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The Islander Jan 1, 1916

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Array i
*
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 40        THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JAN. 1. 1916. Subscription price, $1.50 per year
\
SANTA AND THE WAXWORKS.
This Cantata and play was given in the Presbyterian Church
on Monday evening to a crowded
audience. The whole entertainment showed careful preparation
and great attention to detail
which was worthy of the occasion. The opening songs were
well rendered and the children
in their dresses made for the
songs, looked very neat and becoming. The Sunbonnet Song,
sung by a number of little tots
all dressed in pink dresses and
pink sunbonnets, looked very attractive, and gave a good account of themselves. The Kodak
song, another feature, where all
the girls were ready to take a
snapshot, with their camera in
their hand, came in for well merited approval. In the' Moving
Picture* song'the whole school
took part in this very snappy and
humorous piece, with actions
suited to the part, and it was
quite evident the "Moving Picture show,' meant a lot to all who
took part, if we should judge bjf
the spirit they entered into and
the expression on their bright
and happy faces. The Gingerbread song, with about i twelve
girls all of a size dressed as Gingerbreads, did their parts well
and deserved the applause they
got. Another piece which was
very touching and real was given
by the girls, and was entitled
"Lost in the Street," depicting
the girl who was lost in her
search for Santa. The Cook song,
sung by older girls all dressed as
cooks, with their white dresses,
aproas and white cock caps looked very like their calling. They
had a very good song to sing, one
with a good swing which went
brightly and cheerily. The chorus and the refrain went with
splendid time to the steps of the
cooks in their actions.
In the second part of the program the celebrated Madam Jar-
ley with her world renowned
waxworks gave a splendid entertainment. Miss Lena Cessford-I
as the "Teacher," did her part
well and in introducing Mrs. Jai-
ley with her famous Waxwprks
to her school promised ' a rare
treat to her scholars. Mrs. T.
Cessford, as Mrs. Jarley had a
very, large part to play as well as
THIS MAP SHOWS SALONIKA AND THE SURROUNDING
DISTRICT.
The territory to the north has been evacuated by the Franco-British
forces and it is their purpose to use Salonika as a permanent base.
Sevei-e .fighting is expected at any time in this neighborhood.
take part in some of the songs,
which she did with great credit
to herself, her rare wit and readiness in the various parts assigned to her well deserved the special approval of the audience,
which bestowed the same on her.
Her Waxworks all deserved special merit for the way they performed their part. The Prima
Donna, in the person of Miss Jessie McDonald, was splendid, and
not a muscle seemed to move as
she was wheeled before the audience. Miss Hilda Watson, as
Maud Muller looked very tricky
indeed with hei sunbonnet and
her r?ke. Captain Kidd in the
person of Mr. Hood was the real
MacKay. No landlubber him.
Mr. MacKinnon as Jack Spratt,
with Miss Helen Parnham as his
wife were the contrast of the evening and looked real swell. Mr.
F. Kynoch, as Excelsior, looked
splendid and carried his banner
in style. Mr. Spencer as Jack
Horner sat in his corner all tight
to the great delight of the young
folks. The Washerwoman, Mrs.
MacKinnon, left nothing to be
desired in appearance and action
and certainly looked the part,
Special Feature, Mr. Kynoch
as Dr. Hicks was a lightning artist, as fr6m the time he posed
as Excelsior to his change as the
doctor was very short indeed.
Everyone appreciated the hit on
Dr. Hicks and possibly none enjoyed it more than himself as he
sat in the audience.
The Doll. Everyone in the
church were loud in their praise
of little Miss Conrad, who was
dressed as a doll and who was
the cutest and neatest doll imaginable.
Santa, the last Waxwork, was
represented in Mr. Sutherland,
who adhered to the old traditions
of Santa Claus.
In the school Mr. J. Banner-
man as Nilas was the comic of the
evening, while Misses Grace Watson, Bessie Stewart and Annie
Wotson did their parts well, The
whole evenings entertainment
was performed splendidly and
the greatest credit is due Messrs.
Parnham and A. J.' Taylor for
he result of their labors in their
faithful training. The Church
are. certainly indebted to these
two gentlemen for this fine performance. The collection was
liberal, over thirty dollars being
collected for Sunday School.
Pte. E. Horwood returned' to
Vancouver on Thursday morning
after spending a week with his
parents, .Mr. and Mrs. S. Horwood.
CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
SECOND APPEAL.
Somewhat over a year ago, as
President of the Canadian Patriotic Fund, I made an appeal to
the people of the Dominion for
funds to assist the families of the
gallant men who are going to the
front. Though anticipating a
generous response, I was hardly
prepared for the msgnificent
manner in which the call was.
met, Monies have poured into the
treasury of the Fund until the
total contributions have reached
and exceeded six million dollars.
Large, however, as this sum
appears, it has not greatly exceeded current demands and, if
peace were declared in the immediate future, the entire surplus
on hand would be required before
all the men of the Expeditionary
Force could again return home.
To-day there are 25,000 families, comprising, it is estimated,
80,000 individuals dependent
upon the Patriotic Fund.
With further recruiting the
demands upon the i*uud will,,
with each succeeding month,
continue to grow, so that it is estimated that should the war continue during 1916, a sum amounting to some $8,000,000 and probably more will be required. This
would, however, only mean $1
per head of the population for
the people of Canada, and it is
little indeed to ask of those who
remain at home in comparison
with the sacrifice in life and
limb of .hose who are fighting in
defence of the Nation.
In spite of all the various calls
that have been made for funds to
aid our soldiers and sailors and
the magnificent response that
has been made in each|and every
case, I still feel assured that the
warm hearts of all Canadiads
will respond to this further appeal to enable the Patriotic Fund
to continue its splendid work
during 1916 and take care of the
families of those who are fighting for their Sovereign, the Empire, and the Dominion, on the
battle-fields of Europe and on
the High Seas.
ARTHUR
Lieut. C" R. Mcdonell of Victoria of No. 2 Tunnelling Company.was here during the week. TWO
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, JANUARY 1st, 1916.
THE NEW YEAR.
A friend stood at the door;
In either tight-closed hand
Hiding rich gifts, three hundred
and three score;
Waiting to strew them daily over
the land,
Each drop he treads in it, and
passes by;
Even as the sower.
It cannot be made   fruitful till
it did.
Friend, come thou like a friend,
And whether bright thy face,
Or dim with clouds we cannot
comprehend.
We'll hold   our patient hands,
each in his place,
And trust thee to the end;
Knowing thou leadeth onward to
those spheres
Where there are neither days,
nor months, nor years.
Miss Mullock, in this beautiful
poem gives our ideas better than
we can express them. The idea
-of each day being a gift, hidden
from us until its hour comes, is a
pretty thought. So many gifts,
so much cime to use for either
profit or loss, and so many hands
are held out eagerly for the coming days, looking for them to
bring happiness, or gain of some
kind. The spirit sometimes grows
faint before the unknown future,
consequently it is enough to take
one day at a time and try to
make that good. It is hard enough even then, and sometimes
it is best to go hour by hour. One
day at a time is the secret of every noble life. One day at a time
taken up bravely with its duties
faithfully done as they come, its
trials patiently borne, its temptations faithfully resisted, its
crosses cheerfully carried, its
joys rightly used, and its gladness gathered from each passing
hour. Instead of making many
resolutions at tho first of the year
to be quickly broken, let us strive
M
JANUARY 1st, 1916.
AY this day and all the days of the
New Year bring to you and all
those who are dear to you the
sunshine of happiness, and that
each and everyone will be
buoyed up with strong hope for
the future.
A New Year's Wish to Everyone
FROM
CAMPBELL BROS. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
4
to meet each day bravely, and
take what it brings unquestionably.
Oh, hand some lamp like hope
Above the unknown way,
Kind year to give our spirits freer
scope,
And our hand strength to work
while it is day.
New Year greetings are greetings of good will. How they
soften hard hearts, purify base
desires, sweeten bitter thoughts,
and make every deed purer and
tenderer. Let hearts expand,
sympathies enlarge and good will
reign. Let benedictions drop
from lips, and substantial gifts
fall from overflowing hands.
Make cheerless homes radiant,
and hopeless hearts to thrill with
unspeakable gladness. Forgive
your enemies. Bury the past.
Rise above the mean and petty
resentments which you may have
harbored against those who have
not used you well.   Be generous.
Happy New Year! What a
blessed phrase! Speak it from
the heart and then strive to make
every one's New Year a happy
year and yours will be happy indeed.
"SHORT A MAN,
ii
A man whose name is widely
known for generous service and
inspiring leadership tells this
story of his boyhood:
At seventeen he was a member of a church in his native
town. One Sunday he crossed
the commons to the other church
of the village, and said to the
pastor, "I sing bass in the choir
and I teach in the Sunday School
but our church has a dozen who
can sing bass or teach. I understand that you are short a man
in your choir. If you want me,
I'll take a letter from my church
and come over and fill in."
Of course the minister wanted
him; and so the young man entered on a life of remarkable service
for others, a life of "filling in"
whenever a good cause or an uplifting agency was' 'short a man."
There are wonderful opportunities for those who face life in
that spirit. Egypt was short a
man when Joseph went theie.
' Israel was short a man when the
young David stepped out lo meet
Goliath. Greece was short a man
when Leonidas led his spartans
to Thermopylae. Every page of
history, ancient or modern, tells
the same story.
There never yet was a school,
a church, an office, a factory, a
political campaign, or any other
worthy institution or work, that
had not room for another worker.
Are you the man that some
worthy cause is short of?
—The Companion.
SLAUGHTER
SALE of
HIGH-CLASS
GOODS
ConsistingofWatchesJewellery,
Cut Glass, Clocks, Fancy Goods,
and Books of all kind. A large
assortment of articles suitable
for Christmas gifts are included
in this sale at immense reductions for cash, in fact, no reasonable offer will be refused.
SELECT YOUR HOLIDAY
PRESENTS NOW!
AS
THIS SALE WILL LAST
FOR 12 DAYS ONLY
Commencing today, December
11th.    One dollar has the purchasing power of two dollars in
this Sale.
SPOT CASH.
T.D. McLEAN
■
The Jeweller   Cumberland, B.C.
YOUNG MEN AND THE
MINISTRY
One hundred years ago the
ministry was the noblest career
a young man could choose. It
meant dignity, authority, leadership, high standing in the state,
and the respect and esteem of all.
In the ministry centred learning,
intelligence, and judgment.
It is not so now, and everyone
admits the change. The minister
no longer leads the general
thought of the community. He
is treated with consideration, but
too often with patronage, by the
active wealthy members even of
his own parish. And because the office commands less,
respect, it is sought by men of
first-rate energy and ability.
Yet it is ' still true that for'
young, strong hearts thei e is no
better way of helping their fell-
owmen. There never was a greater need of spiritual help than
there is to-day, never we-e there
more souls wandering, groping,
reaching out with vast and vague
desire for something that mere
common, daily effort cannot give.
No human being can offer those
souls such rich possibility of comfort as the minister whose whole
heart and life is in his work.
Why is it, then, so many are
needed and so few are found?
First, because it is a life of sacrifice. There is no wealth in it,
no luxury. A man must give up
ease and good living, and be
ready to vow poverty as Saint
Francis did.
Secondly, it requires preaching,
and few have the gift of eloquence. But preaching is to-day
the least part of the minister's
duty. It is a small thing to be
able to turn spicy phrases that
make a man forget to wish he
were in his automobile instead of
in his pew. The quiet, intense,
passionate power of paying a finger on the wounds of the Soul
and healing them is worth far
more than sermons. And many
men have the power and could
use it, if they would.
Finally, the young man may
feel that he cannot subscribe to
alj ihe usual articles of creed and
dogma; but those things should
never be suffered to strangle the
spirit. Dogmas are made for
man, not man for dogmas. Our
religion is too apologetic, too
critical, too explanatory. It
should be constructive, vital, dynamic. The one thing that counts
is the relation of the soul to God,
and even there we should not explain or analyze too much, but
work, and feel, and love.
Let the thousands of strong
young men who want to do gopd
in the world consider how rich
and vast are the possib lities in
the field of the ministry. If the
impluse of the spirit really takes,
possession of them, no one of the
difficulties need stand for a moment in the way.—The Companion. FOUR
IPI^NDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
One Christmas Eve
Bu Harru T. Barker
{Copyright by Western Newspaper Union.)
He was grinning like a schoolboy
at the gyrations of a mechanical
clown. His bluff hearty laugh seemed
to come straight from his heart. His
long white whiskers, bearskin coat,
merry eyes and full-round figure—
suggested the veritable Kris Kringle
to a T.
Men, women and children were all
smiles as they looked him over, but
too polite to linger and embarrass
him. The proprietor of the store, observing the slight halt in the passing
procession, beckoned to the stranger.
"My friend," he spoke rapidly,
"could I have a word with you?"
"A dozen, if it suits you," responded the other heartily, and followed his
Interviewer inside the store.
"It's Just this," explained the store
man: "we've got a Santa Claus—see
him yonder, in that booth, shaking
hands with the children?"
"I see him," nodded the Westerner.
"He is on till midnight and I can't
spare him. A family here—the Moodys
—best people in town—want me to
send them up a Santy. You're just
made for it. Come—ten dollars cash
and it won't take you r~i hour. I'll
furnish the robe and cap."
The Westerner smiled queerly. I'll
take the Job," he replied.
Directed by a lad from the store,
he was piloted to the Moody mt.nsion.
admitted and shown into a room off
the main parlor, where a Christmas
tree stood, loaded and ablaze.
All around it the hired Santy gazed
keenly, almost eagerly. He appeared
to be scanning the various framed portraits on the wall and seemed disappointed, as if in that inspection lit
missed something he had expected to
find.
A servant came and helped him on
with his costume, directing him in
what he should do when the children
entered the festal room. An adnii
able Santy he made. He went through
his part in a merry heartsome wav
then quietly slipped out through
the side door and proceeded down thc
street. He seemed to have been over
the ground before, for he reached hisr
destination by pursuing lanes and by
ways where he would not be observed
In the costume he still retained.
It was in the
snow-drifted garden of a neat but
humble little cottage that he finally halted.
"I'll do it," he
spoke to himself,
"if I can work it.
Maybe I'm not
forgotten here!"
He knocked on
the door and a
woman   opened   it.
"Don't be scared, ma'am," spoke
the Westerner. "You see, I've just
been up to the Moodys—relatives of
yours, I believe—acting Santa Claus.
Knew that you had' a little one here,
saw the tree and thought maybe 1
could make her happier by going
through my act."
"Oh, would you?" cried the lady in
quick delight. "Indeed, it would cap
the climax of all her Christmas eve
joys."
"Smuggle me into the room with
the Christmas tree," suggested thu
Westerner buoyantly. "I'll do the
rest."
It was passing strange, but, conducted into the apartment and half hiding behind a screen, the Westerner
. studied the walls of the room circum-
snantlv.  iust as he had done at the
Moody mansion. A great glow spreaa
over his face as he noticed a portrait
over the piano, in the special place of
honor. It was wreathed with holly
and evergreen.
"No, not forgotten; that's certain,"
he uttered in an Intense tone. "I
guess I've landed in a real home spot."
The little one of the household
came in, leading the children of some
poor neighbors. ,They screamed and
then fluttered with delight as Santy
came Into view. Then their eyes
danced as his jolly manner restored
confidence. He handed out the presents from the tree.1 The air quivered
with the joyful shouts of the happy
little ones.
" 'For Uncle Reuben,'" he read the
card pinned onto an old worn woo'en
stocking. "Where's he? Come on,
Uncle Reuben!" he shouted into
space, and his tone was a sob.
"Oh. he isn't here," prattled little
Esther, stepping forward. "He hasn't
been for two Christmases. That's
him," and she pointed to the holly-
wreathed portrait. "He'll come back
some time, though. Mamma says so,
don't you, mamma? And every Christmas I put a nice card in his old.
stocking, and then I save them all up,-
to give to him when he comes back." j
A choking sound came from the
throat of the Westerner. He turned
aside and reached under his robe. It
was to unclasp a great belt buckle, a
belt bulging with gold.
"Your Christmas gift, Mary!" he
cried to the mother of little Esther.
"Only a trifle out of a whole mine-
it's full of the stuff," and he threw
lt into her lap.
Then off went costume and cap.
"Don't you know me, Mary?"
"Uncle Reuben!" she gasped.
"Uncle Reuben -ind Santa Claus,
both in one!" shouted the Westerner
hilariously.    "Little Esther—come!"
And Esther bounded into his arms
in a wild transport of recognition and
delight.
NOTIS
B'GOLLY IF R, FELLER
WANTS TER SUCCEED
IM THIS WORLD HE
HRS   GOTTER   .
THROW MWMY HIS
WISH  BONE   fl/\T
GET   R ,
brckbone!
'^g^ -aHRNESS'-
Wanted to Hatch It
A trained ostrich disconcerted its
exhibitor at a London music hall by
continually endeavoring to break
away from all restraint and to climb
over the footlights into the orchestra.
The widely-advertised act came to a
sudden end, and the professor emerged
from behind the curtain and apologized
for the actions of his pet in these
words:
"Lydies and Gentlemen—Hi am very
sorry 'o disappoint you this hevening.
We are compelled to cease our'hen-
gagement until the management hen-
gages a new orchestra leader. The
one at present hemployed 'as no 'air
on 'op of 'is ead, anc'. my bird takes
Hit for a hegg "
I ILO I LO THEATRE
f  PRO. CHANGED MON., TUES, THURS. * SAT.
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I TONIGHT SEVENTH EPISODE
"The Broken Coin"
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MATINEES TUES., THURS.,and SAT., CHILDRDN 5c.
BROADWAY FEATURES
Every Thursday.
"DEAD MENS' SHOES"
Next Week.
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*    tucket"--Lawrence D'Orsay.
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DO YOU REALIZE
THE POSSIBILITIES
OF YOUR TELEPHONE?
Why has the telephone become so popular in all
countries? Because it transmits the h,uman quality
of the human voice. *
When a person is speaking over a telephone, the
tones and accent of the voice are very distinct; each
talker recognizes instantantly the voice of the other.
That's what. makes long distance telephoning so
satisfactory. You know whom you are talking to,
you know your message is being received, and you
get your answer.   All in a moment's time.
S British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd. fi
0)Ot)O(tO()O(X»»3^-eXJO.)O()O()O()O()O()O()O(!O()O{3O(IOi)i
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected ia yonr section
SHIP YOITRFins DIRECT to 'SHUBERT"the largest
House in the World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMERICAN RAW FURS
a reliable—resporfsiblB'-safe Fur House With an unblemished reputation existing for 'more than a third of a centurv," a low? suc-
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A.B SHUBERT Inr 2S27WESTaustinave.
/-V. Ll. OCTUDJblVl, inc. Dept.C69CH.CAGO,U.S.A. 'THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
*i
I
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 2nd Sunday after
Christmas:.
8.30 a. m., Holy Communion
11 a. m., Mattins.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service   of    Intercession   on
Thursday at 8 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
Dance tb the perfect rhythm oi the
Edison,
Diamond Disc
Phonograph
If you are just learning the
new dances, start right. Get
the rhythm of them firmly fixed
ln your mind through the well-
chosen, well - played records
rendered by Mr. Edison's latest
invention.
If you are already an expert
you will appreciate th« splendid interpretation which the
mellow, fully-rounded tone of
this wonderful instrument produces.
No Needles to Change. A Permanent Diamond is the
Reproducing Point.
Mr.   Edison's  perfect  mechanism  insures uniform pitch
and uniform speed from the
first revolution to the last.
Hear the new dance records
which we have just received.
Come in any  time and  hear
as many as you like.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
Hon. W. J. Bowser who is
on his way from Victoria to Kamloops, where he will spend a
month's holiday, He is feeling in
preety good health, but his phys-
ican has ordered a complete
change of air and surroundings
to aid thorough recuperation.
DON'T FORGET YOUR 0WNI
In speaking of a person's faults,
Pray don't forget your own:
Remember those with homes  of glass,
Should seldom throw a stone.
If you have nothing else to do
But talk of those who sin,
Tis better we commence at home,
And from that point begin.
I'll tell you of a better plan, '
And find it works full well,
To try my own defects to cure,
Before of others tell:
And though I sometimes hope to be
No worse than some I know,
My own short comings bid me let
The faults of others go.
Then let us all when we commence
To slander friend or foe,
Think ofi the harm one word will do
To those who little know,
Remember curses, sometimes, like
Our chicks, "roost at home."
Don't speak of others' faults until
We have none of our own.
Notice is hereby given that on the 1st.
day of December next application will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the renewal of the hotel license
to sell liquors by retail in the Hotel
known as the Union Hotel, situated at Un
ion, Nelson District, in the Province of
British Columbia.
John N. McLeod.
Dated this I5th.4ay of October, 1915.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel af Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
One Hundred Dollars Reward will be paid by the City
Council for information leading'
to the arrest and conviction of
the person or persons maliciously
breaking and destroying plate
glass windows in the city of
Cumberland.
JAMES WARD,
Chief of Police.
City Mai!, Cumberland, B.C.,
November l?t, 1915.
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Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 76 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
[agsiet Cash Store
.1 P.O. Box 279
Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
The Yuletide Dawn
By Victor Radcliffe
(Copyright by Western Newspaper Union.)
Joy bells were ringing out upon the
clear, frosty air, but their sweet tin-
tinabulations had little of cheer or
comfort for Gabriel Monroe.
He had made his own life's history,
and this was what made him somber
this ideal winter's day—the day before Christmas. Pride had been humbled by regret; he was old, wearied,
heartsick. This was his second day
home—if he could call it that—after
a five years' sojourn in a foreign land.
It all came back to him now, the
salient appeals to his better soul
pierced the frail armor of the heart he
tried to make iron. He recalled the
hour when his daughter, Eloise, had
come to him with the news that his
son, Gerald, had married against his
wishes. On the moment, Gabriel Monroe had disowned him, banished him
from heart and home. In vain had
Eloise pleaded for her brother.
He closed the old mansion at once,
announcing that he intended to live
abroad. Eloise declined to go with
him. Gerald was young, inexperienced, without resources. Plainly she
recited her duty to her father as she
felt it. She would stay and help Gerald become a man.
Since his return, after a lapse during which he had
not so much as
written to his rejected children,
he had learned
that a little golden-haired child
had come to Gerald and his wife.
His son had not
made a great success in a business
way. He had been
ill and at present had a hard time
making ends meet.
But he had turned out to be a diligent, earnest man. The gentle influence of a loving wife, the Bisterly care
of Eloise, had been his at all times.
Eloise, her father heard, was beloved
of a worthy young engineer, at present at a distance.
Old Gabriel moved about uneasily in
his luxurious armchair. He paced the
apartment for an hour, he tried to
read. His eye caught a notice in the
local paper. There was to be a Christmas sale at the village hall, he noted,
under the auspices of a ladies' club,
for the benefit of the poor. Why not
go? Sooner or later he must meet old
acquaintances.
The maddest, merriest of Christmas
groups thronged the big hall. There
were booths and counters and, near a
bewildering Christmas tree, an immense papier mache creation in the
form of a stocking. Its province simulated a fishing well, for near by were
poles and line, and upon payment of
a fee a cast over into the top of the
stocking brought up a gift, fastened
on by someone concealed inside.
Old Gabriel made happy a score of
little ones by paying for their fishing
plunge. He bought several trinkets
and toys and dis-
t r i bu t e d them
freely. His heart
was beginning to
warm up. He met
a few old friends.
He lingered late.
Somehow his
thoughts were
turned into a new
channel. The
flood gates of sentiment were wide
open in his heart for the first time in
years.
MUNICIPALITY OF THE CITY
OF CUMBERLAND
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby-
given to the electors of the municipality of Cumberland that I
require the presence of the said
electors at Council Chambers.
Dunsmuir Avenue, on Monday,
the 10th., day of January, 1916,
at 12 o'clock noon, for the purpose of nominating persons to
represent them in the municipal
council as mayor and aldermen.
The mode of nomination of
candidates shall be as follows:—
The candidates shall be nominated
ih writing, the writing shall be
subscribed by two voters of the
municipality as proposer and seconder, and shall be delivered to
the Returning Officer at any time
between the date of the notice
and 2 p. m. of the day of nomination, and in the event of a poll
being necessary such poll will be
opened on Thursday, the 13th.,
day of January, 1916, at Council
Chambers, Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B. C, of which every
person is hereby required to take
notice and govern himself accordingly.
No'person shall be nominated
or be eligible as a candidate for
mayor or alderman unless he be
possessed of the qualifications by
law required of those officers,
and unless the candidate shall,
on or before the hour of 2 p. m.
of the day of nomination, furnish the Returning Officer with
a statement in writing, specifying the land or real property upon which he qualifies, his nomination shall be invalid and shall
not be acted upon by the Returning Officer.
The qualifications as candidate
for mayor are as follows:—
He must be a male British subject of the full age of tewnty-
one years and not disqualified
under any law, and have been
for the six months next preceding the day of nomination the
registered owner in the Land
Registry Office of land or real
property in the city of the assessed value on the last municipal
assessment roll of $1,000.00 Ov'er
and above any registered encumbrance or charge, ar.d who is
otherwise qualified as a municipal voter.
The qualifications as candidate
for alderman are as follows:—
He must be a male British subject of the full age of twenty-one
years and not disqualified under
any law, and have been for six
months next preceding the day
of nomination the registered owner in the Land Registry Office
of land or real property in the
city of the assessed value on the
last municipal assessment roll of
$500.00 or more, ever and above
any registered encumbrance or
charge, and who is otherwise
qualified as a municipal voter.
Given under my hand at the
City of Cumberland this 28th
day of December, 1916.
Alex. McKinnon,
Returning Officer.
NOMINATIONS FOR SCHOOL
TRUSTEES.
Nominations for School Trustees will be received on Monday,
JanuaiylOth., 1916, at 12o'clock,
noon, at the City Coun.il Chambers.
There shall be three trustees
to elect, one for a term of one
year, and two for a term of two
years, Jor until their successors,
in office are elected.!
Thej mode of nomination of
candidates shall be as follows:—
The candidates shall be nominated in writing. The nomination shall be subscribed to, by
two duly qualified electors as
proposer and seconder, and shall
be delivered to the Returning
Officer at any time, between the
date of this notice and 2 p. m., of
the day of nomination, and in
the event of there being more
than three nominations a poll
will be opened, on Thursday, the
13th., day of January, 1916, in
the City Council Chambers, Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B. C,
of which every person is required
to takeinotice and govern him:
self accordingly.
The two candidates receiving
the highest number of votes,
shail be declared elected for a
term of two years, and the candidate receiving the next highest
number of votes shall be declared
elected for a term of one year.
The qualifications for Trustee
are] as follows:—Any person, being a British subject, and of the
full age of twenty-one years, and
not disqualified under and have
been for six months, next preceding the day of nomination,
the Registered owner in the Land
Registry Office of land and real
property in the City, of the assessed value, on the last Municipal assessment roll of $500.00 or
more, over and above any registered encumbrance or charge,
and who is otherwise qualified as
a Municipal voter.
Given under my hand at Cumberland, B. C, this 28th., day of
December, 1915.
A. MacKinnon,
Returning Officei.
$25.00 REWARD
Will be paid to anyone giving information leading to the arrest
and conviction of any person or
persons damaging vacant property in the City of Cumberland.
JAMES WARD,
Chief of Police.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
n Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
JJlanaore. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applioant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivwions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaut himself.
Eaoh application must be accompanied
by a fee of |6 which will be refunded if tha
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on tho
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of mesoh-
antable ooal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year. 11
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface right* may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—-Unauthorised publication of thw
advertisement will not be paid for.
I
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hederson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland THE  1SLANDEK, UUJftbUKLANU, ti. U.
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.. LL.D. D.C.L.. President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES. Ast't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by tbe survivor. S60
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
*•"
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE Ae    iW C K. I IN IN (J IN
SEr '      THE FURNITURE STORE
a=
We Recom*
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for iQUEEN BEER,
—you'llpke it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS,]
The auctioneer of tbe occasion began to Bell off what had not been disposed of. He came at last to the big
stocking. Someone started a bid of
ten dollars. Almost unconsciously old
Gabriel doubled it. Thirty—forty-
there was zest in helping a good purpose. The auctioneer nursed the excitement of the bidders.
"What a Christmas tbe money will
make for the poor!" he shouted. "Maybe the stocking isn't half empty-
stocking and all there is in it goes to
the highest bidder!"
"Forty-five!" sang out the town
banker.
"Fifty," nodded old Gabriel, and
"Sold!" announced the auctioneer,
highly pleased, and then, as everybody,
excited and laughing, surrounded the
fortunate purchaser, there came a tap
from inside the stocking and a muffled
voice sounded:
"Please let me out—it's dreadfully
close in here!"
As a section of the papier mache
contrivance moved apart, revealing
the "fisher maiden" of the occasion,
out stepped—Eloise.
"Father!" she gasped.
He started and quivered. He had
bought "all there was in it." Upon the
Impulse of a moment hung all the future destiny of four souls. He opened
bis arms, the tears rushed to his eyes
and Eloise was in his embrace.
It was the gossip of all the town how
jld Gabriel Monroe met and expanded
the golden opportunity of his life that
Christmas eve.
It was like a romance—the faithful
suitor of Eloise telegraphed for, the
discarded son, his wife, sweet little
Dolly, sent for and installed in a home
whence want and care were,banished.
It was "grandpa" who carried the
little one ln his arms into the room
trhere the Christmas tree was all
iblaze and sparkling next morning,
music to his storm-
haven-found soul,
vere the rapturous words:
"Oh. the beautiful—the beautiful!'
i
ind.  sweetest
'.ossed,   but   now
Uno-e Eph. Remark.:
when new shoes alw'ys squeaked like
a sewin' circle eatin' celery. Neglect-
in' t' wash his feet won't nec'sarily
give a feller a strong constitution."
Illustrated Song
"Miss Vamper has not a particle
of tact."
"What has she done now?"
"The other evening when Mr. Jag-
gles, who is notorious for not paying
hi*; debts, asked her to sing, she went
to th« piano and Bang. 'Trust Tim
uot!"'
NOW STOP!
Do not throw this adv. away,
--the most important announcement is still to come.
Do you realize what this
means to you ? 1" It means
that you will always have
that neat, clean-cut, well-
groomed effect. 1 Your
clothes will always look as
if they had just come from
the tailor's, spic and span,
neat, refined and giving the
impression of prosperity
and business power.
Remember I call for and
deliver the goods.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
Nojgames of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY  PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES; OFFICE, 3-5     RESIDENCE 7*8
P.O. DRAWER  430
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
FOR SALE-At A.R.Kierstead's
Blacksmith Shop, 5 sets Market
Sleds, $40,00 and up; also auto
wheels repaired.
There was a lively Hockey
game at Maple Lake on Sunday.
The S. S Thor arrived at Union
Bay on Thursday evening for
a cargo of coal.
Staff Sergeant John C. Brown,
of the 62nd., was here on a visit
during the week.
Messrs.    Booth,    Macfarlane,
Hudson and Abrams were visitors to this city from Union Bay
,   on Monday evening.
A number of citizens of Cour-
' tenay were here on  Monday evening to attend the local Masonic
Lodge.
H.< Browning, Assistant Secretary of the Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir Ltd., left for Victoria
on Wednesday morning.
The Mayor and Mayoress of
Courtenay gave a very enjoyable
card party at Feckner's Hall,
Courtenay on Wednesday evening.
The Canadian Colliery office
staff who spent Christmas at Victoria returned to this city on
Tuesday and Thursday.
A meeting of the local branch of
the People's Prohibition Movement will be held in the Council
Chambers on Tuesday Jan. 4th.
All those in sympathy with the
movement are invited to be
present.        '
Major R. vV. Coulthard of Calgary, officer commanding No 2
Tunneling Company Engineers,
Canadian Expeditionary Forces
was here on Wednesday and
Thursday looking for miners.
The Sunday School scholars
and teachers of Grace Methodist
Church held their Christmas
tree and entertainment in the
church on Christmas evening.
The children were given presents
as usual only on a smallerv scale
on account of the idle times.
Residents of Cumberland who
have resided here for a number
of years will regret to hear of
the- death of Mr. Thos. H. Williams, who died at Renton, Wash,
on Tuesday last. The late Mr.
Williams was a brotherin-law of
Mr. Thomas Richards, of this
city, and was a man of sterling
qualities and a highly- respected
citizen of Cumberland some thirteen years aero. Mr. Thos. Richards, accompanied by his sons,
Henry and Thomas and his son-
in-law and daughter, Mr. and
Mrs. Macintosh, left on Wednesday to attend the funeral.
r
THE   BIG   STORE
"1
-*****$
IPM
r
r*
%lESm
^/-ii^'Hrwri
VTC
For Ladies.
Perrins' Gloves in black, tan kid, and
tan and grey suede.   Perrins' Gloves
in white kid also white with black
stripe. Price $1.50 per pair,— every
pair guaranteed.
Ladies Umbrellas Our assortment is
very choice and we can assure you
of satisfaction. Prices from $4.50
down to $1.50 and the handles are
very new.
Ladies' Collars A new delivery of the
latest and smartest on the market.
Call and inspect our complete assortment and you will be satisfied
Prices are very reasonable.
Ladies'Waists Our latest arrivals
merit your approval and prove to be
real good value. The styles are very
new and the cloth, crepe-de-chene,
makes a very smart waist. The
prices are reasonable.
Ladies' Handkerchiefs Galore. We offer
you a very large and comprehensive assortment to choose from, and
our prices are right.
Our Fancy Work Department includes the latest goods of "Belding-
Paul" which is a perfect guarantee
of up-to-dateness.
Ladies' Hair Combs, Ladies' Ties,
Ladies' Barettes, Ladies' Purses,
Ladies' Hose.
For Gentlemen
Gentlemen's Sweater Coats in a good
variety of colors and at prices
bought long before the advance in
wools.   Prices from $2.50 to $7.50.
Gents' Ties A late delivery of "Crescent Ties" have come forward for
Xmas showing in all the new'weaves
and patterns. Prices 65c to $1,50.
Cash Ties For durability and smartness try a Cash Tie and you will
admit tjie sterling quality of this
popular tie. Price 65c. N.
Gent's Braces and Armlets^done up in
sets as well as Braces and Garters at
all prices to suit your purse.
Gents'New Caps The smartest line
we've had in all the wanted silk finish
styles in checks and stripes. Prices
95c $1.25 and $1.50.
Gents' Socks make a most acceptable
gift as well as useful. A full range
to select from.
Gents' Umbrellas in new handles and
good covers from $1.50.
Ua all mtr (tinstamm mt txtmb %
(Enmjj.lttn.mt0 of Op #-?aantt.
L.
SIMON LEISER
&
CO.,
LIMITED.
THE
BIG   STORE
•
Phone 3-8
•
■

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