
Churches
CUMBERLAND, SUNDAY, NOV. Uth.
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
10:45 a.m.— Special Memorial Service
Sunday School 2:30 p.m.
7. p.m.—'Evensong.
GRACE METHODIST (III ItSH
Rev. J. R. Butler, Pastor.
11:00   a.m.—  Subject:   "Characteristics of Elijah's Prayer."
Music by Junior Choir.
7:00 p.m.— Special Thanksgiving and
Patriotic Services.    Subject "In View
of   Recent   International   Complications Has Christianity Failed."
Special Music. 'To God be Ihe Glory'
(Doane). "The King's Business." (Cns-
sel) by the choir. Solo, "Land of
Light and Glory" (Elzar) by Miss E.
Henderson. "The Recessional'1 (Kipling.) will be suug by the congregation.      Everybody welcome.
St. George's Presbyterian Church
Itev. James Hood, Pastor.
Thanksgiving Services.
Sunday evening special anthems by
the Choir.
"Sing unto the Lord"
"Ye Shnll Dwell ln the Lord."	
Come and express your gratitude
to the Lord for His benefit in Songs
of Praise.
IN MEMORIAM
NOTICE
All persons having accounts against
the St. John Ambulance Association
are requested to send them in to the
secretary not later than November 17.
Prizes, Money, Fun and Frolic—Nov.
20lh, Agricultural Hall. Courtenay.      i
  I
In loving memory of dear husband
Louis Francescini, who departed this
world Nov. 6th, 1921.
We know that he has gone from us.
To Heaven his soul depart
But never can we think of him,
Without a breaking heart.
Lips cannot tell, nor words express
The sorrow that we bear,
To part with those we love the beat
And see the vacant chair.
Cruel death, has taken htm away,
From his loving wife and son.
But let us think it's for the best,
And say, "God's will be done."
'Tis sweet to know we'll meet again.
Where troubles are no more,
And that the one we loved so well
Has just gone on before.
Inserted by his sorrowing wife and
son.
MASKS for The MASQUERADE at
LANG'S DRUG STORE
I
EXTRA
SPECIALS
EXTRA SPECIAL: Last Year's Pack to be Cleaned up.
65c
Victory Strawberry Jatn 4 lb. Tins
Stanley's Plum Jam 4 lb. Tin
Stanley's Peach Jam 4 lb. Tin
King-Beach Apricot Jam 4 lb. Tin
King-Beach Raspberry Jam 4 lb. Tin
Empress Gooseberry Jam 4 lb. Tin
Empress Strawberry Ja!m Is, 35c, 3 for
Marmalade, 1 lb. Glass Jars, each
65c
65c
55c
65c
60c
$1.00
25c
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
CARD OF THANKS
The undersigned extends heartfelt
thanks to Dr. Hicks, Miss Brown aud
the nursing staff of the Cumberland
General Hospital for their devoted
care and kind attention to Mrs. Wat-
erflleld during her recent Illness.
(Sgd.) H. Waterfield.
LEAGUE
STANDING
P.   W.    L.    D.
Pts.
Cumberland
8     6     11
13
Nanaimo City
8     5     12
12
Ladysmith
7     4     3     0
8
O. W. V. A.
7     2     4      1
5
Davenports
7     2     3     2
C
Northfleld
7     0     7     0
0
SNAP IN A NHW WILLIAMS PIANO
j Owner paid $450. less than a month
| ago is l»avng for England—will sell
j cheap. Apply Mrs. F. Oliver, Cumberland, Marshall Music Co., Lavers
old stand, Courtenay.
CLAMS WANTED- SAANICH CAN-
ning Company, Limited., Sidney
Wharf. jo.
WANTED- TO HEAR FROM OWN-
er of good Farm for sale. State
Cash Price, full particulars. D. F.
Bush, Minneapolis, Minn.      —40-6.
WOOLENS
Imported Scotch and Irish Woollens
in Suit lengths fnr Ladles and Gentlemen's Suitings.— Unexcelled quality.
Lowest prices. Agasslz St Co. 13.1 Pent
berton lllilg. Victoria, B.C.
CHRISTMAS CARDS
Iu selected packets &c, also Personal
Greeting cards.— Lowest Prices.
Agassis! & Co. l»!l   Pemherton   Bldg.
Victoria, II. C.
NOVELTY  ADVERTISING
Calendars — Metal Signs — Stickers
—Labels &.c. — Lowest Prices. Agas-
tlr, & Co. 188 Pemherton Bldg. Victoria
A delightful party was given by
Mrs, T. Eccleston and Mrs. S. Jones
at the home of the latter on Monday
evening last, some thirty guests being
present, who sat down to a sumptuous
banquet. One of the features of the
party was a huge fortune pie with
streamers attached, the pulling of
which caused much merriment. Games
music and dancing followod, all the
guests enjoying themselves thoroughly. Mrs. Walter Hudson acted as
pianist In her usual efficient manner,
the party breaking up shortly after
midnight, a most enjoyable time being spent by all.
Tires to Fit any Car from
$10.00 Up
A TIRE SHOP FOR TIRE SERVICE EVERY TIME
BOOL  & WILSON
COURTENAY       " NANAIMO
GAS PHONE 178 OIL
Mr.  Reg.  O'Brien  returned  home
this week after spending the past few |
months In Renton, Washington.
Special-Saturday
Vacuum Lunch Kits
Complete With Bottle
$2.38
Candy Department
SEE OUR WINDOWS FOR WEEK END SPECIALS
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
«* as
When you want
your Battery and
Electrical Repairs
Done Right
BRING YOUR. CAR TO US.     WE SPECIALIZE IN
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL REPAIRS.
COME IN AND   TAKE   ADVANTAGE   OF   THE
LATEST WILLARD DROP IN PRICES.
A BATTERY FOR YOUR FORD, CHEVROLET, AND
OTHER SMALL CARS.
$22.90
Sparks Co.
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICIANS
PHONE 99 PHONE 99
COURTENAY, B. C.

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