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The Cumberland Islander Sep 18, 1920

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
d
with which Ib consolidated the Combe Hand News.
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No.  38.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1920
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE; TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
First Aid And
Mine Rescue Work
New Association Formed to Inculcate Better Knowledge of
First Aid Work.
At a well attended meeting of persons interested In First Aid and Mine
Rescue work held In tlle Government
Mine Rescue Station, Cumberland, on
Sunday, September 12, it was decided
'to amalgamate the First Aid work
with the Mine Rescue work, and an
association was formed for this purpose. The association Is named the
Canadian Collieries St. John's First
Aid and Mine Rescue Association.
The following gentlemen were elected to honorary positions:
Mr. Jns. M. Savage, General 'Manager Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Ltd., Honorary President.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, First Vice-President.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent, Second Vice-President.
The working executive of the association is as follows;
Mr. George O'Brien, President.
Mr.  John   S.  Williams,  Vice-President.
Mr. Jonathan Taylor, Secretary-
Treasurer.
Mr. Charles Parnham, Mr. Wm. Beveridge and Mr. Wm. Devoy, Working
Committee.
Each member will contribute $1.00
per year, and will be given a membership ticket (not transferable) which
will entitle him to nil the benellts of
membership.
It is Intended to have a series of lectures on the necessity of colliery employees having a good working knowledge of First Aid and Mine Rescue
Work, and the management of the
Canadian Collieries nre doing their
utmost to keep up the enthusiasm
crenttd by the good showing tlie First
Aid and Mine Rescue teams made at
the recent competitions at Ladysmith,
where a comparatively young team
won tlie Coulson Cup and several
oilier coveted prizes.
The Mine Rescue team also did very
well In securing second place against
the very best teams In British Coluni-
hlt and thc State of Washington, nnd
it was only through a slight oversight
in not having the apparatus perfectly
airtight that prevented them from
winning the premier honors. However, we hope to see the first prize
coming to Cumberland next year.
It Is intended to canvass nil persons
interested in this noble work to become members of the association and
have a good strong organization In
Cumberland. The committee hope to
have some mining authority to give
lectures on the various dangers surrounding tlie mining of coal, such as
dangers from coal dust, gases, haulage, etc.. which will he quite interesting. It is hoped by the knowledge
thus gained to decrease the accident
rate in the mines of the province.
There is nothing to lose by joining the
association, but a whole lot of knowledge can be gained which will be of
use to tlie average man ln any class
of employment, so put your shoulders
to the wheel, boys, and help the good
work along.
New Ball Ground
Open Tomorrow
South Wellington Meets United
Boys in First Local Game
of Fall Season.
The new recreation ground at the
Cumberland School ls to be opened
tomorrow when Cumberland United
receive a visit from tlie Soutli Wellington team. We took the liberty of
climbing the fence boarding the
grounds on Thursday evening, and to
say the least we were astonished at
tiie marked Improvements that have
taken place there. After a full weeks'
incessant ruin the ground was in excellent sliupo. When it gets thoroughly dried out and settles down It
should be the best Held on the Island,
and about one of tlie fastest in B. C.
The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd. has gone to considerable expense
In getting these grounds in shape.
In order to level tlie slope, thousands
of loads of earth were utilized in tlie
process, and continual rolling to pack
it down. A good fence and new goal
posts have been erected. Greet credit
is due the management of the company for their generosity in connection
with this athletic field.
The powers that he have decreed
that all matches played in tlie Upper
Island League schedule shall. take
place on Sunday. Whilst we do not
want to go into the subpect of Sunday
football at present, we do thing it a
great pity that the games could not
have been played on Saturday afternoons, as In thc Summer League.
As Uie football management cannot
make a charge for admission to the
games on Sundays, they have to resort
to voluntary collection.
We have had much experience In the
"collection stunt," and it has beeu a
dismal failure wherever tried in connection with athletic games and such
like. Some fans, whilst perfectly
content to pay fifty cents for admission to sec a good game of football,
as soon ns the collection starts, dig
down in their pockets and produce a
live or ten-cent piece. It has been
known for "sports" to dig down in
their pockets and slip a nice pearl
button in the collection hat—and even
wanting change: It is up to every
football fan here to give as much at
the collection as they would at the
usual admission. Only by this means
can the game be kept going. Take
heed, ye fans, dig down and dig deep.
We have a splendid team, which has
made an enviable record—let us support them to the best of our ability.
The game tomorrow against the
South Wellington team is scheduled to
atari at 3 o'clock. The team to represent Cumberland Is as follows: Goal,
J. Clark; right baclt, H. Smith; left
iback, J. Campbell; right half, Conti;
centre, Strang; left half, E. Jackson;
forwards, Uaitnerman, Boothuiun,
James, Home, Harrison; reserve, A.
Wylle.
SHOOTING JiJSTJS SEASON OPENS
Great Indignation Amongst Hunting Fraternity Over Action of
Government at This Late Date—Qrder-in-Council Passed by
Government Prohibiting Shooting of Blue Grouse on Hornby
and Denman Islands.
Wedding
ST0CKAND-8IIEPPARD.
St. Paul's Church, Nanaimo, was the
scene Saturday evening at 6.30 of a
quiet but pretty wedding when the
Hector, Rev. S. Ryull, performed the
ceremony which united Miss Editii
June Sheppard, daughter of .Mr. ami
Mrs. W. Sheppard, South Wellington,
and Mr. Charles John Stockand, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Sumuel Stockand, of
Cumberland. The bride! who was
given away by her father, wus attended by her sister, Miss M. Sheppard, as
bridesmaid, while the groom wus supported by ills brother, Mr, James
Stockand. Following the ceremony,
a reception was held ut thc home of
the bride's parents. After a short
honeymoon Mr. and Mrs. Stockand
will take up their residence in Cumberland.
G.W.V.A. Receives
Fine Donation
Royston Lumber Co. Ltd. Contributes $289 Worth of
Lumber for Hall.
The Great War Veterans' Association have received a donation from the
Royston Lumber Co. Ltd., which donated lumber to the value of $2S9.62
through the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd.. toward the construction of the Memorial Hall.
G. W. V. A. WANTS
READING MATTER
The G. W. V. A. asks for donations
of books, magazines, periodicals, etc.,
for use In the Memorial Hall. Such
mny be left at the Memorial Hall, City
Hall or The Islander Offlce.
NANAIMO KENNEL CLUB
SHOW NEXT WEEK
HARMONY REBEKAH
LODGE TO HOLD SALE
OF WORK NEXT MONTH
The members of Harmony Rehekah
Lodge, No. 22, I.O.O.F., Intend holding
a sale ot work and afternoon tea on
October 27. •
On Monday evening the members of
tlie lodge and their friends are holding a social evening in their hall, commencing at 8 o'clock.
. Mr. H. M. Robertson, of Lamnnda
1,'ark, California, lias been appointed
judge of all breeds at tlie Nanaimo
Kennel Club's show to be held on
Tuesday nnd Wednesday of next week.
VOTE ON PROHIBITION
REFERENDUM OCT. 23
The Prohibition referendum to be
voted on by the electors of the Province of British Columbia lias been set
for Saturday, October 23.
As if to remind people that it is a very unbusinesslike adminis
tration, the Provincial Government put through an order-in-council Thursday prohibiting the shooting of blue grouse on Denman
and Hornby Islands, just as the season was about to open. This
information was received locally Friday by Provincial Constable
Mortimer, after many hunters had already departed for their i'av
orite hunting grounds, others were completing arrangements to
take advantage of the week-end to partake of the great sport,
Parties have gone to considerable expense and trouble to get prepared for the outing, most of whom would not have done so had
the shooting of grouse been prohibited sooner.
No less than 200 gun licenses have been issued by the provincial
authorities in Cumberland. One can hardly blame hunters if they
accuse the government of taking money under false false pretences—issuing licences first and then prohibiting the shooting of
the most desirable game afterwards. Just another glaring instance of the unbusinesslike administration of the Oliver government. Honest John may be a good farmer, but as a sport he leaves
much to be desired.
Interesting Statistics On The
Climate Of British Columbia
Interesting Statistics of Rainfall
and Snowfall in the Province
During Last Year.
The Department of Agriculture of
the Province of British Columbia has
just issued a very Interesting bulletin,
entitled "Climote of British Columbia."
This bulletin gives the rainfall and
snowfall at all meteorological stations
in the province, and also the temperatures, hours of bright sunshine, the
average temperature for stations having observations for ten or more years
as well as the average precipitation.
In the introduction, it says: Generally speaking, the climate of this province greatly resembles that of the
European countries lying within the
same parallels ot latitude, and extending from tlu; British Isles to the
Baltic Provinces. Owing to the tempering effect of the Paclflc Ocean, the
winters on the coast are remarkably
mild and the summers cool. Heavy
rains occur In winter on the west
coast of Vancouver Island and on the
western side of the Coast Mountains
ou the Mainland, while on the eastern
portion of Vancouver Island the precipitation is comparatively light, and
ut the southern extremity about Victoria it ls remarkably so, while the
amount of bright sunshine exceeds
that recorded at other British Columbia stations.
The precipitation for the year 1919
at some of the stations was as follows:
Rain   Snow
Anyox     49.66 161.80
Alberni     68.04   26.75
Port Alberni     73.46   15.65
Chemainus       47.27     5.75
Clayoquot     106.60      —
Cowlchan       41.83     3.00
Denman Island     43.71   20.00
Holberg      93.64     8.10
Hornby   Island      50.04   10.10
Ladysmith       50.37   13.25
Nanaimo      34.01    3.40
Parksvllle      30.61     8.00
Prince Rupert     82.14   44.40
Rain   Snow
Quotslno    ,  70.52     5.00
Sandwick     50.20   23.00
Stewart    49.17 176.00
Surf Inlet   167.16   47.85
Victoria    28.29     0.40
New Westminster   62.26^29.00
Steveston   27.56     1.75
Vancouver   64.01   32.00
Some of tlle stations have very -little
rainfall, but they make up for it in
snow,.for instance:
Pemberton Meadows  27,87 102.00
Bablne Lake  8.02   90.75
Barkerville    21.45 198.80
Prince George   11.08 135.00
Van^-boot    3.33   76.50
Ferguson   17.46 308.00
Goose Lake  2.90   42.50
Glacier   16.98 378.00
Revelstoke     16.29 174.00
Vanderhoof   3.33   76.50
MEETING OF MEMBERS
OF ANGLICAN CHURCH
Plans for Social and Other Activities for Fall and Winter
To Be Dealt With.
A combined business meeting and
social evening will be held in the Parish Hall of Holy Trinity Church on
Tuesday evening next at 8 o'clock, it
is intended to discuss plans for social
and other activities for the fall and
winter.
Y. M. C. A. TO SHOW
PICTURES OF CANADIAN
LIFE TO CHILDREN
Mr. C. B. McKinnon, secretary of the
Nanaimo District Y. M. C. A. is showing a series of pictures of Canadian
life, education in character, to the boys
and girls of cities and towns In his
jurisdiction, which includes Cumberland. The pictures are said to be
very line, and Mr. McKinnon is making arrangements to show them here
shortly.
"The Third Eye"-An Enthralling
New Serial-Coming to the "llo-Ilo
The Ilo-llo management announce that they have booked
a splendid new serial for the local theatre, which will follow
"The Black Secret," which will conclude shortly. "The
Third Eye" is a melodrama that will enthrall and hold keen
interest from beginning to end. There is a bafllling mystery
and a great love story—thrills to chill the blood—sensations
by the thousand—there are surprises to amaze the most
blast of film fans. It is a mystery serial that will foil keen
minds and keep them all guessing. It is a Western serial
that has the flavor of the plains, the lure of the open, the
swift riding and daring that one naturally expects.
A serial of melodramatic mystery enlivened by thrilling
surprises and sensational suspense.
Two Shows Every Week Night
Commencing with Monday evening there will be two complete showws ever week night at the Ilo-llo Theatre, the first
one commencing at 6.30. There will be the usual matinee
every Saturday afternoon.
Regular Meeting
Of City Council
Routine Matters Dealt With at
Regular Meeting Held on
Monday Evening.
The usual fortnightly meeting of the
City Council was held .Monday evening
last, a full council being present.
A communication was read from the
Barret Company agreeing to allow
half the freight on the returned empty
I'urvla barrels. This was accepted by
the council.
The B. C. Telephone Co*, forwarded 11
cheque for $70 for a trade licence, it
Is understood tliat Ihe Telephone Co.
says It cannot continue to give the
city the use of free telephones, which
are said to be the result of an agreement allowing the company to install
telephone poles some years ago.
The Union Water Works forwarded
a letter thanking tlie council for the
use of its team and men in helping
with the new dnm. Their financial
statement accompanied the letter.
The Union Water Works also issued
a cordial invitation to (lie City Council to pay a visit to thc new dain at
their convenience.
The council accepted the invitation
and decided to make the trip on Tuesday evening last. Owing lo rain the
trip had to be postponed.
A communication was received from
the Gutta Percha & Rubber Co. re the
size threads on tlle couplings of the
500 feet of new hose for the fire department. The Information required
was supplied by the city clerk .
Bills and accounts amounting to
about $600 were read and referred to
tlie Finance Commute for O. K.
Aid. Wj|N*, of the Board of Health,
said tjj-rcollectiou of ashes, refuse,
etc., h/d not been completed. Alleys
and  lick  premises  were  not at all
 '■*''*''**'—ail)* ji-^-1 up.   There was
a lot of old stuff that should be cleared
away—It was unsightly If not a menace to health.
After some discussion it waB decided to instruct the Chief of Police to
have the machine-guns placed ill tlie
council chamber until their dual disposition is dealt with.
Tux Sale.
The city clerk was instructed to go
ahead with the tax sale, if necessary,
though it was hoped that the taxes on
the very few properties affected would
be paid shortly and so avoid a sale.
OCTOBER 18 TO BE
THANKSGIVING DAY
Thanksgiving will this year be celebrated on Monday, October 18.
Shooting Season
Opened Today
Nearly everyone who is tlie owner
of a gun has this week been busy
cleaning her up" and otherwise getting prepared for the big day of the
shooting season—today being tlie official opening day.
One of the parties who have made
good preparations consists of J. W.
Cooke, Wm. Merrifield, Chas. H. Grant
Mickey DeCour and Gibson. This
party left town Friday morning, going
to Hornby Island. The have several
large cases of supplies, as well as all
tlie necessary apparatus and "bait."
11 order to do things up to date. Grant
and DeCour went ahead a coupe of
days earlier. Inking a motor car over
to tlie island, shipping it 011 the S.S.
Charmer, so between the noise of
canonading and the soft "purr" of
the "Elizabeth" the residents of this
peaceful island are- likely to have
their peaceful solitude rudely disturbed.
The season opening today allows
only for tlle shooting of blue grouse
nd deer. The hng limit for grouse is
six of any one species, or twelve of nil
species, In any one day; total bag limit
for the season, fifty.
In respect of deer, the Game Act
ays no person shall anywhere kill or
take or have In his possession during
tlie open season more than three deer,
nf which not more than one deer shall
be of the female sex.
Thc season for blue grouse closes
in September 27. and for deer on December 15.
Among tlie hunters who arc going
out on expeditions ure—Mr. Dick Coe,
Dick Coe Jr. and sou and Tom Darn-
ley, who nre bound up the lake.
Mr. Itobson nnd Mr. Glazobrook who
are going up tlie valley.
Mr, Rutherford Is taking bis gun up
tlie valley.
Roy Rideout is going up Comox
Lake lo do slaughter,
Important Meeting
And Banquet of
Masonic Lodge
One of the best sessions ever held
by the Masons of Cumberland took
place on Thursday evening In the
Masonic Hall, when tbe Cyprus Chapter No. 10 of the Royal Arch Masons
assembled to receive an ofHOtal visit
of Must Excellent Companion K. B.
Paul of Victoria, First Grand Principal of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter
of British Columbia. He was accompanied by night Excellent Companion
Charles .1. Parnhani. Grand Superintendent of District No. 1.
After Inspecting the work of 1 ho
local chapter, Most Worship Companion E. B. Paul delivered a very able
and Inspiring address to the companions on "The Symbols ot Royal Arch
Masonry."
Past Grand Director of Ceremonies
Very Excellent ('apt. A. F, Yates ot
Nanaimo addressed the craft on the
secret work of the Royal Arch degree.
Excellent Commander Smith of Ihe
Caniosun Chapter of Victoria was also
present.
Very Excellent Commander Dr. li.
K. MacNaughton wus installed as
Grand Stewart.
A large number of visitors canio to
Cumberland to take part in the event,
including Companions of the Keystone
Chapter of Nanaimo and Chapters of
Victoria and Vancouver.
Following the session of the Chapter a sumptuous banquet was patakeu
of In the Anglican Church Hall. The
banquet was most successful. The
hall was gaily decorated, Masonic
symbols being in evidence, Many remarks were made of tlie manner lu
which the tables were set out, said to
be the most unique arrangement ever
seen in British Columbia. These arrangements wero In the hands of
Excellent First Principal T. Carey,
to whom great credit was given by the
assembled craftsmen.
Fully 60 sat down to tbe banquet,
Ihe catering ot which was In the hands
of Mr. Scott of Kelly's Cafe. Every
satisfaction was expressed at tho
very excellent dinner supplied by him.
Most Excellent Companion E. B.
Paul responded to the toast of "Tho
Grand Chapter of British Columbia,"
ably assisted by Very Excellent Companion T. JH Arnell of Columbia Chapter, Victoria.
lilght Excellent Companion V.
Stewart of Victoria responded to tlie
toast of "Camosun Chapter," nnd invited the Cyrus Chapter to a re-union
of Vancouver Island Royal Arch
Masons to be held in the city of Victoria on October 11.
The toast of "Columbia Lodge 26"
was responded to by Worshipful
.Master Charles Graham in bis usual
very able manner.
Farewell Social
To Geo. Michell
Over a  Hundred  People  Turn
Out to Take Part in the
Happy Function.
As .Mr. George Michell, of the Electrical Department of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., is leaving
Cumberland in order to lake up an
extended course in the famous School
of Engineering at Milwaukee, the
staff of the Canadian Collieries otlice
tendered him a farewell social and
dance in the Anglican Church Mall
lasl evening. Despite the heavy rain
a large number turned out to take
part iu the function nnd wish the
popular George every succes in his
undertaking.
The lirst portion of the evening was
spent in dancing. About 11,80 the
ladies sot to work to get the refreshments ready and after the inner man
had been satisfied, .Mr. Stacey called
upon the assembly tor a few minutes
f their time as he had a very pleasant duty to perform. He said he had
been asked to tender to .Mr. Michell a
smalt token of appreciation by his
fellow workers on the occasion of his
leaving the district to lake up studies
in a strange country. Mr. Stacey said
lie did not want to take up their time
by making a long speech, so he would
call on Mr. Michell to accept (lie very
handsome shaving set from Ills fellow-
workers.
Mr. Michell, on rising Id thank Mr.
Stacey, was greeted with loud applause. He said he thanked them
from the bottom of lifs heart for their
token of appreciation. It would, be a
reminder of the many happy times he
had spent in Cumberland. (Prolonged
cheers.) Dancing was again indulged
in until the wee small hours. two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 18, 19S0.
GAMES
FOR THE LONG EVENINGS
Now that the long evenings of Fall and Winter are
upon us, you will require some interesting games to
help pass the time pleasantly. We have received a
large assortment of popular and novel games, etc.,
including—
CHECKER BOARDS—Folding heavy cardboard, with
15 black and 15 white checkers.
PARCHES1—The game that has been very popular for
years. Highly lightographed board, for 2, 3 or 4
players.
OUIJA BOARDS—A very interesting and mystifying
game. Supposed to answer questions", past, present and future. Will supply amusement for long
evenings.
CHESS, DRAUGHTS AND CROK1NOLE.
SMALL CARD (.AMES, ETC., IN LARGE VARIETY.
V. 0. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
THE person who says "Hello" when
answering the telephone smiles very
condescendingly when he hears some
one else say, "Are you there?" He thinks
such a question is silly.
What does the man who answers with
"Mr. Blank Speaking," think of the person
who says "Hello"? Observing proper practice himself, he in his turn thinks the helio
greeting is equally out of place.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Taste is the test
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
UNION  BREWING  CO.,   LTD
NANAIMO. B.C.
Change of Schedule
Commencing Monday, Sept. 20th
there will be Two Shows every
week night. First Show commences at 6.30. There will also
be Matinee Saturday afternoons
Ilo-llo Theatre
Ask for the'Brands'that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ™,| «™°< Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
International Mine Life-Saving
Contest Held At Ladysmith
Teams From State of Washington and British Columbia Meet in
Life-Saving Contest—Draw for First Place in Mine Rescue
Work, Newcastle and Nanaimo Go 50-50—Cumberland and
Cassidy's Tie for Second Place Four Points Behind Leaders.
LADYSMITH. — The fifth annual
field day of tlie Vancouver Island
.Mine Rescue Association took place
last week on the Agricultural Ground
here. Tlie day was ideal, and though
there were sports ot* an attractive
nature just up the line a little way,
and a picnic across the hay which was
a crowded affair, there were a good
three or four hundred people in attendance, who followed the many competitors with creat interest.
The competition which occupied
most of tlie lime was the Mine Rescue
work for the V. 1. M. S. A. shield,
which trophy for the past twelve
month': has heen in tlie proud possession of tlie Black Diamond team.
State of Washington,
Tills year it was tied for hy two
competitive teams. Xanaiino and Newcastle (Wash.|, each gaining 04 per
cent, marks, other teams following
close, Cumberland and Cassidy's being
tied for second place with 90 per cent,
ar.d another set of teams witli SS per
cut. A suggestion was made that the
captains of the two teams should toss
a coin to decide the winner but this
was felt by all ot them to be a very
unsatisfactory method of deciding
sucli an important event. After getting iu communication witli Seattle
and a general pow-wow of the successful teams, the matter was ulti-
mately settled by going over the work
again on Tuesday morning.
TU* for tin* Second Time.
Once again the result was a tie, the
judges not being able.to detect any
difference betwixt tlie work of the
two teams. It was decided by the
committee to issue duplicate medals,
each to be recognized as winners in
the ftcst^egree. and each team to have
their names engraved on the shield,
and hold tlie shield for six months of
the year.
The Nanaimo team was composed of
Robt. Laird (captain). Thos. Parkinson, John Sutherland, David Brown
and Francis John. Tlie Newcastle
team: Wm. Jones (captain), Geo.
Elltnor, Tony Tonda, Joe Brimia,
Theo. Rouse, Jas. Toman,-with manager H. N. Freeman.
To get sucli high marks tlie competitive teams of necessity did exceptionally fine work. All were very well
drilled and showed keen interest in
the competition.
Tlie Draeger, Gilibs and Paul apparatus were all used by one or other
of the competitors, and tlie test covered about half an hour's work.   The
ontestants met nt the mine store, and
after   donning   their   apparatus   they
walked to the mine head, where they
tested for gas and damp by use of Bird
md   Walff   lamp.     Having   satisfied
themselves, they entered the mine and
ultimately came along the passage to
tlie point where the explosion is supposed  to  have  occurred,  testing  tlie
roof and walls as they went, and repairing same  where necessary.   They
passed  through  tlie stopping  barrier
"and on  over the   overcast;   passing
through and down from this they had
to negotiate the "cave" or fall-in of
the roof, the result of the explosion,
then on a little way where they came
upon  an  entombed  worker  who hud
brattlsed   himself   off.     The   rescue
party immediately applied'the salvator
or half-hour apparatus, placed liim on
a stretcher and brought liim out oi the
mine by way of tlie undercast.   When
tlie pit-head was reached the pulnio-
tor wus applied by some of the team,
while  rubbing  and   chaffing  of   the
patient  was  attended  to  by  others.
Tlie details of the test are not easy to
describe by one not versed in tlie many
technicalities of mining, but the work
itself, us curried flfct by the contestants, was certainly more than strenuous, uml the teams are to be congratulated upon their Interest In tills very
Important work of life-saving, ns they
must have worked together for mouths
to have conic to such it state of general    proficiency.      The    contestants
wore from Newcastle (Wash.), Nanaimo (2 teams), Cumberland, Cassidy's,
Ladysmith, Fernie und Michel1,
FIRST AID CONTESTS.
The first aid contests were very
closely contested. On two or three
occasions tlle judges gave oral examinations to help them In their decisions. The teams competing, and also
in the double und single events, showed great skill in the practical application of their knowledge, and thc subjects to be demonstrated were far
from easy at a glance through
from easy.
Tlie following were the winning
teams: Full team events, Department
of Mines cup: 1st, Simpson's team,
'.N'annlnio;   2nd,  Cumberland,  Captain
Beveridge.
W, L. Coulson cup: 1st, Cumberland, Capt. J. Taylor; 2nd, Cumberland, Capt. W, Beveridge.
Open events—There was an oral examination for captains in this event.
1st, Simpson's team, Nanaimo. 550
cash prize; 2nd. Cumberland No. 5
team, Capt. J. Taylor, $25 cash prize.
One man event—1st, W. Jones, Newcastle (Wash.); 2nd, Thomson and
Baton, Nanaimo.
Two man event—1st. S. Carruthers.
Nanaimo; 2nd, J. Williams, Cumberland.
The judges had a hard task, and
deserve a special mention, as it was
no easy or pleasant job to be about
all day journeying from one contestant to tlie other, and right well did
they stick to tlie field and give of their
best. The mine rescue work was un-
dc*r thc jurisdiction of Mr. T. R. Jackson (Nanaimo), Mr. R. Strachan (Fernie), Mr. Jas. Bagley (Seattle), all
mine inspectors, und Mr. J. G. Schon-
ing of tho Seattle Rescue Station.
The following were the Judges of tlie
First Aid competition: Dr. W. D.
Brydone-Jack (Vancouver). Dr. Wilkes
(Nanaimo), Dr. Ingham (Nanaimo),
Dr. * Miller (Vancouver), Dr. Corson
(Vancouver), Dr. MacNaughton (Cumborland), Dr. Montgomery (Ladysmith ) .—Ladysmith Ch ronlcle.
DESERTER RECEIVES
TWO-YEAR SENTENCE
VICTORIA.— Cecil Grahamc of
Saanich. a deserter from the Canadian
forces overseas, has been court niar-
tialed at Work Point Barracks and
sentenced to two years' improsinment
with hard labor.
Grahame was arrested by the military authorities a week ago. He was
drafted in 191S and sent to the Old
Country. Getting leave to visit Ireland he deserted and eventually made
his way to the United States. He remained there until after the armistice
and then returned to his home district. The first steps towards his apprehension were taken twelve months
ago because of information laid by
members of returned soldiers' clubs.
Tlie court martial verdict was read to
the troops assembled at Work Point
Barracks Saturday in the presence of
the prisoner.
CHURCH PROPERTY
MAY NOT BE SOLD FOR
ARREARS OF TAXES
VICTORIA.—This city can not seize
and sell for taxes St. Andrew's Roman
Catholic Cathedral at .View alld Blan-
chard Streets, according to the decision handed down by the Court of
Appeal here.
Bishop Macdonald, prelate of Vancouver Island, inaugurated the action
against the city lb prevent City Treasurer Smitli from seizing the church
and property and putting it up nt tax
sale because taxes, not paid since 1913,
now amounted to more than $10,000.
F. A. McDIarmld, who fought tlie
case for the bishop through the courts
up to tlie Court of Appeal, claimed
that church sites are exempt from taxation. He lost in the Supreme Court.
Chief Justice Macdonald is the only
nieffiber of the Court of Appeal to dissent from the judgment.
"This decision means that a church
can not he sold for taxes and also
that taxes cannot be levied upon ..It,"
said .Mr. McDIarmld, explaining tho
effect of the decision.
It Is said tlie decision of the Court
of Appeal will be taken to a higher
tribunal.
Auto Repairs
BEST   IN   THE•  CITY
Work Guaranteed
Cumberland Motor Works
DISTRICT AGENTS FOR CHEVROLET CARS
LAYMAN'S VIEW OF
MANNIX EPISODE
They Want to Be Able to Annul
The Marriage of Persons
Lawfully Married.
VICTORIA.—The problem of religious controversy, which lias proved
so troublesome when associated with
other political differences in Canada
and South Africa, is likely to play a
larger part iu Australian politics, according to G. H. Blakeinorc, of Sydney,
New South Wales. Mr. Blakemore has
just arirved from Australia and Is
making a brief stay in Victoria.
The intervention in the case of
Archbishop Mannix lias focussed tlie
attention of the whole world on Australian Roman Catholic affairs iu their
relation to tlie Irish question. Mr.
Blakemore states that the situation is
a peculiar one in Australia, in that
the Irish Catholics and other Catholics in the Commonwealth, with about
22 per cent, of the population, have
far more than their share of influence
in Parliament, the civil service and
other bodies. In New South Wales
adroid political management, he states,
has resulted in about 45 per cent, of
the members being Catholics in the
Assembly, or at least twice as many
as their numerical strength in tlie
population would justify. In some departments of tlie civil service 60 per
cent, are Roman Catholics in that
state, he says.
"We say to the Irishman in Australia that be is bringing an old world
controversy Into a new country, and
we do nol want it to be necessary to
fight the old issues in a new country."
"It looks," he states, "as if the sectarian issue, however, will have to be
fought out in tlie commonwealth as It
has in older countries."
Tlie Antaimore, one of tlie oldest
tribes of Madagascar, possesses tlie
secret of making from tlie pulp of u
native shrub a very beautiful und enduring kind of paper resembling
parchment.
Each family possesses a few sheets
of this paper, on which its chronicles
and traditions nre recorded, and tlie
same paper is used for transcribing
tho laws of Mohammedanism. The
paper is said to have been invented in
tlie middle of the ninth century by a
Mohammedan shipwrecked on the
coast, who desired to transcribe his
torn alld water soaked copy of tlie
Koran in an enduring form. The An-
talmoro will only make the paper for
sale when some pressing necessity
arises.
Circumstances   do   not  shape  men,
but reveal them.—Do Lameiinais.
DR.R.P.CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Ofiice: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT  DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
Begin Your
Trip Right
by selecting the sheila that
hunters from coast to coast
have proved dependable
under all conditions*
Regal
Shotgun Shells
are a double assurance of
success for the man who
prefers balHstite powder.
We also Carry a full line of
Cttnuck and .Novere.fin Nhot-
ftun .Shells and Dominion
Metallic Oirtrid&es — end.
bucked by the bin "D" trademark
NoSpoila&i^co^en.
Noflould.'^j^ V/ide Mouth
Admits Large
Whole Fruit
WIDE MQUIH
MASON J AH
wr^nrANixflfEcoMMrwTHEH
SIMON LEISER
AMD   COMPANY,   LTD
HE FEEDS FOLKS RIGHT
Kelly runs a Restaurant. The
Restaurant does not run Kelly
It is a Restaurant that is mo^re
than a place to eat. It is a
regular home from home.
"CUMBERLAND. B.C
ILLYkS
. September 18, 1920.
RANGES AND HEATERS
A FULL LINE OF HEATERS NOW SH0WIN6
NEW HOT BLAST RETORT* in three sizes, at $22.50,
$29.50 and $38.00.
FAIRY OAKS at $18.00 and $22.50.
TWILIGHT HEATERS, semi-open hearth, at $22.00
and $26.00.
REGALS, the best open-hearth style on the market,
at $30.00 and $35.00 each.
PLAIN  COAL   BURNERS.
AIRTIGHT WOOD HEATERS.
RANGES
We are offering Bome very good prices on Ranges,
which it will he to your interest tn investigate before
buying.
A FULL LINE OF HOUSEFURNISHINGS
ALWAYS  SHOWING.
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT  ALL  THE   LEADING   HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet. Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize in  REPUBLIC  TRUCKS and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.   *
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
fli
Experimenting Wins Success
Says Edison Who Worked One
Year To Reproduce A Word
Br ROV T. BURKE.
Tlie first time I saw Edison I lula-
tool! liim for one of hla workmen. He
was .standing in the roadway between
two of the many great buildings ot*
the Edison manufacturing laboratories
at Orange. N. J. He was bareheaded.
A long, linen duster came below the
baggy-kneed trousers.
In one hand he held a wrench, while
the other hand alternately emphasized
liis own remarks and aided hia deafened hearing in understanding thc remarks of tlie men with whom he was
conversing.
Edison still haa his own private experimental laboratory—and the famous cot still occupies it, the cot on
which he snatches a few minutes' sleep
from time to time, when an important
and long-drawn-out experiment is in
progress.   But Edison is everywhere
in the work rooms of the manufacturing laboratories, pausing at work
bench or superintendent's desk to jot
down In his beautiful copper-plate
handwriting some instructions to an
associate or reminder Ior himself, in
the private offices of his officials for
brief talks or kindly criticism; and
sometmes at conferences, but rarely,
as he has a poor opinion of collective
thought unless arrived at separatively
and merely collated and reconciled in
conlerence.
1 should like to know what lie thinks
of congress. But Edison is most Interesting in his private laboratory, and it
is hy far the most interesting spot in
the vast Edison manufacturing laboratories. If one could thoroughly search
that private laboratory, what treasures he would find. Enough medals
of highest honor, from kings, nations,
states and great organizations to fill
several baskets; letters Indicating the
tribute to genius from emperors, whom
tlie blood of ancestors made emperors
of nations, aud those whom wealth and
brains made emperors of industry—
emperors of all the world. It has been
truly said that all roads lead to Edison's laboratory, as the greatest from
all countries have made pilgrimages
there.
The world has said that Mr. Edison
is one of Its greatest geniuses. Do
you know what genius is?
Definition ot lieiilus
Edison some time ago said: "Wlial
is genius? Why, genius Is simply
hard work, atick-to-lt-iveness and
common sense.
"Tlie only way to keep ahead of the
procession is to experiment, ii you
don't, the other fellow will. When
there's no experimenting, you go backward. If anything goes wrong, experiment until you get at the bottom
of the trouble." And thla Edison has
done, with metals, wlthh men, and the
minds of men.
Mr. Edison found that a great defect
in the phonograph was Its inadequate
rendition of the over-tones in music
and nn accentuation of hissing con-
conants In speech. So he worked for
more than a year, twenty hours every
day In the week, to get a perfect recording and reproducing of tlie one
word, "specie." When this was done,
lie says that he knew that everything
else could he done.
Mr. Edison says: "I'm always afraid
of things that work the lirst time.
When I made my llrat voice recording
on thc phonograph shouting in it
Mary had a little lamb, with fleece of
whitest snow' and it rcprodced it perfectly, I was never so taken back in
my life."
Edison's favorite remark, when he
is told that a new experiment ls satisfactory, is, "Well, hoys, no* let's find
Ihe hugs," und the tlrefcss hunt for defects is on.
Everyone knows that Mr. Edison's
inventions have always been ones that
speeded the progress of tlie world.
Just think of what thc incandescent
lamp alone meant to the world. Edison
gave the world Broadway, the magnificent, the well-lighted stores of this
city and your own electric reading
lamp that takes the place of the kero-
sent lamps that your father used. If
you go to the movies—thank Edison,
for he invented the modern motion
picture. You have htm to thank tor
hundreds of other Inventions and his
wonderful phonograph.
Edison lias one great ambition, one
chief hope—which is, that every home
shall have the happiness, thc contentment and the Inspiration to loftier
ideals that good music brings. The
home without music In it Is Incomplete. The heart without a song In it
has an empty void. The state or tiie
nation without the melody of happy
music in its soul lacks something
material to national inspiration and
national progress.
Perfected Instrument.
Thomas A. Edison gave the world
the phonograph in 1877, and then,
more than thirty years inter, apent
$3,000,000 and Ave years of ceaseless
labor in the new research work to perfect it so that every home, from tlie
lowliest to the highest, might have at
its fireside the message of an inspired
singer, the breathing soul of a genius
bowed violin, tho hearer of tlie inspired music of a Rachmaninoff, Ihe
great pianist. If Edison could have
lived lu tlie time of Herod, to have perpetuated the voice of the Divine Master, what would it have meant to the
restless world today?
Of practically every working day
for seven years, except during the war.
Edison has given two hours of every
morning aud every afternoon to listening to the compositions of all time and
to choosing the ones that will make
better the lives of all people. It is
probable he has heard more songs,
musical compositions, singers and
other artists that any other living
being.
COAL IMPORTATIONS
FROM AUSTRALIA ARE
SHIPPERS' FORECAST
TO HUNTERS
We carry a full line of Canned Goods suitable for
the hunting trip. Among the many lines specially
suitable for this occasion are—
VEAL LOAF
SARDINES
CANNED SALMON
CANNED CRAB
CANNED LOBSTER
CHICKEN PASTE
DEVILLED 11 A.M
ROAST BEEF
CANNED TONGUE
CANNED SAUSAGE
BEEF STEAK AND ONIONS
We make a specialty of putting up supplies for hunters
and can assure you of every satisfaction.
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
Luxury Tax Removed
from  Electric Heating
Appliances
You will be interested to know that the efforts of
manufacturers of Electric Heating Appliances and of
others interested, have been successful in securing the
removal of the 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle-
plated Electric Heating Appliances.
We quote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread-
ner, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of
appliances:
"In reply to your letter of the 15th inst., I may state
that the luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold
or silver adapted for household or office use. Nickle-
plated electric heating appliances are exempt."
Some of the more important arguments used were:
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion of
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast,
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other
method.
The proposed legislation, therefore, would be taxing
an economy rather than a luxury.
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require
a covering of something to protect them from tho
action of rust.
Nickle is the best and most economical for this
purpose.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run tu
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serioua
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
SAN P'lUNCISCO.—A resumption of
the coal Importation trade between
Newcastle, Australia, is being forecast
by local shippers, despite tlie many
rumors In local shipping circles that
a coal embargo ls to be established in
Australia hy the commonwealth government.
Raising of the railroad rates in tills
country will influence ihe importation of coal from Australia. I'p until
now all coal has come from Ulah.
This was due lo the fact that It was
Cheaper than that from Newcastle and
because the great coal carrying Heel
from Australia which formerly came
here with tlie fuel has ceased operation**,
ONE IN EIGHT OWNS
HIS HOME IN WINNIPEG
WINNIPEG. — Statistics compiled
from city hull records show thai in
Winnipeg one person ou( of every
eight owns bis own home.
CHURCH BUILT OUT OF
TIMBER FROM ONE TREE
With tlie exception of the floor
every piece ot timber used in the construction of a church recently com
pletcd at Santa Kosa, Cal., was cu
from one tree—a giant redwood, 1.
feet in diameter. The iree producei
7S.00O feet of timber, besides a hug
number of shingles.
Overwork haa killed a worker al :
coal-mine In Ohio. .Millions will take
warning from this.   Dull'alo Express,
STa4R   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
The Path of Promotion
LEADS THROUGH ONE OF OUR COURSES
Commercial    Higher Collegiate (University  .'
Stenography      Accounting        iftatrlc., jr. and Sr.)      ^
Secretarial      Retail Coaching   for   exams
Wireless Civil Service of B.C.L.S.
Telegraphy   Line Telegraphy    Law Society
Dental Sehool and Soeitev.
sprOTT-SHaw
BUSINESS    INSTITUTE
Vancouver — Victoria
,    "il'L'w'all|
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES ARRANGED IF DESIRED
bend tor catalogue, stating course desired,    Pupils accepted each .Monday. TW
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 18, 1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B, C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE  Manager ami Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER  lfc,  1920.
THE SACRIFICE  FOR SCIENCE
.Many of the important campaigns of medical science are
marked by tlie loss of lives offered freely to research. It
■was so with yellow fever—no longer dreaded. Latest of
these determined and courageous attacks is that now
launched by Uie British .Ministry of Agriculture against
the foot-and-mouth disease. This malady takes terrible
toll annually of the livestock industry everywhere, and not
lufrequently claims a human lite. The men who will attempt the riddle uf its prevention are tu conduct their
experiments at sea, in vessels litted lor the work. They
will he isolated from human contact, and beset with the
over-present danger of Infection from the atllmals used ln
their experiments. No bugle calls will usher them Into
the light. They will be alone with a most dista.itetul
death. It is thla sort of courage that begets success—and
from the queerest cruise of all time probably will come
the cunciuest of another devastating disease.
WILSON LENIENT TO NOTORIOUS CONVICT i
When Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landls has occasion tu
utter words uf stern rebuke from tho United States Federal
bench nobdy has to interpret his words, a millionaire
cattle king named Dorsey was recently sentenced to eight
years' imprisonment after being found guilty uf using the
mails to sell tubercular cattle over the west. The whit
plague is readily communicated to human beings through
diseased cattle, and this man's crime was a dreadful thing
to think about. Complaints of his criminal conduct came
'from Mexico to Alaska," the court*aid. But a man with a
million has many avenues through which tu reach pardoning power, and this convict was able to get to President
Wilson, win) reduced Ills sentence to four years'. Commenting on the executive act. Judge Luudis said: ''When
the President of the United States paused in the midst of
at affairs tu cut this sentence iu two, 1 wonder what
frame uf mind be must have been in. I suppose Dorsey'fl
pardon is about ready." The swindled fanners, and meat
eaters generally, must be in "a frame of mind" for a general
house-cleaning in official Washington, Verily It is lime
for a change,—Omaha Bee.
A BUSINESS POLICY OF $1,250,000
ON COOKING TROUT
It is probable that the sauce of vacation furnishes Its
own solution of why everything tastes superlative when
one Is out of doors. The most ordinary rasher of bacon
becomes a sugar-cured delicacy when browned—und often
burned—above a driftwood lire. Rank coffee with dregs
eddying in the cup is a blew beyond the skill of famous
chefs—when it is furiously boiled in a discarded lard-pail.
Be that as it may, we are determined to maintain that the
excellence of viands vacational Is altogether real and not
fancied.
An eastern enthusiast, writing a piece fur the paper, says
that trout ure never really appreciated until they are baked
beneath the embers of a driftwood campiire. First catch
your trout—and there's a trick to that—before you swaddle
them in many folds of wrapping paper, having larded the
lish well, and added pepper and salt, and tuck them away
In the embers, heaping coals of fire upon their devoted
piscatorial heads, hanks and tails. After forty minute^,
says this gourmand of the wild, you exhume the charred
paper and unfold it to discover such fish as the late
Lucullus would have fought for.
W.e are going to try it—when-we catch the trout. It may
be that trout so cooked, calmly, dispassionately and deliberately, in the prosaic surroundings of the backyard, would
disappoint and disillusion. But we have no doubts of the
culinary venture—in its proper surroundings. Those trout
are going to argue to appetite to such effect that the natives
will amble down and look envious, and he driven off with
gretjil, difficulty.
ABRAHAM  LINCOLN:
"Property is the fruit of labor; property is desirable; is a
positive good in the world. That some should be rich shows
timt others may become rich, and hence is just eiicourug-
ment to industry and enterprise. Let not him who hath no
house tear down the house of his neighbor; but rather let
him strive diligently to build one for himself, thus, by
example, showing confidence that when his own is built it
will stand undisturbed."
A huge policy of life insurance wus applied for on
August 7th, by the pre-iident of the Brunswick-Balke-
Collonder Company, of Chicago, B. H. Benslnger, The
mount Is $1,250,000 on the whole life plan, taken for busiest; purposes, tlie corporation of which ho is president
being named as the beneficiary ot the insurance. Quite a
large number of rhe important business concerns in the
United States are protected against tinancial loss which
might arise owing to the death of managers or other particularly valuable executive officials, by insurance on their
lives, the premium being paid hy the firm In whose favor
the insurance is taken out. Mr. Benslnger, himself, carries
$1,000,000 of life iiuuiance tor the benefit of his family.
Scientists report that the small boy is the only aulmal
which does nut like a bath. But this is unjust. The small
hoy does like a bath, provided there is not too much regu
lation going with it. He likes his bath only ln the summer
time iu the cool waters of a still running brook, or by the
seashore, without any supervision or soap. Other animals
have similar preferences equally peculiar and unworthy
Pigs like baths of thin mud. Cats like dry rubs, using
their tongues as Turkish towels. Long-haired dogs have
a weakness for plunges into deep lakes, and then for bringing as much of the lake as they can up to the crowd and
shaking it generously over the picnic dinner. So why pick
on the small boy?
WATER, BEAUTIFUL WATER!
"Mr. Toastniaster, ladles and gentlemen, you have asked
me to respond to the toast of 'Water,' the purest and best of
things that .God created. I want to say to you that 1 have
seen it glisten ln tiny tear drops on the sleeping lids of
infancy; 1 have seen it trickle down the blushing cheeks of
youth, and go in rushing torrents down the wrinkled cheeks
of age. 1 have seen it in tiny dew-drops ou the blades of
grass like polished diamonds when the morning sun burst in
resplendent glory over the eastern hills. I have see it iu the
rushing river rippling over pebbly bottoms; roaring over
precipitous falls in its mad rush to, join the mighty father
of waters. And I have seen it in the mighty ocean on whose
broad bosom float the battleships of the world; but, ladies
and gentlemen, 1 want to say to you now, that ns a beverage
ii is a dismal failure."
MEN  AND WOMEN
Men were placed in.this world to harness rebellious
nature, to bridge the ocean with ships, to create queer but
workable forms of government, and generally to he the
carpenters of civilization.
Women were just as surely created to make life worth
living for men.
That Is a crude philosophy, but not less true for being
crude.   It has survived the centuries in spite of unbelievers.
Chunging conditions may force women into unaccustomed activities (we may yet see a conference of women
premiers carrying on the peace discussions at Spa), but
no dull coating of power or position can hide the real
spiritual mission of the feminine.
Thut mission is to bring the element of charm into life.
Thc minds of men in the trenches, numb with monotony
and horror, turned as naturally tu thoughts of guod women
us the Mohammedan towards Mecca at the hour of prayer.
Women who wlll not accept the responsibility of that
truth are lacking in courage.—London Express.
Most everything and everybody finds a defender iu time.
Now, for instance, here is the motor car. After being
vilified for two decades as a menace to life and a dangerously immoral factor iu society, it has found a valiant
defender who declares it to he the greatest moral influence
next to the church. The unexpected line of defence is
undertaken by E. C. Stokes, a hanker and an ex-governor
of New Jersey. His reason for declaring the motor car to
he a great moral force, apart from its industrial importance which no one wants to deny, is that it unites the interests of a family. Where formerly the father would have
me sort ni recreation, the mother another, and the children
yet others, wilh a motor car they all take their pleasure
together; und tlie shady, flower bedecked roadsides ure
crowded with charming picnic parties. .Mr. Stokes says, if
every family in tbe land possessed a motor car family ties
would be closer and many of the problems of social unrest
would be happily solved. - Ohio Stale Journal.
Of a verity— half the world does not know what the other
half is doing—the better "bait's," for example, do not know.
Seattle is indeed a wonderful city.   The coming tax levy
is evpected to be somewhat smaller than the last one.
The fact that sugar is coming down proves that they are
not using much of it in the home-made brew!
The principal legacies left by the late Nat Goodwin,
actor, appear to have consisted of debts. He should have
willed everything to his wives.
One can still laugh and grow fat at the same old price.
Watch Tacbma Grow."    Four babies have been abandoned there recently.
A news dispatch says that General Ayala, once vice-
president of Venezuela, is dead at the age of 73. Another
tradition gone wrong. We always supposed all South
American executives died young.
'What Will Bryan Do?" asks a headline. Don't know
what ho will do today, tomorrow, or next week, but sooner
or later he is sure to sign up another Chautauqua lecture
contract.
CRAZY TIMES
Strike, and the world strikes with you; work, nnd you
work alone. Our souls are ablaze with a Bolshevik craze,
the wildest that ever was known.
Groan and there'll be a chorus; smile, and you make no
hit; for we've grown long hair, and we preach despair, and
throw you a daily fit.
Spend and thc gang will cheer you; save, and you have
no friend; for we throw our bucks to tho birds and ducks,
and borrow from all who'll lend.
Knock, and you'll he a winner; boost, and you'll be a
frost; for the old same ways of the pre-war days are now
from the programme lost.
Strike, and thc world strikes with you; work, aud you
work alone; for we'd rather yell and raise blue hell, than
strive for an honest bone.
Rant, and you are a leader; toil, and you are a nut; 'twas
a bitter day when we pulled away from the oldtlme workday rut.
Walt, and there'll be a blow-up; watch, and you'll see a
slump; and the fads and crimes of these crazy times will
go to the nation's dump."
THE STRANGER
l saw a stranger in the Btreets of Care,
Glad thinly In tho garments beggars wear
in lowly places RS they journey tliero.
I saw liim wandering along the street,
No hat to wear, no siloes upon iiis feet,
Imploring alms of all he chanced to meet.
Day after (lay 1 saw hlni eome and go
From place to piece through wintry sleot and snow,
His bent form shivering, his head bowed low.
Oft In the market place 1 saw liim tread
Among tlie multitude and beg ior bread,
Hut from bis supplications, lo, 1 lied.
I saw him waiting in the misty light,
Imploring shelter from the Inclement night,
And Instantly I turned me from his sight.
He came one night unto my door and cried:
"The wind is cold, I shiver] open wide!"
"Nay, never will I open!" I replied.
,1 asked of one: "This stranger, whence is lie?"
Who straight replied: "Prom some Gethsemane,
Brother of Christ who bore a cross for thee."
I quickly rose and opened wide the door
And called him tlirougb tlie darkness o'er and o'er,
But ho was gone, a stranger evermore.
—CLAUDE WE1MEII.
BIG   REDUCTION   IN   PRICE   OF
ALL WOOL
SWEAT
For Ladies, Misses and Children
We have just received a large shipment of Ladies'
Misses' and Children's All Wool Sweaters in a variety
of the latest styles of Pullovers and Sweater Coats.
These Sweaters were ordered for Fall delivery by a
Vancouver firm who have since gone out of business,
and we have been fortunate enough in securing the
entire order at the lowest figure; we are therefore
enabled to clear them out at the following low prices:
LADIES'
Regular
LADIES'
Regular
LADIES'
Regular
LADIES'
Regular
LADIES'
Regular
pullovers— d»-| i eyr
$14.00 for    tPll..i.ij
PULLOVERS—   (JIA DA
$13.50 for    «PlU*»OU
PULLOVERS—      d»Q  PA
$10.25 for    tPO.OU
pullovers—     d»*7 *7r
$9.75 for      fill .if}
PULLOVERS—      &IJ f\(\
■ $8.75 for      «P I ,\)\)
LADIES' SWEATER
COATS—Reg. $18.50..
$14.85
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S
PULLOVERS—Reg. $7.25
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S
PULLOVERS—Reg. $7.25   «p5.75
PajLLOVi-iUS-Reg. $5.25    $4.^0
$3.40
$2.65
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S d»Q   A(\
PULLOVERS—Reg. $4.25   «pO.^*IU
CHILDREN'S SWEATER
COATS, reg. $3.25 for ..
RIDEOUT'S
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
*■ *■
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book-
The experience of veteran motorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
#THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay September 18, 1926.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Piv
4
JA
Music and Photoplays
"THE' STREET CALLED
STRAIGHT"—A GREAT
STORY AND PICTURE
Have you ever seen u diamond in a
hrasa setting? Or have you ever seen
an Amsterdam Brilliant iu a gold
mourning? You haven't!
But you huve seen a diamond lu a
gold setting. And you have been dazzled and fascinated hy tho brilliance
of the complete product. Anil you undoubtedly have noticed how much the
gold setting magnifies the radiance
and sparkle of the diamond, and how
much more beautiful the gold selling
looks because of the brilliance of the
diamond.
A good story or star Is the Jewel ol
the motion picture, tlie cast, settings,
continuity ami direction, its mounting.
And like tlie gem, lis value and productivity is magnified or minimized according to tlie worth of its mounting.
Story a Classic.
Basil King's" famous story, "The
Street Called Straight," is truly a gem.
it ranks as one of the classics of
American literature, it has called
forth more critical praise than any
novel of the decade, and haa been
read by millions ami told to millions
more. It is generally conceded to be
the best work of an author who has
produced an unbroken line of popular
successes. Produced iu motion pictures by Eminent Authors, with the
personal co-operation of the author,
Basil King, "The Street Called
straight" is an apt Illustration of the
brilliant jewel In an appropriate setting; a setting which contains none of
tlie alloy of mediocrity but wliieh
claims for its elements the pure gold
of a continuity prepared with tlie personal co-operation of Basil King, the
able direction ot Wallace Worsley, Interpretation by a cast which Includes
Naomi Childers and Milton Sills, and
settings of the utmost luxuriance.
The story, sufficiently strong to grip
the interest of millions of readers, is
even more powerful and vivid in its
screen presentation. The tremendous
clash of four stroug wills leading to a
problem, the only solution of which
can mean the wrecking of three liven
for the salvuge of one, Is pictured witli
the vividness of a llghning bolt, tbe
force and power of a thundering cataract.
Hlgli-l'uncred Climax.
Unwilling to accept her fiance's offer
.and unwilling' to marry liim under
Buch great obligations to a former
suitor, Olivia linds herself facing a
desperate alternative. From this
point the story sweeps on to a remarkable ending in which a surprising and
highly dramatic solution to the problem ls presented.
"The Street Called Straight" will be
presented to Ilo-llo patrons ou Monday evening.
.*   *   .
One of New Jersey's justly celebrated electric storms nearly resulted in
several, fatalities the other day when
a flash of" lightning struck tho Hag
pole on the roof of the Blogruph
studios where H. A. Walsh is filming
a new production for Mayflower. The
pole was split In two and crashed
through the gluss roof, partly demolishing an elaborate setting. Several
of the players in the set narrowly escaped Injury from the shower of glass
and timber.
*   .   .
Benjamin A. Prager, president of
tlie Mayflower Photoplay Corporation,
has opened negotiations for the purchase of part of the original timbers
of the Mayflower, the hull of wliieh
was discovered recently in Buckinghamshire, England, by Pr. liendel
Harris. If successful in acquiring tho
timbers, Prager plans to convert one
into a miniature of the Mayflower, for
presentation to the Smithsonian Institute.
.   *   *
DOROTHY DALTON HAS
STRONG ROLE IN NEW
PLAY, "QUICKSAND"
from bartender to his present ascend
ancy through brute force and lack of
scruple. -He has, however, one redeeming tniii, a worshipful admiration for Mary, whom lie has known
from childhood, and although he recognizes that her world Is different
from .his, lie would willingly sacrifice
all lie owns for one word of love which
which is lavished on Jim.
■ lie linn for which Jim works consists ol* Terry, Senior, and ills son,
Alan. The father, who is founder of
tlie business, is a hard-working man
whose word is as good as his bond,
ilis only son, Alan, Is a wastrel, who
spends all and more of his allowance
In nightly debauches. He Is a frequenter of Botand's Cafe and Is on
familiar terms with the cabaret singers und night owls. Taking advantage
of his position in the linn he obtains
Jim's endorsement on a cheque which
lie lias drawn on Perry & Son with a
forged signature. Tlie check Is cashed
III Boland's Cafe by a confederate und
Jim, who lu unconscious of the fraud,
is arrested, und, though the money is
not found in ilia possession, he is convicted and sentenced to live years'
imprisonment. Alary Is determined to
light tor her husband's freedom und
plans lo use her wits to bring whoever is guilty to justice, although she
ins no clue to work upon.
Deprived ol her means, Mary, who
has a trained voice, applies to John
Behind for a position as cabaret singer In his restaurant. Poland reluctantly consents but watches over hello see that she is subjected to no Insults by tlie frequenters of his all-
night resort. He also cherishes the
hope that now that Jim is under lock
and key for five years he may persuade Alary to get a divorce. Alan
Perry, who ls a regular habitus, becomes fascinated with Mary, and
Alary, who has a vague suspicion tiiat
Alan Is Implicated in the forgery,
lures him ou while John Boland
watches witli insane jealousy.
Late, one night after the show, Alan,
mad with drink, follows Alary to her
apartment and uttempts to force his
attentions upon her. The same night
Jim, who has escaped from jail, seeks
refuge iu his own home.
t!o to the Ilo-llo on Tuesday evening and see the startling climax to this
intense situation,
* a    a
Verdi wrote the great opera "Aida"
a result of an offer of $10,OUO for
I Egyptian opera. The offer was
made by Ismail Pasha, Khedive of
Egypt, who ruled from 1S63 to 1870.
* *   *
Jenny Und, who was 'known as the
"Swedish Nightingale," gave half a
million dollars to charity.
* *    a
Alice Verlet, the noted Belgian coloratura soprano, wus named "The
Queen of Song" by Adelina Patti, after
Patti hud heard Verlet as "Queen of
tho night" in "The Magic Flute."    .
"The Third Eye"
Ilo-llo Management Books New
Serial to Commence Shortly,
a Serial of Baffling Mystery,
Intrigue and Romance, in Fifteen Sensational Episodes.
Portrays Role of Brave Wife
Who Risks All to Save the
Honor of Her Husband Who
is Unjustly Accused of Crime.
Jim and Mary Bowen. husband and
wife, with little Frankie, Jim's baby
brother, are a happy household. Jim
ls cashier for Jerry & Sons. Insurance
brokers, and although his salary Is
small he possesses the full confidence
of the head of the firm and tlie future
holds out bright prospects for the little family. Mary, the wire, is a fine
woman who is proud of husband and
home and faces life fearlessly and
hopefully.
John Boland, the district leader,
owner of the Boland's Cafe and res-
"The Third Eye," a serial of baffling
mystery, that has a high-heart love
story with a mystery as strange and
eerie as a tale of Edgar Allen Poe,
lias been booked by the management
of tlie llo-Ilo Theatre, and will commence showing following the last
epnsode of "The Black Secret," which
concludes shortly.
The Third Eye" is a mystery serial
thnt will foil keen minds, it will keep
them all guessing. It will set them
talking. Who Is "The Third Eye?"
What Is "The Third Eye?"
Besides a mystery of dramatic suspense. "The Third Eye" is melodrama
--clean, fast und snappy. Every episode rises to a surprising climax.
Every climax Is preceded by sensational thrills. Intrigue and romance
abound In "The Third Eye.".
Who ls there witli sould so dead who
Is not deeply Interested In mystery?
Who Is there who does not like a corking melodrama? Who Is there who
do.es like a romance balked by Intrigue? All these Ingredients, in artistic degree, aro wonderfully blended
into this serial—the serial with the
most astounding sensations and un-
solvable mystery ever conceived.
"The Third Eye" is a Western
serial. It is not the wild and woolly
kind, but it has the flavor of the plains,
the lure of the open, and tlie swift riding and daring adventures that we expect from the West.
*   *   *
An intoxicated man in a New York
FRANK KEENAN IN
"DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR*
They Pay in Gold—They Pay in
Remorse—They All Pay.—A
Drama of High Society, of
Men, Money and Morals.
Frank Keenan is again thc successful man of big business In "Dollar for
Dollar," his newest Pathe feature,
which conies to thc Ilo-llo Theatro
on Wednesday next.
The theme of "Dollar for Dollar,"
hy Ethel Watts Mumford, Ib based on
reprisal. What Is tlie payment Of "an
eye for an eye and a tooth for a
tooth?" Can one stolen dollar have
the same value as another dishonest
dollar? Is there happiness,. or peace
of mind?
Frauk Keenan enacts the role of a
millionaire philanthropist. His moth-
ods of acquiring weal* Jiave never
been questioned by the social set
ln which he Is a commanding figure,
yet, in the world of finance, he has
tlie reputation of being a man without a soul.
Ho is blackmailed hy Airs. Alarteen,
beautiful widow with a charming
daughter to support. The fortune
that was once hers was lost through
the shady deals of Keenan and his
business rival, and sho decides to use
blackmail methods to make these
men pay.
What happens when she makes of
one man an enemy and of the other
x lover forms the main theme of
'Dollar for Dollar." The cast includes Kathleen Kirkliam, Harry Van
Aleter, Kato Van Buren, Jay Belasco,
Gertrude Claire and others.
.   .   .
Alary Garden, It Is reported, was
nearly drowned while bathing at Monte Carlo. Probably had a spell of her
well known temperament and tried
to boss the ocean.
* ♦    a
Henry Clive. noted actor-Illustrator,
is painting a portrait of Miriam
Cooper, liim star, which tlie Mayflower
Corporation Is negotiating to purchase
for $1,000, thc money to be turned
over to an artist in Chicago who recently advertised his baby for sale for
$1,000 because he claimed he was
destitute and could not support the
child.
* *   ♦
Critics huve said that Sergei Rachmaninoff, the Russnan pianist, conductor and composer, who is now touring America, is the greatest composer-
pianist that has visited the United
States since the time of Rubinstein.
Rachmaninoff, as a boy, studied under
some of thc great master musicians of
Europe and only tho death of thc
great Liszt prevented him from being
a student of that master of masters.
* *   *
Reformer, Spare That Weed
[The reformers have decided to lake
steps to abolish smoking next.—News
item.]
Reformer, spare that weed!
Now you've cut out our booze,
It satisiies our need—
Oh, don't give us the blues.
Pray, let us have one bit
Of earthly comfort left-
Ob, don't cut out our smokes
And render us bereft.
Reformer, spare that weed!
You call it filth—gee!
You say It's deadly poison,
Will make a wreck of me.
But when my pipe goes good,
And the lire's leaping high
On a weary winter's eve,
If that's death, let me die.
a    a    a
11. A.  Walsh  recently paid heavily
because of his   association with   the
affairs of Jloute Carlo.    It   cost   the
director 15,000 feet of lumber, 573,000
nails und a couple of kegs of glue. But
Walsh   didn't   lose   tills    across    the
tallies.   He used it—or rather his carpenters did—building a set representing the Interior of the big casino. This
set, said to be the most accurate reproduction of tlie big gaming establishment ever produced, will bo a feature in a forthcoming production.
.   .   .
Anna Q. Nllsson plans a trip lo
Sweden at the conclusion of hot* pres
cut contract. She will visit her birth
place, which sbe has not seen since
childhood and will star lu three Swed
ish productions.
taurant, is the all powerful dictator j subway gave Albert von Tilzer, tlle
ill his own precinct. He is a big, I popular song writer, the idea of the
coarse-grained despot, who has risen weil known song, "Alcoholic Blues,"
A woman entered the car with i
child in her arms and handed the con
ductor a ten-dollar bill.
Conductor (sarcastically)—"ls that
the largest you've got?"
Woman (Indignantly)—"I will have
you know I've only been married two
years."
She "busted" her beads-
Accidental, no doubt—
And they rolled down her back,
But she shimmied 'em out!
ILO»!L0 THEATRE
TWO COMPLETE SHOWS EVERY NIGHT
Commencing Monday there will be Two Shows
every night, the first Show starting at 6.30
Saturday, September 18th
GLADYS BROCHINEEL
— IN —
"THE MORAL LAW"
Also the Comedy
"Oh, What a Knight"
Monday, September 20th
A  GOLDWYN   PICTURE
Basil King's Famous Story
'The Street Called Straight'
A Big Vital Drama of Love and Sacrifice
The story of a great love born of a great tragedy; of a woman's soul transfigured and redeemed by a man's sacrifice. What ruin, what unhappiness is
the inevitable climax to the blind, reckless struggle to "keep up appearances"—to gratify every extravagant whim—to rise to the level of the
more fortunate. Olivia learned it—when it was too late. She learned
what in her blindness she had never seen. "The Street Called Straight"
is the work of a master author, relentlessly shedding the light of truth on
a problem vital to every American man and woman. The opulent luxuries
of society life—dramatic entertainment that pulses with the passions of life.
Tuesday, September 21st
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
DOROTHY DALTON
— IN —
"QUICKSAND"
Only a cabaret singer? Don't you believe it! The girl is trying her best
to earn the'bread while her husband serves his time on a false charge.
And it's no easy job, as you'll learn when you see this picture.
Wednesday, September 22nd
Frank Keenan
IN
'DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR'
A Drama of High Society, Men, Money and Morals
A STRIKING DRAMA Ol'" SOCIETY LEADERS WHO HIDE THEIR
SECRET LIVES UNDER THE CLOAK OF  RESPECTABILITY.
It was the first time in his life that a woman had cornered this King of
Finance. She had Ihe proofs of his past misdeeds. He had ruined her
husband. Now she had tho upper hand and she played it to the limit Sho
liad come to make liim pay, "Dollar for Dollar." Not only in gold—but
he paid in the torture of hi.' warped soul.   Then the light broke.
Don't forget there will be Two Shows on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday nights, also Matinee Saturday
Afternoon—Subjects will be announced later
3E
•S3 Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 18, 1920.
YOUR S
PROBLE
NO MATTE
PING
SOLVED
HERE YOU
Baking Quality Of
Low Grade Flour
(Experimental Farms Note.)
With the ever Increasing cost ot living, it lias become necessary to Unci
corresponding menus of saving. The
housewife is the person on whom most
ot the responsibility of economizing
rests. Tlie use of some of the cheaper
grade:! of Hour Instead of the highly
expensive lirst patent is another means
of siiving Hint may lie added to ilio
already long list. During the war, all
members of the community were
forced lo use government standard
Hour, which wu:i of a lower grade
than mosl people had boon accustomed
lo. Nevertheless, most of the bakers
succoodod In furnishing bread so good
that few people would have considered
it distinctly inferior had It not been
I'm* the difference In color. Too much
attention lias, however, always been
paid to color in Hour and hread. Bread
Unit is really very pale is not so
healthful us bread made of somewhat
lower grade of Hour, and the war-time
bread .was really superior as a food to
the extremely white product In use
previously. Lower grades of flour
similar to the government standard
flour can always he purchased but are
not usually in much demand on account of their inferior color. These
second aifd third grade flours, however, contain a higher percentage of
protein and assimilable phosphates.
These features are distinctly advantageous.
While the lower grades of Dour may
require some slight modifications in
the baking method in order to produce
the best possible bread, these changes
A LONG-DISTANCE LAYER
(Experimental Farms Note.)
FIRE  IN WATER
As u rule, hens lay two or three eggs
and then miss n day. Sonic g;>od hens
will lay more before they take a day
off and we have known Individual hens
to lay five and six dozen eggs and nol
miss-: a day, but a record in long-distance laying without a miss has, as fas
aa we know, been established by the
Experimental Farm, Poultry Division,
.it Kentville, X. S. Station, where a
Barred Plymouth Hock pullet laid Wl
eggs in 104 days.
This Barred Rock, whose leg band
No. is ti:!, did not start to lay very
early, lu fact her lirst egg was laid
on the 26th day of January. She laid
two eggs and missed a day, laid five
eggs and missed a day, one egg and a
miss, then two eggs, but on the 18th
day of February she got down to business and laid every day for tbe rest
of the month, every day in March,
every day iu April, aud every day iu
May up to the 27th, when she took
two days off, After this time she took
an occasional day off until tbe 20th
of June, when ahe became broody.
When she went broody her total record
was Ktb' eggs in 147 days.
One of the prettiest inventions
of modern science has now been applied to the problem of salvaging the
cargoes of sunken liners. We cannot
have (lame under water iu natural
conditions. But since science has made
this "impossible" possible, and fire
rages today beneath the sea and cuts
steel bettor than a diamond cuts glass.
A beautiful contrivance performs the
feat. Compressed air is forced down
at such a pressure that the water is
hurled nway from a nozzle, wliieh
carries an oxy-aectylene flame. The
removal of the water creaies a space
iu which a vacuum is caused.t Flame
canonI burn in a vacuum, but with this
Invention oxygen is pumped out to till
tlie space which Ihe expelled water has
left. Thut Is thc essential element for
fire. The acetylene flame waxes fierce
lu a tiny zone of oxygen. Tiie diver
directs thc (lame on to the steel plates
of tlie vessel, and hy its aid cuts them
without difficulty, lie burns his way
into Ihe ship, und where he goes in
cargo comes out.
Alberta Town
Strikes Gas
PONOKA. Alta.—Natural gas has
been struck here In a well drilled
by the provincial department of public
works at a depth ot 2,600 feet. A
pressure of (525 feet has been registered and prospects for a good flow
are considered hopeful. If the pressure maintains itself the gas will be
used for heating, lighting and power
services at the provincial asylum ftere,
entailing a Having pf $30,000 nnnuitlly.
A RING FOR A LATCHKEY
arc not serious nnd, as a rule, no difficulty whatever will he experienced in
handling such (lours. When we consider the lower price of the cheaper
grades of Hour and ihelr high nutritive
value, we see two distinct advantages
in using them. Tile claims made fur
tlie whitest Hours are nearly always
much exaggerated and nre sometimes
quite absurd, and the public would
do well to insist on obtaining the
really superior materials which are
hold us inferior.
Tiie Wlllesden magistrate was told
hy a landlord that a man ' who had
failed to get housing accommodation
in any other way had at last succeeded In doing so by marrying one of his
tenants, u widow. He wanted to know
If he could eject iilni ns n trespasser.
The magistrate said he must give
proper and legal notice to ihe actual
tenant.
Visitor: "Why docs your servant go
limit the house with her hat on?"
Mistress l "Oh, she's a new girl. She
hasn't made up her mind whether she
will stay."
1IISS1MJ ACCOMPLISHMENT.
"It Is a strange thing," said the pro-
lessor. "I was shaved tills morning
by a man who really ls, I suppose, a
little above being a barber. I know
of my own knowledge thnt lie studied
at Heidelberg and spent several years
In other foreign educational centres.
I know. also, thnt he has contributed
scientific articles to our best magazines and litis numbered among his in
tlmnte friends men of the highest
social standing. And yet," soliloquized
the professor, "he can't shave a man
decently."
"By jove," exclaimed young Rounder
in astonishment, "What is he a barber
for, with all those accomplishments?"
"Oh, he isn't a barber," said the
professor, yawning. "You see, I
shaved myself this morning."
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and endorsed "Tender fo. repairs to wharf at Royston.
B.C.," will he received at tills ofllce
until 12 o'clock noon. Tuesday, September 21, 1920, for the construction
of repairs to wharf at Royston, Comox-
Alberni District, B.C.
Plans and forms of contract can bo
seen and specification and forms ot
tender obtained at this Department, nt
tlie office of tlie District Engineer at
Victoria, B.C., and at the l'ost Olllces.
Vancouver. B.C., and Royston Station.
B. C.
Tenders wlll not be considered un-
leis made on printed forms supplied
by tlie Department and in accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Mln
Ister of Public Works, equal to HI
per cent, of the amount of ihe tender.
War Loan Bonds, of tiiu Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds and cheques If required to
make up an odd amount.
NOTE.—Blue prints can he obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted hank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the Min
Ister of Publlc Works, which will be
returned if the intending bidder sub
mit a regular bid.
By order,
R .C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 14, 1920.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and endorsed "Tender for wharf at Mansons Landing, B.
C," wlll he received ut this olllce until
12 o'clock noon, Tuesday, October 5
1820, for tlie construction of a wharf
at .Manson:, Landing, Cortez island
B.C.
Plans and forms of contract can he
seen und specification aud forms of
tender obtained at this Department, at
the offices of the District Engineers ut
New Westminster, B. C, und at the
Post Offices, Vancouver, B. C, and
Cortez Island, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered un
less made on printed forms supplied
by tlie Department and In accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to tbe order of tlie Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
of the amount of the tender. War
Loan Bonds ot the Dominion will also
be accepted as security, or War Bonds
and cheques if required to make up an
odd amount.
NOTE.—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing un
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the Mln
Ister of Public Works, which will bo
returned if the intending bidder submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, September 4, 1920.        1-38
LAND ACT
NOTICE OF INTENTION' TO APPLY
TO LEASE LAND.
TO BE OH NOT TO BE
I'd ratlmr he a Could Be
If I could not be an Are,
For a Could Be is a Maybe
With a chance of touching par.
I'd rather he an Has Been
Than a Might Have Been by far\
For a Might Have Been has never been
But tin Has waa once an Are.     .
In the Nelson Land District, lircordliig
District Nanaimo, and  situate nuc
mile In a Northerly  dircclliui  from
Lilian Buy on Baynes Sound.
TAKE NOTICE  that A. E. Water-
house, of Port Alherni, Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-cast corner of Lot 11, thence in
north-westerly direction following
the shore Ave thousand eight hundred
(5,800) feet more or less to Hie north-
cast corner; thence east live hundred
(500) (eet more or less, thence approximate low water mark; thence iu a
south-easterly direction paralleling the
shore to a point east of the point of
commencement, thence west Ave hundred (600) feet more or loss to tlie
point ot commencement, and containing forty (40) acres more or less.
ARTHUR E. WATERHOUSE.
Name ol applicant.
K. B. Fraser, Agent.
Dated 17tt .August, 1920.
10-47-NV12
NO LONGER HIS.
"I thought you owned an automobile."
"I do, but I taught the wife to drive,
and now I'm walking."
TENDERS
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Limited, not later thau Monday noon,
September 20th, for the erection of an
Athletic Club building to be built at
Cumberland, B. C, for which plans and
specifications may he procured at
their offices at Cumberland,
The lowest or any tender not neces-
irily accepted.
W. A. OWEN, C.E.,
Construction Engineer.
Sept. 4, 1920.
FORESHORE LEASE
Nelson District, Vancouver Island.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, of
Victoria. B. C, Colliery Owners, intend
lo apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted nt
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from the South-East corner post
of Lot 11. Nelson District, thence East
sixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to tho
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
the South-East corner of tlie North
Fractional half of tlie South-West
quarter of Section 32, thence West to
aforesaid corner of- said fractional
part of Section 32, being tlie original
high water mark, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being Hie Easterly boundary of Section 82 aud D. L. 2S In suld Nelson
District to point of commencement,
containing in all ninety-six (96) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Graham, Agent.
Dated June 22nd. 1920. 28-8
NOTICE
Amendments to the Pound Bylaw
prohibiting stock of kinds from wandering on the public thoroughfares of
tlie city at any hour of tlie day or
night, will come into force on October
1st, 1920. It Is the Intention of the
authorities, to have tills Bylaw strictly
enforced. Owners of stock will kindly
acept this warning.
C. J. BUNBURY,
4-39 Chief of Police.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
We make a specialty of
CHILDREN'S
Photographs
Have a picture of your
children taken now before
they lose their charms of
childhood. .
BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE 1UILWAV STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C. ih
September 18, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
ffi
Quality
Confectionery
GANONG'S
WILLARD'S
MOIR'S
The best in Candy of all kinds
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
FAMILY SHOE REPA1UEK
Service, Material
and
Workmanship
(iuaraalced
Itukucr Heels Fixed While U Walt
Phillips' military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS  •   Dunsmuir Avenue'
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. OATZ, Proprietor
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE  CREAM   PARLORS
Try one of Henderson's
Special Banana
Splits
. We make oar own Ice Cream
nnd claim it to be the best on the
Island. We get the crenm fresh
from the farm every day.
A. I.. Williams
A. V. Webb
COURTENAY
PLUMBING
COMPANY
SANITARY PLUMBING
— nnd —
GENERAL REPAIR
WORK
Corner Comox Road and
Lake Trail
COURTENAY, B. C.
Telephone 127
FWjdeMou-ih*^
Mason Jars'
"Stelf PecUiiQ'-branci
O
■»UHAElX"Alnri'IHT
wror mouth oars
Htlv jMX'fltfi'mn'l'* /
twiiiaSRWHC*,*0 *
Otaa,
SOLD BY
'giaiOM L£1S£11 & CO., LTD,
ROMAN CATHOLICS DISLIKE MARRIAGE LAWS
OF NEW ZEALAND
LONDON.—A telegram to The Loudon Times saya that there is vlolout
opposition hy the Roman Catholics In
New Zealand to a select committee's
recommendation that It be mnde u
penal offence to declare that persons
lawfuly married and not truly and
sufficiently married. Roman Catholic
bishop:; regard Ibis answer lo the No
Toniore cUTcrec as penalizing Roman
Catholic doctrine, and say they will
resist such a law.
BRIEF INTERPRETATIONS
OF MOTOR TRAFFIC ACT
Several car owners have been lined
within the last week or two for infractions of tlie Motor Traffic Act on the
Island Highway. The following extract, taken from the Port Alberni
News, is worth reading and remembering by motorists:
Does the average motorist know:
That the speed limit iu any city,
town or village is 15 miles an hour.
That 30 miles an hour is the limit
on any highway iu open country, outside these limits.
That 16 miles an hour is the maximum speed where the driver cannot
have a clear and unobstructed view
for a safe distance ahead.
That driving to the common danger
is prohibited.
That municipal councils are authorized to regulate motor traffic In every
respect save as to rules of the road
and rate of speed.
That every precaution must be taken
when passing or overtaking horse-
drawn vehicles.
That accidents must he reported to
provincial or municipal police.
That no person under the influence
of liquor shall drive.
That no person under seventeen can
drive unless by special permit.
That taking a motor car without
authority of tlie owner is liable to six
months' imprisonment.
That the burden of proof Ib on the
driver If prosecuted for speeding, providing notice of intent to prosecute
and the alleged time of the alleged offence is given In writing within 48
hours.
Thai violators of motor regulations
may bo arrested without warrant.
Thut licences mny be suspended or
cancelled for reckless or negligent
driving.
That number plates must he displayed lu conspicuous places al (lie
front and rear aud must be kept en
lirely unobstructed and free from
dirt,
That every motor vehicle, other than
a uiotur cycle must have two headlights, and lliul the licuiu of light
from these must not rise higher thun
42 Inches from the ground when pro
Jeeted 75 feet or more ahead.
That llo spotlight can he operated
on Ihe right hand side of the car. nor
can it be directed upon or strike any
other approaching vehicle or person
on horseback.
Tllat no motor vehicle shall bo at
lowed to stand unattended without
Brat effectively setting the brakes and
stopping the motor.
That every motor vehicle must have
a suitable horn, bell or signalling
device.
That no muffler cut-out is permitted
In any city municipality.
That you must have a red tail light.
Tllat you must give the vehicles you
meet one-half the road and turn to
the left.
That it is up to an overtaken car to
decide if you con pass safely.
That you must not carry firearms
during close season and at no time
carry loaded firearms in your cur.
Paris Murder
Mystery Solved
The mangled body of a man named
Duclos, discovered in the well of a
house iu the Rue Princesse, pointed
clearly to a ghastly murder having
boon committed. Mace, then only a
young officer, burning with desire to
distinguish himself, was allowed to
try his hand at solving the mystery,
and his suspicious, after several weekB
of patient and sagacious work, centred
about a man named Voirbeau, a friend
of the dead man.
Mace asked Voirbeau for information, and the latter professed to be delighted to assist him, adding that he
desired nothing so much as to sec the
assassin of his friend sent to tlie guillotine. The pair became inseparable
companions—Voirbeau laughing up his
sleeve at the Idea of leading Mace
farther and farther astray, and Mace
observing, waiting, feeling Ills way.
Kr-I'iiurfeil the Crime.
At last the detective secured sufficient evidence to arrest his companion, but tbe proof of Voirbeau's actual
participation lu Ihe murder and the
dismemberment of the body was lacking. At the request of Mace, Voirbeau
came to the Duclos house one afternoon about a month after the discovery of the murder and was informed
that tho detective merely wished him
to be present at "a little Investigation
pertaining to the crime."
'Certainly," replied the suspected
man, "my knowledge of poor Duclos'
habits will, I feel sure, be of considerable help to you."
Marvelling at the nerve of the man,
Mace continued hla preparations,
superintending the bringing in of a
wax figure which was a duplicate of
Duclos, even to the color of the eyes
and the peculiar style of shoes which
the dead man bad affected.
"My idea," explained Mace, "is to
re-enact the crime as tar as possible
so that, reasoning from the effect, we
may gain insight into the cause. If
we can deduce anything which might
have followed the murder we may
stumble across a valuable clue to the
subsequent movements of the criminal."
It was at his direction that the figure representing Duclos waa taken to
the bedroom and then, for the first
time, Voirbeau Interrupted the proceedings hy asking the reason for (ills,
since Hie body had been discovered In
the well.
When His Nerve Broke.
Upon reaching the bedroom one of
tlie other detective acted the part of
Ihe murderer, striking "Duclos" down
from behind, und then placing tlie body
upon a large table which stood in the
centre of the room.
Without a word the detective, who
was playing the role of the murderer,
secured a knife. "That's one point
we'll have to guess at," interrupted
.Mace, "for we dou't know where the
weapon came from," and commenced
to dismember the figure upon the table.
As he did so, Mace stepped forward aud
started to pour water from a pitcher
over the "body."
"Here is something wliieh I wish
you would note particularly," he said
lo Voirbeau. "The tilting of this-room
has. as you will observe, a slight slope
toward the centre—really not enough
to be perceptible, but sufficient to
permit any liquid dropping upon it to
gather ln a pool in the middle of the
room," and he pointed to the puddle
of water at his feet.
Waiving Voirbeau to one side, Mace
commenced to dig at tbe tiles in the
centre of the room. Finally one of
them came up—only to disclose a
brownish mass of coagulated blood
which had settled III the distinct shape
of the letter "V!"
"Stop it. for God's sake!" Voirbeau
shrieked. "Even Ills blood convicts
me! Yes, I did II—but let me get out
of here!"
"It wasn't his blood," retorted the
detectiv.e. "bul your conscience. Here's
where tiie blood came from. I placed
It there myself last night!" And he
held up the body of a rabbit, Us throat
slit from car to ear.
Two young women at tho picture
show were discussing their personal
affairs.
"Got a feller, yet, Liz?" Inquired one
"Yes," returned her companion.
"And he's a regulur guy. He's working at the big drygoods store."
"You don't say so! Why, they tell
me he's real refined!"
Rather!  He took me to a restaurant
last week, an'd when we had coffee he
poured it out in a saucer to cool it
but he didn't blow at it like common
people—he fanned it with his hat!"
Miss Gladys (severely): "Bridget,
your manners are not good. You should
not come into the room so suddenly
when Mr. Callalot is passing tlle evening with me."
Bridget (disgusted): "Suddlnt! And
is It Suddlnt ye call It, an' me ear to
the blessed keyhole a full three-quarters ot an hour!"
Women's Sway Is
Absolute In Tripoli
We have gone far along the road
of feminine emancipation, but we
have still a long way to go before
we overtake the stage readied by the
wild Tuaregs of the Tripoli Desert.
Among Hie Tuaregs woman's sway
is absolute. She does not rule by insidious wheedling, but by outright
command and though our own women
may have the men twisted round their
little fingers, the Tuareg ladles can
be said to have tbein well under their
heels.
Among the Tuaregs the woman
bIiowb her face (o all the world; It
ls the men who go coyly veiled. Descent Is traced entirely through the
feminine line, and what little teaching Is given to Ihe young Is given by
the women.
hi order to obtain a wife a man
has to pay a price that, In view of the
Tuareg standard of wealth. Is nothing
less than sheer profiteering.
Indeed, the ladies have put ou tlie
screw so tightly thut the young man
who keeps to the narrow path of
honesty and pursues the only peaceful occupations known to the tribe—I
cane rearing, and carrying goods for
the Arab traders—will have, perforce,
to remain a bachelor, as these occupations will never yield him sufficient surplus to provide him with his
marriage portion.
Consequently, tlie young bloods are
forced to join the rhazzles, or robbing
raids, which have destroyed tlle
trans-Sahara trade, in order that they
may appease tlie rapacity of their
lady loves. Tlie ladles are quite
aware as to tho source of the dowries
their husbands bring, aud. Indeed not
Infrequently II Is "the woman In the
case" who decides upon tho right moment and place for the raids.
The tribute brought by the adoring
husband becomes tlie absolute property of the wife, and the stick he
carries and tlle wooden box In which
he puts what his wife gives him -are
all the personal property the male
Tuareg possesses, and all he retains,
should the lady divorce him.—London
Answers.
AUTO
PAINTING
General Woodwork, Auto Bodies,
Trucks and Wheels btflll U order
Ki'pairs  Promptly  Attended  to.
Jas. C. Allan
for. rrhlenux \ Ill/wlllhini Sis.
NANAIMO, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.M KB It I V\ ELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT   CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, U. C.
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and   Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockei'yware and
General Merchandise.
OHAKLIB S1NIS CHONO, O   '.erlaud
HON'O CHUNG & CO.. Ilevi.,1
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
683 Holdings St., W„ Coiner ot
Oruuville.      VANCOUVER, B.C.
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Hay uml Mahl.
Dunsmuir Ave.,
Cumberland.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
THIS trade-mark is branded
in red on one side of the
Still Better Willard—the only
storage battery with Threaded
Rubber Insulation.
136 passenger car and truck
manufacturers have selected this
battery, knowing from experience that Threaded Rubber Insulation is far superior to wood
or any other form of storage
Danery insulation.
136 Manufacturers Using Threaded Rubber Insulation
Acason
Colonial
Henney
Nelson 6s
Selden
Acme
Comet
Highway
LeMoon'
Service
All American
Commerce
Holmes
Noble
Shelby
Allis-Chalmers
Commodore
Holt
Northway
Signal
American
Cunningham
HupmobSa
Ogren
Singer
LaFrance
Daniels
Indiana
Old Hickory
Southern
Apex
Dart
International
•Olds
Standard 8
*Apper9on
Dependable
(I. H C.)
Oneida
Standard
Armleder
Atterbury
•Auburn
Diamond T
Dixie Flyer
Dodge
Dorris
Fargo
♦Kissel
Koehler
Lancia
Oshkoah
•Paige
Parker
Studebaker
Stutz
Sunbeam
Bacon
Lexington
•Liberty
Peerles.
Peugeot
Turkington
Bell
Fergus
Luveme
Phianna
Belmont
Ferris
III
ssss
Pierce-Arrow
Titan
Bessemer'
FWD
Premier
Tow Motor
Beta)
Blddle
Franklin
Fulton
Preston
Ranier
Transport
Traylor
Broclnray
Garford
Mercury
•Reo
Ultimate
Buffalo
•Buick
OMC
Giant
Meteor (Phil*.)
MHC
Republic
ReVer.
Veile
Connonhall
Glide
•Mitchell
Riddle
Vulcan
Capitol    "
Great Western
Murray
Robinson
Ward LaFrance
•Caw
Hahn
McFarlan
R a*. V Knight
White
•Chevrolet
HCS
•McLaughlin
Rowe
Wilson
Clydesdale
Hurlburt
Napoleon
Sandow
Wlnther
Cole
Hawkey.
Nash
Sayere
Winton
Collier
Haynei
Nelson
Seagrav*
Wolverina
; '   i   ■
-. i
1
A-
•For Export
Sparks Co., Distributors, Nanaimo, B.C.
STORAGE*
BATTERY Page Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 18, li>20.
FALL  ANNOUNCEMENT
New Coats-
New Dresses
-New Suits
Messrs. Scurrahs, of Victoria, will be here on
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Sept. 24 and 25
with a most comprehensive showing of all
the latest styles in
Ladies' Coats     Ladies' Suits     Ladies' Dresses
THOSE WHO PAID US A VISIT DURING THEIR LAST SHOWING
WERE LOUD IN THEIR PRAISES OF THE MOST CHOICE SELECTION OF BEAUTIFUL MERCHANDISE AT REASONABLE PRICES.
CUSTOMERS DESIRING SOMETHING SPECIAL WHICH WE DO NOT
CARRY IN STOCK CAN HAVE A CHOICE OF SPECIAL GOODS BY
LEAVING THEIR ORDERS PREVIOUS TO TIIE VISIT OF MISS
MAVIUS, WHO COMES REPRESENTING MESSRS. SCURRAHS, AND
WHO WILL BE DELIGHTED TO BRING SUCH GOODS.
R U B B E RS—
We have a complete line of Rubbers for Men, Ladies, Boys, Youths, Misses and Children.
We carry the SAME OLD RELIABLE LINE—as usual.   None better.
PHONE 134
DRYGOODS
& GENT'S FURNISHINGS
SITUATION WANTED
WANTED — BY YOUNG ENGLISH
lady, position as companion-help in
good family; experienced; excellent
references. Apply "Companion."
c-o Islander. 6-42
"WHAT WE KNOW"
1. That the Ilo-llo lobby is a great
hangout for uu overcoat.
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
MEETS NEXT FRIDAY
Personal Mention
Tiie opening meeting of tiie Winter
2. That someone (we'll not mention |SeBston „,• th8 Womell*s Auxiliary to
the General Hospital will be held on
HELP WANTED
WANTED—A MAID FOR GENERAL
housework and plain cooking; also
nursemaid for three children. Apply immediately to Mrs. A. L. Smith,
Parksvllle. 38-1
FOR SALE
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $050 to $1200. T. B.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, Bee T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED IN
private family. Address J. Vernon-
Jones, c-o Islander Olllce.
his name this time) fancied this over
com.
3. Thut one day the aforesaid party
helped himself to this overcoat along
with a pair of new shoes.
■1. We think that person only needs
a suit and a hat to complete his fall
outfit.
5. Thut tlie overcoat and shoes cost
sixty iron men.
6. Tllat if Mr.   does not report
he will he reported—and maybe deported.
The old-fashioned woman who
prides herself on the quality of her
home-made jelly now has a daughter
who dances like it.
Friday uexl, September 24, at 3 p.iu..
in tlie Anglican Church Hull.
AMY B. CLINTON, Sec.
WOMAN'S  AUXILIARY
OF G. W. V. A. HOLDS
MEETING MONDAY
A special meting of tlie Womun's
Auxiliary of tlie G. W. V. A. will be
held Monday evening in the City Hull
at 7 o'clock, when important business
is to be deult with.
WARNING
The party who stole u pair of new
shoes worth $10 and an overcoat worth
$50 from the I In-Ilo Theatre on Tuesday had better return same to the Ilo-
llo Theatre or Islander Offico as soon
as possible to save further trouble.
THE CORNER STORE
Phone 133
SPECIALS TODAY
GRAPES, per lb 35c
GREENGAGE PLUMS, per lb 25c
Strawberries, 35c. per Basket
TOMATOES, per 11)  25c
DATES, per lb 25c
CHILDREN'S SHOES
AT GREATLY  REDUCED  PRICES —COME  AND
INSPECT OUR STOCK.
DRY GOODS
PURE WOOL BLANKETS, per pair   $14.00
A GOOD RANGE OF MEN'S WORK SOCKS.
MEN'S WORK GLOVES AND GAUNTLETS.
W. GORDON
Phone 133
Cumberland
Church Notices
HOLY TRIMTY C1IOKCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sept. 19th, XVI. Similar After Trlnlly,
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Uev. Father II. Beaton, Comox.
IIRAI li METHODIST CHURCH
Iter. O. II. Kinney, B.A..F.R.G.S.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James ilood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.80 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Mrs. A. C. Lymn will be at home on
Friday, September 26, from 3 to 6.
Mrs. Tom Scott and Mrs. Stewart Burrell will receive with her.
Mr. George Michell, of tlle Electrical
Department of the Canadian Collieries.
is leaving tomorrow, going to Milwaukee, where he intends taking a two-
year course at the School of Engineering there. Following this he expects
to take another two-year course.
.   .   *
Mr. V. Stewart and wife, Mr. E. B.
Paul, Capt. A. F. Yates, Mr. T. J.
Aniell and Mr, Smith were guests at
Beaufort House, arriving Thursday
and leaving Friday morning.
.   .   .
Messrs. C. J. Parnham, Geo. Michell.
T. Carey and Alex. Walker motored
to Nanaimo Wednesday, returning
Thursday.
a    *    a
Mis Worship Mayor D. R, McDonald.
accompanied by Mrs. McDonald, left
Thursday morning on a week's vacation. They intend visiting Victoria and
Mainland points.
a   *    *
Mr. Thomas Graham. General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, returned on
Monday.
a    .    a
W. Monteith, auditor of Victoria,
was in town this week on professional
work.
...
Mr. and Mrs. McMillan of Drum-
heiller, Alta., arrived Saturday evening on a visit to her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. J. McKenzie.
.   .   *
H. Mamklln, joint manager of the
Simon Leiser Co.. Ltd., of Victoria, was
in town several days this week.
* •   ♦
Mrs. J. McKenzie returned home on
Saturday's train.
* .   .
Mr. Durno, of Wallace, ParHons and
Farmer, Ltd., of Vancouver, was in
town this week on business.
* a    *
Mr. and Mrs. John Frame left Tuesday morning for Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Stanley Warren ot Victoria was |
a visitor this week.
* •   *
Mrs. Watson and Miss Grace Wat-
sou left for Vancouver Tuesday.
* .   *
Mr. Henderson, of F. & F. Henderson of Vancouver, was in town for
a couple of days on business.
* *     a
Mr. C. Hobbs, of the auditing firm of
Buttar & Chine at Vancouver, was in
Cumberland on professional work for
a few .days.
* *   *
Mr. Robson, of tlie staff of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, will be leaving Cumberland at once, as he has received orders to report at the head
office in Vancouver. Mr. Robson will
be missed here as he has made a large
circle of friends during the short time
he has been located In Cumberland.
* *   •
W. L. Bums of the Western Dry
Goods Co. of Victoria, was ill town
during the week.
a    *    *
Mr. Sam Kiucaid, who was relieving
Mr. Robertson at the Telegraph Office
recently, is now located in Prince
Rupert.
* *   *
J. Daniels, Geologist of the Canadian Collieries, left for Victoria on
Saturday.
SPECIAL SERVICE AT ST.
GEORGE'S TOMORROW
Rev.  Dr.  McMillan  or Toronto
Will Deliver an Address—
Song Service Follows.
A service of special interest will be
conducted at St. George's Presbyterian Church on Sunday evening at 7
o'clock. Uev. Dr. .McMillan of Toronto wil be present and give an address on "Tlie Place of Music in Our
Public Worship of God." He will also
illustrate tlie beauty and power of
song. As an expert in this line he will
be worth hearing.
At the close of the regular service
there will lie a song service for all
who desire to remain. A cordial Invitation is extended to all. Come and
you shall indeed lie made welcome.
gfsu\     SINCE (J 1870      IG^iF'
SHILOH
^O&SFICOUGHS
BIRTH.
QUINN—To Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Quinn,
of llevan, at the Cumberland General Hospital, September 13, a
daughter.
SPECIALS
Sugar— 10's, $2.25; 20's, $4.50; 50's, $11; 100's, $22.00
ROVAL HOUSEHOLD FLOUR   24's, $1.95; 49's, $3.75
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR   7's, 60c; 49's, $3.50
GRAHAM FLOUR   7's. «»«! M's. *-U>*'
SWIFT'S ANI*) SHAMROCK PURE LARD,   3's, $1.15;   5's, $1.95
SWIFT'S AND SHAMROCK PURE LARD   10's, $.1.85
SWIFT'S OLEOMARGARINE, per lb  511c
SQUIRREL PEANUT BUTTER.... l's, 50cj 5's. $110; 15's, $(W5
MEADOWBROOK BUTTER, per lb  40c
CLARK'S PEANUT BUTTER, in glass jars .... !15t* jar, !1 for $1.00
WELCH'S GRAPE-LADE, per tin   25c.
WHITE CREST APRICOTS, per tin   25c
LIBBY'S AND HONOLULU LADY PINEAPPLE—
Extra sliced   l's, 25c tin; 2's, SOc
MAPLE LEAF OR PACIFIC .MILK   15c tin, 7 for $1.(111
QUAKER TOMATOES, large size   2 tins 45c
LIBBY'S PICKLES—Sour Mixed, Sweet Mixed, Chow and Sweet
Chow, Sweet Gherkin and Relish; per bottle  25c
EMPRESS   JAMS   AND   JELLIES   Raspberry,   Crabnpplo   and
Apple Jelly; l's. glass jars   50c
IIIP-O-LITE MARSHMALLOW CREME—Bottle 45c
KLIM—1-lb. tin is equul to one gallon of milk; each 75c
UINSO LAUNDRY COMPOUND—Requires no boiling, no rubbing; per packet   lllc
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
ORANGES   8 dozen $1,110
LEMONS, dozen   80c
Preserving Pears and Italian
Prunes
POTATOES  30 lbs. $1.00
ONIONS   5 lbs. 25c
CABBAGE, per lb  7c
Dry Fruits will be much higher
this Season
Buy Now and be Sure of Getting Your Supplies
SULTANA RAISINS 35c lb, or 3 lbs. $1.00
SEEDLESS RAISINS, pkt  SOc
SEEDED RAISINS  85c pkt. or 3 for $1.00
CURRANTS, per pkt  SOc
BULK DATES, per lb  25c
PEELED AND DRY PEACHES 35c pkt. or 3 for $1.00
MIXED PEEL, Cut, per lb. box (10c
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
B.C. CHAMPIONS WIN OPENING
GAME AGAINST LADYSMITH
Motorists Fined
For Speeding
Assessed on Mileage Basis Over
Thirty Miles an Hour—45
Miles $40 and Costs.
Upwards of seventeen motorists who
were caught for speeding ou a measured mile on the Sandwick Road two
weeks ago by Provincial Constables
Mortimer and Dawley, appeared before
Magistrate Hames in Courtenay yesterday afternoon, and were all fined
$10 for exceeding the speed limit of 30
miles nn hour and also one dollar a
mile for each mile over 30 up to 35.
Above 35 miles an hour .the price was
$2 per mile—thus a car going 45 miles
an hour was assessed at $10 speeding
fee and $30 for mileage, plus costs.
One gentleman who was going half
mile over the limit, paid $14.50 In
lines and costs.
The fall styles in hairdresslng decree that more of the girls' ears shall
show this year than last.
Cumberland Team Wins Opening Game of Season Against
Ladysmith—Score 1 to 0.
The local football team journeyed
to Ladysmith last Sunday and opened
the season by defeating the Nanaimo
and District champions hy the score
of one goal to nil.
Boothman won the toss and took advantage of tlie wind, and the B. C.
champions were soon swarming around
Morgan's goal, but poor placing
spoiled their efforts. Home was early
In the limelight, he repeatedly robbing
the Ladysmith right wing and never
allowing them to settle.
Ten minutes from the start Bobbie
Brown met with a nasty accident, receiving a bad knock over the kidneys,
Which left liim a passenger for tlie remainder of tlie game, aiid which will
probably keep liim on tlie side line
for a few weeks.
Ladysinitli was also unfortunuto in
losing tlie services of Douglas, who
twisted his ankle, when blocked by
Smith.
Cumberland pressed continually
throughout the lirst half and could do
everything but score, Morgan being in
top form in gonl, while tlie cliaui-
clianiplons' front rank never seemed
to get their stride. Halt-time was
lulled without cither team having
found the net.
On resuming Cumberland again applied the pressure hut all their efforts
were without success. Ladysniilh
front rank gave Clark & Co. a bad
scare at this stage, a break through
and a shot from Fairley striking tlie
cross-bar and rebounding into play.
Give-and-take play followed, with the
Cumberland boys having tlie edge.
Harrison and Boothman were causing
the Ladysmith defence lots of worry,
and were always dangerous, Harrison
making spectators and players gasp
with a hot one, which Morgan saved
in sensational style. But the left
wing were not to be denied, Harrison
again testing Morgan, and tlie ball
coming out to Boothman. He scored.
as only Arthur can, giving Morgan no
chance whatever.
This proved to lie the only goal and
Cumberland captured two points and
a good start in the league.
Tlie champions did not play to form
On the piny, however, they deserved
to win, but can do much belter. The
right wing never got down to their
game, but can bo excused as Bobby
Brown was only a passenger behind
them and would have been better off
the Held.
In tlie second half Harrison and
Boothman found their feet and were
no end of worry to Morgan. James
wns well held hy Strang; this young
player has thc makings of a splendid
centre half and will be worth watching. Home was the pick of the Cumberland halves, and should improve on
acquaintance—but Andy is a forward
and at times forgot himself and wanted to go through with the front rank.
Conti at centre half piayed a hard
game, but would be of more service
to the team as a wing half. Smith was
the best back on the field, his tackling
and kicking being nt all times clean
and true. Heck has never played a
better game for Cumberland, and
when in shape has few equals.
Wilkinson played his final game he-
fore leaving for Portland, and at times
was to lie found among the forwards,
so anxious was tie to give his team a
good start In the league. Arthur will
be greatly missed, lie was always the
gentleman on and oil' the field and
was probably tlie most feared and
most popular player in B. O.
For the losers, Morgan, Strang,
Fairley and Hyland were the pick.
They aro a well-balanced eleven,
young and full of running power, and
with more experience will be hard to
beat.
W. Burnip of Nanaimo officiated as
referee, with satisfaction to both sides.
FOOTBALL NOTES.
Bevan Juniors journey to Union Buy
on Sunday. This will lie the second
encounter, the first ending in a draw,
and both teams ure out to win. A great
game should be the outcome.
Manager Brown reports his players
lu great shape, so better look out.
The Bevan team will he selected from
tlle following; Brown, A. Thompson,
E. Thompson, Robertson, Burns, Walker, Weir, Williams, Parks, Cameron,
Fielding, Altken and Robertson.
BAND TO GIVE DANCE
NEXT THURSDAY
The Cumberland City Band have
engaged the llo-Ilo Dance Hall for
Thursday evening next, September 23,
and are making arrangements to give
a big dance ou that date.
Those who take part In tlie delightful affairs given by Uie band will
not forget to reserve next Thursday
evening.

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