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The Cumberland Islander Jun 20, 1930

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Array ****** **************************
"SO THIS
is colleg:
****************  ****
timberland Islander
>ff
At the Ilo-Ilo
this week-end
WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED THE CUMBERLAND  NEWS.
FORTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 25
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA       FRIDAY,  JUNE  20th,   1930.
SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS  PER ANNUM
CAPT. GUTHRIE HELD
ON CHARGE OF MURDER
AFTER DEATH OF SON
Father Confesses He Threw Stick Which Caused Wound in Son's
Head.   District Shocked by Tragedy
Following a verdict of death from,
misadventure returned Tuesday by!
the coroner's jurp investigating the j
death of Patrick Tohmas Guthrie,
sixteen years, the father, Capt. Patrick Hugh Guthrie of Guthrie Farm!
Comox appeared before Magistrate;
Bates Tuesday evening on a charge j
of murder and was remanded for
eight days. A warrant against
Guthrie was issued by Sergeant!
Mansfield of the provincial police.
Guthrie who is an ex-Imperial Army
officer and Boer war veteran has
been a resident of Comox for many
years. The mother of the lad is on
a visit to her old home in Scotland.
The verdict of the jury was that j
the sixteen-year-old lad came to his
death by misadventure as the result:.
of being struck on the head by a stick
thrown at him by his father on June
14, Death occurred the following
evening a tSt. Joseph's Hospital, Co-
max
Capt. Guthrie made a written!
statement to the police and a volun-
tary statement before the coroner.
The district was much shocked by
the tragedy and much sympathy is
felt for the family.
Father  Tcllt  Story
According to the account of the
tragedy given by the father at the
inquest, he and the lad were mending the water supply pipe into the
horse trough on Saturday. He had
taken off the stop cock when his son
Patrick offered to fix it for him.
When the job was completed Guthrie told the boy at was not right, and
that a washer would have to be put
on. The lad agreed, but refused to
go and fetch one when asked, saying
that he had done enough work. On
being ordered to fetch the washer
again the lad commenced to talk
back to his father, and ran down the
lane on one side of the trough and
the father on the other. Guthrie
picked up a small stick and threw at
him. The boy ducked his head and
the stick which was aimed for his
body, hit him on the head. After he
was hit he continued running down
the lane still giving his father what
the father termed "cheek". The lad
did not stop till he reached the creek,
when he felt blood on his face. Guthrie told him to stop and let him look
at his head, but the boy refused. He
remained away from the house for
three hours and had been out in the
sun without a hat. When he returned the father asked him if he was
hurt, and he said he was not.
About half an hour after vomiting
set in ,the father seeing that the boy
was ill, got him to sit down and covered him with rugs as he was shivering. A little afterwards he was put
to bed, but as he continued to get
worse the doctor was sent for. The
boy could talk, but could not walk
unaided.
Capt. Guthrie identified the piece
of stick produced an court, which was
about fifteen inches long and an
inch and a half wide. It wns of
sawn lumber.
Dr. T. A. Briggs stated that he
was called to the Guthrie home about
10 a.m., June 14th. He found the
lad in bed restless. On examination
he found a small wound not more
than half an inch long on the back
of the boy's head. It had stopped
bleeding, and there were no other
signs of hemmorrhage. At the suggestion of the father he had the boy
removed to the hospital, where on
probing the wound he found what
appeared to be a fracture of the
outer plate of the skull. On Sunday afternoon the boy's condition
was much the same, but on Sunday
evening there was a sudden collapse
ending in death.
Dr. E. R. Hicks of Cumberlnnd,
who conducted the post mortem,
stated that he found a piece of wood
driven into the skull about three
quarters of an inch long by a quarter
of an inch wide. The brain tissue
was swollen.' In his opinion death
was due to a blow with an instrument
which fractured the skull. The piece
of wood was very difficult to distinguish from the outside. If it hid
not been there the wound might have
bled freely and the result would not
have been the same.
LAWN BOWLING CLUB
WILL HAVE CLUB HOUSE
Arrangements have been completed whereby the Cumberland Lawn
Bowling club will commence the
building of a club house this week
end under the supervision of Mr. W.
A, Owen, architect and construction
engineer of the local colliery company. The green was inspected by
a number of the executive committee this week and it is reported that
the green is coming along in good
shape; play wall almost be possible
by July lst. The bowls, ordered
some time ago have arrived and are
in first class condition. They are
being stored nt the Athletic Club until such times as the members are
ready to take them away. Lockers
will be provided in the club house
and any member desirous of leaving
his bowls there will be nt liberty to
do so.
DAUNTLESS OPEN
TO VISITORS
H. M. S. Dauntless will be open to
visitors on Saturday and Sunday
from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Boats will be
provided as there is sure to be a
large number of the residents of the
district anxious to take advantage of
the opportunity to visit the ship.
Driver Has License
Suspended For 6
Months' Period
MAGISTRATE   CONWAY   SAYS
STOP  MUST  BE  PUT TO
RECKLESS DRIVING
Evidence submitted before Magistrate Conway when William Harrigan, of Minto, was charged with driving to the common danger resulted in I
the Magistrate fining the accused $25 j
and costs or in default, 30 days imprisonment nnd suspended his licence
for the next six months. The magis-
trate said a stop must be put to this j
reckless driving so prevalent in this
district and in future all motorists!
charged and found guilty of driving
to the common danger, in addition to
being heavily fined will have their
licence cancelled.
From the evidence submitted it
appears Harrigan, who was driving
a car belonging to Mrs. Cross, was
travelling towards Minto and when
near the Cumberland cemetery he
struck a car driven by A. Passie who
was coming to Cumberland, Passie
in his evidence, proved that he had
pulled his car well over to the side
of the road when he saw the other
car approaching, his right wheels being well off the tarvia and into the
gravel, but notwithstanding all his
efforts to give the approaching car as
clear a road as possible was struck
by accused's car. Considerable damage was done to both automobiles
but neither driver injured.
We are given to understand that
Harrigan failed to pay the fine and
will serve 30 days at Okalla.
Cumberland To
Play Dauntless
LOCALS HAVING DIFFICULTY
FIELDING TEAM
The cricketers from H.M.S. Dauntless will be in Cumberland on Saturday afternoon nt 3 o'clock to play
the local team at the "Y" ground.
The visitors have a very good team,
Lt.-Com. Onslow, who played for
Cumberland last Sunday being one
of their best mainstays. The Cumberland secretary informs us that
he Is having Borne difficulty in getting players for Saturday, owing to
several going out of town. It is hoped
however, that one or two of the old
guard can be persuaded to turn out
and give the navy boys a good game.
Certainties for the local team will
be J. Idiens, F. V. Hall, S. Gough, J.
Vernon-Jones, J. Vaughan, T. H,
Mumford, J. Heaton and T. Carney,
S. Boothman, G. I. Guy, Allan Nunns
L. H. Finch, R. Yutes, J. Stewart
will be approached.
Local Cricketers
Defeat Cowichan
A very interesting and enjoyable
cricket game took place on the Cumberland ground Sunday when Cowichan after beating Courtenay on Saturday took on the local team. The
Cumberlanders were assisted by two
of the officers from H.M.S. Dauntless, Lt.-Com. R. Onslow and Midshipman Prowse.
The visitors won the toss and put,
Cumberland into bat, the whole side
being dismissed for an even 80 runs,
three players only reaching double,
figures, Idiens, Onslow and Vernon-
Jones. Idiens played good careful
cricket and stayed in for almost an
hour for 18 runs. Napper proved to
be the visitors best bowler taking
three wickets at a cost of 14 runs.
After dinner the visitors opening
batsmen faced the bowling of Ver-
nonJones and McLaughlin. The former was successful in his first over,
clean bowling Green before any
score had 'been made. McLaughlin
was successful in his third over getting a wicket with only seven runs
on the board. The Courtenay-Cum-
berland player was bowling in good
form and 5 wickets were down for
24. Prowse relieved Vernon-Jones
and was successful in getting two
wickets when he was relieved by Onslow, the naval officer getting a
wicket in his first over. Hall relieved McLaughlin but after bowling his
first over put Vernon-Jones in to
howl again who with his flrst ball
bowled Corbisbley bringing the visitors innings to a close for 61 runs,
Cumberland thus winning an interesting game by 29 runs.
Cumberland Inning
Dando, c. Kirkham, b. Craig  4
Idiens, st. Dunlop, b. Leggett ....18
Onslow, l.b.w., b. Freeman  10
Carney, c. Dunlop, b. Freeman .... 7
Hall, b. Napper   7
Prowse, l.b.w., b. Barkley   6
McLaughlin, st. Dunlop, b. Napper 6
Vaughan, c. Leggett, b. Freeman 0
Gough, c. Craig, b. Freeman   3
Vernon-Jones,  not out  10
Taylor,  b.  Napper   1
Extras    9
80
Bowling: Freeman, 4 for 26; Craig
1 for 11; Napper 3 for 14; Barkley,
1 for 13; Leggett, 1 for 8.
Cowichan Inning*
Greene, b. Vernon-Jones   0
Dunlop, b. McLaughlin  23
Freeman, b. McLaughlin  3
Leggett, l.b.w., b McLaughlin .... 1
Napper, c. Hall, b. McLaughlin .... 2
Joplin, c. Gough, b. Prowse   2
Carr-Hilton, c. McLaughlin   2
Craig, b. Onslow  5
Barkley, not out   4
Kirkham, b. McLaughlin  0
Corbisbley, b. Vernon-Jones   6
Extras   4
61
Bowling: Vernon-Jones, 2 for 12;
McLaughlin, 5 for 14; Prowse, 2 for
11; Onslow 1 for 3.
High School
Promotion List
| STRAWBERRY SOCIAL
j AND SURPRISE STALL
The ladies' aid of the Cumberland
United Church will hold a strawberry
social in the Church hall on Wednesday next, June 25th from ;i to 6 p.m.
A special feature of the social will
be a surprise stall and afternoon tea
! Ladies' Auxiliary
Instals Officers
PLOMMER TO HEAD
COALMINE AGENCY
CRIBBAGE PLAYERS
TO CALL IT "A GO"
The Elite (ladles' cribbage club
will call it "a go" on Wednesday
next, when activities will cease for
the summer months. To celebrate the
occasion a night of crib will be held
at the Eagles' Home on June 26th
which will be open to all and sundry,
Magnificent prizes have been obtained for the occasion and we are told
that the refreshments will surpass
anything yet attempted by this very
pro|*r«iive ladles' club.
Vancouver—Harry R. Plommer
has been appointed general manager
of Wellington-Comox Agency by Lt,-
Col. C. W. Villiers. Mr. Plommer
has been a resident of British Columbia since his school days.
Starting with the Royal Bank of
Cnnada in 1906, he has had wide
general experience in the province,
.including general secretarial work
and accounting in association with
Nicola Valley Coal nnd the Middles-
boro Collieries, and several construction and operating plants of the:
Canada Copper and Granby Consolidated M. S. and Power Co.
In 1925, Mr. Plommer succeeded
. Valentine Quinn as treasurer of
I Granby in Vancouver, which position
HUNTING THEY GO
DOWN IN DIXIE
For the coming week's Fox Movietone News at the Ilo-Ilo a great programme is promised. Commencing
Monday and Bhowing Tuesday and
Wednesday, patrons will see and
hear: Hunting they go, down in
Dixie", sportsmen and their dogs
pursue elusive reynard at Howley-in-
the Hills, Fla.
A bit of India in South America.
Natives of British Colony do their
"Angels dance" in far off Paramari
bo, Dutch Guiana. "Boy diving
champ, is only seven", Palm Tippy,
who has been an expert Bince he was
a baby, does his stuff at Miami beach.
"Bells of Shannon call back to Erin," romantic Irish landmark, famed
in song and story, rings out over
Cork.
Football draws big in Britain,"
vast English crowds see semi-final
cup mntches at Manchester and
Leeds. Several other items will also
be seen and heard. This coming
week's Movietone News is well worth
tho price of admission, if no other
pictures were shown.
The following list of successful
students at the Cumberland High
school handed in by principal F. R.
Shenstone shows the standing of the
various scholars, thc names being j will he served,
published in order of merit.
Grade IX to Grade X
Promoted—Madge Bryan, Thora
Keeler, Allison Geekie, Masaro Sora,
Audrey Phillips, Mary Beveridge,
Chrissie Robertson, David Hunden,
Wong Lowe, Bennie Nicholas and 0n Tuesday evening, Mary Fre-
Edora Turnbull equal, Wilton Dal-!lone* Past madttm President of the
by, Marguerite Herd, John Banner- jladies' auxiliary of thc Fraternal
man, Dilys Williams. '0rtler of Ea»Ies' assisted by Susan
Promoted with supplementals— Covert» Past President, installed the
Audrey Gear, Takeru, Annie Brown, blowing officers into their respec-
Mary McMillan. tive chairs: Jr. past president, Mary
Partial Standing—Muriel Harrison I Derbyshire; madam president, Eliz-
Willinm Mcintosh, Joe Whyley, Jes- abeth Bates- vice-president, Cather-
sie Harvey, Malia Tomasi, Otto Hot-'ine Stockand; secretary, Mary James
stetter, Beth Dunsmore. , treasurer, Mary Bradley; conductor,
Wally   MacMillan;   chaplain,   Ruth
Richardson; the outside and  inside
Grade X to Grade XI
Promoted from grade X to grade
XI (matric):
First-class standing—Nina Shields
Cazuka Iwasa.
Second Class standing — Nellie
Jackson, Harriet Horbury, Hiroshi
Okuda, Kiyoshi Nakamura, Kathleen
Stephenson, Floyd McMillan, Sheila
Conway and Edna Watson equal,
Cyril Davis.
Pass—Mary Carter, Willie MacNaughton, Mary Hutton, Janet Lawrence.
Passed with supplementals—-Hi-
sake Nakano (comp.); Siglmorl Hit-
oshi (comp.); Hatsue Matsukura,
(comp. and arith.); Alden Francescini (alg.); James Calnan (alg. and
lit).
There was a very gratifying attendance at the whist drive and social evening given by the W.A. of
the Anglcian Church at the Church
hall on Monday evening. Eighteen
tables of cards were in play, Miss D.
Cannon and Mrs. J. Ledingham tying
for first. On the cut of cards the
former received first and the hitter
second. Mrs. C. Grant (sub,) won
men's first prize; Mr. Sam Turner
second. Mrs. Mossey and Mrs. Symons (sub.) received Indies' and
gent's travelling prizes. A very
pretty hand-embroidered runner donated by Mrs. Conway which was
raffled went to Mr. Sam Turner. Refreshments were served by a committee of members.
guards Lily Bradley and Mary
Schmidt; trustees, Mrs. Littler, Mary
Conn, Mary Schmidt; captain, Susan
Covert.
At the close of the installation,
Mrs. Bates, madam president, presented Mary Derbyshire, retiring madam president, on behalf of the sisters, with a lovely tea set. Susan
Covert .being this auxiliary's first
representative to the convention held
recently in Victoria was presented
with a Pyrex pie plate with silver
stand. This sister brought back a
very good report and suggestions
from the convention. Mary Frelone
Susan Covert and Mary Derbyshire
were presented with beautiful gold
rings with the Eagle emblem, this
being the jewel for the past presidents.
Drill  Team  Appointed
Mrs. Susan Covert, captain of thc
drill team, appointed the following
sisters to the team, Mary Frelone,
Emma Aspesy, Kate Bobba, Kate
Weir, Ellen Carney, Jennie Damonte
Mavta Cne, Mary Morello, pianist,
Delina Frelone.
After the lodge business was concluded, the sisters enjoyed a pleasant
evening, refreshments being served
before the close.
QUINN'S TEAM WINS
COULSON CUP AT FIRST
AID COMPETITIONS
One First and Three Seconds Annexed by Local Teams in Firsl
Aid and Mine Kescue Contests. Ladies' Team Fails
ELECTRIC LIGHT
QUESTION TO BE
DECIDED  IN FALL
A short meeting of the city council was held in the council chambers
on Monday night with his Worship
Mayor Maxwell in the chair and all
aldermen present. Very little business came before the city fathers,
reports of committees all revealing
thai tho various departments of the
city were in good shape. A communication was received from Mr. Neil
McDiarmid notifying the council that
it was impossible to get the electric
light question before the court of
appeal which sat iu Victoria recently
until the next sitting, which will take
place in the fall in Vancouver.
Bills and nceouns to the amount
of $285.08 were referred to the finance committee and if found correct ordered to be paid.
Dr. and Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton
and Misses Jean nnd Norma Parnham
motored to Nanaimo Saturday to
attend the first aid field day.
LARGE NUMBER OF
ELECTORS GATHER
TO GREET LEADER
Parksville en Fete for Visit of Hon. R. B. Bennett; Eloquent
Address Stresses Need of Man of Convictions
for This Riding
PRELIMINARY VOTERS'
LIST MAY BE SEEN
AT POST OFFICE.
For the convenience of everyone,
n copy of the voters' list has been
posted at the local post office. This
will be a great help, especially to the
ladies who are interested in the coming election, as the office of the enumerator at the Cumberland Hotel
was hardly convenient and realizing
this the official in charge of the registration list had it posted at the
Post Office.
he has held until now, and during
the past five years he has devoted
considerable time to Granby's Cassidy Colliery, both sales and operating.
The importance of having a man
of the practical and theoretical
knowledge of Mr. Thomas Graham,
the conservative candidate for Comox-Alberni ,was stressed by the
leader of the party, Hon. R. B. Bennett, K.C., and by Hon. H. H. Stevens, of Vancouver, at a most encouraging meeting in the interests of
that candidate held Monday afternoon at Parksville. In spite of the
fact that it was in thc middle of the
day, there were more than five hundred present at the open air meeting held outside Thurston's Hall.
Formal   Welcome
Before tho meeting the Development League of Parksville, took occasion to welcome Mr. Bennett and
the party accompanying them, and
assisting in the meeting at an informal reception at the Island Hall.
This was of a non-political nature
and was followed by the entertainment of them all at luncheon as the
guests of the league.
On the point of the tariff change
of position by the Liberal Government, Mr. Bennett described the position of that administration as being
summarized in the statement:
"We have been wrong for nine
years but for thfl last month and a
half we've been right, and so vote
for us."
Making an appeal to the electorate for Mr. Graham the leader said:
Man  of  Convictions
"Send to parliament a mnn with
convictions. What is thc use of
sending men who were anxious to
say they voted for e ver'ythdn g,
whether that of tho Liberals, or of
the Conservatives, like the late member for Comox-Allierni. Elect a man
who stands by his convictions, so thnt
we can make of Canada a country
of homes, not of living places alone.
In voicing an appeal for Mr,
Graham, the lender said the candidate could be of thc greatest assist
ance in thc House of Commons at
this time as an authority upon the
fuel question.
After traveling over Canada he
was impressed with the human element material to build a nation. He
also had a conviction that no other
country in the temperate zone hod
such a variety of resources and pro
duction as had Canada.
Then turning to the question of
what was lacking in making more
of the country, he asked the audience
to think nation wide.
Why had the 1,350,000 people who
should have remained here left Canada, he asked? If they found the
reason, then self interest should
prompt a remedy.
The people  left  Canada  not
cause they did not like Canada, but
because of unemployment.
Natural  Resources
Why had they not the work to do
here'.' There were timber, minerals
and agricultural openings. In the
matter of dairying, Canada had built
Up an industry at great trouble, and
found markets in England and elsewhere for it.
Tho Government hnd mado a
treaty with Australia. One would
have thought that in making a treaty
with that country provision would
have been made for finding a favored position for Canadian timber
there. Lumber was a staple Industry
here, and required in Australia, and
shipped there from the United States
Successful Meeting
By Conservative
Ladies' Ass'n.
WHIST  DRIVE  AND  CONCERT
DECIDED ON
A very successful meeting of the
Cumberland Lallies' Conservative Association was held at thc residence
of Mrs. Thomas Graham on Wednesday evening with Mrs. J. Derbyshire in the chair. Much business of
interest to the lady voters in this
district was transacted and arrangements made for a big whist drive,
followed by a concert in the Memorial hall on Wednesday next, June
25th. Cards will start at 7:30 and
refreshments will be served. A concert will follow the serving of refreshments, an ambitious program
having been arranged, Those present
at the meeting on Wednesday included Mesdames Thomas Graham, G. K.
MacNaughton, J. Derbyshire, A. G.
Jones, J. Newman, W. Jackson, B.
Nicholas. J. Lockner. E, King, C.
Whyte, W. Woods, W. Graham, A. J.
Taylor, Donald and Hates, Mrs. Graham served refreshments following
the meeting. Charge for admission
to cards and concert will be 25c.
PASS LIST OK
CANDIDATES IN
RECENT EXAMS.
The
been
held f
ie.  Pi
following candidates have
successful at the examination
>r Coal Mine Officials at Fern-
Inceton, Cumberland and Nanaimo on May 21st, 22ml and 23rd:
Second Class — Harry Hopkins,
Blakeburn, B.C.
Third Class — Edward Surtees,
South Wellington, B.C.; William Forsyth, Princeton, B.C.; Joseph Del-
prato, Blakeburn, B.C.; Cadwaladr
Williams, Cumberland, B.C.; Francis
Kelly, Merritt, B.C.; John Yates,
Fernie, B.C.; Thomas Bryden, Blakeburn, B.C.; Antonio Ambrosi, Prnice-
ton, B.C.
Mine Surveyors—Harold H. Gardner, Coleman, Alta.; Charles J.
Heaney, Vancouver, !!.<'.; Terence
C.  Holmes,  Victoria.
FORMER LOCAL STUDENT
GAINS   tsl   CLASS   HONORS
A former local student, Toshio
Kajiyama is receiving the congratulations of liis many friends in Cumberland on passing witli first-class
honors In second year at the medical college, Toronto University. He
came first in a class of one hundred
students. When attending the Cumberland High school he was a pupil
of Mr. F. Ii. Shenstone and Miss
Phyllis Partridge ui»l during his
scholastic* career here was successful
In   gaining   the   Canadian   Collieries
n the treaty provision was made j gi
butter and cheese, however. Heir"
recalled that when the importations j
of butter from Australia threatened I i
the  industry here, a dumping tariff j
of   six   cents   a   pound   was   raised I
against   Australian   butter  .
He then traced the alteration of |
trade from New Zealand until now]
Canada imported 35,000,000 pounds'
of butter from that Dominion. Yet
the Liberal Government took no i
steps to check this situation until the
eve of election.
He also alluded to the diversion of
copper in an unfinished state to the
United States, which was another
cause of diverting population from
Canada.
Dumping Practices
Mr. Bennett referred to the dumping followed in manufactures in the
United States. The mass production
was allowed to come in from the United States, with the result that factories were left without markets in
Canada. The instance of the woolen
(Continued on page three) |
***********
"Talkies
For
Courtenay
The management of tlie Gaiety theater announces that ]ust
as soon as thc equipment is received and can bo installed.
talking pictures will be shown
regularly In Courtenay.
Work is already under way to
remodel the theater so that better seating arrangements may be
provided. Thc floor Is to be
sloped from the rear.
As thc projection room has already bcen enlarged to make
room lor the new sound equipment -and to comply with government regulations, it is not expected that it will lake long to
install the various units required
for synchronization and amplification after the machinery,
whicli has already been ordered,
arrives.
*******************************
Thero was a large number of interested spectators present at the
15th annual field day of the B.C.
Coast and Vancouver Island Mine
Rescue and First Aid Association
held on the Central Sports ground.
-Nanaimo, on Saturday last. Cumberland teams numbering eight entered the various contests, annexing
the Coulson Cup with the team captained by "Jim" Quinn aiid three
seconds. Tho judges for the various First Aid events were Dr. Ingham. Dr, MacNaughton, Capt. Dul-
laine, Mr. A. J. Taylor, Mr. J. Del-
aney and Mr. Jos. Barton. The
judges of the Mine Rescue events
were Mr. H. H. Sanderland, of the
Safety Supply Co., of Seattle, and
Inspector of Mines H. E. Miard, of
Fernie, at the Bench, which Inspector Geo. O'Brien, of the local staff,
and Mr. John G. Schoming, in charge
of the U. S. Government Rescue Car,
of Seattle, looked after the work in
the mine.
Tho first event of the day was the
Mine Rescue contest for the V.I.M.S.
A Shield, which started with the Cassidy team at H a.m. from St. John
Hall going to the bench .assembling
machines, later going into tho smoke
room, and then on into the mine to
work out the problem given to them
to perform.
Their place at the bench was taken by Nanaimo No. 1, Capt. Broder-
ick's team, who followed out the
same procedure as the first team, being ready to enter the mine by the
time the first team had finished.
The third team to go to the bench
wns the No. J Cumberland team,
Capt. Watson, who carried out the
same work as the proceeding teams.
Tho fourth team was Cumberland
No. 2 which was captained by Mr.
Quinn, and curried out the same
work as the others.
The fifth and last team to take
part was the Nnnaimo No. 2 team,
Capt, Sutherland. This team had
the misfortune to have one of their
number collapse witli the machine
on, which practically finished the
contest.
In the meantime tbe First Aid events got started soon after 10 a.m.
with the Junior Boys for the V.I.M.
S.A. Cup, 4 teams competing and the
Western Fuel Corp. Cup for Junior
Girls, two teams competing, which
were both competed for at tho same
time.
The judges bad an extremely difficult task to pick the winners in tbe
boys' event, as tbe teams wero so
evenly matched, hut eventually
awarded first place to Capt. George
Emorick's team of Nanaimo, second
place going to Capt. Geo. Gunniss*
team also of Nanaimo. The winners
in the girls' event being Helen
Brown's team of Nanaimo with Doris
Campbell's team of Nanaimo second.
The next event was tbe senior ladies for the V.I.M.S.A. cu]., four
teams competing, tbe Cumherland
team, under Mrs. Hudson being Unstrung favorites. This contest was
very keenly contested bul at 'he final
it was found the Cumberlanders were
unplaced, Mrs. Scott's team of Nanaimo gaining first place with Mrs.
Sharp's team, also of Nanaimo gaining second.
The next event was for thfl Novice
cup, which brought out four teams,
and was keenly contested, but Capt.
Harold Broderick's team of \naai-
mo was awarded fust place, and second  place  went to  '■•  Cassidy team,
Captained by Win. Hynds.
As it wns now 12:30, a halt was
railed, and judges and guests fl BOttl-
bled at Ihe Malaspina Hotel where a
luncheon was provided for them.
At 2 p.m. a start was again made
with tho Department of Mines cup,
which was contested hy eight teams
ami won by D. Stoddart'a team of
Nanaimo; second place by Matt.
Brown's team of Cumberland.
Tho Coulson cup was thc next full
t team event, and was contested by 8
] teams, first place being won by Capt.
I J, Quinn's team of Cumberland; se-
I comi   plnce   by  J.   Weir's   team,   also
I of Cumberland,
The next event wns an open  full
j team event for the Comox Logging
& Railway*,Co. cup, and brought out
' no  less than  cloven  entries,  two of
' which  were teams  from  Camp 3 nt
i Headquarters  and   ono   from   Van-
! couver, the rest being Island teams.
j This event brought  out a lot of interest, and took quite a time to decide,    so    closely    were    the    teams
matched,   but   tbe   decision   was   at
length given  to  Capt.  I).  Stobbnrt's
team of Nanaimo, and second place
to Capt.  Robertson's team of Gamp
8, of the Comox Logging &tv.  Railway Co.
Thc last event of the day was the
(Continued on Page 3) PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FRIDAY, JUNE 20th,  1930.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED  EVERY  FRIDAY  AT CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
THE POPLAR
He  bowed his head  to where she .stood,
A beautiful vision of maidenhood;
Long slender lines, and straight aud blue,
In colorful nature's brightest hue.
Proudly she  bent  her  haughty head,
Swayed by the gusty wind o'erheud,
Straightened again with languorous grace,
Softly folding her gown of lace.
Slowly she faded from his sight,
Drifting in to the darkening night;'
He stood there straining his eyes to see,
The wonderful, maidenly poplar tree.
Dilys Williams, Grade IX,
Cumberland High School, June, 19.'I0.
WE OWE A LOT TO TELE
WE OWE a great deal to "tele". What ia
"tele", you ask? What does it do to help
along the human race? Here below I give
the one-two-three of the "teles" to which we
moderns owe so much.
One. The TELEgraph enabled Grandfather to
thousands of miles in a few seconds, where once
it had taken weeks and months.
Two. The TELEphone appeared in Father's day
and once again the limitations of time were destroyed.
It isn't necessary to elaborate upon these two.
Their stories are old and, sad to say, familiarity
has almost bred contempt for the marvels of telegraphy and telephony. But today we are learning
thc wonders of
Throe. The TELEchron, which has virtually
eliminated time's last frontiers. For those of
you who are not familiar with the word, may I
say that telechron is merely the impressive name
of ancient Greek origin for the modern electric
clock, which is self-starting, is operated by ordinary alternating electric current.and is so honest
that it can't possibly give you anything but the
correct time unless the current stops altogether.
Think of what this means to men and women
everywhere! No more will it b necessary to
say, "If s 2 o'clock by my watch, 2:10 by Mother's
and half past by the clock in the kitchen." No
more will Catherine or John be too early or too
late for work because some clock or watch lost
or gainer!. The newest "tele" is an inexpensive
home regulator that removes the myriads of
troubles of the family that does not have absolutely correct time.
Bring on your "teles", Messrs. Inventors! If you
have other ideas along the lines of the telegraph,
telephone and telechron, by all means work overtime to perfect them in our generation. Others
will probably invent many devices for the comfort
of our sons and (laughters—we crave more "teles"
Editorial by Richard S. Bond.
nual meeting of the Pedestrians Association recently,
the minister remarked that England had not yet gone
as far as some other countries in the matter of imposing
penalities for dangerous anil reckless walking, and he
hoped that such action would not become necessary, but
if fatal road accidents continued to increase it might be
necessary in the public interest to impose penalities on
pedestrians who walked to the common danger.
—British Columbian.
SAFETY OF PEDESTRIANS
IN' DISCUSSING the proposals of the Provincial Government in taking over the full responsibility for
the construction, maintenance and regulation of tho
arterial highways, the Burnaby Municipal Council referred to the increasing necessity for regulations for the
safety nnd protection of pedestrians.
The necessity for such provision is becoming increasingly evident. Not long ago a judge, in dealing with an
accident case in England in which a pedestrian had been
severely injured, semi-seriously remarked that it was
time an act wns passed requiring all pedestrians traversing country loads to wear tail lights. While the remark
was made in a half jocular vein it has been, to a greater
or less degree, acted upon and white belts with red reflectors on tho back arc being sold and worn in England
by pedestrians who desire to ensure their safety on country roads.
The British Minister of Transport, Mr. Morrison, has
however gone farther than that.    Speaking at the an-
Leisure Moments in Cumberland
"How ever can yon be content in a little town like
this," asks a city guest, "this isn't living, it's just existing.    What do you do with your spare time?"
What do we do with our spare time in Cumberland?
Why in this town of some eighteen hundred persons,
there aren't hours enough in the day, nor days in the
year for one to participate in all the interests offered
tiy this busy little burgh. Apart from all the teas and
dances showers and birthday parties, one could fill the
hours with sports alone, and lead a very active life.
Football, baseball, basketball and cricket, furnish en-
thusaism enough to endanger the blood-vessels of a
large percentage of the population. Tbe players on these
teams have proved themselves no mean opponents for
some of the visiting city teams; badminton, tennis and
trap-shooting have many ardent supporters and keen
competition exists between members for the winning of
valuable trophies, to say nothing of also giving the teams
from larger centres some excellent sport and practice;
something in fact to take homo and think over.
The town it would seem has almost a club for every
person; in this way everyone may have his chance to
be the president of something! To enumerate: first and
foremost is the Canadian Club, which eaters to the Canadian citizen, who, besides being interested in National
ideals, enjoys the opportunity of hearing the opinions
of well known authorities on various educational subjects.
Next in importance is the Cumberland Literary and
Athletic Association, comprising a membership of all the
"white" employees of the Canadian Collieries, and many
outside people who wish to enjoy its numerous advantages.
This association has for its headquarters a club-house
unusual in its picturi'.sqiieness fashioned after a castle
in the Mother Country. Here are housed the lending
library, billiard room and gymnasium. This club features several brunches of sports .namely football, tennis,
badminton and bowling, and would be a recognized benefit to any community.
Then there is the Rod and Gun Club, the activities
of which give keen interest to followers of Isaac Walton;
to say nothing of the valuable information with which
they are able to furnish the game board!
Again, the town though small could well compete with
any city in its number of social elubs. Amongst them
whist, bridge and cribbage, (the latter no longer confined to the male of the species). A thimble club at
which momentous affairs are setled;and various lodges,
Welsh and Scottish societies; church and hospital affairs
and auxiliary functions; lirst aid demonstrations and
social evenings.
Besides all this may be enjoyed aquatic sports on
Comox Lake, school sports on holidays, bathing and fishing in the Stratis of Georgia, paved roads and perfect
scenery.   Then for the stay at homes, the mighty talkie.
Who can question what we do in leisure moments!
If residing in Cumberland, in the opinion of our city
friends, is mere cxisence, what would it be to live!
SPRINGTIME
Winter has gone, thc snow is o'er,
Spring  again   will   reign  once  more;
Flowers peep through the sod and earth,
Bringing the si{**us of joy ami mirth.
The world is brimming over with life,
People forget their sorrow and strife,
The scented birch and hawthorn white,
Across the pools their arms unite.
Birds flit joyfully from crag to trees,
The lark, the sparrow and humming bees
Sing out their warmest welcome to all,
That spring again has come to call.
Mary Hutton, Grade X,
Cumberland High School, June, 1930.
Miss Viola Campbell, one time resident of Cumberland, is spending a
vacation in the district, staying for
a time at Little River. As a student
at tbe Cumberland Public and High
Schools Miss Campbell made many
friends who will be pleased to know
she is progressing very favorably in
her chosen profession, nursing, practicing at present in Hollywood. Miss
Campbell will be in the district for
the next three weeks.
Sandwick
Friends will learn with regret that
R. T. Cooper is in St. Joseph's hospital
suffering from pleurisy.
W. E. Ekins, of the circulation department ot the Daily Province, was
in the district over the week-end.
Miss Lucy Pickering has returned to
her home until her wedding takes
place at the end of the month.
Harold Bersey left on Monday on a
business trip to Vancouver.
*    •    •
Rev. G. R. Bourdlllon returned to
Esqutmolt after conducting Sunday
services here.
• »   *
George Grieve has been appointed
Daily Province carrier and Sandwick
subscribers will now get their paper
daily.
• •   •
Miss Kathleen Cooper has returned
after an extended visit at Edmonton.
This is a pii-ture of llu.' Canadian National Steamship "Prime Henry" which was constructed in England and
has arrived ou the Pacific (-'oast to enter the Alnskan service of the company. This steamship was constructed at
the ship building yards of Cammel. Laird & Company and is a palatial tribute to shipbuilding art. If is ultra modern
in every respect and will cruise the waters of the Inside Passag'- between Vanrouver and Skagway during thc summer
months. H is 884 feet in length ami will carry 884 first class and 70 third class passengers in addition to 1500 day
passengers. From left to right the ship's officers shown above are D. W. Graham, 2nd officer; Captain A. J. Gilbert;
P. M. Holmdon, chief officer; E. F. Cnllin*. Mrd officer.
Courtenay Lose
To Cowichan
The Cowichan cricket team, with
ten men, paid a visit to the Courtenay
XI on Saturday, beating the home
team 101 to 84. Courtenay went to
bat first with Idiens and Bourdillon,
who, before they were out, had run up
a score of 70 and it looked like a good
day for the Courtenay cricketers. But
the remaining batsmen fell quickly.
Leggett and Freeman were the chief
run getters for the visitors, the former scoring 59 and the latter 20. Had (
Thomas held a hot drive by Leggett
at his fifteenth run, the win would
have been reversed.
The scoring was as follows:
Courtenay
Idiens, b; Freeman   36
Bourdillon, b. Freeman 30
Ellis, b. Freeman    4
Rossiter, c. Freeman, b. Leggett ....   0
McLoughlln, hit w.. b. Freeman ...   0
Galloway, b. Leggett     2
Inglis, l.b.w., b. Freeman      6
Duckitt, c. Oreen, b. Freeman ...    0
Grier, b. Freeman     0
Tull, b. Freeman ....:.    0
Thomas, not out     0
Extras    6
Total   84
Cowichan
Green, c. McLoughlin, b. Grier .... 0
Dunlop, l.b.w., b. Grier   2
Craig, b. McLoughlin   1
Leggett, c. Thomas, b. Grier   59
Freeman, b. McLoughlin   20
Carr-HIHon, b. McLoughlin   5
Barkley, b. McLoughlin   4
Corbishly, b. McLoughlin  0
Kirkham, b. Idiens   0
Jobling, not out   5
Total
101
A jolly surpise party was held at
the home of Mrs. T. McMillan on
Friday last, the occasion being her
birthday. A large number of friends
and relatives called to wish her good
luck and a long life. Cards were enjoyed during the evening, winners
being Mrs. W. M. Brown and F. McMillan and S. Williams, Jr., consolations. Refresments were served and
a most jolly evening enjoyed by all
present.
*    •    *
Mrs. Cunliffe of Nanaimo and two
grand-children were guests of Mrs.
W. Hudson last week.
They sawed
through
a telephone
cable
A gang of men were digging a ditch at Steveiton.
They found what appeared
to them to be a log of wood
io they tawed through It in
to places to get rid of it.
About 200 Steves ton telephones went out of service
as a result.
The "log" was actually a
wooden duct that contained
a 200-pair telephone cable,
and the workmen had cut
out a section of cable about
14  inches  long.
A telephone cable splicer
worked from 3 o'clock in
the afternoon until 7
o'clock the following morning, splicing in a new section of cable and restoring
service.
B. C TELEPHONE CO
P. P. Harrison
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Main  Office
Courtenay         Phone 258
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings
Telephone 115B or 24
The GEM
BARBER SHOP
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
.   Practical Barber & Hairdresser
j )   Child'n's hair cut any style 35c
Ladies hair cut any style 50c
SCOTTISH LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
Dyers and Dry Cleaners
Special family laundry rate.
Orders left at the Ratz Cafe,
phone 150, Cumberland will receive prompt attention. A trial
order will convince you.
Telephones:    Courtenny 226
Cumberland 150
ILO-ILO    THEATRE
Cumberland Two Shows: 7 and 9 p.m.
*********** *****************************************************
The College Musical Comedy Riot.!
,>0000000+000000000000000**0*+**+*+t*+4+>m+40+
FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
June 20 and 21
tfpx$otdwt/n\\
ALL TALKING
Dancing!
sat ifiie!BeiciiaoBa3sa='r5'=:'=:—.'ji^at<cs: «esBeBSBHeMBHeeHeMraaotaa^^
Thursday, Friday
and Saturday
June 26th, 27th and 28th
The
Aristocrat
ofthe
Stage and
Screen!
One of the most fascinating
figures of the past century
brought to the talking screen
through the magic Vitaphone
nnd the art of a matter actor
"Disraeli," the wit, the ladies
favorite, the keen and far-
seeing diplomat, who survived the jeers, racial prejudice! andancient traditions to
become England's Prime
Minister and a Queen's favorite.
I
THE SONGS YOU'LL
WHISTLE
CAMPUS CAPERS
I DON'T WANT YOUR KISSES
( If I Can't Have Your Love)
UNTIL THE  END
SOPHOMORE PROM
»1Cr COLLEGE DAYS
Gel set for your happiest experience in
months ot picture-going. Co-ed cuties!
Campus cut-ups! Songs galore, merry high-
nlca! Thrills ol' football! Thrills of boy-and-
girl love affairs! It's young—it's grand—
It's fast: and funny every minute!
Perfect Picture Entertainment
Laughs! Song Hits!
Youth!
1
m
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, June 23, 24, 25
i
I
i
I
w
s?
AYtARNER BROS PROD;.
*m®t< wmmmm wmwmw?mmmwmmmmmmmm FRIDAY, JUNE 20th,  1930.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
sumjnerfares
Back EAST
-via *
CANADIAN KOCK1ES
■    flWrfJASPEK  .
NATIONAL
PARK
Quinn's Team
Wins Coulson Cup
(Continued from Paf>e One)
PAGE THREE
Tak. Ae SCENIC route .ad
... Go Canadian National...
tnnT'dtWI
you'll tn|oy tha extra rtftnt-
ownti on this famous trans-
continantal louta. Courteous
attendants, Individual radio,
vHa.jlin windows, luautlous
dining car service. This
summer see monarch Mt.
Robson, Ml Edith Cavell and
tht ever-changing panorama
of thc Canadian Rockies.
Plan a few days al Jasper
Park Lodge en route... golf,
swimming, riding, motoring.
Commencing May SSnd Low
Summer EnurtionTickcts will
be on sale from Vancouver,
Ntvt Westminster, Prince
Rupert, .also from Kamloops,
Vemon end Kelowna . . .
liberal stopovers.
Special   Featurea
',r .., l.r it,■i,,,,,: thrnu.t.
Ihe tmlit,, Pd„0"i M
Prlnre K„prrf. lea,,,
laver ,„,<, „:.<„1 „„,!
I.tanit point. ,',,< tt an
a,l,nthnat iiim,, . . .
meal, and Ii.rth In.-Wn,
Tickets on Sell
May!!
to September 30
Return limH, October 31
Vou may aha break your
journey at Minaki loilft.
In th* "taisj of the
Woosit Country." Col/,
bottling, Jtriniminfl and
plvnty of racial actlt Itlr:
Buffalo • •
Charlottctown
Chicago * •
Detroit • .
Halifax . .
London * *
Minneapolis *
Montreal , .
New York .
Niagara Falls •
Ottawa • •
Portland • •
Quebec . •
St. John • .
St. Paul .....
Toronto * '■
Winnipeg    ■
157.76
124.9!
156.83
90.30
109.9!
157.75
116.90
75.60
134.10
151.70
124.9!
129.60
151.90
142.60
152.20
75.60
116.90
75.60
Canadian National
°Jhe Largest "Railway System in America
For information call or write E. W. Bickle, Cumberland, B.C.
or C. F. Earle, District Passenger Agent, Victoria, B. C.
Hotpoint Campaign
June 16th to 28th inclusive
a Luncheon Cloth
and 4 Serviettes
(in assorted colors)
and a GENUINE HOTPOINT IRON all for only
$5.55
THINK OF IT!—A Linen Tablecloth and Four Serviettes for only SIXTY CENTS by making this double
purchase.
On Sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Company Limited
--man   event   which   brought   out
twelve teams.and was won by Capt.
Stanley's team, of Vancouver, with
I Capt. Beveridge's team of Cumber-
■ land second.
! The teams and their friends met at
; St John Hall at 7:30 p.m. where
i Vice-President Henderson in calling
the meeting to order expressed re-
'■ gret at the unavoidable absence of
Pres. T. R. Jackson, also of Hon. W.
A. McKenzie, minister of mines, and
others. He also expressed the thanks
of the Association for the donation
of grounds and hall by the Western
Fuel Corp., also Dr. Ingham and Dr.
MacNaughton, together wdth Capt.
J. Dallam of Victoria; also A. J.
Taylor of Cumberland; Mr. J. Barton
and Mr. Delaney of Nanaimo, for
their help in judging first aid events.
He also thanked the Department of
Mines for generous financial assistance and help; also the Comox Logging for the donation of a handsome
cup and cheque for prizes, and the
members of the local committee who
had the arrangements in hand.
He then called upon Mr. James
Dixon, chief inspector of mines, who
gave a short speech in which he called attention to the increasing interest in first aid and mine rescue work,
pointing out that its chief value lay,
not only in attending to accidents,
hut also to help in the prevention of
them. He then proceeded to distribute prizes to the successful compet-
itors, with a word of encouragement
to each.
Among those present were: Major*
Clark of the Safety Department of
the B. C. Loggers' Association; Mr. j in first aid for senior men, J. Quinn,
Buck, wood's superintendent for the; captain, J, D. Davis, H. Waterfleld,
Nanaimo  Lumber Co., anil General [
Manager John Hunt of the Western [
Fuel Corp., and officials of the Co-
there   will   be   no   want",  said   Mr.
_.  ,   ..-.~,   Bennett.
J. Brown.and W. Davis. Second place He pointed out how large a pro-
also won by Cumberland, J. Weir, portion of the imports from the Un-
captain, T. Shields, J. Taylor, M. I ited States could be produced in
Brown, G. Hygh; eight teams com-j Canada, and urged Canadians to be
peting. I less dependent on others.
■     For the Comox Logging & Railway i     The United States let in raw main the  V.I.M.S.A.  cup  for  boys, ■ Company cup .open, Nanaimo won, | terials   free  from   Canada,   yet  on I
five teams competed, three from Na-'-
mox Logging & Railway  Co.
The   Various   Winner*
Shower For
Bride-To-Be
Cumberland. June 16.—Miss Nellie
Cameron, a June bride-to-be, was
complimented by a large number of
Iricnds when she was tendered a do-
24—TELEPHONE—100
TAXI
Charlie Dalton
Meets Boat at Union Bay
Every Sunday morning
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
naimo ,one from Cassidy and one
from Cumberland, Nanaimo taking
both first and second places, the winning teams being First, Geo. Emer-
ick, capt.; A. Thorneyeroft, Bob.
Roberts, Ray Anderson and Albert
Dunn . Second: Broderick, capt.; G.
Gunnis, E. Stolenberg, J. Kemp and
N. Odgers.
In the competition for the Western Fuel Corp. cup, junior girls, Nanaimo also took first and second, the
winning teams being: First, Helen
Brown, capt.; Marian Brown, May
Gunnis, B. Davies, C. Moore. Second: Doris Campbell, capt.; I Shaw
V. Stobbart, M. Frater and A. Moore
For the V.I.M.S.A. cup, senior ladies, Nanaimo entries made a clean
sweep. First: Mrs. Scott, capt.; Miss
A. Towe, Miss L. Johnston, Miss B.
Kemp and Miss F. Aitken. Second:
Mrs. Sharp, capt.; Mrs. Turner, Mrs.
Roper, Miss Carpenter and Miss Col-
son. Four teams competed in this
event, two from Nanaimo, one from
Cumberland and one from Cassidy.
For the W. A. McKenzie cup, novices, Nanaimo took first place, with
Cassidy second, there being four j
teams in this competition, one from
Nanaimo, one from Cassidy, one
from Cumberland and one from
Camp 8, Headquarters. The winning teams were. First, H. Broderick
capt.; W. Pashley, N. Odgers, W
Hutchinson and A. Dickinson. Second: Alex. Gordon, D. Radford, W.
Hines, A. Dean and A. Patrick,
D. Stobbart, captain,' C. Wharton,"*?.' I manufactured jroodsTTuTcUon of|;'f»"' <™» *% tZ^'hST,!
Kemp, L. Wharton,and Walt Whart-1 high duties was_ placed against goods:laneous Blfts at **• home <* het mo
on.   Second place taken by Camp 3
team of the Comox Logging & Rail- t#iiv   t   uBUU a rtUKI
.ivoke the United States, and a year |RoberUson   we're   joint   hostesses   who
ago had refused to increase the Brit-,had   arranged   a   jolly   programme  of
ish   preference,   because   the   step j games,  contests,  etc.,  for  the enter
tainment of their guests.   Cards were
played during the early evening when
way Company, James Robertson,
captain, Eric Flinton, B. Churchill,
J. McQuinn, and J. McLaughlin; eleven teams competing.
Two men event won by Vancouver, E. Stanley, captain, T. J. Morrison and D. Hislop. Second place won
by Cumberland, W. Beveridge, captain, A. W. Watson.and T, Brown;
twelve teams competing.
In the competition for the V.I.M.S.
A. shield Nanaimo team won with
97.6 per cent, the team being, Geo.
Hoggan, captain, D. Radford, J.
Wright, Jr., Wm. Morgon, James
Galloway, and W. B. Beatte. Second
place won by Cumberland with 06,8
per cent the team being A. W. Watson, captain, Wm. Beveridge, T.
Brown, W. Devoy, J. Dick, und M.
Brown. Third place won by Nanaimo with 94 per cent, team: Matt.
Broderick, captain, Hans Muki, Jess
Good, John Anderson, D. H. Simpson and Peter Kemp; five teams competing.
jther,   Mrs.   Sam   Cameron,   Sr.,   last
; Wednesday   evening.     Mesdames   Ir-
Do not pro-1 vinC[ T Bair(J H pai-kin;i0n ancj s, l.
coming  from  Canada
Mr.  King had said, .... T_ Halrd| ,
voke the United States, and a year i Robertson   were
would  provoke the  United  States.'
Hon.   H.   H.   Stevens
Mrs. J. Westfleld and Mrs, T. James
Fint   Aid  Events
For the Department of Mines cup
senior men's team won by Nanaimo,
D. Stobbart, captain, Charles Wharton, Peter Kemp, Len Wharton, and
Walt Wharton. Second, won by
Cumberland, Matt Brown, captain;
J. Buchanan, T. Eccleston, W. Bennie, B. Horbury ;eight teams competing.
Cumberland won the Coulson cup
GUEqberlaijd
Hotel
ItiiltS
UcasimiiLili:
; Cum menial
; HeadtjuarlLTS
! Accomodation  The Best
I Rooms Steam Heated
'        W.  MERRIFIELD,  Prop.
Automobile Side  Curtains Repaired'
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Also Harness Repairs
E. L. SAUNDERS
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Large Number
Of Electors Gather
(Continued from page one)
Hon. H. II. Stevens, of Vancouver,Ualned flrst a,ld SCC01Kl P'izcs resPcct-
in a short speech, said he was pleas- ;'"*•, flh  "rs   £  "T^'  T^*8
i .l  s.  ir     «-*    u .l i-   consolation.   Mrs. T. Baird wns winner
ed that Mr. Graham was the canal-   ,„.„,,, j „,
„,,,,... i of the muMcal chairs (fame and Mrs.
date. He doubted if there were many H Thon,,on of the gues,sing contcsL
men in Canada who could play aiIn a novel and amUbing candy eatmg
more important part in solving the contest Mrs. F. Slaughter carried oil-
fuel   problem   in   Canada  than   Mr, | the honors.    A delicious supper was
Graham
"We  do   not   consider  Mr.  Neill
your  former  member,  as  your rep
resentative   either   in   voicing   the' assisted in serving.    The raanj
.__    „  and  yellow,
tn an independent, but has IJ^^*^™?^ intu the Ioom by
most slavish support of any!
slnvi
ouse
little Misses Helen Shearer and Rita
•a     ."•'. ""*! I Baird. quaintly  attired as bride  and
to  the   Liberali     nn     ,„,,,„ .,, „.     fT,u„    .
mill in Victoria through the policy
of the present Government was cited
as a case in point.
With resources of men and women
and natural wealth, the balanced results of employing these for the benefit of the country were not carried
out and Canada lost in population.
Hc instanced the policy of the
United States. That country, to
meet sucha condition, raised a tariff
under which the Government provided for an equal chance being given to the people of their country tn
develop that country.
Hon. James Malcolm had admitted
in the House: "Of course, if you put
up the tariff high enough, you will
have competition at home, giving
you cheap goods." The United
States stood by the slogan: "Our
Country First."
If this country had applied the
principles that had made other nations great, there would not be the
present unemployment.
The revenues he pointed out, were
decreasing. In April there had been
$21,000,000 worth more imported
than was sold.
Give   Canadian*   Chance
"Give Canadians an equal chance
with   those   of   other   nations,   and
served at tables effectively decorated
with early summer blooms, when Mrs.
'J. Donelly aud Mrs. S. Cameron, Jr..
„,    ._ „   .      —jisted In serving.    The many gifts
opinion of this riding, or of this pro- were  presented  in  a   basket  prettily
vince," Mr. Stevens said.    "He has |decoralcd in blue, white
never be<
given the
man   in   th
party."
He observed that it was the duty
of the electorate of Comox and AI
berni to judge which candidate could
best represent them.
In the nine years that the Libe
had been in power Canada had lost
1,850,000 of a population that ought
to have been here, Of this number
1150,000 alone were native Canadians
There had been $40,000,000 spent
in bringing people into the country
This fact alone was sufficient to
condemn  tbe Government.
groom, respectively. The guest of
honor, though much touched by tliis
evidence of the good wishes of her
friends, expressed her thanks in a
neat manner.
During the evening Miss Lizzie Henderson, Mrs. Jas. Potter and Mrs. J.
Thomson rendered delightful solos.
Union Bay
Mrs. A. Horne arrived home on Friday, after spending a lew days in Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tappin and Mr.s.
Pollock motored lo Victoria on Saturday, returning on Wednesday.
Effect on Industry
The loss of population, he said,
was due to the fiscal policy of the
present government. It had killed
the woolen industry, then the iron
and steel industry, and other industries related  to  it.
Mr. Kine; was responsible for unemployment to the extent that his
fiscal policy closed down industries.
Common humanity would h av e
prompted finding means to help out
thc problem. All he did was to read
from his book written some years
ago, and say "thou go and feed these
people."
The leader of the Conservative
party would have voted §10,000,000
if necessary to find means of solving,
the unemployment problem but the j Bennett with regard to the coal sit-
Govemment turned a deaf ear to nation. Canada had one-seventh of
them. He praised the work of Mr. j the coal, and was the third wealth-
( iest in eoal. The Dominion used
30,000,000   tons   of   coal,   and   only
Miss Mary Erant arrived home on
Sunday after spending a few days in
I Vancouver.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Searle Jr., who
were recently married in Vancouver,
are visiting the former's parents. Mr.
and Mrs. E. T. Eearle, Sr.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. S. Abrams and daughter, Jean, motored to Alberni on Sunday.
* •   •
Mr. and Mrs. A. Bradley returned
on Sunday from Victoria.
Bennett
Conservative Canddiate
Mr. Graham extended the greetings of the district to Messrs. Bennett and Stevens.    He assured his
produced 18,000,000 tons. The sum
of $50,000,000 was sent to the United States for coal.
Mr. Percy Rushton, of Parksville,
leader that after the poll that riding j who presided,  expressed  his thanks
would  be a factor in  the Conserva-■ for the attendance, and said it would
tive majority. . have been much larger, but for the
He welcomed the statement of Mr.  time of year, and period of the day.
Cumberland and Union
Waterworks Co., Ltd.
ESTIMATES GIVEN ON ALL PLUMBING
AND REPAIR WORK.
Phone 75
A. B. CLINTON, Manager.
B i
**********************************************************
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX MAXWELL, Proprietor.
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
aTtsfrw.ra
RILEY'S TRANSFER
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
 PROMPT ATTENTION	
David Hunden, Jr.
COAL     —     GENERAL HAULING     —     WOOD
of all descriptions
Headquarters
for
Heinz Q (  Varieties
2FOR25c
UR CHOICE
SMALL CREAM TOMATO SOUP U «Pl.Ul/
SMALL BAKED BEANS
SMALL COOKED SPAGHETTI     OR YOUR CHOICE
FOR
B Will you pay 75c to get rid of Dandruff?
It dsnt' at all surprising thnt many thousands of women and
men have found the solution to the troubling dandrufl problem in a 75c bottle of Booster Hair Tonic.
If you have any evidence of humiliating dandruff, begin with
Booster at once. Remember that it is cntiicly safe, and douse
it full strength on the scalp. You will bo delighted to find how
quickly Booster overcomes ordinary cases of loose dandruff.
Sold at THE CENTRAL BARBER SHOP
Toiletries, Creams, Powders,  Sundries, Cutlery,  etc.
Barber Supplies, Novelties, Tobaccos and Candy
Heinz Pickles, sweet or sour, white pickle onion
(a flavor all its own 35c. or 3 for $1.00
Heinz Sandwich Relish 30c
Heinz Salad Cream   30c
Heinz Bottled Vinegars, new price, 16 oz. size
25c; 32 oz. size  45c
Heinz Tomato Ketchup (outsells all others) 3 for 95c
Heinz Chili Sauce   35c
Heinz Ideal Prepared Mustard   25c
Heinz Worcester Sauce, 6-oz, 35c; 12-oz.'-  50c
Heinz Fresh Cucumber Pickle   30c
Heinz Fresh Cucumber Relish   30c
Heinz Small Duchess Queen Olives   30c
Heinz Medium Duchess Queen Olives   40c
Heinz Peanut Butter (medium size 30c
Heinz Peanut Buuter (large size, no oil on top) .... 45c
Heinz Cream Tomato Soup, medium size, 3 tins 50c
Matt Brown's Grocery}
Phone 38
Cumberland
Great Bargain
Lumber Sale
EFFECTIVE AT ONCE
QUARTER MILLION FEET IN VARIOUS SIZES AND GRADES.
 • • •	
WITH THE FOLLOWING PRICES WHILE THEY LAST:
1
All No. 1 Com mon Grade:
100,000 feet 1 x 0" Shiplap, Dr)
50,000
20,000
20,000
5,000
5,000
20,000
1 x 8" or i0" Shiplap Dry, 	
2 x 4" to 12"—8' mid longer, Dressed 	
IH x 6" to 12"—G" and longer, Hough	
1 x 4"   Flooring 	
1 x 4", Dressed    	
2 X 4", 2 x 0", 2 x 8", 2 x 10" and 12", Dressed
or sized in Random Lengths ....
  .$15.00
  $18.00
  $15.00
  $15,011
  $15.00
  $15.00
$15.00
MISCELLANEOUS:
No 2 Common:
20,000 feet 1 x 4" to 12" and 2 x 4" to 12", Rough or Dressed
in Random Lengths
$12.00
Culls—Odd sizes consisting as follows:
15,000 feet 1 x 4" to 12". 2 x 2" to 12", 3 x 3" to 12", 4 x 4"
and G x li". Rough and Dressed, Random Lengths  $ 8.00
 • • •	
Royston Lumber Co.
Office—159, Cumberland
Phones:
Night Call—184X, (
ourtenay
t PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FRIDAY, JUNE 20th, 1930.
SPECIAL SALE
150 Boy's Sweaters
Sizes 2 2to 30
Price 95c. each
FOR A FEW DAYS ONLY
We have secured a special consignment of Boys'
Sweaters in sizes from 22to 30, in colors Fawn, Grey,
Navy and Maroon, all colors in all sizes, and be on
time as this Special will not last long. They will soon
be sold out.
Several Other Specials will also be on view, QKp
come and see them, at	
*******e*eeeee**»9*****e**ee*e**e»*****e»e»***e*******»******e* '
Personal Mention
4j:
A-
I
SUTHERLAND'S
I    DRY GOODS & GENT'S FURNISHINGS
•■:-.-.TUT>.T>-.i."^^^
SPEND
Your Holiday
This Year In
British
Columbia
Your own Province offers
more vacation charms than
any other part of the
Continent.
Ask for Booklets from
Bureau or Provincial
Information
VICTORIA,   -  B.C.
C- **************eeeee***************
Miss Jean Peters, of Vancouver, is(
here on a visit to her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. B. Peters, Allan Ave. Mrs. I
Peters, who recently underwent an op-
eratlon at the local hospital, is pro-!
gresslng favorably.
...
Mesdames C. Whyte, Covert, and M.
Mitchell returned on Friday from Victoria where they attended the recent
Rebekah Assembly of the I. O. O. F.
The Grand Master of the Grand
Lodge I.O.O.F, Mr. J. C. Brown,
draws our attention to the fact that
all papers published the nominating
of sixty-one new candidates at the
annual session of the order held in
Victoria last week. This was a mistake says the Grand Master as ninety-one new candidates were nominated.
*    *    *
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Robertson andi The sacrament of the LorrJ'r, Sup-
famlly motored to Nanaimo to spend!'per will be administered ft the Cum.
the week-end.   They were accompan
^iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
| The Hot Weather I
H .    of the past few days has helped the berry crop.   Local |j
=      Strawberries will be in any time now and our patrons j
=      can leave their orders at our store with utmost con- 3
!=     fidence. ==
| Mumford's Grocery §
"IF YOU GET IT AT MUMFORD'S, ITS GOOD"       =
H     Phone 71 Deliveries Daily   1=
is responsiDie
for Prosperity in B.C.?
W/HEN ihe 600.000 oeoom   n tins
** Province qraso the moaning ol the
"Buy B.C. Goods Idea'  yout customers
and clients wil' have liettet   olis
Headier iobs arqer   ncomes   They
Will be able to buy more ot the looits.
or service you have lo sell ihey
will be able tn nay their bills promptly
.. they will be more prosperous. and
M will you.
You are the only one ol the 600,000 who
can decide whai you should ilo when
you make a purchase. A good time io
Marl the prosperity habit is the nexl
time you buy.    Ask '« I.e. Produce
B.C. PRODUCTS
««BUREAU»»
oj thr
VANCOUVER   BOARD   O      TRAOt
ied by Misses Nettie Robertson and
Carrie Richardson.
T. H. Carey und Misses Charlotte
and Evelyn Carey motored to Nanaimo
on Saturday.
Mrs. George Hoffheinz and infant
daughter. Kathleen, of West Cumberland, are visiting relatives in Portland,
Oregon.
« • •
Mrs. J. H. Robertson entertained on
Wednesday evening at two tables of
bridge when guests were Mesdames J.
H. Cameron, R, A. Robertson, M. Stewart, W. Hutchinson, A. Somerville,
Misses N. Robertson and L. Sheppard.
Delicious refreshments were served
and winners were announced as, flrst,
Miss L. Sheppard; consolation, Mrs.
M. Stewart.
* *     *
Leslie Dando is over from Vancouver
on a visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
C. Dando, Sr.
Mrs. J. Donelly, of South Wellington, and her daughter, Mrs. Whltelaw,
of Nanaimo, who were guests for-sev-
eral days of Mrs. Jas. Baird, have returned home. While here they paid
a visit to Campbell River, accompanied by their hostess and Mrs. T. Baird
and at that point were the guesta of
Mrs. Annie McNeil.
• a •
Miss Marjorie Brown haa returned
from Vancouver where she attended
Normal school.
* +    *
Mrs. Jas. Magnone, of Port Alberni,
left for her home last week after
spending a time the guest of her mother, Mrs. M. Mitchell. She was accompanied by her sister, t Mrs. W.
Thomson, who spent a few days with
her, returning Sunday.
• *   •
Leland Harrison left for Nanaimo
Saturday where he will Join a survey
party going north to the Skeena river.
* *   •
Mrs. Jas. Baird spent several days
last week with her daughter, Mrs. P-
Smith,  at Courtenay.
Misses Nellie Jackson and Jessie
Harvey entertained their Sunday
school classes of the Roman Catholic
church recently on a jolly hike and
picnic. Needless to say, the young
folk enjoyed immensely the good
things provided and spent a very happy
day.
«    *    *
W. Argyle spent a few days ln Nanaimo,  returning Sunday.
* *    •
John Thomson returned on Saturday evening from a motor trip to
Aberdeen, Wash., where he visited his
son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Thomson and family. Mr. and
Mrs. Jas. Menzles, of Nanaimo, came
up with Mr. Thomson on Saturday evening, returning home on Sunday accompanied by Mrs. Thomson and W.
Thomson.
a     a     a
Cliff, and Chas. Dickinson, of the
Union Hotel, motored to Nanaimo
where they spent the week-end.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Devlin take
this opportunity of .hanking Dr.
MacNaughton, the Matron and nursing staff of the Cumberland General
Hospitiil for their very kind and
sympathetic attention to their son,
Jackie, whilst under treatment at the
hospital.
LOST—CAR LICENCE PLATE'NO:
22-101. Finder please return to
J. H. Robertson, Telegraph Office,
Cumberland, B.C.
FOR SALE—A DOCHERTY PIANO
in first-class shape. Cheap for
cash, or terms can be arranged.
Cost S460 new. Apply P. O. Box
481, Cumberland tfn.
.11
berland United Church, immediately
following the morning service, Sunday, June the 22nd, 11 a.m.
...
Miss Randall of the staff of Cumberland General Hospital has resumed her duties after a month's vacation spent at her home in Victoria.
Miss Nettie Marshall of thc hospital statr left Sunday for Vancouver
where she will spend part of her vacation.
...
Messrs. J. C. Brown, P. McNiven and
M. McLaughlin, who attended the 56th
annual session of the Grand Lodge of
I. O. O. F. at Victoria last week as
delegates from local Union lodge No.
II. returned Friday
...
Mr. and Mrs. F. McCarthy, of Nanaimo, visited here at the week-end,
the guests of the latter's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. F. Wilcock.
•   .   •
Robt. McNeil, of Britannia Mines, is
paying a visit to hts family here.
.    *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Graham were
week-end visitors, the former returning to Nanaimo on Sunday and the
latter leaving for Camp 3 where she
will visit her daughter, Mrs. J. Marsden.
»    *    •
Mr. and Mrs. R. Laird and family,
of Nanaimo, have taken up residence
here, the former having been appointed manager of No. 5 mine of the Canadian Collieries (D.) Limited.
Mrs. Fred Bell and family, of Nanaimo, paid a visit for a few days to
Mr. Bell who is employed here, returning home on Sunday. While here
they were guests of Mr. and Mrs. S.
Horwood.
...
T. Armstrong has returned from a
visit to Vancouver and to Victoria
where he attended the F. O. E. convention held last week.
...
Mrs. A. Miller and children and Miss
M. Smith are visiting friends in Seattle, Wash.
We are in receipt of the newest
edition of Nestle's "Milky Way"
Recipe book, a book of thirty-two
pages and cover. It is well printed
on good heavy paper and contains a
number of recipes which are sure to
please. We hope to publish some of
the recipes starting next week.
...
Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Horwood had as
their guests during the week-end Mr.
and Mrs. James Parfltt from Victoria.
...
Thomas Pearse returned from his
visit to San Francisco on Sunday last
and reports a good time, wonderful
country to drive through and roads
which make our Island roads look very
cheap.
The members of Royston branch
of the W.A. to the M.S.C.C. will hold |
their annual garden party on Wednesday, 25th, from 3 to 6:30 p.m.
an the gardens of Mrs. Sillence and
Mra. Greig. Usual attractions:
needlework and cooked food stalls,
ice cream, candy, clock golf, aunt
sally, fortune telling and afternoon
tea. Keep this date for Royston.
...
Miss Barbara Phillips of Victoria
is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Amy
Clinton.
*    *    *
CELEBRATE WEDDING
ANNIVERSARY
A very interesting party was held
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. C.
Walker, formerly of this city, but
now residing at 457-7th ave. W„
Vancouver, when they celebrated the
25th anriversary of their wedding
day on the evening of June 10th,
midst a 1 irge circle of friends. The
happy ci uple received many con-
gratulattbns. The dining room wus
nicely d eked with spring flowers
ond the nipper table centred with a
beautiful large wedding cake and
pink and white carnations with maid
en hair ferns. The evening was
spent in music, singing, etc. Mr.
and Mrs. Walker were the recipients
of many leautiful presents including
a silver :ea service. After a well
spent eve ling the jolly party dispersed wishing the host and hostess the
best of lu ?k, long life and prosperity.
1
I
I
YOU WILL NEED
Cream of Lilies
more than ever during the present bot weather. If
you have not already tried our famous lotion for keeping the skin white and soft, you have missed the best
thing on earth.
See our selection of Sun  Visors,  Colored  Glasses.
Bathing Caps, Tennis Visors, Tennis Balls, Rackets.
All new and the prices are very reasonble.
i
1
1
1
i
i
I
1
Lang's Drug Store I
Cumberland — —
"IT PAYS TO DEAL Al
wmimmimimiiEziit
LANG'S"
fi
1
I
Fanny Bay
Mrs. A. McLauchlin entertained at
bridge ami tea on Thursday afternoon.
The prizes were won by Mrs. A. Cowie
and Miss 3. Swan. The quests included Mrs. A. Cowie, Mrs. G. Cowie, Miss
B. Swan, Mrs. Hastings, Mrs. Larson,
Mrs. Swan and Mrs. MacDonald.
...
Mr. and Mrs. H. Rogers motored to
Nanaimo on Friday.
♦    »    *
Miss Blanche Swan, of Vancouver,
Is visiting relatives here.
Monster
Whist
Drive
Wednesday, June 25th
at 7:30
MEMORIAL HALL
under auspices of Cumberland   Ladies'   Conservative
Association
•   «   •
Concert will follow whist—
refres'iments will be served
and 2E c only will be charged
£f»XK VOOND OF
MEAT FOR WHICH ,
VoU FAV - MU|I
BBAR otJJJ
CRITICAL
O.K.
YES, ALL OF THE MEAT
RECEIVED AT THIS SHOP
is government inspected, but we
won't take anybody's word for its
condition. It must pass the proper test under our critical inspection before we offer it to the dis-
criminating housewives to whom we
cater. Allow us to cater to your
meat-needs.
CITY MEAT MARKET
riione 111 We Deliver
CLOSING OUT
SALE STILL ON
at Mrs. FRANCESCINFS
Lace in Ecru and white suitable for scarf centres, 2 for 95c
Boudoir cushions in all the best shades, pir pair   $1.10
Stamped Towles in pink, gold and blue borders.
Stamped Scarfs in Oyster linen ond Indian head     QP .
and tafi linen, 2 for     t/iJV
Ladies' Vests and Bloomers at cost price and below.
Children's Vests and Bloomers.
Lovely big sleeping dolls, regular $4.50 and s^O  Kfcfl
$6.60 to sell at   »pO»Dl/
Smaller sized Dolls and everything in toys all to be sold at
cost price
Special prices on Boxed Xmas Handkerchiefs and Stationery.
1 only Mauve Beach Robe   $3.7S
Ladies' Hose, cashmere, 3 pairs for   $1.00
Remainder of Children's Socks, 3 pair   95c
Ladles' Silk and Wool Hose  75c
Children's Sweaters and other things too numerous to mention will be sold at cost.
•        •        •
Mrs.   Francescini
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland
1
1
i
Look Over '£,
Dresses   95c and $1.95
Porch Dresses       .49
Cream Corduroy Pants    4.75
Workmen's Shirts  95c, $1.49 and   2.25
Boys' Khaki Blouses 59
 • • •	
W. H. Anderson  -  Union Hotel
Phone 15 Cumberland
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. I. Lloyd, at |
Cumberland general hospital on Sat- j
urday June 14th, a daughter.
To Mr. and Mrs. D, Stevenson, at Cumberland general hospital
on Tuesday June 10th, a son.
K. R. Mallins, Lite of the Capitol
Theatre, Nanaimo, will be in Cumberland every Friday at Mra. J. Frizzles, Penrith avenue, teaching violin,
cello, banjo, mandolin and steel guitar.
Mr. Mallins will be pleased to demonstrate any instrument and guarantee a practical thorough training
to all students. Terms, very moderate, tfn
\%itmvm
] UN*WEETENEDU||J*i|
JUST rich, pure
country milk in
handy form.
Improves your
cooking.
Forfrcercclpe bookwrito
Thc Borden Co.,Llmitcd,
Homer Arcade,
Tides in the Comox District
1 Date
Day
JUNE
[ Time H't.
Time
H't.
Time
H't.
Time
H't:
:?,o
Friday
j 0:17 12.4
7:89
5.6
13:21
8.5
17:56
6.9:
.si
0:47 12.4
8:10
4.4
14:42
9.4
18:58
8.0:
:?.?.
Sunday
1 1:16 12.4
8:52
3.1
15:48
10.5
20:06
9.0:
.n
Monday
I 1:40 12.0
9:19
1.8
10:44
ll.b
21:14
9.8;
:?a
Tuesday
I 2:18 12.8
9:57
0.6
17:34
12.4
22:18
10.4 ■
• '?.(,
Wednesday
1 2:52 13.0
10:37
0.4
18:22
13.1
23:17
10.7!
:?m
Thursday
j  3:30  12.8
11:10
1.1
10:09
13.6
;?.!
1 0:1,1 10.8
4:14
12.7
12:03
1.4
19:54
14.0;
■SR
] 1:08 10.5
5:00
12.2
12:49
1.2
20:37
14.2;
■an
! 2:04    9.8
0:00
11.6
13:30
0.6
21:18
14.2;
so
Monday
| 3:05    9.0
7:13
10.8
14:24
0.6
21:67
14.0:
EVERYBODY KNOWS
that Logging and Lumbering is
British Columbia's major industry
and is likely to be for some years
to come; but not everybody realizes
the increasing importance of our
forests to the world at large, as
forests elsewhere become denuded.
We still have 360,000,000,000 board-
feet of merchantable timber	
but we have none to burn.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-YOU CAN HELP!
BKITISH COLUMBIA FOl'EST SERVICE
MACLEAN'S Orange Pekoe.QUALtTY ONLY
AT LOCAL GROCERS

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