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The Islander Feb 12, 1916

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VOL. VI., No. 46        THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, FEB..12. 1916.        Subscription price, $1.50 per year
COAL INDUSTRY WANTS PROTECTION
Ottawa. Feb. 4.—Strong representations urging that a heavy
duty be placed on crude oil imported into Canada from the
United States are to be made
during the session of * he Dominion House.
The element which is in favor
of making users of liquid fuel
pay additional toll is said to have
marshalled its forces and to be
making its preparations to force
an issue on the question.
The large corporations and
manufacturing interests which
will be vitally affected by the
proposed new imposition are taking steps to combat the movement and a lively fight between
the opposing factions, the coal
dealers and the oil corporations
and .oil users is likely to occur.
COAL VERSUS FUEL OIL.
The Nanaimo Conservative Association has forwarded a telegram
to Mr. F. H. Shepherd, M. P.,
who represents that city, to use
his utmost endeavors to impress
upon the Government the necessity of granting adequate protection to the coal mining interests
from the menace of the unrestricted competition of fuel oil.
Campbell's Spring Goods now
being opened.
Harry  Devlin,   Inspector   of
Mines, left for Nanaimo today.
WANT MORE LIGHT.
The Dominion Government
some eight years ago erected for
the people of Cumberland and
vicinity a Public building which
is used as a Post Office, a Government Telegraph Office and a
Customs House. In the corridors
of the Postofflce Department,
when the fixtures were completed, the Public Works Department made pVovision for 20 lights
evidently thinking that amount
would be required to give sufficient light to the public in the
transaction of their postal business, and when all the lights are
turned on the illumination is all
that can be desired. During the
last few months the Islander has
heard several complaints concerning the lighting of the Post Office. One person complained
that he had received a registered
letter and there was not sufficient
light to read the address; another person received a post office
money order and he was unable
to i ead the amount of the order
before having the Post Office, of
course anxious to see that the
amount was correct.
As stated above, there are
twenty lights in the corridor of
the Post Office Department, and
The Islander man, to satisfy
himself, visited the Post Office
at 5 o'clock in the evening dur
ing the week and found the
caretaker on the job. Instead
of turning the lights on at the
switch he proceeded to get a
step ladder and turned on one
small light at the end of the corridor, removed his ladder to the
other end of the corridor, and
turned on another small light,
giving two lights where provision
is made for twenty and leaving that part of the Postofflce set
aside for the use of the public in
almost darkness. Upon seeing
this The Islander man came to
the conclusion that every home
in the City of Cumberland, irrespective of how poor and humble
it may be, is better lighted than
the Public Building of Cumberland. This condition of affairs
is entirely the fault of the caretaker. Although h«. may be an
elderly gentleman and take the
same amount of care of the Post
Office as an old, eccentric lady
would take of a curly dog, he
must understand that the public
are going tp have light or other
wise the proper authorities will
be notified of the facts as they
exist. So, Thomas, be careful,
and turn on the lights like a good
boy.   Be good!
Spring Goods now being opened at Campbell's.
The annual meeting of the West
Cumberland Conservative Band
will be held in the Band Hall on
Tuesday evening, Feb. 15th. All
members are requested to attend.
AN ITALIAN POST TEN THOTSAND FEET f B9VE SEA LEVEL.-On January 10th a daring group of Italian
Scouts on skis made a desperate attempt on the enemy's advanced lines, in a district similar to that shown,
destroying two blockhouses.
HEAVY SNOW BLOCKADE TIES
UP LOCAL MINES
During the past week we have
had another heavy fall of snow,
coming down continuously for
four days until Wednesday, interrupting traffic to an extent
never before known in this part
of Vancouver Island.
Owing to the immense amount
of snow which fell the local mines
were shut down for a week. It-
proved an utter impossibility to
move locomotives or cars until an
army of men shovelled out the
snow from between the twenty-
five miles of railway track leading to the Bay. With the local
officials putting forth every available effort the local mines were
only able to resume operations at
two mines on Thursday. With
a downfall of rain Thursday the
blockade was entirely raised, all
the mines resuming operations
yesterday.
Several of tbe local merchants
were running short of supplies
owing to the blockade of snow,
the Wellington Colliery Railway
Company being unable to move
any freight between Union Bay
and Cumberland.
The mails coming into Cumberland hove been very irregular,being sometimes two and three days
late, coming via the government
road in a four-horse sleigh.
The only accident during this
strenuous period occured on Sunday last when the snow and ice
fell from the roof of the Simon
Leiser Building while Mr. Wm.
Gleason was passing, pinning him
amidst the debris. The injured
man was taken to the Cumberland
General Hospital where it was
found that Gleason was suffering
from a broken ankle bone,bruised
back and scalp wound, He is at
present under the care of Dr.
Geo. K. MacNaughton.
Several buildings have collapsed during the past week: the Chinese theatre at Chinatown is a
mass of ruins; the two-storey
building on Dunsmuir Ave., at
one time occupied by The Islander
and owned by Thos. Edwards, of
Vancouver, has fallen in under
the heavy weight of snow; part
of the large building owned by
the Richard Short Estate, occupied as pool rooms, has also fallen
in. The pool tables are now removed to the Cumberland Hall.
The Italian Hall at West Cumber
land has also caved in. TWO
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. 0.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAO.
uty? Jfilatttor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12th, 1916.
TOBACCO SEED BEDS.
It is recognized by authorities
that in the growing of tobacco
the quality of the leaf produced
depends much on the manner in
which the plants are started.
It is realized also that expense
can be saved by doing this in the
best way. For six years the Experimental Farms have been investigating the problem of tobacco culture and in order to give
growers the advantage of the
lessons learned there has been
issued a bulletin entitled "Tobacco Seed Beds." It is numbered
21 of the Second Series. This
phamphlet of 51 pages prepared
by Mr. F.Charlan, Chief of the
Tobacco Division, treats the subject in six parts under the following heads: Types of beds, the
soil and seed bed, shelters, seed
sowing and maintenance of bed,
diseases, and the making of a
hot bed. This bulletin, which is
generously illustrated, is free to
to those who apply for it to the
Publications Branch, Department
of Agriculture, Ottawa.
TEN
COMMANDMENTS
MATRIMONY.
OF
It is claimed that Theodore Parker just previous to his wedding
day inscribed in his diary ten
beautiful resolutions which he
termed as the "ten commandments of matrimony." They are
as follows, given here as a guide
to husbands:
1. Never, except for the best
reasons, to oppose my wife's will.
2. To discharge all duties for
her sake willingly.
'6. Never to scold.
4. Never to look cross  at her.
5. Never to worry her with
commands.
SPRING 1916
New Goods Arriving Next Week:
Ladies' House Dresses,
Wash Skirts and Middy Suits,
Shirt Waists and Middy Blouses,
Silk and Satin Underskirts,
Velvets,
Dress Goods,
Dress Ginghams,
Dress Muslins and Ducks,
Crepes,
Nainsooks and Lawns,
Linens,
Galateas,
Tickings,
Towels and Towelling.
6. To promote her piety.
7. To bear her burdens.
8. To overlook her foibles.
9. To save, cherish and forever
defend her.
10. To remember her always in
my prayers.
Thus, God willing, we shall be
blest.
Matrimony is always a subject
of great interest and importance
for the single. Several young men
of our town seem to be all worked up on this matter. They are
making goo-goo eyes at girls,
even in church; and the pomade
they use on their hair would be
enough to grease our band wagon
They are extremelj anxious, so
we are told, to get married for
better or for worse.    That's one
point; it will be the one or the
other and all the silly goo-gooing
and the brainless plastering on
the hair cannot change it.
We do not advocate a continuous honey-moon. That is all
tomfoolery; and the sooner our
young folks see that either before or after the wedding, the
better it will be for their domestic welfare. The wedding union
should be among other advantages for the providing of a
pleasant home, where the husband loves to spend his leisure
hours and the wife finds pleasure
to work. In order to provide
such a haven of contentment
more is needed than sentimental
cares and a rich father-in-law.
What is needed is common sense
in both parties, and a lot of that.
But some young men are fools
and imagine that the foolishness
of calf-love makes a paradise between any four walls. They become bewitched with some giddy
butterfly society girl and marry
her. Then expect her to go home
and wash the powder and rouge
from her face, and fi y a beefsteak, mend his socks and sew
on his buttons. Mostly living
representations of fashion plates
don't like household duties and
prefer reading a love story. Be
wise.
It is pretty hard for a woman
wearing a dress she has 'turned'
three seasons and faded cotton
hose with patched heels, to say to
her liege lord: "I love you just as
well as when we were married
ten years ago." THE rSEANDRR. nTTMRERLAND, B.C.
THREE
S\?
LEEDS AND THE WAR
How an English City Gives Men and
Munitions Cheerfully
Leeds, wTites the Lord Mayor, is
"doing its bit" by supplying all sorts
of guns, from the monster weapons
of our battleships down to the crackling machine guns and the service
rifles. It has begun producing large
quantities of shells; also such explosives as "T.N.T." and lyddite (picric acid). Leeds can pride itself on
having been flrst in the field with a
munitions of war scheme. Lee.b secured a shell making shed, 107 yards
long by 32 yards wide, which has five
hundred occupants, all turning out
shells as fast as ever they can.
Leeds helps the guns by making the
aeroplanes that do such brilliant observation work, and building locomotives, traction engines, steel transit
wagons, and motor-driven vehicles.
Leeds has no reason to be ashamed
of its fighting record. The strength
of the Leeds lads in khaki is an army
corps of 40,000 men, 2,000 are serving
with the regulars (army and navy),
and over 12,000 with the new %rmie:.
She boasts a "Pals" battalion and a
"Bantams" battalion, the latter some
1,400 strong. Then the oldest of
Leeds' regiments—the Leeds Rifles-
may well be proud of its six battalions
with a strength of, roughly, 5,000 officers and men.
Busy and Generous
Of boots and-clothing Leeds is turning out vast quantities of these indispensable articles. The dye and
chemical companies of Leeds are very
busy trying to cope with the demand
for dyes for khaki, etc. So many of
their hands have enlisted that there
has been a serious shortage of labor;
while it has been difficult to get sufficient supplies of raw materials from
such places abroad as Jamaica. For
the wounded, Leeds has open arms.
Apart from the regular hospitals,
large buildings, such as the Heading-
ly Teachers' Training College, have
been converted for the use of the
wounded; whilst owners of private
mansions have been only too ready to
place them at the disposal of the doc
tors and their charges.
Leeds' "silver bullets" are worth
mentioning, says her Lord Mayor. We
have some 1,600 Belgian refugees in
the city. Many of these are housed
ln private homes. The Belgian Consul's Relief Fund and the Lord Mayor's Belgian Famine Fund have received strong support. Recently the
Marchioness of Aberdeen visited the
city speaking on behalf of Ireland's
children. "Paddy's" fighting spirit is
such that Ireland is almost denuded
of able-bodied men. There are only
old folk and chidren left, and distress
ls widespread, and Leeds has begun
to send aid.
Hard Hit But Chirpy
Of course, says the   Lord   Mayor
again, Leeds has felt   the   pinch in
some directions.     As in most other
Slaces, our professional men, hotel
eepers and restaurateurs, costumiers, and purveyors of articles of luxury have been hit, while one or two
of our staple industries are suffering
severely. For example, ln normal
times Leeds did a big printing trade,
but this has fallen off greatly owing
to tha decrease ln advertisements.
Then in the early months of the war
our smaller engineering firms were
rather seriously affected, but they
quickly adapted themselves to the altered conditions, and are busy on
munitions work.
Best of all, the war has brought
here, and I have no doubt'equally elsewhere, a remarkable rapprochement,
or "rally round" of all classes. Recently at a packed meeting in the
Town Hall the principal speakers
were the Vicar of Leeds, the Roman
Catholic Bishop of Leeds, and the
President of the Leeds. Free Church
Council. There may not be peace on
earth, but in tbis country there is certainly good-will between man and
man. Leeds has retained its characteristic "chirpiness," like Private
Lonsdale.    Despite scanty food and
other hardships, Lonsdale remains
"chirp." In a recent letter to his ife,
he remarked that there were only
some 770 Sundays between him and
his native city!
HUNS WOO BELGIUM
Eminent Herr Professor Rebuked b)
Belgian Colleagues For Intrigues
The German diplomats are busily
engaged trying to make capital out of
the old animosities between the Flemish and the Walloon population of
Belgium. Through the voices of her
statement, professors and journalists
Germany is endeavoring to convince
the Flemish people that she recognizes
them as her blood relations and brethren and that she has no higher desire
than to deliver them from the French
yoke. A famous Belgian historian received a visit from one of Germany's
great luminaries, Professor Lambrecht
The German professor immediately began to speak to his Belgian colleague
of the close affinity of race between
the Germans and part of the Belgians.
He swore that the Kaiser was by no
means inspired by the evil intentions
attributed to him by wielded people,
on the contrary he never for a moment
had thought of annexing Belgium, but
simply desired to acquire the coast of
the country as a bulwark against England and this would really be an advantage also to the Belgians, who
would thus themselves be protected
against the perfidious country across
the North Sea, which was their greatest and bitterest enemy. "If Belgium
would enter into some form of a union
with Germany her people would get
full freedom to develop their magnificent gifts, while otherwise such a thing
would be quite impossible," he continued. Germany, the most noble
minded and generous country ln the
world, would then found a new country, Franconia, and found a number
of universities there for the inhabitants of the Latin race."
The Belgian professor with all the
courtesy due a scientific celebrity declared that this project had not the
slightest chance of success and that
not a single Belgian would think of
entering such a German university.
On the other hand, he declared, far
from looking upon England as an
enemy Belgium would gratefully try
to get into even closer touch with
that country. Professor Lami jeht
afterwards called on two other Belgian scientists, although warned that
each of them had lost a son fighting
against the Germans. In each case
he was politely but firmly shown the
door.
Famous "Whens1
« friend's yornifl oftsprt*
swears yotw ckest
ma iac«, ana lap with jam
FATE FORCING HAND OF ALLIES
Paris, Feb. 7.—Weare passing
through dark, damp days, which
are not good for the soul. I have
known some black moments and
doubtless shall know worse. The
German is exploiting all the psychological factors he is capable
of understanding, and his press
just now is engaged in confirm-
ing the world in the idea of a
motionless and unbeatable Michael straddled across Europe
and disdainful of his little enemies. But the idea is beginning
to penetrate the Teuton's head
that this is not a war of victories
but a war of extermination of his
species. We, in England, are
better informed on this point
than we were a year ago.
When a whole nation goes into
the trenches there can be no victories: there can only be Rilling
and at least three nations desire
greedily that the Teuton be' killed
in retail, since he cannot be
killed wholesale.
The[German cannot withdraw
from his present lines. He dare
not, because he would have to
explain that Taction to his own
people. He must use himself up
gradually, [[either by advancing
and winning victories, or by staying where he is, and when he is
used up there will be very ltttle
of the German problem to settle.
That is tbe end where the destinies are forcing us, despite all
the efforts we have made to a-
void it
The question of indemnity to
Germany has disappeared by the
force of facts. If she claims one
it will be cheaper to continue killing. If she demands peace without indemnity, returning to the
status quo, what guarantees will
there be that as soon as civilization is disarmed she will not
throw herself on us again? The
moral lawjdirecting her life compels her to do to.
That is why her ships cannot
be allowed to go to sea again.
She cannot wage any more war
than she is now waging, because
she is engaged on all possible
fronts. She can defend and consolidate her conquests, but what
good is concentration when she
perpetually has to throw men in-
to'the fringe of fire burning all
around her? Allah has decreed
that she shall perish by her own
act, from the consequences of
the law that she professes and
through  her own temperament.
If the Allies had won five or
six months ago they would have
left Germany still capable of retaining her lines. Now no Germany will remain. This may
sound extravagant, but all that
will remain will be a few peo
ples living on the eternal defensive in moral, social and political
trenches. Grant that everything
in Germany favors a defensive
impossible to break, an influx of
food stuffs impossible to stop, a
people indefinitely enthusiastic
for war; even then we must hold
on. France, who has paid the
flesh of her flesh; England with
her half-million losses and about
to pay more; Russia with her
dead impossible to count.
All the rats are before us in
the same ditch, and as far as
England and the Empire are concerned we can put as many men
into the line in France to, hold
the Teutons as the French have.
Regarding the financial situation. If I were younger I would
say "fan immense wave of prosperity follows every war, but I
leave this to people twenty years
younger and accept the commoner idea that universal ruin awaits
us.S But, when the whole world
is materially ruined, each nation
will be as rich as its neighbor.
I imagine that in England,
where small subscribers are not
numerous, a certain proportion
of debt will be simply effaced, or
repudiated, a very just reason
being that men rich enough to ■
lend big sums to the state are
rich enough to lose them. It is
immoral, but we should only
laugh. So should even the rich
menforced to lose.
Perhaps they would receive title of nobility, a compensation
that would be an admirable and
practicable apotheosis for our national snobbery.
Anyhow we shall see funny finances and the spectacle of Central Europe administered like an i
estate for the benefit of France,
Russia, England, Italy, Serbia,
Montenegro, Japan, Australia,
New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, India and Belgium.
Those who till the soil will be
rich after the war; those who do
not will be poor, but there will
be no Germany.
In the County Court of Nanaimo holden at Cumberland, B. C. in the matter of
Malcolm Newberg, deceased, and
In the Administration Act;
Take notice that by order of Kis Honor
Judge Barker, made the 12th day of January, A. D. 1916,1 was appointed administrator to the estate of the said Malcolm
Newberg, deceased, and all parties having claims against the said estate are
hereby required to furnish same, properly
verified to me on or before the 21st day
of Febrnary.A. D. 1916, and all parties
indebted to said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness to
me forth with.
WM. WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 21st day of January, 1916. FOUF
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Aged Parents of Local Man Are
Burned to Dsath by Huns
t*
Mr. Mike Minach, a native of
Montenegro, and now a patient
in the Cumberland General Hospital, recently, received a letter
from his cousin, Steve Minacfc.
(formerly a resident at No. 8
mine and now in a hospital in the
Balkan area, with a bullet in his
shoulder,) stating that Mike's
two brothers had been killed in
battle and that his aged parents
had been burned to death in the
most dastardly manner by the
brutal Austro-Germans.
It would seem tbat this part of
Montenegro where the Minachs
lived had been overrun and devastated by the Germans, who in
passing through the country locked the doors of the schools and
churches (where the aged and
women and children had gathered
for shelter and prayer) and then
ruthlessly set them on fire.
Of the truth of the above there
is absolutely no doubt, and the
sympathy of the whole community goes out to him who by barbarous German cruelty has been
bereft of those as dear to him as
his own life. Can such wanton
outrages continue to be perpetrated on the defenceless aged and
innocent women and children
without arousing such an unquenchable wrath in the breast of
every Canadian, who pretends to
be a man, as will not be appeased
till every act of German barbarism is avenged an hundredfold?
ILO ILO ITEMS.
Episode Thirteen of the Broken Coin tonight at the Ilo Ilo.
Coming Thursday, "The Last
Hour," an Essany three-act
drama. See it at the Ilo Ilo.
There will be a dance in Ilo
Ilo Hall on pay night, Feb, 19th.,
and as dances have been few
lately on account of weather conditions, it is expected that there
will be a big' attendance, from
nine to twelve, Ladies free,
Gents 50c.
Episode No. Thiiteen--"War."
Episode   No.   Fourteen-*"On the  Battle
Field."
Episode No. Fifteen-'Thp Deluge."
Episode No. Sixteen--"Kitty  In Danger."
Episode No. Seventeen-"The Castaways."
Episode No. Eighteen--"The Underground
City."
Episode No. Nineteen--"The Sacred Fire."
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No.  Twenty-two-"An American
Queen,"
Lilloet Volunteers Join 102nd.
Lieut. Brydon, officer in charge
of the Vancouver depit of the
102nd Overseas Battalion. Northern British Columbia Regiment
was treated to a pleasant surprise on Friday morning, when
nine of the huskiest men he had
ever seen, well booted and
clothed to withstand the rigors
of British Columbia weather as
one finds it this winter in the Interior, presented themselves before him, brought their heels together with the regulation click,
saluted as one man, and declared
unanimously that they had enlisted in Warden's Waniors and
were ready to take passage to
the battalion headquarters at
Comox. \
The party represented the second contingent from Lillooet,
which district has been particularly prodigal in furnishing real
specimens of manhood to the
King's tailor. They were: A. H.
Macdonald, brother of a Vancouver barrister; H. Wade, W. Johnstone, M. J. Bagleson, H. S.
Moore, Allen Hume, W. Clyde,
J. Carmichael, and H. J. Hutch-
ins. According to an enthusiastic statement made by Lieut,
Brydon they are "just about the
best yet." Not a man under
twelve stone, and all as hard as
nails and as keen as razor blades
"Another party of fifteen came
in from Vernon today," said the
officer in charge. "We are sending a detachment of forty forward to Comox, and with the
quotas arriving from all quarters
it will not be long before the battalion is at full strength."
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Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
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BROADWAY FEATURES
Thursday.
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"THE LAST HOUR"
A thrilling Essany Drama, 3 Acts.
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§
The Telephone Takes the Miles
Out of Distance.
For Sale CheAp—A McClary's
"Kitchener" stove, in good
condition. Apply Leslie J.
Aston, Shoemaker, Cumberland.
To Replace Sunken Lusitania
New York, Feb. 7.—News advices received from Liverpool
state that the Cunard line is understood to have taken over the
newly constructed steamer Stat-
endam, which was only recently
completed for the account of the
Holland-America line at the Belfast yards of Harland & vVolff.
The steamer is reported to bave
been bought from the Holland-
America line some time ago by
the British Government, and is
said to have been used by the
British Admiralty in hospital
work.
Although there is no confirmation of the statement, it is said
that the Cunard line in acquiring
the steamer from the British
Government within the past
uonth has paid approximately
$5,000,000 for the vessel. It is
also stated that the vessel will
be used in the Liverpool and
New York passenger service, to
replace the Lusitania.
When you want to phone to Vancouver Island, to
the Kootenay or down the coast, use  the telephone
right beside you.   Every telephone is a long distance
D     telephone.
Q There is no difficulty in  hearing the party at the
jjj     other end.
Q So when you want to telephone long distance, do
K     so from your own house or office.
B        You get your party, or you don't pay.   That means
K     you get your answer.   And all in a few moments, too.
|
| British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
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SHIP YOUR FURS DIKECT <o "SHUBERT" the largest
house in thc World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW HJ1.S
a reliable—responsible—-safe Fur House with au unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a century." a long successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt,SATISFACTORY
AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for "Cftt *l)ui)trt feijipper,"
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write lor it-NOW-ifs FREE
A R SHIIRFRT Inr- 8S-27west.Austin ave.
J\. D. anUDLRl, inc. Dept.C 69 CHICAGO, U.S.A. NDUR, CUMBERLAND, B.C..
FIVE
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastori
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 6th Sunday after
Epiphany:
11 a.m., Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service  of   Intercession   on
Thursday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.   JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date application will be made
to the Superintendent of the Provincial
Police for the transfer of the Licence for
the sale of Liquor in and upon the premises known as the Bevan Hotel, situate at
Bevan, Nelson District, British Columbia,
from Hugh Thornley to WatkinWilliams,
of British Columbia. WLWM ********
Dated this;17th3day ofjjanuary, 1916.;
HUGH THORNLEY,
Holder of Licence.
WATKIN WILLIAMS,
Applicant.
FIRE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co, of Liverpool.
Total Assets - $26,788,930.
W.   WILLARD,
LOCAL AG E N 1
CUMBERLANDmIHOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
Red Tape ^
When old Machonlchle came In,
with hia head looking like a balloon
Wvi druggist did his beat to appear
sympathetic.
After about a yard and a half ot
plaster had been fixed to various parts
of his cranium, the old man prepared
to leave the shop.
"I have always taught my son," be
murmured sadly, "to count five before speaking, but I know now that
wu a mistake."
"Really!" answered the druggist.
"I should have thought It was an excellent plan."
"No; I don't think so. Vox instance, this morning I was standing
at the back door instructing him how
to dig up a flower bed. I saw his
attention wandering. A look of excitement came into his eyes. He was
gcing to speak, when he remembered
his training he had received."
"Well," asked the druggist, as the
old man paused, "did he count five?"
"Oh, yes; he counted all right!
But before he'd finished the chimney
pot that he had seen coming had fallen on my head!"
The Adventures of Johnny Mouse
STeV/j/AJ OF
frlS  WEDO/eVt-X
/*1/}/*XCr*i.'
tKlftou
LACO NITROGEN
LAMPS
(THE DAYLIGHT LAMP)
PRICE SCHEDULE:
'60   Watts - $1.10
•Oi
100
200
250
300
350
500
1000
xx
xx
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
1.25
2.25
3.00 '
3.35
4.00
5.00
8.00
Frosted Lamps 10% Additional.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oik, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31      ' BBf imf***mSMm
SIX
THE ISLANDER,   .UMBERLAND, B.C.
I
JOHN BULL:—"Great Scott! You fellows must have mighty big
insides."—From "Passing Show," London, England.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 87
Ajjent for tlie
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Undersoil, Proprietor
I'Mimates Rnd Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI PROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Goal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
•n Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
' he Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
lories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.   -
Application for a lease must be made by
the applioant in person to the Agent or sub-
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by seotions, or legal subdivisions
of seotions, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplioaut himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year. 123
The lease will inolude the oosl mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
$10.00anaore.
For full information applioation should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to  any
Agent or 8ub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B-—Unauthorised publication of this*
advertisement will not oe paid for.
Wellington
ailway Company
I
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EF
:FI
EC
TP
v'E   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.
9.35
P.M.
3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M,
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2,00
A.M.
10.30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10
3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05
3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00
3.00
(f)LakeTrail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55
2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3,50
8.50
2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45
2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30
2.30
..11        =
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY 9HH
———
THE  ISLANDEK. UUMrJE •■ ANO. n  <_,
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LUX. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES. Ass't General Manager
SEVEN
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S60
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
Wa 11 na fiicUN^ ** only skin deeP;
TT aiipapci o^but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15^ a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
m**ms
We Recommend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so|very gocd.
Every possible precaution is taken
in thejbrewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels forljQUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[establishedJM years.]
WHERE SOCIALISM FELL
V
Germany's Largest Party Denied Itself
at Kaiser's Word
The war has accomplished what
neither the great Bismarck nor his
minor successors were able to do. It
has broken up the great Social Democratic party in Germany. In the
Chamber ot Wuertemberg the radical
Socialists declared war on the knife
against their old party when they
formed the new independent party,
the Socialist Union, whose actual program is peace. Perhaps the most
tragic element in the breaking up of
the great socialistic world movement
is that Its downfall in Germany has
been brought about by a question as
typically national and imperialistic as
this: Wherther or not Germany is to
profit by the war by extending her
frontiers.
Here, at least, one was inclined to
think, was a question on which all international Socialists must agree, but
later attempts that were made to
bring about a reconciliation served
only to widen the breach.
The fate that overtook the international Socialists when the war
broke out wat indeed a tragic one and
esspecial tragic to the German Socialists. Never had that party held a
stronger or more proud position—with
Its four million voters, the greatest
party in Reichstag, and numerous
representatives in the chambers of the
various countries of the German Empire. In one day the gigantic work
of generations collapsed. The day
when the German Socialists as a
whole, like a flock of sheep, deserted
their ideals and voted in favor of the
war appropriations, they sealed their
owu doom. In a single moment the
powerful party became a nonentity-
its ideas and its power were swept
aside by a wcrd of the Kaiser and
the millions of voters who for generations had been taught to hate and
detest war, embraced the guns,
shouldered the rifles and went to war
with a song on their lips. So much
went to pieces that most of the German Socialist leaders seen nothing repulsive in annexing Belgium. So
much has gone to pieces that German
Socialist leaders calmly discuss "regulations of frontiers" as the result of
the war. "How is it possible to get
away from these facts?" says Herr
Liebknecht, the only German Socialist who from the very first remained
loyal to his ideals, which with him
had become convictions. "How powerless are not even the most honeyed
and clever phrases against these
dreadful events, and what a bottomless pit of 1 ypocrlsy it is to pretend
that they dc not exist or that they
mean nothing!"
Mrs.  Newlywed  Again
Mrs. Bible had only recently returned from the honeymoon trip and
was enjoyint the delightful novelty
of marketing one morning.
"Oh, yes, and I wish some butter,
too, please," she added, as she waa
about to leave the store.
"Roll butter, ma'am?" queried the
clerk.
"No,'' returned she, promptly; "we
wish to eat it on toast. My husband
doesn't care for rolls."—Harper's
Magazine.
NOW STOP!
Do not throw this adv. away,
-the most important announcement is still to come.
Do you realize what this
means to you ? *\ It means
that you will always have
that neat, clean-cut, well-
groomed effect. 1 Your
clothes will always look as
if they had just come from
the tailor's, spic and span,
neat, refined and giving the
impression of prosperity
and business power.
Remember I call for and
deliver the goods.
' Cumberland
DYE WORKS
NOTICE.
Effective from opT. 1st, 1914.
No^games of any kind will be
permitted on    th£   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
afternoon teas served
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY  PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND   INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-B
P.O. DRAWER  430
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE ISLANDEK. CUMBEia
l***m      I
TOWN    TOPICS
FOR SALE-At A.R.Kierstead's
Blacksmith Shop, 5 sets Market
Sleds, $40,00 and up; also auto
wheels repaired.
J. R. Lockard, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries. Dunsmuir Ltd., left for
Victoria on Friday morning.
Four teams are engaged in
hauling coal to the residents of
this city.
Passenger, freight and coal
trains are now running on schedule time on ♦he Wellington Colliery Railway.
W. A. Lee, Inspector of Offices
of the Dominion Express arrived
here Thursday evening and left
for Vancouver on Friday morning.
Col. J. W. Warden, Commanding Officer of the 102nd Battalion
Major Hagar. Capt. Stead and
Dr. MaiNeil, also of the 102nd,
visited Cumberland yesterday
with a view to placing troops here
until the recruiting barracks at
Comox is ready.
The public schools of the city
were closed for the first three
days of this week, commencing
again on Thursday. The trustees
employed several men in removing the snow from the school and
making pathways for the pupils.
The regular meeting of the
City Council will be held in the
Council Chambers on Monday
evening, February 14th., for the
transaction of business. At this
meeting the by-law to borrow
$3000 on the current year's taxes
will receive consideration.
The Canadian Collieries Basket
ball team met the Courtenay team
at Courtenay last night. The
Company team after a mos*. exciting game won by a score of 18
to 2. At half-time the score stood
3 to 2 in favor of the locals, but
on resuming play the Cumberland
forward line hit theii stride and
with some nice combination rolled
up 15 more points. Baker was
the outstanding star of the locals
but he was well backed by the
rest of the Company boys. North
played well at centre for Courtenay.   D.C.Macfarlanerefereed.
COMING EVENTS.
A Leap Year Dance will ke
held at Bevan on Tuesday, Feb.
29th.. in the Bevan Hall. Bevan
Orchestra will furnish tre music and refreshments will be
served during the evening.
Dancing commences at 9.30 p. m.
sharp. Admission, Ladies 75c,
Gentlemen free.
The annual Masquerade Ball
under the auspices of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade
will be held in the Ilo Ilo Dance
Hall on St. Patrick's day, March
17th.
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Cumberland General
Hospital will be held in the West
Cumberland Band Hall on Wed
resday, April 26th.
r
THE   BH
ORE
CORSET   SPECIALS
D. &A.
Service
Corsets
Popular
Priced
Corsets
(giWsWMU
No 1. A Splendid 75c. Corset, Made of Coutil, medium low bust
and long close-fitting skirt; has four hose-supporters. £$Just the thing
for those who like a light weight Corset.
No 2. A Beautiful Model, that will giveTgreatSwear|an^ryice,
Has medium high bust neatly trimmed, and strengthened in" front
which keeps corset from stretch in j out of shape.   D.& A. leader price,
$1.50
No. 3. Incomparable Reducer, With" double straps, byjthejaid of
scientifically laid pieces, will give the ideal front effect, and reduce
abdomen, hips and back. Hook at bottom of front. "Satisfaction
guaranteed in this special Corset.   Price
$2.50
L
\e-*-*e-<
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE
Phone 3-8
J
'wvO '

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