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The Cumberland Islander Sep 4, 1925

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Array TASK CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which la consolidated the Cumberland News.
4
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 36.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1925.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Comox Fall Fair, September 8 and 9
Will Let Contract For
Pulling Street Stumps
Under the heading of unfinished
business, at the Council meeting on
Monday evening, Aid. Potter brought In
his report on the widening of Fifth
St., from Allan Avenue to Dunsmuir
Avenue. There are seventeen large
stumps to pull, he said, and such being the case the council decided to
let a contract to an outside concern
for their removal. Intending bidders
must have their tenders in the hands
of the city clerk not later than Monday, September 14th.
Ali-erman Potter also reported that
the cribbing on First Street, near the
Presbyterian Church, hnd been repaired and the west portion of Maryport
Avenue had also received its share of
attention. Here several loads of ashes bad been placed and a trap installed to connect with the sewer.
Alderman Ledlngham reported, for
the Fire Wardens, that the truck had
been called out three times during thc
past two weeks, for small roof Ares
at which there had been no great damage. It was also said that the wheels
on the hose truck would be strong enough to last out the winter so nothing further In this matter wlll be
done until next year. However, the
chemical truck was In need of a new
carburetor If it was to give Its maximum efficiency and therefore the assistant Are chief was given Instructions to procure this as soon as possible.
POST OFFICE AT
COURTENAY IS
NEAR COMPLETION
The contractors on lhe construction
of tbe new post office at Courtenay
have announced that their end of the
work will be complete by the end of
the present month. After this the
furnishings must be Installed but by
the end of October the citizens of inn
neighboring town should be In possession of a public building that they
have wanted for a long time.
TIME OF SOCCER
GAME CHANGED
LOGGING COMPANY
ADOPTS MEASURES
TO PREVENT FIRES
At the request of the St. Andrew's
team and the secretary of the Pacific
Coast League, the time of Sunday's
soccer game on the Recreation Ground
haB been changed to 2:00 p.m., not
3:00 o'clock as advertised throughout
the district by hand-bills. This will
be the first game here for some time,
and coupled with the fact that it will
be both team's first start In the new
league, there is certain to be a very
large crowd iu attendance.
The Vancouver team has considerably augmented their line-up. having
signed two of Nanaimo's star players—Nell Macfarlane and Ernie "Fat'
Edmonds—both of whom will be seen
in action here on Sunday. Turner
and Oraham, two former Cumberland
players, are also with the Saints, filling the positions they held on the
team here. »
The management of the local aggregation announced their Une-up as
follows: Walker; Mortimer and Marshall; Monaghan, Conti (Capt.), and
Brake; Bannerman, Plump, Fowler,
MacDonald and Hitchens. Confidence
In their ability to trim the Saints is
expressed on all sides.
Remember the time—2:00 o'clock
Sunday afternoon. A. S. Jones, of
Union Bay, will referee.
ATTRACTIONS AT THE
GAIETY
PLEASE NOTE
In the hand bills distributed yesterday by the Mercantile Store Company one Item was headed "Grocery
Specials for Saturday and Monday."!
the bills being printed and delivered |
before Messrs Read & Osborne remeni
bared Monday was a public holiday,
The prices advertised, however, hold
good for tomorrow only and patrons
may be assured that they are Ihe lowest In town.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Cumberland School Board was not
held on Tuesday as only two of the
members turned up at tbe meeting
place. They were the secretary, A.
MacKinnon, and Trustee J. Ledlngham.
Sept, 4 and o—"Secrets of the
Night") a whale of a mystery story
wilh a laugh In every scene. Adults
50 cents, Children 25 cents.
Sept. 7 and tt—"The Goose Hangs
High"; a laugh, a tear, and a thought
to carry home. Adults 35 cents,
Children 15 cents.
Sept 9 and 10—"Argentine Love";
with Bebe Daniels and Ricardo Cortez. N'uff sed. Adults 35 cents.
Children 15 cents.
Sept. 11 and IS—"The Price of
Pleasure"; what you have been waiting to see for a long time. AduP.s
50 cents, Children 25 cents.
LABOR DAY DANCE
IN VETERAN'S HALL
A Labor Day Dance will be held In
the Great War Veteran's Hall on Monday evening. September 7, commencing at 9:30 o'clock. First-class music
by Robertson, Newman, Goodall and
Pilling. Gents 75 cents, ladies 25
cents. Dancing until 2:00 a.m. Everybody welcome.
Comox Lake-Alberni Road
Receives Support Of The
Island Boards Of Trade
Although the forest fires of the
summer that Is drawing to a close
did an enormous amount of damage
in Comox district there Is reason to
believe tbat the measures being adopted to prevent a recurrence ot the disaster tliat befell Camp Three ot the
Comox Logging and Railway Company wlll, in years to come, prove
lo be of value not only to the company
but to the stockmen of this district.
It has been stated that in the reconstruction of the camp which Is now
under way, the new buildings wlll be
equipped with roof sprinklers similar to that in use on the roof of the
King Oeorge Hotel, Cumberland. But
It Is not so much in this direction that
the Interest of stock raisers lies us
in the action of the Logging Company
in seeding the burned over area. Besides assisting in arresting any future conflagration that might breakout, this operation will probably be
of great benefit to cattle raisers,
whose problem has been sometimes to
find sufficient grazing ground for
their stock. Besides being of value
to those already In the stock raising
business it wlll materially add to the
area that can be utilized for the purpose, thus affording an opportunity
for expansion In this branch or tho
farming industry.
CONSERVATIVES MAY
OPPOSE NEILL IN
FEDERAL ELECTION
The appointment of a returning officer for the next Dominion election
leaves little doubt that such un event
will take place this year. Activities
of the various political parties point
to the belief that an election Is not
far off. The Conservative party
leiders have held several meetings in
preparation for tlle contest.
No candidate has been officially
nominated but It is understood that
overtures have been made to a very
prominent person with what result
the leaders in the party are not prepared to say. It Is a foregone conclusion that Mr. A. W. Neill, the present representative of tills constituency
In the Federal House will stand for
re-election and to further his organization a big meeting of his supporters wlll be held In Courtenay on Wednesday, the 23rd Instant! No other
parties have so far signified their intention of getting into the battle.
REPLACING BRIDGES
.Mr. John McMillan, bridge foreman
for the Provincial Department of Public Works has left for Valdez Island
where he will replace seven bridges
that were destroyed by torest fires
this summer.
NOTABLE VICTORY FOR
WESTERN PROVINCES IN
FREIGHT RATES WAR
The three western provinces of Canada have achieved notable success in
their fight for lower freight rates on
western grain. To British Columbians the order just Issued by the
Railway Board paves the way for the
inauguration of a period of prosperity such as the west has not known
for many years. The new order
should mean a, saving of nearly nine
ceuts per hundred In frleght charges.
If this signifies anything at all, it
Is that Canadians have decided that
too long has their grain been sent to
United States ports for shipment to
other countries, with a Consequent
enriching of a people who have no
other Interest in the prairie country
than monetary gain at the expense of
the Canadian growers. Perseverance
and patience have been rewarded
after one  of  the  most  trying  long
drawn out battles In the history of
the Dominion of Canada. In which
justice has at last been done Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.
Tlie equalizing of freight  rates ou
grain westwardbound will prove to be
the    most    noteworthy    achievement
since the peopling of the prairies, and
i wr*ll be the means, of ushering in an
{era of development that  will be felt
! not only at the coast hut in the re-
I molest corners of the three provinces
I directly  interested.      British  Colum-
j bians hope, and are optimistic enough
j to.believe, that the order just issued
is simply a forerunner of what they
j are to receive in respect to rates on
I other classes of freight and that in
| future  trade  will  as a  result, grow
j more   strongly   Inter-provlnclal   than
International.
The Man They Couldn't Hang
THREE TIMES THEY TRIED—THREE TIMES THEY FAILED
For something like six minutes I
stood on that drop blindfolded and
pinioned whilst the wardens jumped
on the boards to make them part." I
was literally resting on mj toes, and
every time the wardens stamped, the
trap nf the scaffold shook. Again
and again the bolt was drawn by the
executioner, but lt was evident that
the mechanism would not work."
Such was the statement made years
afterwards by John Lee the man who
escaped the death   penalty   through
perhaps the most wonderful fortune
ever recorded.
Lee was only a lad of 20 when on
November 14. 1884. occurred the tragedy which was to take him to the gallows. When he was discharged from
the British Navy through ill-health, he
found one of the best friends a mall
could ask for. A certain Miss Keysc
—an old lady of 58 living at Babbe-
combe near Torquay, had already
proved a good friend to young Leo.
Resolution Of Council
Is Not Endorsed Here
THE ELEVENTH
COMMANDMENT
When Cecil B. DeMille's picturization of the "The Ten Commandments '
started Its record making run or 02
weeks in New York, all the metropolitan critics were unanimous In
their praise. George .Mitchell, who
reviewed It for "Judge," said:
"Very frequently we have felt thai
there were too many commandments,
but after having seen this production,
we'd add another: see 'Tlic Ten Commandments.' "
This extrordinnry Paramount Picture Is now coming to the Ilo-llo Theatre. Cumberland, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Sept. 14, 15 and
16 and will be shown In the Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay, the following
three days, Sept. 17, 18 and 19 for tlle
first popular priced engagement since
it was nationally shown. The price of
admission will be Adults 50o and
Children 25c.
RETURNING OFFICER
APPOINTMENT MADE
Mr. P. Leo Anderton of Courtena)
has been appointed to act as returning officer for the Comox-Alberni
constituency In the forthcoming Dominion election.
I A resolution passed by lhe .Saanich
Council for presentation ai the convention of the Union of B. t*. Munici-
: palttles was one of the communications given consideration at the coun-
I oil meeting Monday evening. This
resolution, after pointing out tliat the
gasoline  lax   was   Inaugurated   upon
. the suggestion of the Union and that
' most of It is collected in Municipal
ureas, urges that the government distribute a portion of the revenue therefrom in tlie same manner as the liquor
profits. The Cumberland council
could not see its way clear to endorse
this resolution as it is not a member
of the Union of Municipalities and in
addition it has no wish to antagonize
the government which lias always
treated Cumberland in a fair manner.
!    Another resolution was also before
'the council—from the city of Courtenay. to the effect thai the tax on
beer parlors be paid direct to the city
and not to the government This also failed to get the endorsation of the
, local mayor and aldermen.
The Workmen's Compensation Hoard
[alio wrote in respeel In Mrs. J. llurg-
blner's claim for compensation in conned ion with ihe death of her husband. The claim was rejected, the
letter said, because ihe disability
which resulted fatally was not due to
tiie alleged accident. The letter was
ordered bled.
Hills ami accounts to ihe total
amount of 5171.7*2 were referred '.*)
the finance committee and ordered
paid.
ATTRACTIONS AT THE
ILO-ILO
Sept, 4 nnd 5—"Top of the World ';
a complex love problem in darkest
Africa which Nature solves. Adults
50 cents, Children 25 cents.
Sept. * and S—"The Air Mail"; nor
snow, nor rain, nor wind, nor night
can stay the pilot In his flight. Adult i
35 cents. Children 15 cents.
Sept. 8 und 10—"Excuse Me"; Rupert Hughes' production of bis own
story. Adults 35 cents, Children 1",
cents.
Sept. II ami 12—"The Thundering
Herd"; by Zane Grey, with Lois Wilson and Jack Holt. Adults 50 cents.
Children 25 cents.
PIT HEAD BALLOT
TO DECIDE CASE
(Continued on Page Three )
GAME REGULATIONS
FOR THE DISTRICT
The Associated Boards of Trade nf
Vancouver Island, in convention assembled, this summer endorsed a reso
lutlon favoring the construction of a
road that would connect Cumberland
and Comox Valley with Alberni. As
a result of the passing of this resolution, every community on Vancouver
Island, especially north of Nanaimo.
has expressed a desire to see a road
opened up through Comox Pass, thnt
would connect the east and west coast
settlements of the Island ln a more
direct way than is the case at present. The distance between Comox
Lake where the Island Highway now
terminates, and Alberni is estimated
jto be twenty-two miles—or about the
same as that which coal now travels
from Cumberland to Union Bay.
This twenty-two miles of new road
would virtually be the completion of
the Island Highway in the mid-Island zone, making accessible to motorists a panoramic vista of scenic
grandeur, second to none, wending Us
way over the Beaufort ridge, through
a lake dotted forest, comprising, so
timber men and statisticians tell us
the most valuable stand of Dougla
fir left untouched on Vancouver Is
land. From a motorist's standpoint
no other road is quite so important;
no other public work would strengthen the spirit of Industrial co-operation without which the communities
of thc east aiid west coasts cannot
properly expand.
Alberni is not merely a dot on the
map . lt Is the trading centre of a
long stretch of coast line made prosperous through exploitation of Its natural resources. The same may be
said of the Courtenay - Cumberland
district on the east coast. Does It,
therefore, appear to be good business
to continue to travel seventy miles In
order to connect the two coasts of
Vancouver Island when the distance
can be shortened to twenty-two?
There can be only one answer to this
question and that is contained in the
resolution endorsed by the Associated
Boards of Trade, whose reason for
existence Is the desire on the part of
business interests to assist in the
economic development of various sections of Vancouver Island. That
here Is merit In our request for the
oad through Comox Pass Is evident
y the action of other communities
through their representatives on thc
Associated Boards of Trade.
Considerable changes have been
made In the Provlnclal game regulations for the approaching hunting
season, according to the list appearing in the current Issue of The Britisli
Columbia Gazette.
Following Is a list taken from The
Gazette dealing chiefly with the surrounding district:
Big (iame
DEER (mule, white-tall and Coast
In the western district, bucks only.
except on Queen Charlotte Islands
and those portions of Vancouver Is-
land known as North and South Saanich. and Highland districts, open season from September 12, 1925, to November 30, 1925, both dates Inclusive
Fur-Hnirlng Animals
In the western district, all fur-bearing animals, except muskrats on Vancouver Island and beaver throughout
the district, open season from December 1, 1925, to March 31, 1926. both
dates inclusive.
(fame Birds
DUCKS (except Wood and Elder
ducks), Wilson snipe coots, black-
breasted and golden plover, greater
and lesser yellowlegs—Western district. In that portion thereof situate
and lying to the south of the fifty-second parallel of latitude, open season
from November 1, 1925, to February
15, 1926, both dates Inclusive.
GEESE and BRANT—Western district, In that portion thereof situate
and lying south of the fifty-second
parallel of latitude, open season from
November 1. 1925, to February 15.
1926, both dates Inclusive.
BLUE GROUSE—Western district,
on Vancouver Island, except South
Saanich   nnd   Highland  districts  aud
the municipality of North Cowichan,
and the districts of Seymour. Sahtlam.
Quamlchan. Cowlchan. Ilelmchcn anil
Shawnlgnn. and that portion of Vancouver Island situate and lying north
and west of Salmon Itlver, Strathcona
Park. Burmau River, Muchalat Arm.
Zuclarte Channel and Nootka Sound,
and except in the electoral district ol*
Esquimau and In the Islands electoral district, except Mayne Island, open
season Trom September 12, 1926, to
October 31. 1925, both dates Inclusive.
In that portion of Vancouver Island
known nnd defined as the Highland
District and in the electoral district of
Esquimalt. open season from September 12, 1925. to September 80, 1925,
both dates inclusive.
In the remainder of the district, except Hornby Island and that portion
of the Mainland known as the City of
North Vancouver and the district municipalities of North Vancouver and
West Vancouver, including the watersheds of Caplllano. Lynn and Seymour
Creeks, open season from September
12, 1925, to October 81, 1925. both
dates inclusive.
WILLOW GROUSE—Western district, on Vancouver Island, excepl
Oak Bay municipality. South Sannich.
Highland District, .North Cowlchan
municipality, and the districts of Seymour, Sahtlam, Quumlchan. Cowlchan,
Helmcken nnd Shawnlgan. nnd thai
portion of Vancouver Island Bituate
and lying north and west of Salmon
River. Strathcona Park. Riirmun River. Muchalat Arm, Zuclarte Channel
and Nootka Sound, and except in the
electoral district nf Bsqulmalt, and in
the  Islr.nds  electoral district, except
WILL FACE REDDICK
IN VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER, Sept. 2.—Roy Cliffe.
the sensational young Courtenay light
heavy weight, who has been battling
his way to the top in the past six
months, wlll get his dig chance wheu
he faces Jack Reddick here in a ten
round bout for the Canadian championship on Friday. September 11th.
Cliffe's rise in the ring iu his one
year   of   battling   has   been   nothing
short of phenomenal.     Now he finds
himself  facing a   chance   to   secure
national honors.     Reddick, although
battling  regularly, has uot  defend'-1
| his title iu a buna tide championship
match  since  knocking    oul    Soldier
I Jones in Toronto some time ago.
j    Cliffe, w'ho Is at present in Seattle,
j Is due to arrive In Vancouver Inimeili-j
I ately, accompanied by manager An    |
J tin. to prepare for the bout.     Reddick
is ahead*, on the ground and iu train-
ing for the fracas. ,
The question of adding Mr. A. .1.
Taylor 10 the Hospital Blaff for Therapeutic treatment was the main Issue
of tlie special meeting held last Saturday evening hy the employees of
the Canadian Collieries in the Athletic Club. Reports were read from
the doctors iu which tbey stated that
with the machine at present in the
Hospital they could give tbe treatment where necessary, also tbe nurses
could do likewise. Considerable discussion ensued and finally u motion
was passed to tlle effeel tbat a pithead ballot be taken to see if the
employees are willing to contribute
nine cents per month in order to have
the services of Mr. Taylor.
NET TOURNAMENT
IS PROGRESSING
The annual club tournaments being
carried out at present on die local
tennis courts arc progressing very
favorably towards the finals, scver.il
matches having been played during
the past week. Those who have not
played are asked to do so as soon as
possible. During the week the draw iu
men's and holies' doubles was also
made unci play in this section will
commence noon Trophies for the
winners in each evonl have also arrived ami may in- .ecu in Steveno'
Jewelry Simp. The cup for tli,*
ladies' single-, which vvil! become Ml.'
property of the winner, is especially
beautiful.
Th,. Hight Reverend chas, Schofield,
Bishop ol Columbia, was in tlie cltv
last Sunday io Induct the Rev. Mr.
itowbathan. successor io Rev. w. Leversedge.
Weekly Dances To Aid Funds
Of Cumberland Football Club
(Continued on Page Two)
Cumberland United'* entry into tho
Pacific ('oast Football League wlll increase to a considerable extent the
expenses of maintaining the team, an
expense thai will not he offset by the
Kate receipts.      To assist in meeting
this added cost the management of
the team has decided to hold » series
of Saturday night dances In thc Ilo-
llo Hull, commencing September 12,
and continuing weekly until further
I notice.      The  hall  will  also   he
gaged by them every oilier Wednesday* commencing September 23, when
the entertainment will take the form
of a whlsl drive ami dance. Patrons
of these events will be assured of the
besl floor In the district for dancing.
first-class music, nnd a comfortable
hall specially heated when the weather demands, and in return they will
he assisting their favorite team in Its
quest for championship honors. Popular prices will prevail always, PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1925.
BREAD ON The man who makes money in
THE WATERS a community has a duty to perform to that community. It
may be that he has made his money by superior
business ability, and that he would have done as
well anywhere. That should not alter the case.
It' his gifts are great, his responsibility is equally
great. No man was placed on earth for the sole
purpose of making money, and the man who has
that sole ambition in life had better never have
been born. It is not an act of charity, but the
performance of a righteous duty for the man who
has made money to pass a little of it on for the
benefit of the community, even though he never
expects to see a dollar of his contribution come
back.
PUT YOUR There may be brief periods when
HEART IN IT money is easy, you might by accident back a long shot at the
race course and clean up a bit of coin, an old
uncle might die and leave you a legacy, but remember this—that with health and strength to
back you, life means hard work; and hard work
on long lines, with natural ability and good conduct, means success. Waiting for the easy
money will wear you out and lead you nowhere.
The young man who begins life with no advantage or patronage and makes his way to 'i
good place, invariably must follow the trail of
hard work. He must give his heart to what he
has to do—not half the time, but all the time; not
grudgingly, but gladly; and not merely for the
sake of a salary, but because he loves to be at it,
and makes the work in good measure its own reward. It will come to pass, if you take hold like
this, that men will say you have genius for what
you take in hand; but you will know that one of
the fine qualities in a genius for anything is an
absorbing love for it, and the power of intense
application by which every other power is set to
its finest edge, and is directed to the one great
purpose the man holds in his heart and brain.
You will find this true in any field of endeavor—
in business, or work on the common levels, or
work on the loftiest height—to give your heart
to it is one of the greatest secrets of success.
HARVEST Every season in country life has its
SEASON peculiar beauty, even the bleak and
severe austerity of winter. The
spring time brings its beauty of fresh promise,
summer atlds its luxuriant high tide of life. But
the first days of fall, the harvest time is in many
ways the most beautiful of all. It has its marvelous touches of color, and also a feeling of fruition and reward for human labor. What artist
ever really transferred to canvas the intense
crimson of the tomato or the smiling gold of the
orange? What artificial color could ever reproduce the cheerful beauty of an apple tree dotted with its rich, red fruit? Who ever painted
the golden tones of a heap of husked corn or of
ripe pumpkins ? But the beauty of harvest goes
far deeper than its mere appeal to the eye. It
carries a satisfaction to the human spirit. Life
is full of disappointments, and people often feel
they are constantly going from one series of buffets to another. One has the feeling that the
universe is against him and forever defeating his
efforts and plans. Harvest comes, bringing with
it a goodly showing of the products of man's toil.
You look over a ripened field of grain or a well-
laden orchard, and it is hard to feel that the world
is very wrong. You can't help seeing that in
the long run earnest work is well.rewarded, and
that the fertile earth makes ample provision for
all its children. So a trip through the country
at harvest time, not merely feasts the eyes, but il
reinvigorates one's faith in the essential justice
of life. It is with a more hopeful spirit that the
town dweller returns to his dusty streets and hard
brick walls, after the inspiration of a trip through
country scenes at harvest time.
STARTING The opening of the school season
TO SCHOOL is at hand. This is a yearly common-place. Yet, like many common-places, pathos lurks behind it, and, to the
understanding, tragedy as well.
The first day of school is symbolical. It
marks the parting of the ways; the rending of
home ties; domestic readjustments, breaking the
colt to harness and fitting its back to one of the
burdens that is never laid down till Death unpacks the load.
The pathos lies in the fact that with the first
day of school the mother loses her baby. She
goes with it, clinging to her hand, but babbling,
joyous, eager. She leaves her baby there forever. It's a little boy or girl that comes back
home.    The first cleavage has started in.
The babies cry when mother leaves them
with teacher, but they are soon comforted. The
mothers cry at home, too, but though they smile
and seem to forget, there's always the clutch at
the heart. A baby in the house, clinging, dependent, made for love and mothering, means so
much. The self-reliant child that comes home
at noon can never quite take the place of the baby
that has vanished.
And the tragedy comes from the loss of freedom. The delicious irresponsibility of babyhood
takes flight the minute the school room door is
opened and the first lesson given out. The child
is dedicated to work; it has to take up, in its littlo
way, the obligations of the world. It can never
be wholly carefree again. Up to now, it has
been out of the game of life. It has been outside of the borders, frolicking. But the minute
it goes to school, it is reckoned upon. It becomes
a piece in the game. It has its work to do; its
place in life; its responsibilities.
Those of us who have passed through it all
feel the tragedy. We envy the freedom of the
children. We dread to see them lose it. It is
not that we hate work or fear duties. Labor i3
the salvation of us all. To those who have found
j their niche it is the greatest happiness.
We wouldn't go back to childhood if we could.
But we have earned this knowledge bitterly. It
has meant blows given and taken, and in the end
an acceptance of things as they are rather than
things as they should be. It means the exaltation of philosophy; the triumph of experience.
And the tragedy of it all. over Which the practical
may laugh because they can not feel it is that the
little school children of this week—babies of the
day before—have to go through it all themselves.
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give tht best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE I AMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
LOST—A pair of gold-rlmmed spectacles in the Royal Bank of Canada
Will the person who picked up same
kindly oblige by returning then) to
Mr. A. Walker, New Townsite.     .16.
'M
Rule in Comfort
"on Balloons
DUNLOP
BALLOON TIRES
"WkVE THE WAY"
TAXI TAXI j
Safety and Comfort
Day or Night
CAR  SERVICE
24 TELEPHONE mil
Cumberland Hotel
Car   leaves   Cumberland   lintel
at   8:00   o'clock   every   Sunday
morning   nnd   meets   boat   at
Union Buy.
TOURING PARTIES CATERED
TO AT REASONABLE HATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
TAXI
TAXI
GAME REGULATIONS
FOR THE DISTRICT
(Continued From Page One)
.Mayne Island, open season from November 1, 1925, to November 30, 1925,
both dates Inclusive.
In that portion of Vancouver Island
known and defined as the Highland
District and In the electoral district of
Esquimau, open season from November 15, 1925, to November 30, 1925,
both dates inclusive.
In the remainder of the district, except Hornby Island In that portion of
Hie Mainland known as the municipality of Point Grey, including all
lands of the Crown, and that further
portion known as the city of North
Vancouver, North and West Vancouver district municipalities, including
the watersheds ot the Capilano, Lynn
and Seymour Creeks, open season
from October 15, 1925, to October 31,
1925, both dates inclusive.
PHEASANTS — Western district,
cock birds only. On Vancouver Island,   except   Oak   Bay   municipality,
.and on Gabriola and Texada Islands,
open season from October 15, 1925. to
November 30. 1925, both dates inclusive.
On Sidney, Moresby, Pender, Mayne,
Galiano, Salt Spring, Dbnman, and
Hornby Islands, open season from
October 15,1925, to December 31,1925,
i both dates Inclusive.
On tbe Mainland, except that portion thereof known as the Squamish
Valley and the municipality of Point
Grey and that further portion of
Point Grey under the control, of the
Crown, open season from October 15
1925, to November 30, 1926, both dates
Inclusive.
Western district, hen birds, on Salt
Spring, Denman, and Hornby Islands,
open season from December 1, 1925,
to December 31, 1925, both dates inclusive. '■
The open season declared by these
regulations shall not apply to the
hunting, taking or having In possession ot quail, pheasants, prairie chicken (sharp-tailed grouse), or partridge
when snow ls on the ground.
All patrons, customers and friends are cordially
invited to inspect the Comox
Creamery Exhibit at the
COMOX FALL FAIR
Tuesday and Wednesday
September 8 and 9
Comox Creamery Association
MERCANTILE STORE CO.
PHONE 133 READ & OSBORNE CUMBERLAND
School Opening Specials
PULLOVER   SWEATERS
Boys' Pullover Sweaters, In
smart colorings, —Universal--
Pride of Ihe West makers.
Special     .SI.05  to $4.1)5
BOYS' TWEED PANTS
Boys' Tweed   Pants,  straight
Knee   $1.25
Bloomer Style $1.05 tt $2.50
BOYS' SHIRT WAISTS
Boys' Shirt Waists, a special
value, well worth $1.50. Special
School Opening Sule   05r
BOYS' WOOL HOSE
Boys' Fancy Top Wool Hose.
sizes' 8% to 10   050
Smaller sizes   750
Boys' School Boots, In Lecklen,
Sterling. Tredrlle and other
makes at   $2.05 f<> $1.05
BOYS' SCHOOL BOOTS
Boys' Tredltlte Dress Bool,
smart styles. Black or Brown
$3.75 to $4.75
COMBINATIONS
Boys' Merino Combinations,
soft quality, strong wearing,
sizes 24 to 82. Special ... $1.25
Shirt and Drawers, per garment   750
GIRLS' DRESSES
Girls' Wash Dresses, values
up to $1,115 ut one price .... 050
GIRLS' HOSE
Girl's Hose, ln a large assortment from, per pair 21)0, 750
GIRLS' MIDDIES
Girls' Middles, In White Drill,
assorted collars. Regular price
$1.75.     Special   $1.25
GIRLS' SWEATERS
Girls' Sweaters, in fine knit
Pullovers and Coat styles, new
colorings   $1.05 tn $»Jill
GIRLS' SLIPPERS
Girls' Patent Strap Slippers,
sizes 8 tn i:\i-. Keg. values .o
18.76* lor       $1.05 und $2.05
GIRLS SCHOOL SHOES
Girls' School Shoes, extra
good value, In Cote and Tredrlle makes, Brown & Black
$2.95 to $4.95
TWEED BARGAIN
English Tweed ln neat patterns, 40" wide 71)0 and OHO
FLANNEL SALE
32" Flannel, smart pin stripe,
per yard   $1.45
64" Flannel, in new shades.
Per yard   $1.05
MEN'S DRESS SHOES
-SPECIAIS-
Men's Leckie Dress Shoe in
Drown and Black, all sizes. Keg.
»9.50 for   $«.75
Astoria Shoe, In Brown qnly,
Reg. »9.50 for $«.75
Doctors'. Cushion Sole. In
Blnck, Keg. »7.50   $5.1)5
Walkrite Shoe, real smart
dress shoe. Regular price $6.50
for   $4.75
Grocery Specials Saturday Only
Braids Tea. per lb Wll'
Braids ColTee, per II)  (Wc
Tudor ColTee, per lb  Mil
Nabob Custard, largo tins 2,'n*
Sunmaid Seedless Raisins, t/*Ku>
Malklns Best Jelly Pwds. 8/250
■impress Jams—4-lb. tins. Plum,
(Irceniage,  Gooseberry,  Logan,
Raspberry and Peach   J5c
Tlllson's Health Bran. pkt. SOc
Ready cul Maccaroni, 2 lbs. Sue
Horseshoe Salmon H's 2/15c
School
i
Thrift Dry Soap, reg. 50c per
pkt. for   85c
Nestles Milk 2/S5C
Christies  Biscuits,  reg.  50c lb.
for  45c
Knew Fruit Salts, bottle .... 95c
Economy and Mason Fruit Jars
pints only, per doz  flic
Sunkist Oranges, per doz 80c
Toilet  Paper  6/26o
Bulk Cocoa, per lb  IOc
Sugar, 20 lbs  tlMl
Pendrays Water Glass, tin 85c
White Swan Soap, pkt  SOc
Supplies
Smooth  Scribblers  ....  «/25e
No Lines. Scribblers ... S/ftc
Drnwlng Pads, each   5c
Drawing  Pads, large .... IOc
Map  Drnwlng  Pad     10e
Blotters, each    5c
Blotters,  large, each  ....  lllc
Music Dictation Book .... IOc
Note Hooks, each 5c
Pencils,  each     5c
Pencllholdcrs .... 5c and 10c
Pen Points .... 3/Sc and 6/5c
RulerB, each  10c
Rubbers, each   5c
Drawing Instruments .... SOc
Ink   IOc
Paste   10c
Gum    10c
Wax Crayons   10c
Reeve's  Crayons     15c
Reeve's Paints   10c
Paint  Brushes, all sizes 5c FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 4, 1025.
SSSBBi
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
nf
BIG PICTURE WIL BE AT
CUMBERLAND, SEPT 21
AND COURTENAY SEPT 22
Following-is a reprint from The
Vancouver Sun of August 31, commenting on the big picture "The Man
They Could Not Hang," to be shown
In Vancouver and which wlll be here
for one night only, Monday, Sept. 21
and at Courtenay the following even-
Inge The price of admission at both
theatres will be Adults 75c. and Children 35o.
"Tht seat sale starts today at the
Orpheum box office for the novel
photoplay, "The Man They Could Not
Hang," coming the lirst three days of
next week.
"Although $1.50 was the admission
price at the Grand Theatre In Toronto, where 25,000 people saw this
production. Manager Barnes has made
apeelal arrangements to show the picture here at popular prices. The entire production will be given, assisted
by eminent English artists who accompany the film.
"Although the picture deals with
the miracle of the triple failure to
bang John Lee, tho subject has been
dealt with ln such a masterful way
that there Ib not one morbid moment."
THE MAN THEY
COULD NOT HANG
(Continued From Page One)
§
i$r*'>
SEALED Tenders addressed to the
undersigned, and endorsed "Tend ir
for wharf, Blubber Bay. B.C., will he
roceiied until IS o'clock noon (daylight saving), Friday, Sepli inlier Pi,
1VJ5, for the construction of a wharf.
at Blubber Bay, Texada Island, Comox-Alberni District, B.C.
Plana and forms of contract can he
seen and specification and forms' of
tender obtained at this Department, at
the offices of the District Engineers.
Post Office Building, New Westminster, B.C., Post Office Building. Victoria, B.C., also Post Offices, Vancouver, B.C., and Blubber Bay, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and In accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the .Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
of the amount of the tender. Bonds
of the Dominion of Canada or bonds
of the Canadian National Railway
Company will also be accepted as security, or bonds and a cheque If required to make up an odd amount.
NOTE—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing nn
accepted cheque for the sum of $111,011
payable to the order of the Minister
of Public Worka, which will be returned If the Intending bidder submit
a regular bid.
By Order,
S.  E.  O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 24, 1926. 30-3'
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
tho undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for Repairs to Wharf, Clayoquot,
B.C.," will be received until 12 o'clock
■Ml (daylight saving), Tuesday, Sep.
Umber SS, 1025, for the repairs to
wharf and approach, at Clayoquot,
Comox-Alberni District, B.C.
Plana and forma of contract can be
aeen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at this Department, at
the office of the District Engineer.
Post Office Building, Victoria, B.C., also at the Post Olllces, Vancouver, B.C.,
Alberni, B.C., Port Alberni, B.C., and
Clayoquot, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered uu-1
less made on printed forms supplied I
by the Department and in accordance j
with conditions contained therein.
Bach tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to tbe order of the Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 per
cant of the amount of the tender.
Bonda of the Dominion of Canada or
bonda of the Canadian National Railway Company will also be accepted as
security, or bonds and a cheque if required to make up an odd amount.
NOTE—Blue prints can be obtained
at thla Department by depositing an
accepted cheque for the sum of $10.00.
payable to the order of the Minister
ot Public Works, which will be returned If the intending bidder submit
a regular bid.
By Order,
S. E. O'BRIEN.
Secretary.
Department of Public Works.
Ottawai August 27, 1925. 36-37.
Anxious to befriend him again she
provided him with temporary employment ut her home "The Glen."
Tragedy Came Suddenly
For  some   while   life   passed  very
quietly In Babbecombe. ■ Then, suddenly came tragedy.     When the news
of a brutal murder was made known
ill the neighborhood early ln the morn
ing of November   14,  1884,  horrified
neighbors   were   astonished   to   hear
that tho victim was Miss Keyse. When
the women servants had gone upstairs
to bed on the night of tlle murder,
the.,- had left Miss Keyse 111 the dining
room writing.     Lee slept downstairs
in the pantry.     At 3 or 4 o'clock in
morning,   the   women   servants   had
heen roused by an alarm of lire. They
found  the  house  ablaze   in   several
places.     The first thing they did was
to  rush  to their  mistress'   bedroom.
£ihe waa not there so they  began  a
search of the house.     At last they
found ber dead on lhe door of the dining room with her throat cut nnd tor-
rii.le wounds about the head.      The
murderer had  evidently  tried  separately io hum the body of his victim in
addition to firing the house, for her
clothes   were   destroyed   the   corpse
partly  charred, and   papers   soaked
with paraffin all -which had been placed
around tlle body and llred.     Outside
the  dining  room  in  tlie hull  was  ti
large pool lof blood.      No money 0:
valuables weie missing.   Lee, accord-1
Ing to his own account tiled lo buisi
open '.he French windows of the dining room to let out tlie smoke, and in
so doing received a cut on the arm
t'.-om broken g!aas— an accident that
WP3 lo have far-reaching conBequenc
e 1, tor he was arrested Immediately by
tho police who arrived on the scene
as being the only man in tlie house al
tlie time of the crime, and before long
was standing his trial.
The Evidence
"I do not question the verdict ot
the jury," l,ce himself allowed In recent years. "On the evidence that wa-
placed before them they could havi
come to no other conclusion." The
evidence indeed seemed terribly con
elusive. Shortly before the crime be
had been heard to use threats of vengeance against Miss Keyse. A bloodstained knife was found In the pantry
where he slept. There was blood on
a hatchet he handled just after the
crime, whilst in a cupboard near the
prisoner's bed was an empty oil-can
which should have been full. Further, on the prisoner's socks were
hairs corresponding to those of Miss
Keyse's, on his trousers too. were
bloodstains which were half obliterated with water, and his shirt was
stained with blood in front, whilst as
evidence of motive lhe fact emerged
that his wages had been reduced only
a short time before. For the prisoner the defence could only plead that
tlie bloodstains were caused by the
cut mentioned above, that as he had
helped to carry out the corpse on discovery, tlle marks nf oil. traces of
hair, and some of the bloodstains were
natural, that there were circumstances suggesting that the cook hnd a lover and that suspicion might quite as
justly he thrown on him nr some man
unknown. Lee himself did not go
into the box, for the law which allows prisoners to give evidence on
their own behalf had not been passed
at that time, hut throughout the trial
the man In the dock preserved a nonchalant demeanour which impressed
even the judge.
Appeals In Vain
Petitions were addressed to the
Home Secretary in vain, and on Sunday. February 22. 18S4, the victim who
had written a letter to his sweetheart
and received visits from his mother
and father, took the sacrament for
what he believed to be the last time.
At  8 o'clock the  next morning Ihe
door of the cell was opened and the
governor  appeared   with  Barry,   tbe
executioner,   and   the   chaplain   duly
robed.      The   executioner   pinioned
Lee with a large belt with straps on
it, and slowly the procession started
to the scahold whilst the prison bell
tolled  In   measured   strokes.       The
route of course, wss through part of
the prison which Lee had never been
allowed   to   see   before, but   here   a
strange   experience    confronted    tho
pinioned man—the surrounding wero
perfectly familiar even though he was
treading the path for the first time!
During the night before, as he himself
afterwards revealed, he had a dream
in which he had been on the scaffold
and in which three times the bolt had
tailed to work.     "This is the place I
aw in my dream," he reflected as he
walked through the yard to the scaffold.     "I wonder whether the rest of
my dream may not come true?"     On
he scaffold  his feet  were  pinioned,
lhe big bag put over his head, ami
after Harry had asked whether he had
in,v final word to utter there was a
alienee, during which the condemned
man could hear the wrench of a bolt
being drawn.     The trap gave about
two Inches.     A second passed, whilst
the prison bell tolled and tlle wretch-
oil  man awaited  his doom,  wardens
iumpeil on the boards to make them
part.
Trail Palled to Work
Over and over again tlie bolt was
drawn, but after six minutes, which
111st havo seemed to Lee like ail
aternlty, the attempt was abandoned
and lie was led into a little store room
l(x yards away. There he could hear
he practice which was a prelude tn
:he second execution. The trap was
.man! to fall over and over again and
mail., when they were certain that
hero could be no second failure, he
■vas led hack. Once more his legs
ivere pinioned, and the cap and rope
tdjusted. The trap fell but again
jnly for two Inches—and though those
1 round stamped on It and hammered
it could not be made to fall. For the
■ econd time the rope and cup were
removed and for five minutes the
orisnnor wailed whilst the bolt was
crked backwards and forwards ami
vhat sounded like tbe noise of wood
lelng chipped away came to his ears.
The Third Attempt
For the third time the man stood on
the scaffold, and for the third time,
when the bolt was drawn, there was
that first drop of two inches wliieh
left him with head jerked upwards
and poised on his toes. For the third
time all attempts to carry out the execution were useless anil he was removed—this time to his cell.
Presently the executioner entered
and began to unplnion the man who
had borne bis torture with a wonderful fortitude. Hut Lee now found the
suspense unbearable and pleaded that
the execution should be carried out
without delay.
"Don't do that, leave them on," he
cried, "I want to he hung." Here,
however, the chaplain intervened wilh
explanations. Hy the law of the land
they cannot pul you on ihe scaffold
again, he told him as Barrey removed
the straps that had secured arias and
hands. And gradually it dawned on
the man. who had escaped death In
this miraculous fashion that his
dream had come true. On December
18. 1008 be was released after **■" years
pennl servitude still protesting his innocence as vigorously as on the day ■
when, a bid of twenty, he had heard
the sentence of death wliieh his executioners proved powerless to car
oul.
PAGE THREE
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND  GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE 150
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
LABOR DAY]
ina Self respecting
WAY        e
shoes smm-with
a,    2-4     ..
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.
Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBIKXAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike   service.
20  rooms,  electrically   heated
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phene II.
8. ¥ATJM, Manager.
WMMmwmmuiumioM
IKEATINGS
KILLS
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHAND — TYPEWRITING   - HOOK KEEPING.
BUSINESS .METHODS
New Location Opposite Corfleld's Garage.
muaaySXtt]ft.\
Sprinklcund«rnififtndiDcIatbeic!oMt« to
KILL MOTHS
CMenMtinf/ *Sp^
Keep a supply
iftyourpantiy
FREE RECIPE HOOK
Write the Borden Co., Limited,
Vancouver, B.C. |
Every Woman
Needs A Sink
Why get aloof without■ kitchen link
any longer? Here U a new SMP
Enamalad War* Sink, the ve"ry
latest Made of rust-resisting Armco
Iron, with three coats of pureat white
enamel, tame as on bath tub*. Size
IV 1 Wsft'deep, with 12* back,
complete with strainer, brackets, all
fittings and directions for setting up.
Price, complete, $13.00.
The SMP Enameled  Drain
Board iTiown above is made to fit
the SUP Enameled Ware Sink, or
all standard links. Site 20* x 24*.
Haa the same material and enamel
as SMP Sinks and Is complete with
bracEeta and fittings for setting up.
A great labor saver.
Price, complete, $6.50
For sale by plumbers and hardware
stores throughout tbe country, or
write
«*«Snkt Maal Products c* «39
MONTREAL   TORONTO    WINNIPEG
.fOMONTOM     VANCOUVER   CALCAftV
201*
8011) BY .MATT HIMHVVS
GROCERY, CUMBERLAND.
DR
W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
Improved New
Model Eureka
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00 $65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30-inch extension tubing, 7-inch aluminum nozzle with detachable
upholstery brush, and radiator tool.
FREE
FREE
FOR SALE BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Lumber
In every sorts of building material.-*,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS.
8H1NUL.ES,
kiln drtbd floorings,
and   furnishings.
we deliver to anv where in short
notice with reasonable charges.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
1
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
[Night call;
134X Courtenay
1(9 Cumberland
Red Top Relief Valves. $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
Commencing Wednesday, August 12th, the company freight   boat   will   leave   Vancouver   each
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m.
DELIVERING COUKTENAY FRIDAYS
Way Points—Baynes Sound, Thursdays
VANCOUVER'COURTENAY TRANSPORTATION
Phone 144 COMPANY Phone 14*1
Chas. Simms, Agent
|   Widening The Field
Doubtless at the present time you use the telephone for thc purpose of having social conversations
with friends in yi.ur community. With the same ease
you can add to your telephone calling list those friends
who reside manj miles away, for the long-distance
telephone is well suited to friendly talk-trips.
S!W
—J 111
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
IlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^
SATURDAY SPECIALS
BUTTER HORNS
FANCY PASTRY
Lemon, Apple and Raisin Pies
Also a large assortment of Small Fancy Cakes
Cookies, Fruit, Cherry and Sultana Cake
Marocchi  Bros.
Hb
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
3:
IslanderOfflce for Private Greeting Xmas Cards PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.,
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1925.
A COWBOY ABROAD
IIY TOM MIX
A record of tho most notable reception ever accorded by
Europe to a private citizen
Released   tor   Publication   lu   The  Cumberland   Islander
101 urn  INSTALMENT
JomSviix and tke &rd %ayor of London
—at once Impressed me as the sort
of man capable of the exacting demands of his oilice.
His was the kind of courtesy and
bearing Mrs. Mix certainly had in
mind when*she spoke of European
culture and polish. Abundant iron
gray hair framed impressively a
healthy, ruddy complexion. Hi*,
eyes showed bright and keen from
under straight eyebrows. His nose
was straight and long, and his chin
,.the kind which made you feel ini-
■ j| mediately lie was not the sort of per-
i son to deal unfairly with.
More than his line head, I noticed
| a   width   und   depth   of   chest   which
i made me marvel.     He was not a tall
j man. but neither was he short—one;;
first impression was that of squareness,     One could almost see under
j his robe of oilice. which he had donned preparatory to entering court for
j the morning, the bulging of his powerful muscles.
' As 1 say, I marveled, for here I rec
ognized a man at once an Intellectual
and an athlete. Later lie told nn
that in 1887 lie had been a champion
cyclist and an amateur strong man,
It was plain to see he had had a rugged training.
"We have a great deal in common.
Mr. Mix," he Bald. "We are both
athletes; and not only that, we both
■ have been olllcers of the law."
j He explained tliat his ofHce as Lord
Mayor also necessitated him presid-
1 Ing ovet one of the city's courts. Into
i which he was preparing to go at. thut
! time.
"Our methods of dealing with law
breakers have teen different," he continued, "Hu! our efforts have been to*
1 ward the same end. Von met your
1 man with a gun in one hand and hand
cuffs in another, quite often on tbo
'open plain or in tlie mountains where
'you had run him down.     You pitted
■ vour horsemanship and marksman-
'ship against his.      1  have to pit mv
bruin and will Eorco against tho^c o?
tricky law dodgers. Your cureei
was more picturesque than mine, bul
I don't believe more interesting."
The Lord Mayor then put on hi.:
chain of ofiice and 1 went with him Into tlie courtroom, which is a part of
home, and after him, every year, another Lord Mayor—we prepared to
leave. The Lad/ Mayoress showed
us to the foyer and there bade us good
bye. News-papermen held me for h
moment, and then, still flush with the
interest of ray visit, and altogether
unsuspecting, 1 passed through the
open door to the street.
After luncheon at the Wellington
Hotel in Fleet Street—in the heart
of London's publishing district—with
the correspondents of American newspapers, among them several men from
ohl Texas—we returned to the hotel.
England was abounding with lovely
weather the few days I spent there,
and I was particularly happy the following morning to find that the sun
was shining and the world gay, For
1 was to ride Tony In Rotten flow,
the famous bridle path in Hyde Park,
and 1 hadn't had a canter with him
sincy the Central Park ride more thai
ii week previous iu New York.
Well, we gave staid, dignified old
Rotten How a shock that morning,
Waiting outside Tatersall's in Knight.-.
bridge, only a short distance from
Hyde Park Corners, 1 found a crowd
waiting, again Tony was forced to
show his ingenuity in nosing his way
through without hurting any one.
Finally, however, Tony trotted Into
the bridle entrance of the park, and
we came face to fate with the wild
est, most eager crowd met on the
trip. Tony and I together seemed
| to be just what they wcre after. Almost as far as I could see there was
nothing but a sea of heads. These
heads all moved forward at once when
1 turned into the path. Tony and 1
were smothered in people. I began
to fear Tony would become frightened
and lash out with his heels, and I
thanked my stars that two mounted
policemen finally pushed through and
cleared a path. Several riders who
had volunteered to act as my escort
were hopless to get to mc, and so,
with the two officers as companions,
I started out on that, to me at least,
memorable ride.
We went to tho theatre that evening and from there I was whisked
away to Covent Ciarden where a big
charity ball was being given by the
Theatre Guild of London. Covent Oar-
den's place in English musical history is as important as our own Metropolitan, or Paris' L' Opera, or,Milan's La Scala. In fact i*. means
mude in England,
I   was  deeply  Impressed  with one
costume that struck me as being very
realistic, being that of a potentate nf
j India.      Later I  learned the man In
| the  costume   was  the   Maharajah  of
j .lodbpur   and   he    was    wearing    his;
every day dress.     Anyway, I felt he
should   have   won   the   prize.      The
Maharajah,   was   In   England   to  do
' some polo playing.
j    'lbc next was my last full day in
London, for I had to leave for Franco
the following morning, and I hnd to
I make thc most of it.     I did.     Leav-
| Ing the hotel at 9 o'clock I did not return until late tint evening.
An early sun reflected itself in the
Thames, and. glimmering up into my
bedroom window, awakened me early.
I was by hours tlu: lirst riser of any
nf tlie party and ! thus had a long
lime alone. Again I totik my place
at the open French windows which
looked out over the river, and I sat
for several hours watching London
awaken. It is a far from lazy city.
As soon as it was light enough ."
make navigation possible, boats began
lo move up and down tlie Thames,
disappearing under the bridges which
spanned the river up and down stream
and hurrying on their way. I believe
no one ever iiad seen London, or part
of it. to better advantage than  I did
in the early morning from my hotel
windows.
,. It was well I had this time alone,
for it was ihe last leisure of that day.
My schedule was a busy one. Beginning at 1.0:30 o'clock wilh an appointment with the Lord Mayor of
London, almost every minute was oc-
cupied.
Ail London appeared to be aware
1 was to visit the Lord .Mayor that
morning, judging from the great
crowd which was waiting in front of
ihe Mansion. Our progress through
ii was slow, but finally, thanks to the
aid of a number of hobbies, we were
able to reach the entrance.
The Lord Mayor—Sir Alfred Power
the    Mansion    House.        From
judge's stand I had a glinipse of tlie
offenders awaiting trial.
"There's Tom .Mix," came loud
whispers from all parts of the com;.
That took some of the wind out c.f
my sails.     Even the crooks knew me.
The Lord Mayor then turned mc
and my companions over to the Lady
.Mayoress to show us the Mansion
House. It was a pleasure I had anticipated, for 1 knew theie was <n
much history in the place each detail would be of consuming Interest.
Finally, after we bad penetrated
the age-encrusted mysteries of tin-
old Mansion House—on the site of
which the most famous Lord Mayor
of London. Pick Whittington. had his
ILO ILO THEATRE
EXCEPTIONAL ATTRACTION
-ONE NIGHT ONLY-
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21—AT 8:15 P.M.
World Tour — Direction  — Hugh. D. Wilson
•   ■■   'A.Xm
A*  Aw-/
The Most Astounding
Case in Criminal
Annals.
The Life Story
Of John Lee
Absolutely True in
Every Detail
Laughs, Thrills, Tears
yet     not    mie    gruesome
moment    in    I lie    picture.
Specially   Imported
Scenic   Musical   Prologue
>MSN IMHtKKN
THOMPSON
English  Dramatic Soprano
as Mrs. I,re.
W. LKONAJIDE UOWE
formerly with Long. Fairbanks,    will    graphically
describe  Lee's  wonderful
escapes.
KNTIKK   MUSICAL  PltOGItASI  CARRIED  HY  COMPANY
Complete company and production direct from its extended runs
iu Toronto. Montreal and the Orpheutu, Vancouver, U.C.
Press anil Puhlic Enthusiastic About This Super-Film
•Mm
s cJomrc]^{ix in.QondQn,
"Opened for a week but re-
i hied a second week, which
Endi ;ii. - how much Interesl
was aroused."—Mail and Empire,  Toronto,
The story lends itself read- |
ily tn picturization, is rellev- '
ed with many touches of humor,  and a   happy ending."--
The (Hobo, Toronto.
"Absorbing picture."— Dally
Star, Montreal.
"Keeps tlie audience spellbound, and packs the Theatre,
both matinees aud nights." ■
London (Ont.) Kree Press.
"Tells its wonderful story in
n quiet, easy way."—Ottawa
Journal.
ADMISSION—ADULTS 75c — CHILDREN 35<?
(Includinir Tax)
WATER NOTICE
Diversion iiimI 1st*
TAKK NOTICE that John William
Smith and James Droughton Smith,
whose address Is Sandwick. Comox
District, B.C.. will apply for a licence
to take and use 500 gallons per day of
water out of an unnamed spring which
overflows and drains into Ranch No.
137 and Is situate on Lot 202, Comox
District. The water will he diverted
at the spring and will he used for
domestic purposes upon the land described as Lot 20", Comox District.
This notice was posted ou the ground
on the 28th day of August. 1926. A
copy of this notice and an application
pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act" will he (lied in the olllce of the
Water Recorder at Nanaimo, 11.C, and
with the Comptroller of Water Rights.
Parliament Buildings,' Victoria, D.C,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice In a local
newspaper. The .late of the first
pulili.-sitli.il of this notice is August
28th. 1925.
John  William Smith.
James  Ilroughton  Smith.
Applicants.
By P. P. Harrison. Agent.
Cumberland. B.C.
35-38. Barrister, etc.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTMNDMENTS
TAKE NOTICE
I, the undersigned, will not he responsible for any debts contracted By
my wife, Qruce Graham,
Signed  this 28th day of August.
Roland Graham.
35-30. Cumberland. B.C.
The "OEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 50c
Children's hair cut any style 36c
/ Will Call
at your house In time to lake you to
the train  or boat.
Car   For Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE SB OR M—ASK FOU
Geo.   Mason
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may he pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years ot age,
aud by aliens on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
antl improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
wblch can he obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands. Vicloria. B.C., or to any Gov
eminent Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only laud suitable tor agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8.0110 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
lo be addressed to tlle Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division. In which the land applied for
Is situated, and are nude on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crowu Grant can he
received.
For more detailed Information see
Ihe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
]    Applications are received for pur-
: chase    of    vacant    and    unreserved
: Crown   lands,   nol   being  Umberlaiid,
for agrlculiiirnl  purposes;  minimum
price of first-class 'arable) land is (5
per acre, and second-class  (grazing)
i land $2.50 per acre.     Further infor-
' illation   regarding  purchase  or  lease
of Crown  lands Is given In Bulletin
| No.  10,  Land  Series,  "Purchase nnd
, Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
! timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
I may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment rt
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions aro fulfilled
and land has heen surveyed,
LEASES
For grazing alld Industrial purposes nrcas not exceeding 640 acres
may he lensed hy one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under Ihe Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the rnuge administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially tree,
permits nre available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
HOW TO PRODUCE
A BETTER RACE
Can we produce In Canada a better,
more efficient, and happier racet This
is the question that tbe recently formed Division of Education of the Canadian Social Hygiene Council under
Professor Peter Sandlford and A. D.
Hurdle, M.A., have set out to answer.
For months these experts ln con-
juctlon with an Advisory Committee
composed of biologists, hyglenlsts,
psychologists, educationalists, and
noted figures In the church and women's organizations have been searching for an answer which Is not merely theoretically acceptable, but Ib definitely practical throughout the Dominion.
Findings are to be later embodied ln
ollicial publications of the Division of
Education ot the Social Hygiene
Council, but a forecast of them ls now
available from recent pronouncements
made by the directors of this department.
The answer to all three questions
Is yes, but the end In view ot attaining better health, greater happiness
and usefulness, as well as a prolongation of human life, iu this country Is
dependent, here as elsewhere, on the
somewhat slow process of eilucatoa
of the whole people In what life ls and
how it should be lived.
Starling with the thesis that if one
entire generation can be fully educated In all that scientific standards
>f personal and social hygiene ma.*
ican to themselves and children, It Is
loatulated that the succeeding gen-
irntlon will he an improved race.
In the opinion of these experts and
Ihelr notable Advisory Committee tho
question will be shown to resolve 11-
alf. in Us final analysis into the pro-
ilem of educutlng parents hecau o
patents are Ihe teachers ln the pre-
ichool yenrs. a period or Hfo now being recognized as tho most import-
ant for nol only laying the foundations o'* health, hut of morals and
character as well.
Ihe report will etiphaslze the
point that when parents are taught
0 realize that a child Is made or marred physically, mentally and morally
before he ever sets foot in a school,
there will be a much greater readiness on (heir part to know and to
■.eacli the science of life.
A fundamental recommendation In
the report will be that Instruction of
■hlldrcn from very early years shall
be given in suitable form for their
limited understanding but with neither evasions or sentiment, through
sucli sciences as botany, zoology,
physiology nnd household science,
with more advanced knowledge of a
protective character Imparted not
later than Ihe age of ten to both boys
and girls.
The paramount importance of train
Ing children trom babyhood in right
habits, and proper attitudes of mind
will be emphasized, while the dangers of aloofness or silence about vital
subjects on the part of parents will be
pointed out along with the need ot
establishing confidential contacts with
their children, and of implanting in
them gradually an Ineradicable respect for themselves, the family and
the race.
Throughout the recommendations nt
this report will run the conviction
that proper education of the young
will depend first on instructed parenthood, secondly on the active cooperation of school, church, and medical fraternity In ensuring a logical
continuation of the work of building
up u generation ot instructed youth,
and thirdly on the Imperative necessity at all times of keeping away from
an over emphasis on sex. while offering Instruction to allay all natural
curiosities and recreation or other
wholesome activities to provide for
both physical fitness and healthy
minds In the young of the race.
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM.M1SRRIFIEL1),    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINI
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
1 BARRISTER  and  SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
When you art In need of a
Plumbing * Mealing Eafla«r, lot
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124 Phone UT
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your  needs   will  receive  immediate
attention.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1925.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
d>
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
COMOX  VALLEY  COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following Is a list of cows In the above association tbat gave 60 lbs. or
more of butler-fat for August, 1925.
Days Lb.    Lb.
F-csh      Name of Cow                -     Breed Milk Fat          Owner
93   Hillside North   P.D.  Jersey 1416 59.4 W. A. Urquhart
102 Primrose       Odr. Jersey 975 58.5 Miss M. SI. Hardy
80   Italia of Blue Klbhon   P.U.  Jersey 1080 58.3 II. Williamson
68   Pinky   Odr. Jersey 1050 57.7 W. A. Urquhart
103 Clancy   Gdr.  Jersey 1128 57.5 W. A. Urquharl
107   Molly   Odr. Jersey 906 57.0 Miss M, M. Hardy
106   Jane   Gdr.  Jersey 897 56.5 C.  H.  Hughes
147   Emma     Gdr.  Jersey 951 54.2 W. A. Urquhart
75   May     Odr. Jersey 960 53.7 J. Isblster
90   Patsy     Gdr.  Jersey 1122 51.6 D.   Kilpatrick
280   Lilly   Odr. Jersey 750 50.2 VV. A. Urquharl
220   Landscers Bonny Fern   P.B,  Jersey 1074 50.0 Miss M. M. Hardy
WM. ROSE, Supervisor.
tween old Camp Three of tbe Comox |
Logging and  Hallway  Company and I
Oyster River.     Nine hundred feet of
new road is being opened up, eliminating several bad curves ill the highway.
BUILDING
MATERIAL OF ANY DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
NEW ROAD ON
ISLAND HIGHWAY TO
ELIMINATE CURVES
The Department of Public Works
has a gang of thirty men at work
straightening the Island Highway be-
BABY SHOW MAY
BE IN CONJUNCTION
WITH FALL FAIR
COURTENAY, Sept. 2.—Last iiIrIii's
meeting of tiie directors of the Comox
Agricultural anil Industrial Association was very well attended, A
great deal of business relative to the
annual fall fair to ho held here next
week was transacted with dispatch.
An Invitation Is being sent to A. w.
Neill. M.P. to perform the official
opening ceremony and thc local 1110111-
ber, Mr. Harrison, Is being asked to
assist In this function, It wns decided
to Insure the gate receipts against rain
This Is the lirst time this precaution
has been taken for the fall fair. The
sports committee having made application to tlie parent association for
a grant towards Iheir prizes, tlie directors voted a sum of $50.00 for tin-
purpose. The matter of holding a
"baby show" was the cause of a great
deal of discussion. It was finally decided, however, that .Mr. A. 11. England, who was in the chair, should get
in touch with the hospital authorities
to see if it were possible to make the
necessary arrangements at this late
(hue.
A special grounds committee was
appointed with .Mr. W. J. Guiin as
chairman, the rest of the members being the heads of the various live-stock
committees, the other members being
Messrs J. Crockett, Pattlnson, Kev. J.
W. Flinton and the secretary. .Mr.
li. l*. Hurford reported as to obtaining "silver trophies" lor some of the
classes antl also in regard to the erection of refreshment booths.
A great deal of interest is being
shown lu Mils year's exhibition anil
one of the largest meetings of Its kind
over held in Courtenay resulted last
night. Those present were Mesdames
W, lirown. W. McPhee, l>. Hell. 10. v.
rilomas  and  till'    .Misses    Alllt.    anil
Messrs ,\. ii. England, VV. .1. ounn, It.
r. Hurford, w. tnincan, B, Hughes,
11. Smith, .M. H. Tribe, II. s. Baker,
George Edwards, J. Paterson, W.
Cliffe, Oeorge Thomas, D. Robinson,
II. M. Halliday. I). M. tsenor, W. A.
Urquhart, tt*. J. stalker. II. Cox. W
Rockwell and tlie secretary.
atlon are busy making preparations
for the forthcoming exhibition. Yesterday afternoon a number of them
were to be seen strenuously engage'!
in Hie agricultural hall anil at various booths in tile grounds. Among
them  were  .Mesdames  I). Hell and  W.
Brown and .Messrs Edwards, Shannon,
II. Smith, it. l*. Hurford. II. s. Baker,
Geo. Thomas and tlie society's secretary. An exhibition of llluc Foxes
is the latest entry for the show. This
is coming from Canadian llluc Fox
Farms Ltd., Vancouver.
WILL SHOW BLUE
FOXES AT FAIR
IS APPOINTED AS
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL
COURTENAY, Sept. '■'■. .Miss Edith
Crockett, who obtained a Brsl class
teachers' certificate In Victoria recently, lias been appointed principal
of tlie Headquarters school, Another
room lias been added to litis school
and Miss King is to have charge of
tlie junior classes.
COURTENAY,  Sept.   3.—The   Hull
•md Grounds Committees of the Com-1
ox Agricultural ami Industrial Assoc!-
-«
1 Fob Your
EVES
Buy McBryde's Bread
 Purest and Best
And Patronize our ICE CREAM PARLOR—
The Coolest Spot There is in Town.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN
must please.    If for any reason you are not pleased
with a drink at our fountain do us the favor to ask
the dispenser to serve you with a second drink.    It
will be done without cost.
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
COURTENAY, B.C.
OUB MOTTO 181	
Fair to our Patrons; Fair to our Employees; Fair to
ourselves.
Dry Cleaning
Did you ever stop to figure that when you send a
suit or dress to the cleaners, you pay for the cleaning,
not barely removing the spots or patches of dirt?
This practice might improve the appearance of
your suit, but does not get to the real injurious particles of dirt and grease imbedded in the material.
In our method your clothes are washed in pure,
clear gas until every spot of grease and dirt is removed, then they are turned over to experienced hands,
shaped and pressed on one of the latest steam garment
pressers.
Try Us Once, We Guarantee Satisfaction
The White Laundry & Dry
Cleaning Company, Ltd.
TELEPHONE 157 COURTENAY
Our delivery calls in Cumberland Mondays and Fridays
or leave parcels at Spooner's Barber Shop.
Auction Sales
Saturday, Sept. 12, Fair Week—For Mr. F. R. F. Biscoe
at his residence The Orchard, Courtenay, All his excellent household funiture and effects. Sale at 2:00
o'clock.
Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 16 and 17—A highly
attractive and interesting auction for Mrs. Bruce of
Belvoir Villa, Cumberland. There will be offered for
sale house and grounds, valuable household funiture
and grand collection of cut glass, china and silverware,
Hardy and Pearce
AUCTIONEERS, COURTENAY, B.C.
Office l'hone 10 House Phone 79F
28
3SEH
The BIGGEST CROWD that ever hit Courtenay is coming on September 9th when the
COMOX FALL FAIR
and all its attractions together with the Comox Logging Co.'s Picnic is to be held at the Agricultural Grounds
■s_'
EES-
A   Wonderful   All-day   Sports
Program—Log Rolling, Bucking
and Eye Splicing Contests, Racing, Jumping, Tug of War, Duck
Chase and Pig Chase—
ALL   THE   FUN   OF   THE
FAIR.
GOOD MUSIC—COMMERCIAL
DISPLAYS & ATTRACTIONS.
SPECIAL   FEATURES   AND
SIDE SHOWS.
FREE—Refreshments, Loggers' |
Style,  served by  Camp  Cooks*    f.
and Agricultural Ladies' Aux. j*
"All vou can cat and then some"    z
1
Mammoth Dance at Royston at Night.    Moody's Orchestra
OH, BOYS, IT'S GOING TO BE A BIG ONE
=E22
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ^^t^^iTL^-c^ n
Horses, Swine, Sheep, Goats, Poultry, etc.   Also Farm and Garden Produce, Domestic Science, etc.
FOR CONCESSIONS AND RESERVATIONS
AND   FULL   PARTICULARS,   APPLY   TO
L Felix Thomas, Secy. Phones: 151 & 24L
THE COMOX AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL   ASSOCIATION.   COURTENAY.   B.C.
37
HSn PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4. 1925.
m
3s
ti
News Items from Sutherland's
On Saturday the 5th wo have put
on display about lu Voile, Ratine and
other lines in Ladies' Dresses regular
prices   at   $5.95   for  a   quick   selling
event they go at   $'2.95
Ladies' House and Street Gingham
Dresses, in a good variety of colorings .and a fair assortment of sizes.
Regular prices for some of these were
up  in   54-95.      Por  Saturday   selling
each, at   $1.95
Girls' School Gingham Dresses —
ihe balance ot our season's stock, all
the better grade Gingham a and sizes
in ii years, encli   $1.96
I'OR ABOVE GOODS SEE WINDOW
School days, scliool days are here
again, and most mothers are busy lilting oul the children. We can assist
you very materially il you will call
and see our lines for boys and girls.
A new line of Hoys Sweaters in h.z.jk from 22 lo 112. in shade*
of Mine, Gray, Brown and Navy, all one price, each   $1.2.1
Hoys' Sweaters, in a hotter grade of wool and in various
colors, each   $1.9.1
Boys' Pants, in the guaranteed Navy Serges, in Tweeds, etc
every size in stock. Our new fall assortment has just arrived.
Von make no mistake when you secure a pair or two of these,
as we guarantee they will give good wear,
Ladies' Waists, ahout 30 in the lot and values to $7.50 eacn.
Some of them are not the latest style, hut tlie price ought to
dear them.     Your choice for  #1.011
Tlie New Kail Coats for Ladies are arriving, and some very
smart coals are now on view at moderate prices.
Our Millinery Department has a goodly assortment of new
Fall Hats, and the variety of colorings, as well as the extra goul
value will surprise you.
HOSIERY—Our Hosiery Department has received larg>
shipments of the new Kail Hosiery and our many lines ure on
sale. We invite you to inspect our Hosiery, for Ladies, Men,
Boys and Girls, and see the extra values we have to offer.
SUTHERLAND'S
a——»—■=
L!
YOU
CAN  BUY
A
W
GUARANTEED
•nifSoreC
VSED CAR
ON EASY TERMS
at
IS
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORI) DEALER
Telephone Hi Courtenay, B.C.
m
CARD OK THANKS
.
Mr, and .Mrs. Alex Walker. New
Townsite. wisli to thank the doctors
and nurses of tlie Cumberland General
Hospital for the many kindnesses
shown Mrs. Walker while a patient in
that institution.
LECTRICAL
IS
■A
ra is
U I'll ELECTRICAL EXPERTS
You will final ni this shop—specialists in auto ignition problems. I!
you require advlco or assistance in
this respect, call on us and wo will
try and help sou out. We niiilur-
Btnnil nil iKiilticiii systems and wlll
give you nn estimate on any job.
THE BATTERY SHOP
Walker & Strachan. Cumberland
FOB SALE —l Ton Ford Truck, with
overdrive, 1024 model. Apply Mercantile,  Cumberland. 36.
1(111 SALE—English Pedigree Roller
Canaries—Guaranteed Blngers—Apply I*'. Bond, New Townsite, Cumberland. B.C.	
KOI! SAM!--Eight roomed liousc with
pantry and bathroom. Apply Mrs,
Wnlscin. 1»T Maryport Aviv     36-36.
0HS
Bli a Sii
There's nothing puzzling
about the quality of tho
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
('ui'. .Illl  mid   IliiiiMiiulr.
Personal Mention
Miss Olive Bird, of Vancouver, and
I Miss White, of New Westminster, WHO
have heen visiting .Mrs. Norman
Searle, of Union Bay, and Miss Bird,
of Cumberland, returned to their
homes on Sunday last.
Mrs. Harry Wilson, of Nanaimo, arrived in the City last Friday on ;i visil
to her parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. Walk- ■
er.
Mrs. J. Doyle and Miss Alice Do/lt .
who have heen holidaying for the pasl i
two months with Mr. und .Mrs. Thomas
Graham, returned Sunday lasi to
their home fn Jollet, Illinois. Mm.
Oraham accompanied them to Vict*
oria, returning the following day.
Miss Frances Strachan left Saturday last for Victoria to intend the
1925-26 term of the Sprott-Shaw business college.
Union Stage
Co., Ltd.
Stages leave from the
CUMBERLAND HOTEL ANE
WAVERLY HOTEL
for Nanaimo and all way point.-'
at 8:00 and 9:45 a.m. daily.
TRAVEL BY STAGE
Miss Marjorie Grant and Miss Doris
Bailey, who spent the summer in Cumberland with their grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. John R. Gray, left Wednesday morning for Victoria. Miss
Grant will'train for the nursing profession In tlie Jubilee Hospital thero
while Miss Bailey will proceed to
Vancouver to attend University.
Mrs. It. Goodall returned Tuesday
from a short holiday spent in Vancouver.
Hun. William Sloan. Minister of
Mines, arrived In the city today, presumably on business ln connection
with the coming Federal election.
Miss Christine Bannerman left on
Tuesday morning for Vancouver
where .she will visit for a few days
before proceeding to Cranbrook to resume Iter school teaching.
Miss Alma Conrod returned Tuesday evening from Vancouver where
oho had been spending a week's vacation,
Mrs. A. .1. Fouracre and Mr. Jack
Fouracre returned to Victoria Saturday last after a week's holiday iu this
city,
Mrs, H. Robertson left last week-
cud foi Vancouver to spend a week'1;
vacation.
T. D. Coldicutt,
Manager.
I Ull) (11' THANKS
Hnving sold mil my Shoemaker
business, located nn Dunsmuir Ave.
lo Mr. E. l.. Saunders, l wish to thank
nil friends nnd patrons I'm* their trade
during the i*nst years and to Bolioit
rrom tbera a continued patronage for
my siu-i essor, who. I am sin e. will
continue to cater to their wants as
faithfully us I Imve tried to do in th*-
IHlst.
36. (Signed)  S.  DAVIS.
At the Ilo-llo, September 11 and 12
iund?r>"o  WMkg
mimi T ^
T^h_}^ritumr^mp.-KUOi.r    HQUHBtEW,    HAYMOW* -
FOR QUALITY  BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
MANN'S BAKERY
Appetizing Fruit Pies for Summer Time
Apple ,Pineapple, Raisin and Apricot
Our Famed Sc tch Oat Cakes and Girdle Scones
Sure to Please.
WTEK END SPECIALS
Delicious Custard I, Lemon Pies and the Real English
Dath Buns   .Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls.
No id No Re-.-ommending
Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order.
MANN'S CUMBERLAND, B.C.
All Orders Delivered 1,|**>ne ls
v KT, -fr .  .    : =x-.**m ,%i
The Canadian National Railways
with its Universal Connections,
can Book Steamship Passages to
all Parts of the World
TIIHOUOH TICKETS ISSUED
OVER Mill
TRANSATLANTIC
TRANSPACIFIC
ALASKA, WEST INDIES
MEDITERRANEAN
ROUND TUE WORLD
STEAMSHIP LINES
PREPAID   PASSACJ
BS   ARRANGED   FOR   IP
YOU   DESIRE   TO
BRING   RELATIVES   OR
FRIENDS
FROM ABROAD
Full Particulars may be obtained and Complete Arrangements made through E. W. Bickle, Agent,
Cumberland, B.C.    Telephone 35
TIONAL RAILWAYS
*T-\
V
FREE
Ruler and
Blotters
SPECIALS
%&2£*&£
PRICES ABJ^,,..   ,.-_ ,
I Lang's Drug Swe
1    « Van*- sl"">
ESS
Used Cars
We are offering at special prices the two following
cars which it would be well to see and try out.
Ford Sedan
Late model, new tires, good upholstery, period running order (jrrn A A
Yours for   JhOOU.UU
Dodge Touring
All good tires, good running shape, guaran-
A real buy  «P^75.Ul)
MacLaughlin Touring
Nineteen Twenty-Four Model.     First class
A snap at  «plZ5U.UU
EASY TERMS
See or Call
Pidcock & McKenzie
Phone 25 AGENTS Phone 25
STUDEBAKER AND DODGE MOTOR CARS
Accessories      —    Gas and Oils    —   Machine Shop
Auction Sales
At The Anglican Church Hall, Cumberland
SATURDAY NEXT, 5th SEPTEMBER
Commencing at 1:30 p.m.
R, 11:1,1 X THOMAS, duly Instructed by Messrs THOS. lioitliv,
THOMAS 111,1111 AND J. T. BROWN all ol whom are
lonvlng lim district. Those sales comprise VKIIV SELECT
llorsi.IIOI.il FURNITURE anil n large number of sundries.
AT S18O P.M. there will be offered the VKKY DESIRABLE ».
ROOMER, OM: STOKE* DWELLING HOUSE, WITH PANTRY
AMI GARAGE, WELL SITUATED ON A FULL-SIZED LOT,
[00x1211 FEET), IN GARDEN AND EMIT TREES, in ono of
Cumberland's best residential streets, commonly known as No.
407 Penrith Avenue, nnd being lot 3. block 14, according to map
No. 522 of the City of Cumberland, registered at the Lands offlce, Victoria.     RECOMMENDED AS A SOUND INVESTMENT.
These sales will commence on time.
Full particulars may be had from posters or the Auctioneer. ".
FOR  UllS. 0. 0. GRAHAM, THK ORCHARD, COURTENAY,
WEDNESDAY, ffllrd SEPT.—Full particulars later. Inspection
by appointment, phone 117. Courtenay.
E. Felix Thomas
Insurance AUCTIONEER        Notary Public:
Office Phone 151 House Phone 24L
aKj^TiTTTJ, »> aaaaaia^jLia-ijaw"^
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