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The Islander Feb 5, 1916

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Array Hf*
legislation Library
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
v
VOL. VI., No. 45        THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, FEB. 5. 1916. Subscription price, $1.50 per yeat-
AN IMPORTANT I8SUE
The free importation of fuel
oil into this province is one of the
most important questions that
confronts the people of British
Columbia today, and yet there
are certain sections which do not
give the issue the consideration
it demands. It is a matter that
should be discussed at the table
of the council chambers by the
mayor and aldermen of every
city; every board of trade and
political organization—Conservative or Liberal—should deal with
this vital question before the cry
goes up:"It is too late." These
organizations should not only deal
with it by resolutions and then
let the matter drop, waiting for
some other opportunity to present
itself, but deal with it now and
continuously and with firmness,
until the demands of the coal industry are heard. Let every
section of the province which is
interested either directly or indirectly knock at the doors of the
Federal House and request consideration of the vital question
that ia gnawing at -the very life
of British Columbia.
Fuel oil, a foreign product during the past three years, has built
up an immense business without
paying any. revenue either into
the Provincial or Dominion Treasury at a time when the cry is
money and more money for war
purposes. The «oal industry of
this province has millions of
dollars invested; employs thousands of men; pays out millions in
wages, made and spent within
British Columbia. What capital
has fuel oil invested? What men
does it employ? It is nil compared
with the coal industry, yet the
Federal Authorities allow this
wholesale impoitation of fuel oil
duty free. It is unreasonable
and absurd to even a disinterested
party. The members of the
Provincial Parliament representing the coal mining centres of
the province should deal with
this fuel oil question and urge
upon the government the immediate-necessity of forwarding
strong resolutions to the Federal
authorities demanding an import
duty upon fuel oil.
HOSPITAL BALL POSTPONED
UNTIL APRIL 26.
The,annual meeting of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Cumberland
General Hospital was held at the
home of Mrs. Edward W. Bickle
on Thursday evening, when it
was decided to make the Hospital Ball an annual event and the
dance that was advertised to be
held in the West Cumberland
Band Hall on Wednesday, Feb.
16th., has been postponed on account of the heavy fall of snow
and severe cold weather until
Wednesday, April 26th. That
date is now set by the Ladies'
Auxiliary for the Annual Hospital Ball. The officers were all
re-elected, which are as follows:
Mrs. Alex McKinnon, President;
Mrs. Alex. Cameron, Vice-president; Mrs. Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, Secretary, Mrs. Hen-
ry Bryan, Treasurer.
T. B. O'Connell, Manager of
the Royal Bank of Canada returned from a visit to Nanaimo
on Sunday morning.
COUNTY LODGE, L.O.L, MEET
The annual meeting of the Nanaimo County Lodge L.O.L., C.
24 was held in the K. of P. Hall
in this City on Tuesday, Worthy
B-other Charles Marsh presiding.
There was a good attendance and
the enthusiasm shown by the
members proved conclusively the
keen in erest they take in the
work of the Lodge. A resume
of the past yeai 's efforts and the
flourishing condition of the Lodge
reflects great credit upon the of-
firers in charge and caused several expression of appreciation
from members present. After
the members had partaken of a
sumptous repast the County
Lodge proceeded to elect its officers for the ensuing year, which
reads as follows:
Bro. W. Wesley Willard, County Master; Bro. Thos. E. Banks,
D. C. M.; Bro. Rev. Henry Wilson, Chaplain; Bro. Jas. Miller,
Ree. Sec.; Bro. John S. Banner
man, Fin. Sec; Bro. Charles
Marsh, Treasurer; Bro. Alex.
Armstrong, Lecturer; Bro. H.
Glover, D. of G.
The members of Nanaimo
County Lodge are looking forward to a prosperous year.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Coller-
ies Dunsmuir Limited, accompanied by Mrs. Lockard arrived at
Victoria from the east on Thursday. General superintendent
Lockard left Cumberland about
ten weeks ago - for New York
and points East. It is expected
that he will return to Cumberland on this evening's train.
GENERAL VIEW OF PIRiEUS. •-The Greek naval base and the Port of Athens, distant but five miles from the Greek capita',
where the Allies have landed.
CUMBERLAND TO BILLET 500
MEN0FTHE102ND.
The Cumberland Board of Trade
has offered the commanding officer, Col. J. W. Warden, of the
102nd., Comox Atlin or Northern
British Columbia Regiment free
quarters, light and water for 500
troops in the City of Cumberland. The Board of Trade offers
the New England House, a building of fiftv rooms, the rooms in
the McPhee Block, and the civic
authorities have placed at the
disposal of the Board of Trade
the City Hall and Council Chambers for the use of the 202nd until the military authorities can
complete the recruiting barrack*
at the Sand. Spit at Comox. The
Board of Trade has been assured,
but not officially, that their kind
offer will be accepted and it is
expected that troops will commence to arrive in this city within the taxt ten days. There are
now some 300 men stationed at
Courtenay including the 200 who
arrived during the week. Cumberland will furnish quarters,
light and water for a similar amount.
HEAVY SNOWFALL CAUSES
MUCH TROUBLE
The extraordinary heavy fall'
of snow during the past month
has at last brought Cumberland ■
to a standstill. It is estimated
that seven feet of snow has fallen during that period. Traffic
on the Wellington Colliery railway has been stopped for the
last 48 hours, with an army of
men shovelling snow. The Charmer's mail, due to arrive at Union Bay on Wednesday arrived in
this City hy sleigh on Friday
morning. The local mines for
the last three days have been
idle, with the local officials and
every available man shovelling
snow, and still they have been
unable to move any trains of
coal. If the snow shovel comes
operations may commence on
Monday. The Wellington Colliery railroad, as other railroads
on this Island have no equipment
to cope with such a heavy fall of
snow, which is very unusual in
this part of the province.
Born—At the Union and Comox
District Hospital on Tuesday
to Mr. and Mrs. Austin Hugo,
a daughter. TWO
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, ti. (J.
BE OF QOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAB.
GUp Jalantor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5th, 1916.
The Fuel OU Question.
(From the Nanaimo Herald.)
There are one or two points
which must always be' kept clearly in mind in considering the
question of a protective duty on
coal agaainst foreign fuel oil.
The first is that the coal mining
industry of this province, and
particularly of this island, is entitled to more than equal treatment in competition with a foreign product such as fuel oil. The
present government was returned to power on the one great
issue of protection for Canadian
industries. The people of Canada
were offered their choice between
this issue, and reciprocal trading
with the United States. They
chose the former and returned
the present government to power
That was in 1911, and in spite of
the issue on which it was returned to power the coal industry of
British Columbia for four years
and a half has not only received
no protection, but has actually
been discriminated against in
favor of fuel oil from the United
States. After four years and a
half of this the best the Finance
Minister can piomise when it is
forced upon his attention is to trj
to arrange a tax so as to put coal
on an equal competitive basis
with fuel oil. The government
went into office on a protective
tariff policy, and against reciprocity, and now makes a concession of giving the most important
industry in this province no
better than equal treatment. The
industry is entitled to protection
as much as any other industry in
Canada. The manufacturing interests, seeing that they are amply
protected themselves, cannot
come out into the open in their
hostility to the protection of the
coal industry. If they did then
their opposition would lose all
force.    The coal industry has to
SPRING 1916
New Goods Arriving Next Week:
Ladies' House Dresses,
Wash Skirts and Middy Suits,
Shirt Waists and Middy Blouses,
Silk and Satin Underskirts,
Velvets,
Dress Goods,
Dress Ginghams,
Dress Muslins and Ducks,
Crepes,
Nainsooks and Lawns,
Linens,
Galateas,
Tickings,,
Towels and Towelling.
go outside Canada for the major
part of its supplies and practically
all its supplies. It is therefore
one of the biggest subscribers to
the Dominion treasury under the
government's tariff policy. Where
is the consistency in it? The
people of Canada cannot afford
Free Trade at this stage of their
Industrial development, and in
1911 would not entertain the
reciprocity proposals of Sir
Wilfrid Laurier. The people of
British Columbia were a unit on
the question, and having en
dorsed a protective tariff they
look to be protected in their own
industries. -
What the mining communities
of the province are most conscious
of at present is that they are not
being protected, and they are resolved that this question will
form the one political issue at the
next election. The war promises
to bring about many economic as
well as social changes. Free
Trade will not be so popular in
the United Kingdom after the
war is over. Britain and her allies will have their own trade to
build up and it is almost certain
that the British people will
not keep open house for the German manufacturer. There will
probably be trade agreements
among the allies, and almost certainly closer commercial relations
between the Mother Country and
the overseas dominions. The policy of the latter has been and
will be more still to build up its
own manufactures and industries.
So far as this province is concerned no better starting point than
fuel oil could be found. And there
is a further reason why it should
be tackled at once in addition to
the coal industry. This reaspn
is the government's necessity for
finding taxes to meet the war
expenditure. Foolish legislation
followed by lax administration
paved the way for fuel oil to cut
out coal in the provincial market,
the market which on any tariff
agreement should belong to it
exclusively, and the government
is now. presented with an opportunity of at one stroke removing
a glaring economic injustice and
securing a material contribution
to its war chest. We trust it will
avail itself of the opportunity.)
In the report of the honor list
published last week, Div. V.
should have read as follows:—
Edith Hood, Etta Hood, Edna
Marsh, John Francioli, Emma
Mussatto. THE ISLANDER. CUMBEKLAND. B.C.
THREE
1/
The People's Prohibition Movement
of British Columbia.
VANCOUVER ISLAND   BRANCH
A Non-Sectarian and Non-Partisan Organization.
i
ITS ORIGIN
This Movement had its inception in a Convention
composed of several hundred delegates representative
of all parts of the Province, which assembled in Vancouver on August 25th., and 26th., 1915. This Convention unanimously adopted certain resolutions which
have since determined the character of the organization
and given direction to its activities.
ITS PURPOSE
The immediate purpose of the organization is to secure the suppression of the liquor traffic by legislative
enactment to the fullest extent of the constitutional
powers of the Provincial Legislature. At the same time
the fullest possible sympathy and co-operation will be
given to the Dominion wide movement for National Prohibition.
ITS METHOD
As its" name indicates this Movement is in the highest degree democratic and its sole court of appeal the
people of the Province. It is not trammelled by entanglement with any sect, faction or political party. Believing that a large majority of the people of the Pto-
vince are heartily sick of the liquor traffic, with all its
concomitant and consequent evils, its members have
pressed, and are pressing, the Government of the day,
vigorously and unanimously for the submission of the
whole matter to a vote of the people at the earliest possible date and in such a manner as shall admit of their
rendering an unequivocal verdict. In view of the Government's failure thus far to give satisfactory assurances
that this will be done the following position in the form
of an individual card for each signator is now being circulated for signature by the electors throughout the
Province:
(Face of Card)
To His Honour, The Lieutenant-Governor-in-Coun-
cil, Province of British Columbia, this petition sheweth:
1. That I, the undersigned, am a duly qualified voter in
the Province of British Columbia, in the Electoral Riding of  :
2. That I am in favor of Prohibition of the Liquor Traffic without compensation.
3. That I hereby request the Government to submit to
the electorate of the Province at the earliest possible
legal date a measure which shall be approved by the
Executive Committee of the People's Prohibition
Movement of British Columbia, and which shall embody the principles outlined on the back of this card*
4. That should this measuie be approved by a majority
of the electors voting on the same, I hereby request
that the said measure shall be enacted as law to come
into force not later than the First day of January,
1917.
5. And I further request that in the meantime the hours
of sale of intoxicating liquors be curtailed, making
the closing hour 7. p. m. on each legal day, until the
above described legislation comes into effect;
And your petitioner will ever pray.
Witness: Signed	
 Address -	
Dated at B. C.
this day of  19...
(Back of Card.)
Provisions of Proposed Measure.
ITS SCOPE.
The. suppression of the Liquor Traffic to the
fullest extent of the powers of the Provincial Legislature.
ITS PURPORT.
To prohibit the sale, barter or gift of intoxicating liquors within the Province of British
Columbia for beverage purposes.
All signatures will be tieated as strictly confidential
by canvassers and officers of the Movement, unless ex-
. press consent is otherwise given by the signators. When
the canvass is completed the signatures will be checked
with the voters lists and covering affidavits setting
forth the results will be made for presentation to the
Government.
ITS MEMBERSHIP
Any person, male or female, who may be sympathetic
with the aims and activities of the Movement is eligible
for membership. Enrollment is now in full swing but
• do not wait to be solicited. Your duty to ally yourself
with a righteous cause is quite as imperative as that of
somebody else to ask you to do so. Call at our Headquarters or give your name to any local officer or committeeman.   DO IT TODAY.
ITS FINANCES
It cost the friends of Prohibition in Alberta $30,000
to win their fight, and it has therefore been estimated
that victory in British Columbia cannot be secured short
of an expenditure of $25,000. Through large volunteer
service and strict economy the work has thus far been
carried on almost exclusively by means of the funds
from membership fees, viz: $1.00 for men and 50c. for
women. If registration continues as t should the entire campaign can ie thus financed, and nobody asked
for large sacrifice in this time of stress and strain.
Come along with your dollar and make this in the fullest
sense the PEOPLE'S PROHIBITION MOVEMENT.
J. Burt Morgan, President
H. A. Beckwith, Hon. Secy.
Vancouver Island Branch Office,  Rooms 101-2 Union
Bank Building. Victoria, B. C.
Cumberland District:—Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, Pres.
Wilson R. Dunn, Sec. FOUE
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
&
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LOCATION OF PIRj-ETS.  GREEK NAVAL BASE.-The island of Corfu, off the
West coast, which the French have seized, is also shown.
BICKERTON-WHYTE
A quiet wedding took place at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
Whyte, Derwent Ave. on Wednesday morning, February the
2nd when their eldest daughter,
Miss Ina Whyte and William Bic-
kerton, of the Dominion Police
force at Union Bay were united
in marriage by the Rev. James
Hood of St. George's Presbyterian Church. Only the immediate
friends were present. Miss Hazel
Whyte, sister of the bride, acted
as bridesmaid and James Whyte
had the honor of being best man.
The bride looked very pretty
in a navy blue broadcloth suit
and white satin hat. The presents
were numerous and costly. Mr.
and Mrs. Bickerton left immediately after the ceremony by
sleigh for Union Bay, their future home
ILO ILO ITEMS.
The kingdoms of Gredschoffen
and Grahoffen are at war. See
the opening of hostilities in tonight's episode.
Episode No. Eleven-"The Clash of Arms"
Episode No. Twelve*-"ACry In The Park"
Episode No. Thirteen-"War."
Episode    No.   Fourteen-"On the Battle
Field."
Episode No. Fifteen-'The Deluge."
Episode No. Sixteen-"Kitty  In Danger."
Episode No. Seventeen-'The Castaways."
Episode No. Eighteen-*"The Underground
City."
Episode No. Nineteen--"TheSacred Fire."
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No.  Twenty-Uvo~"An American
Queen,1'
SAVING AND SUCCESS.
A great banking house issues,
as an advertisement, this quotation from James J. Hilh
"If you want to know whether
you are to be a success or failure
in life, you can easily find out.
The test is simple and infallible.
Are you able to save money? If
you drop out you will lose. You
may think not, but you will lose
as sure as you live. The seed of
success is not in you."
James J. Hill has far too sound
sense and far too wide a vision
ever to have said this without
qualification.
The mere saving of money
helps to success in,petty business;
in large business it helps but little; and in the professions, the
sciences, the arts, and in any line
of endeavor that tends towards
the physical, social intellectual
and moral betterment of mankind
it counts not at all.
The woild's greatest men and
women whom history ranks as
the highest successes, down
through all the ages, and who
have led us from savagery to
civilization, became great not
through whal they got but what
they gave. They not only did
not save their money, they did
not save themselves.
Who could imagine a Homer,
a Luther, a Martin, a Franklin,
devoting their lives to the paltry
saving of their pennies? Few of
them ever had many pennies to
save.
Saving has its virtues but it
has its vices too. It is the worst
of all vices when it narrows a
soul down to mere money.
a&saDa3<asK>ci)asE>3!>c29)c9a^Q ixaM>a»<aH><.i><MD<!i>
i   PRO. CHANGED MON., TUES, THURS. ft SAT.
j	
I TONIGHT    12TH. EPISODE
i "The Broken Coin"
V -
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|   MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
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EVERY TUESDAY, One Number
- of the -
"BLACK BOX"
Serial in Fourteen Episodes.
BROADWAY FEATURES
fnursusiv ■
"VICTOR'S AT SEVEN"
A three reel comedy mix-up with
Hughie Mack.
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>GD<amGi.*
USE THE TELEPHONE!
This is the kind of weather when the telephone is invaluable. It is of utmost service at all
times, but when you do not want to go out, you
can reach anywhere with the aid of the instrument
on the wall.
Your telephone can be used to talk to Nanaimo, Victoria, Vancouver, to Kootenay towns, or
down the coast. There is no such a thing as
distance with the long di£ance telephone.
t British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd. 8
i
OIOOO-.
>O»OHO»OHOHC»>Ot>OHOtiO«O0OHO(
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yoor section
SHIP YOUR Fims DIRECT fo "SHUBERT" the larBest
house in the World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMERICAN RAW FURS
a reliable—responsible—safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for "more than a third of a centurv." a long successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt,SATIS FACTORY
AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for "ittit ftftubert feWm-tr,"
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write lor it-NOW-it's FREE
A R SHURFRT Inr 2827WESTAustinave.
*\. Q. OnUDLt\l,jnC. Dept.C 69 CHICAGO, U.S.A. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
VIEW OF RUHLEHEN CAMP.—Drawn by a British prisoner in the hands of the
Germans. This is one of the biggest prisons in Germany, and it would seem
that the roadway in the foreground is more suitable for ducks than men.
HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT BURNED
Ottawa, Feb. 4.—Fire broke out last
night at nine o'clock in the House of
Commons Reading Room, sweeping
with tremendous fury down corridors,
and leaping to galleries in the space of
three minutes filling the whole wing
with an impenetrable pall of smoke. It
was followed immediately by explosion
and flames.
Ottawa, Feb. 4.-At 8 o'clock this
morning the fire that destroyed the
Parliament Buildings was completely
under control, but flomes were still
shooting from the Senate end of the
building which was the last to fall a
prey to the flames, Half the main
tower remains standing, the upper
portion containing the great clock hav
ing fallen at 2 a.m, The origin of the
fire is still a mystery, although it is believed to be incendiary. Frank Glass,
of London, Conservative member for
Middleseex, was in the reading room
when fire broke out. He said he felt
heat and looking around saw smoke
coming from a pile of papers under a
desk. He called a guard who rm for
a fire extinguisher, but before he could
.use it the whole room appeared to burst
'Into flame. Fire wus shouted in the
chamber where the House was in session, which immediately adjourned.
The casualty list as far as known is as
follows: Dead, Mesdames Bray and
Morin, of Quebec; two policemen killed
by falling tower. Injured, Hon. Martin Burrell, severely burned.
FIEE  INSUEANCi
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
TotalAssets • $26,788,930.
W.   WILLABB
LO 0 A L AG E N 1
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.'
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor,
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 5th Sunday after
Epiphany:
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service   of   Intercession   on
Thursday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.f
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.   JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date application will be made
to the Superintendent of the Provincial
Police for the transfer of the Licence for
the sale of Liquor in and upon the premises known as the Bevan Hotel! situate at
Bevan, Nelson District, British Columbia,
from Hugh Thornley to Watkin Williams,
of British Columbia.
Dated this 17th day of January, 1916.
HUGH THORNLEY,'
Holder of Licence.
WATKIN WILLIAMS,
Applicant.
4//
J
LACO NITROGEN
LAMPS
(THE DAYLIGHT LAMP)
PRICE SCHEDULE:
60   Watts - $1.10
100
•*
1.25
2.25
3.00
3.35
4.00
5.00
8.00
Frosted Lamps 10% Additional
200
'*
250
*.•
300
*.*
350
'*
500
n
1000
•*.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd.
P. O. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T.E.
Magnet
P. O. Box 279
BATE
Cash Store
Phone 31 SIX
THE
■ UMBERLAND. B.C.
Recruiting for 102nd Excellent
(From the Victoria Colonist.)
By far the greater part of thi
time that has eiapsed since th.
102nd.. Battalion, C. E. F., wa?
authorized, its 0. C, Lieut.-Col.
J. W. Warden, has been travel -
sing the highways and by-ways
of the Provincial Interior. He
has visited most of the important
centres and all the districts of
the Kootenay and of the Boundary country. After an extended
tour, he returned to the unit's
headquarters here, yesterday,
and gave his officers a very encouraging report of the enthusiastic manner in which the men
of British Columbia are responding to his appeal for recruits.
"They are all with me," he declared last evening. "I have
been very fortunate in having
been able to secure the disinterested assistance of influential
friends. With their help it was
not hard to obtain support for
the 102nd. When I say that we
will have at least 800 men at the
Comox training camp in the
course of a week or so, I think
that all will admit that we have
not done badly. There is no
doubt that the battalion will be
at full strength by the time that
the weather permits active outdoor training of the kind that it
is the intention to give the men
of the northern British Columbia coips preparatory to their
service on the firing line."
Explaining the statement of
the number enlisted, Col. Warden
said that already there were approximately 300 at Comox. Yesterday, 250 more left Nelson for
the Vancouver Island barracks.
A special train went to Revelstoke to bring them to the Coast,
and tomorrow morning a special
boat will meet them at Vancouver to take them to the camp
This contingent will be augmented on its way to the Terminal
City. Between 50 and 100 will
be picked up in this way, so that
the draft when it reaches its destination will be swelled to about
350. In Prince Rupert and Prince
George there are recruited in the
neighborhood of 200, who will
join their fellows as soon as the
climatic conditions improve.
Col. Warden was careful to
make clear that in these figures
he was counting only volunteers
who have been actually attested.
There are many others who had
signified their intention of coming to the 102nd., and who were
now in billets. When the period
over which this arrangement was
to extend had expired, these
troops doubtless would join him.
He did not propose relaxing his
efforts on this account however,
and the campaign which he has
R!
Y NEUTRAL.
IRELAND, ia Columbus 0/spi
been vigorously prosecuting
would be continued without cessation until the ranks were full.
Col. Warden's just completed
tour was made under circumstances that were far frorp pleasurable. In fact, he states that some
of the experiences through which
he wept matched anything that
he encountered, in France while
on active service. The thermometer throughout registered between 35 and 50 degrees below
zero. From Victoria he went to
Revelstoke, thence down the Arrowhead Lakes to Nelson, making short stays at different points
en route. He also touched at
Cranbrook and Fernie. and went
through the Boundary District,
visiting Grand jForks, Midway
Penticton, Summerland, Kelow-
na, Vernon and Sicamous, as well
as other communities.
Col. Warden leaves today for
Comox. He will be accompanied
by Mrs. Warden and his family.
Incidentally, he states that section of the Island is so attractive
that he will make a temporary
home there which will not be
broken up until he and his men ',
are ready to go to Europe. Many
of his fellow officers also are taking their families to the training
centre, being of the same opinion as their O. C. On this occasion, the colonel's stay will be of
short duration, it being his desire
to see that the men are comfortably housed and are being properly looked after. Thb done, he
wilt return to Victoria and almost immediately start on another trip. This time his itinerary
will be through the Cariboo and
other Northern district!?.
Col. Warden speaks enthusias
tically of the progress *he unit is
making in its organization. He
referred in this connection to the
band, in which he expresses
special interest. He says that
he has ordered a set of. silver instruments, the best to be procured, and that the indications are
that the battalion will have an
aggregation of musicians second
to none in ability. He wishes to
thank Mr. John Matthews, of
Courtenay, for a contribution of
$60 to help along the band, stating that it will be very useful and
will be utilized to assist in the
realization of his ambitions with
respect to that important adjunct
of the battalion.
The Canadian Colliery Basketball team will proceed to Courtenay on Friday Feb., 11th., and
play a game with a team of that
City. The Canadian Collieries
team, selected from the office
staff, will line up as follows: C.
Baker and W. K. Hancock, forwards; John Stevens, centre,
Allan Nuns and C. Mackintosh
guards. The Courtenay boys
have a job on their hands to defeat the office staff.
In the County Court of Nanaimo holden at Cumberland, B. C, in the matter of
Malcolm Newberg, deceased, and
In the Administration Act;
Take notice that by order of His Honor
Judge Barker, made the 12th day of January, A. D. 1916,1 was appointed administrator to the estate of the said Malcolm
Newberg, deceased, and all parties having claims against the said estate are
hereby required to furnish same, properly
verified to me on or before the 21st day
of Febrnary, A. D. 1916, and all parties
indebted to. said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness to
me forth with.
WM. WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 21st day of January, 1916.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulation!
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
n Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
' he Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
lories nnd in a portion of the Province ef
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
i f twenty-one years at an annual rental of
81 an acre. Not more than 2,600 aores
will be leased to one applioant.
Applioation for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or leqal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplioaut himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 whioh will be refunded if tho
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on tho
merchantable output of tho mine at tho
rate of five cents per ton.
Tbe person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for tbe full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, suoh returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year. ||
The lease will include tho ooal mining
rights only, but the lessee may bo permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for tho working of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanaore.
For full information applicatiun should
be made to the Secretary of tho Department of tho Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. GORY,
Deputy Minister of tho Interior.
N.B—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will net be paid for.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for tbe
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hederson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs iurnixhed
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
V
;< THE  iSLAWDEK, UUMbUtiLAU).
SEVEN
K\ »
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LU). D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES. Ass't General Manager
CAPITAL. $15,000,000    RESERVE RIND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE,Manager.
Wa Una nofc   Beauty may ** only skin deeP;
▼▼ aiipajJCl o   but don't buy your wallpapers
before you, have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 15j* a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Pbene 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
VAGARIES OF CENSOR
We Recommend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so|very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.   Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it. .
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
On. Austrian    Paper    Talks  Plainly
Despite Clumsy Gagging
The Vienna Arbeiter-Zeitung is a
thorn ln the flesh of the Austrian censor. Scarcely a day passes without
its columns appearing in a curiously
mutilated condition. Yet every now
and then something appears in ita
columns which seems to have escaped
the censor's watchfulness. Thus, it
had a paragraph dealing with a remark of the semi-official Reichspost,
in which this Journal condoles with
the Pope because cf the alleged interference with his correspondence. The
Reichspost declared that this was a
slap in the face ot 300,000,000 Catholics, an action which would embitter
the Christian world, and wound their
inner feelings. The Arbeiter-Zeitung
throws scorn on this in the following
words: "Certainly. The watching
over the correspondence of the Papal
chancery is the most terrible thing in
all this terrible war, and the action
which, more than any other, must fill
the minds ot 300,000,000 with the
greatest sorrow!"
The Arbeiter-Zeitung draws attention to the treatment lt receives from
the censor, but Its position is not
nearly so bad as that of the Agram
Tageblatt, which once appeared with
eighteen white spaces. In a report of
a session of the Croatian Diet there
are seven white spaces, one of these,
over a column long, evidently containing the speech of an anti-war
delegate, the other six spaces apparently containing references to the
speech. An amusing illustration of
the censor's methods is found in the
fact that portions of the speech delivered ln the Diet by the Banus, or
Governor, were deleted. As the censor, ls an official in the Banus' chancery, the incident Is interesting.
Wireless telegraphy was flrst used
In warfare by the Russian army in the
-Hanchurian camoaisn ol won
Guncotton as Bait
A part of the equipment of some
cavalrymen is a fishing rod and several varieties of floats. But there are
others who prefer to flsh for the pot
ln more sudden and ruthless manner.
Their method is very different. They
operate ln those parts of the canals
where roach and dace are thought to
be numerous. The final attack, as ln
all modern aggressive operations, Is
opened by the expenditure of explosives. A small wad of guncotton
neatly exploded under water is enough
to account for all the flsh within a
considerable radius; and a few moments after the discharge the. undersides of the roach and dace appear
on the surface. The idea was suggested by the accidental havoc
wrought among the fish by a certain
Jack Johnson.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses* etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees ancl plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application. -   .
[established^ years.]
Stocky French-Canadians
A curious evidence of type came out
during the rush to get uniforms for
the French-Canadian Battalions. Recruiting was unexpectedly rapid, but
worse still, it was found difficult to fit
the men, as most of the uniforms were
too long, and not big enough around
the chest. This was due to the fact
that the average French-Canadian is
several Indies shorter than the average English-Canadian, but proportionately much more heavily built. Thus
plenty of recruits who stood only 5
foot 2, had chests good enough for a
man of 5 foot 10, and so on. The result was? that the supply of uniforms,
which was built according to the English average, was picked over and over
again, but hundreds of recruits had to
go away in mufti, while ther egimental
tailors worked overtime to adjust the
clothes to their figures.
NOW STOP!
Do not throw this adv. away,
-the most important announcement is still to come.
Do you realize what this
means to you ? 1 It means
that you will always have
that neat, clean-cut, well-
groomed effect. 1 Your
clothes will always look as
if they had just come from
the tailor's, spic and span,
neat, refined and giving the
impression of prosperity
and business power.
Remember I call for and
deliver the goods.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
Nojgames of any kind will be
permitted on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY  PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER  BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND
4/
i 1
EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
FOR SALE—At A.R.Kierstead's
Blacksmith Shop, 5 sets Market
Sleds, $40,00 and up; also auto
wheels repaired.
Traffic will be resumed today
on the Wellington Colliery railway between Cumberland and
Union way.
It was Chinese New Year on
Wednesday. The celebration was
not on such a large scale as in
former years.
Born—At Cumberland on Tues
day, February 2nd, to Mr. and
Mrs. John Hunden, a son.
Miss Mary Pearse, of Minto,
who has been seriously ill with
pneumonia, is now recovering.
Four Japanese have left Cumberland for Vancouver to join the
Canadian Japanese Battalion.
One of the officers of the Japanese Regiment arrived in this
City on Sunday and left for Vancouver on Monday.
"Victor's at Seven," a three-
reel comedy with Hughie Mack,
Broadway Feature, at the Ilolllo
next Thursday.
Miss Evans has "recovered
from her recent illness and resumed her duties at the Cumberland Electric Lighting office.
A miscellaneous shower was
held at the Presbyterian Manse
of St. George's Church on Monday in favor of Miss Ina Whyte.
Girl Guides held their regular
meeting in the basement f>f St.
Georges Presbyterian Church
last evening. Despite the severity of the weather a good attendance was registered. Next
meeting will be held on Friday
evening Feb. 11th at 8 oclock.
The verandah that extended
half way around the Union Hotel gave way under the heavy fall
of snow on Wednesday and now
-lies in ruins. Also the garage
adjoining, causing considerable
damage to the automobile owned
by W. H. White, electrical engineer of the Canadian Collieries.
Patronize Home industry, says
the Vancouver Sugar Refinery,
and buy B. C. su;rar, while they
burn as fuel, California oil, entering the province duty free. Why?
Because it's cheaper. Why is it
cheaper? Because the Federal
authorities allow fuel oil to enter
this province duty free, giving
the coal industry no protection
whatever. The Islander would
say to the Vancouver Sugar Refinery, "patronize home industry
and buy B. C. coal.
CORSET   SPECIALS
D. &A.
Service
Corsets
Popular
Pricejd
Corsets
r
Nol.
No 2.
No. 3.
<g*w*wM*m
A Splendid 75c. Corset, Made of Coutil, medium low bust
and long close-fitting skirt; has four hose-supporters. Just the thing
for those who like a light weight Corset.
A Deautlrul Model, that will give great wear and service.
Has medium high bust neatly trimmed, and strengthened in front
which keeps corset from stretching out of Shape.   D.& A. leader price,
$1.50
Incomparable Reducer, With double straps, by the aid of
scientifically laid pieces, will give the ideal front effect, and reduce
abdomen, hips and back. Hook at bottom of front. Satisfaction
guaranteed in this special Corset.   Price
$2.50
VyVVVkAA/ to
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE!   BIG   STORE.
Phonic 3-8

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