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The Islander Jan 21, 1911

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Array DINNER SETS and
TOILET SETS
Just in,   at
CAMPBELL  BROS.
  YO>      ...     V. e%\
ISLANi
i
Fine Assortment of
Crockery and
Glassware,
Jii^ti An :ved at
oAiVir^BwLL     BROS.
No. 34
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., 8ATURDAY, J ANUA1IV 91, 1911
Subscription price 11.50 P'r year
OP BEEORE
THE JUDGE
The Disappearanoe of
of Laird's Watch Up
for Discussion
R Patriot) and Mike Towers appeared before Judge Alliums on Thursday
to iliscnss with that gentleman the
mysterious disappearance of Marshal]
Lairds watch.
The case tiga'nst Powers was dropped.
M r Laird called, identified Patrick.
The watch had not I n in bis possesion since Jan. 5th. They bad till boon
drinking and iwo or three companions
went homo with him. He was not
lure of Patrick, hut identified Powers
as one oft lie men wbo accompanied
him.
Powers awn "Ji stated that he was
slightly acquainted wilh Patrick. He
luul gone home with Laird on the evening ol'the 5th. I .ni ids watch was on
the tnlile anil he had taken it off the
table and given it to Patrick for safe
keeping. They were all drunk. He
and Patrick left the house together.
He saw Patrick 2 ur 3 dnys later nml
aske.1 if he had given Laird the watch
yet, and he replied he would do anas
soon as the snow went away. He saw
no scratches ou the in-i.ie of the
case.
C'.nstahle McLellan sworn said:—
He knew Patrick. Laird hud told
him of thc loss of the watch. He
kept ii watch on the pari i.s who hail
gone home with Laird and got a
slight look at the watch in the pus
session of Patrick. He asked him for
the watch on Wednesday night hut
Patrick said he would give it to no
one but Lnird. He said nothing a
bout waiting for the snow to melt, tin-
c.-listable saw the prisoners name
scratched on the watch case.
The Judge said that the fact of tl c
name being scratched on th.1 watch
showed intent of theft' but remanded
the esse until yesterday to allow a
watchmaker to ex min the scratches on
the watch.
100 pr. buys pants, double knee and
■eats. Saturday 50c pr at Cartwrights
No old Hags Mottles or Bags at
Cartwrights, but good reliable goods
ou sale Saturday.
A*^. tAlAlAlAimA^SAlAlAlA^A^^IWWlAtAlAllWtlWWll
Correspondence.
Tn the Editor,
A boomerang;—an Australian missile
of hmd wood whioh oan return to tin
thrower.
While attending a meeting called l.j
Mr T. K. M.itc, our newly elected M..y. i
there were questions a-kod by our tailor
of the tuwn, Mr. 8.
If such was the case, thst be, Mr. Bate,
was guilty in acting as ageut for a Fit
Reform, or in other words was he ttymy
to help the city iu having an agent ul
the said linn taking urdela at hit place
of business, llis W.rdiip Mr Bate a i
wered the silly question to the satisfy -
ion of the questioner and the public.
Now is suoh the osse that our tail"!
came to this town and solicited before he
wat a resident and had no licenses to do
•o. I think thst I am right in my remarks, lt takes a thief to catch a thief.
1 intended to mention something more
but 1 think I have come to the iioiut, to
work a man must have tools and to be a
carpenter you mutt have a full kit.
Shot imd Sum
CAPTURED BY
WESTERN PICTURES
Th»> Bison Filmi Are
Popular    With
Patrons
AU over the country—for that matter, all over the world—comes an iu
creasing demand fur western plcturel
There it something irretiaiible in tbe
attraction a good western pioture holds
for h. Tiie Bison pictures were the
lirst real wcateru pictures placed upon
-lie market, and they have had many
imitators.
A true western picture, taken in the
real west, with besutiful scenery fur a
back ground, and depicting inspiring
deeds, will continue to please the pub'
lie; but there it a grave danger that
imirationt will effect the popularity of
his line of subjects.
Furthermore, there it a possibility of
moving pioture patrons being turfieted
with too muoh Wettren subjects. There
it no doubt that the excellence of Bison
pictures have bean able thus far to carry
inferior imitations.
Two reels per week of Bison pictures
sre released and are shown at the City
Hall, they are taken in the West with
Westren themes. Many of the scenarios
tre founded upon Indians legends, and
the characters recuited from the tribes
upon the Westren ooat. The riders are
■plendid horsemen, and the leading parts
ire well acted.
There is something of interest and appeal in a real westren subject for sli
iges and classes and they have proven
.;roat attractions and the shreved exhibitor is alwaya careful to see that he
rets the real unadulterated film and that
t is the Bison.
ANNIVERSARY OF
Scotchmen   Will   Do
Honor to His Memory Wednesday
On Wednesday evening the Scotch-
lieu of thee immunity will celebrate the
One Hundred aud fifty second anniversary nf tlobbio Burns with aeon-
■ rt and dnm". in the Cumberland
Hull.
This.is au annual tifl'air that is
looked forward to not only by the
Scotch element in nor midst hut by
every one else liusirles,
Tiekels ure now on nt\a, and ns the
iiimb.r Is limited those who wish to
do honor to Iho tie tnoiy of lli.hbir
Hums should procure their 1 ttie hit
oi paste lioar.l at ouce.
Ivo ohl Hags Monies or l!ug-nl
Cartwrights, but good reliable goods
on sale Saturday.
Found—A Cllie Dog, Owner oai
have same bv payingexpei.au of ad and
paying for keep. If u t claimed in ti
da)-, sill he a Id.
Appl) this i Diet.
100 prs. boys pants all sizes 00c pr.
al Cui'twrights,
No old Rags Buttles or Bugs ai
Cartwrights, hut good reliable goods
on sale Saturday.
LOCAL MAIL SERVICE.
In effect Out. 3rd.
Arrival
Tuesday morning
Wednesday afternoon
Friday afternoon
Saturday night overland
Sunday, about DM a. in.
Departure
Tuesday—6.15 a. in.
Thursday—6.15 a.m.
Saturday -6.10 a. in
Sunday, i p. in   slu. p
Boy's   High   t"p   shoes   rg.  $1.20
Saturday ut Cartwrights $3.00
IS BATE
A TALK ON
Citizens Greatly   Exercised Over This
Question
Is Mayor-elect Bate qualified?
This hat been the one tupio of conversation in the oity fur the past ft* daya.
At wUI be remembered thit quettion
wat asked by Mr. Bate't opponents'prim
to eleotion but aa Mr. Bate had documentary evidence which teemed t1 prove thai
he wat, aud at he was alto hacked up bj
legal advioe he decided to remain in tht
field, and the eleotort have uid with ne
uncertain voiee that they believe him tc
be the right man for the petition.
After election Hr. Bate left for Viotoria
to lo.k into the charge that hia propert)
wat not properly registered iu the Keg
istry Office, aud discovered tbat through
some technical error thit had not beon
done, but whether this it tuffioeut to disqualify him when the spirit of tha law hst
being complied with it a quettion thai
it now being investigated by Mr. Bata't
lawyer, aud Mr. Bate is confidant that he
will tit.
Mr. Bate't opponent!, however, not
satisfied with the verdict of the people,
deputed one of their number to go to
Victoria to press the case against tbe
Mayor elect.
They are equally confident that Mr.
Bate in disqualified and quote tht opinion
if a prominent lawyer and of tht Attorney Oeneral in support of thit view.
The Msyor is not bound to be swore
n until three weekt from the Monday
following elec i n, and Mr. Bate hat un
til that time to straighten out tha diffi
culty' if he it uot sworn iu by Iht dati
above mentioned the Mayor's teat becomes vacant and a new eleotion will be
necessary. '{
I'llK MUSINGS  OF   THE   MID
NIGHT   PHILOSOPHER
The polit cal tea pot tempest has sim
noted down to tranquility and ouly
i< w grains uf mud fir down a; the bo ■
mm give in itusti. n uf the little tut moil
The late issue was not without its humor
nd pathos, particularly iu the youthful
bespectacled Daniel Webster who beard
edthe linn in hit den and came out cf it,
inside the lion. His efforts reminded me
forcibly of Don Quixote tilting with the
windmill. '1 he political fracas taught a
moral lesson that ihould havt been
learned long ago by tbe leaden, namely
that a man it of on beaten through the
iver zealoutness uf hit friends.
Since election I hsve been studying
some of the Knglish and foreign glossor-
ies b> way of refreshing my memory. 1
was asked the other day if I would buy
a i ioket for the banquet on tbe 25th inst,
culebri. lug the snuiversary of Bobbie
Hunts. I hesitated fur t momont be-
cause the ssme brought happy recollections i.f by gone days to memory. Like
all .ili poem after poem of the Scottish
llaid crossed my memory, poems that
helped to mould mind and bui d oharao-
ter, widtn my sympathies and love of
nature. I patted the money over Wheu
1 got home the editor tout up to me a
poem whioh he received, signed "Caledonia" whioh I will insert tud clow my
musings:
"Ii't oomin'yet fur a' that,
It's oomin' ytt fur a' that,
That man to mtn the world o'er,
Shall brithert bt for a' thst."
—Burnt.
* •
"Hail Scotia's Bard whole deep
Prophetic soul and teleacopio mind
Foretold the dawn of day iu wt ioh
Tbe hum ill raci- will cease to be
Oppresses to themselves, and f uud
A bnnd of deep fraternity,
Long  hn g bef..re the firs faint
r hi .e
O: t.uh  heil eked the deep
llllpetl i.able clouds of night
That's all the race imbued.
II.
Oh I That thou livud'al today to sou
Mrs.Livingston Speaks
at the City
Hall
Mrs. Livingston of Toronto, W. 0. T
17. Lecturer, addressed a fair audience
at tbe City Hall on Tuesday evening on
he Liquor tvU.
Mrs. Livingston is not a Rifted speaker, and hat a voice that it far too weak
for publio tpeaking, but an earnestness
of manner disarms oriticism and
covers a multitude of imperfection in delivery, and her addreii wat listened to
with pleasure aud attention by those
present.
The speaker hu discovered, as hss
almutt evtry othtr intelligent citizen,
that the abuse of the liquor is a grieveout
evil, and even those of us who oannoi
igree that the remedy for thit evil lies in
Prohibition or Local Option, must admit
hat t speaker like Mrs Livingston is s
much more effective temperance advoo
tte than crankt of tbe Spenoerian variety.
At tht conclusion of tht address, the
Rev. Mr Freeman tpoke at tome length
ifcer which the Bev Mr. Laffere made a
tew sensible remsrks.
Mn  Livingston announced that thc
noxt afternoon iha would address a meeting "for ladi t only" in the Presbyter ia
Church, when tha  evils of prostitute.
would be the subji oe ef her discourse.
The long down trodden and oppressed
Awake from out their catskill
Mountain sleep and shake the dew
Of cetituri.s from out their locks
And raise the back that has from
time
Long immemorial tht burden boune
To see the horny hand stretched nut
With open hand that will not oluie
Until a recompense is paid
Tu compensate the toil iu full
Aud did'st thou love to day thy pel
Would cheer the toiler in his light
'Oaiust fearful odds.
* *
i received a poem from a correspondent whi li upon reading I came tu thi
conclusion was not at all bad. It showed that the writer will get over it in
time; but if he has many more met
dreamt we will not be responsible for hit
being at large. We would advise him to
cut down his opium and wake up.
A CHRISTMAS DRBAM.
The stan shunt bright with radiat t
light, when in the deep aud silent nig't.
the belli knelled out their tuneful lay,
that told the dawn uf Christinas Day.
It seemed u if tht earth did rock, witl
joy, and e'en tht waves deep shock co
mingled with the gladsome breeze, thsi
made a harp of leafless trees. For oni
brief hour the magic spell twift csnu
and went, theu rote and fell, then in a
crash of thunder loud, gloom oovered sli
aa iu a shroud. 1 stood aluazi d 1 cuuli
ii it lell what changed the scene from
heaven to hell, when thmugh thegl om
a voice did grate: "Behold the Christ
you celebnte I " I looked and saw a-
mid a aet of gloom a golden throne, and
He who should have wt thereon, prostrate with grief, aud his loud sobs thi
gate of heaveu shook, and earth and sua,
rocked to and fro, aghut to aee, anothet
love and dark Oethtemano in heavi n
whero naught but joy ahould be. Afresh
hii wounds—hii brow, hii tide, burst
forth in agonising tide, till throne unk
down amid tht flood, and earth and tea
grew red with blood. 1 heard a cry—
thtaugelt wept—and ttara forsook their
light, it swept the heavens wide and ml
ed ainiin, through all.buluw, thuu baik
iiii .in. A voice spoke out with awful
doom: "Who  saw   tliu tl.-it-Man
twu-ti ion in i.i^h ii.'.v ii, this seen!
kii- », 'In' o or iii nun. tin lis thrt wnc.
liis 'hr ue lias bucu a crust ol go.d, • 'at
since hu luf. Golgotha hold, a tpuar of
gold hu uruck his heart and driven all
litis wounds apart,—Ium made ihem bleed
LYCEUM PLATERS
NEXT WEEK
C^rarrnyir, Well Spoken- of  by the
Press
On Monday anil Tuesday evening,
the Wttllier-Lyoouin Co. who huve been
putting nn a series of entertainments
in this city, under the nnspices of tin.
Lady Mace dices of the World, will put
on Ihe cream of their scries of entertainments when they present "The
Lyceum Players" to a local audience,
This company includes thu fntimu-
-Signor Kouiitnilli, the Italian harpist,
.vho plays his native music on the bur.,
that sweetest and piobably oldest ul
ill instruments as only an  1 tiiliun can.
11 the Lyceum Players are ns goon
is they are cracked up to be by the
press in the towns where they have
b en appearing there is a treat in .si11: e
for the music loving element of the
t.own on monday and Tuesday night.
Tickets are now on sale at Peacy'-
Drug Store where seats should bi
reserved early.
The regular meeting of Uie Citizens
League which should have been held
ut Wednesday last was pospoued un
bil next week when business of importance wilt be brought up for discussion.
Local Engle." will be pleased to
I aril that F l.ytieh of NewWestnims-
b T.uho instituted tho Comox Aerie in
Litis eiiy has been elected to the city
jiiiucil of the Royal City.
President suspenders 35c pr ai
.'artweights .Saturday.
.Men working sox regular 35c pait
S prs for $1.00 ut Cartwrights Satin
day.
ilANOS IN
:«fiH
3ity Cler}c  Resigns at
First Council
Meeting
BOUT NEIT
Tournament Being Arranged for the Near
Future
The next big sporting event on tht
tapis is a big wrestling tournament and
f negotiations are curried through we
will have tbe pleasure of seeing one of
tbe finest wrestling tournaments ever
.ecu in this part of the country.
It is a long time sinoe Cundierland
had au event of this kind and if the
promoters -get the men they are after
looked up there should be some good
-port witnessed as Sine Swanson always
puts up a great battle, iio matter who
his opponent  is, hut there   are aome
•oil meu in our own midst who would
like a crack at the doughty Sine, and
they are no slouches either. A good
..-aid will be assure of about 5 events,
ind the evening will lie a hummer
Visiting cards ab tue Islander of
e.
Job work 7 You can get what you
irant when you want it at The Isundib.
phone 35.
Do your own shopping. See McKin
aell for Choioe Fruits, Confeotiunery
ind Ice Cream. j?5
Services in the Roman Catholic Church
till be held every other Sunday in Cum-
•lerUi.d.    Rev. II. Meitei.s, paator.
For Sale—Thomsons Boarding House.
This is furnished throughout aud ii in
irst class cuudbion.
For particulars apply between tht
lours of ij and 4 p. in. tu Mrt D. Thornton.
  •
A dance in aid of the City Band will
lai held in the Cumberland Hall on
Kriday evening next, Lewis' 6 pieoe   or-
■lustra will furnish the mutio whilt
idmisaion has been fixed at the low priot
f 81 for gentlemen and ladies fret.'
.Don't forget the Pythian Sittan Val-
titine Dance un Feb. Uth. It will bt
lie best ever.
Mrs. Sinims can receive more pupils
,-'or piano lessons daily (except Tttt-
lay) at any time by arrangement.
Camp Cumberland
With the exception of the Mayor,
vho was absent at Victoria, there was.
full atteiulat.ee at the tirst meeting of tin
lldermanic board on  Monday uveidng.
The session was s very short out
tiost of the time beiuc, taken up in tin
wearing in proceedings, the oath beiny
.^ministered by Magistrate A bran...       u,      tl|„ roof of ,m„di      fa ^ e|.
Tho   City Clerk   read Ins resignatiot |             ,       *
' Dr. D. K. Kerr, dentist, will be  at
'nm-.eiiay   from   February 1st   until
February 10th, and after that date at
Cumberland.
The heavy snow fall of last   week
ullowed hy an equally generous precip-
utiou of rain put a weight and strain
vhich wu laid un the tablu, togetliei
with a number of accounts until the next
nesting of the council after the Mayor's
nturn from Victoria.
Tho uieeiiug than sdjouinud
Ko   old    Hags  Hollies   or   Rags ti
Cartwt Iglits. but good (reliable gooth
on sale Saturday,
CAKD OF THANKS.
I luke this opportunity of thank
.ng all those] who tided to con
fori me in iny recent bereavement hi
the death of my son, Samuel
.Mc Knight.
Andrew MoKnioiit
Still   FAMILY.
fnr him who toils sll unrewarded with tin
•pulls, man's selfish sv.irici us greod—
.,'old is lus god and gold bis crood, aud
gold tho cross hedoth impale, the human
rsco heedless, of wai, aud blood and
and tears; and yot he seeks while yet his
in d iti warm blood rccka to scatter
p. noo ill Christmas gift to those who
feed I iut with their tlirtft. and toil.
II hold auch things as aeon, and felt by
Him revealed in dream.
t nit in many cases proved tto
jt'eat, and a number of woodshed and
-tables, collapsed. The rear part of
t, ib Star Livery Stables, where the
inrses aro housed was one of the build.
i igs that eatne down, but fortunately
..'lined by the creaking of the titular
the proprietors wore able to get the
inrses out laifote the roof camo down.
I'he main portion nf the building also
ive ample warning tbat it was carry-
in,' too great n load, and a gang of
nen were soon mi top of the building
r .moving tho snow.
Penmans Natural wool underwear
ji.00 suit at Cartwrights
The local Chinamen are mad. The
one time in all the year when the
Chink really lives, is during the week
.f the Chinese New Year, and when
anything turns up lo curtail the mea
-.ure of joy at that season, there is
uuch weeping, muck-a-hieing, and
finishing of tooth. During the cold snap
of a week ago, very largo shipments
of delicacies of all kinds, consigned to
the Cliineso merchants of the city, for
tlio New Years festivities, got froien
solid on the wharf ut Union Bay, and
a largo percentage of the goods are practically useless. THE ISLANDKR. CUMBERLAND, B.C
ALAfiOB   proportion
which  tho  worM 'fl  poople
furs
Wbar
fur garments still
North America, says Chambers's Jour
ua), despite tho great changes which
have occurred ou that coutment, ot>
pocially within tho last fifty yours, by
tlu* settling of what wan formerly a
Wilderness. Tho value of the yearly
fnr hunt nil sea Hi: I Innd throughout
tho world ia abuul five million pounds.
Of this amount Canada aud Alaska
contribute nearly ouelifth, uot because
or the large number of skim, secured
ty the hunters, but because B0 mnny
of them are raro aud valuable, for we
BHi.-t remember tlmt tho seals taken in
the waters of North America alone re
present a very large sum each year.
The history of the Hudson's Uay
Company might bo callod a history of
tie American fur industry; because,
•iu<e it was formed back in the seven
teeiith century, this corporation has
hud ita agents and hunters scattered
over nu enormous territory. Over a
Century ago it had no less than one
hundred and sitxy trading-posts ati'l
"factories*'—tho term factories mean
ing stations in charge of its factors or
buyers. It nut only obtained furs from
must of thut part of Canada which :
nnrth and west of tho Groat Lakes,
hut many thousand jM'lts were received
from the Pacific. North-West—thut por
tion of tho United Btatos comprising
the stntes uf Oregon, Washington, and
Nevada—at thnt rime almost unknown
to the white man. In those days Win
nlpeg wus the head centre of the llud
son's Bay .Company, the log fort which
it constructed being tlio foundation of
the present eity. No longer is this the
head centre, for civilization haB crowd
dl the fur hunter farther and farther
north, until Winnipeg is only ono of
the minor Btations of the great corpora'
tion.
Seven hundred miles to the north
west of it is Bdmonton, the largest
market for "raw ' furs iu the New
World, the capital of Alberta, and the
most northern point on the North
American continent to be reached by
• continuous line of railroad. Picturesque yet modem, and an outpost of
empire, Edmonton in tho old days was
an important settlement in that section, tht extreme northwestern market
In the fur country. It was founded a
Century or so ago by the old North-
Western Pur Company, for a brief time
a competitor of the Hudson's Bay Company.
The   industry  ts  now   divided   into
branches.    But  few  of  tho  skins  aro
secured by the buyers diroet from the
hunters  aud   trappers,  most   of   them
being obtained through the fur-traders
Wlm yearly mako expeditions into thc
Wilderness, and obtain a "load," often
for a supply of provisions aud clothing,
ind     perhaps    no     money     whatever
Changes hands,    tn  the  spring,  when
the   ice  and  snow  commence  to  thaw,
the agents of thc big concerns, the free
trailers and thc few trappers who have
Cared to bring thoir furs as far back
as I'M mon tun and Prince Albert, begin
to move back to the north country. The
Objective point of mnny of the traders
is   Kort   Resolution,  a   post   on   Oreat
Slave Luke, nearly one thousand miles
north of Kdmuntou, as the trail leads,
and  something like four hundred  miles
■Outh of the Arctic Circle.    Fort Chip-
powiiyan, on Lake Athabasca is another
Important post, also on the edge of the
fur couutry; and thsre are a number of
posts iu the interior and aloug the Mackenzie lliver, which  flows from Great
8l;ivi;  Lake into the Arctic Sea,    The
D'.-i--' northerly post is Fort McPhersou,
Cn  the Peel Kiver, two thousand miles
porlli of Edmonton, and approximately
o>:e hundred and fifty miles above the
Arctic Circle.
Each company of traders takes a
large supply of provisions and goods
for barter, in addition to its own stock
Of food, guns, etc., and the journey in
Covering the thousand miles to Fort
Resolution, or tbo greater distances to
the more remote posts, is one of great
difficulty and hardship. Tho first nine
ty miles out of Edmonton is overland
to Athabasca Landing, on the A Iha
bases River, where flat boats and can
oes are taken and the trip to the fur
Country beginb in earnest, The route
lies downstream a!) the way, since the
Athabasca flows north into Athabasca
Lake, which is connected with Great
Blave Lako by tbe Great, Slave River.
But there are many rapids to be avoid
ed by means of long portages, so that
■ven this part of tho journey is not
tasy.
The traders come back to Edmonton
moru heavily Udon than when tbey
went away. Tho potts obtained by
barter direct from the trappers or co
letted from distant posts are packed
In bales weighing about a hundred or
an pounds each, and landed nn (heir
Canoes and dat boats. Then the fight
against the current sli the way back
to Athabasca Lund ing is commenced.
Tow linen are attached to the bigger
and heavier of the boats, and they are
)d   upstream   by    men    who   walk
too heavy for the best specimens, wh
he trapper must catch iu snares o!
render boughs or in some such way.
Sometimes ho puts a little grease on hi.-
kmitiug knife und lays it across the sue
cesstcn of dots and dashes in the snow
which show un ermine has passed thu
way. Along comes the little white forn
nu its erratic course again, The greosi
ippeals to it, and it begins to lick the
blade of the knife; but, alast thu.
piece of steel is icy cold, and the tiny
red tongue is instantly frozen to it si
tightly ns to render futile all the fran
tic struggling. The knife ia too heavy
lor the little animal to carry awuy
and in his own good time the trappei
comes and finishes his work.
If he manages to take a silver fox
the trapper is in great luck, for tin
pelt of a prime specimen of that ani
•nal is worth fifteen hundred dollar*
to the mun who buys it down at Kd
inonton, aud the very best will briny
the buyer as much ns twenty-five huu
lied dollars. But the trapper gets few
silver foxes, and for theso be receives ti
price much smaller than the figure at
whieh the white trader will eventually
make his sale. The animal of which
the trapper will probably capture most
is the lynx. One firm of traders brought
eight thousand lynx into Edmonton last
summer, and these formed only a part
of the total receipts. Others which are
tnken in large numbers are beavers,
beers, otters, wolverines, minks, martens, musk rats, musk-oxen, fishers,
weasels, and white, rod, black, and
cross fox. TeiiB of thousands are trapped during the course of a season.
The hunter or trapper must carry
traps and supplies into the remotest
regions, where even lumbermen,, are un
known. He builds a low, wide sled
holding three hundred pounds, nnd
loads this with por a, flour, undercloth
ing, and Bteel traps. And when the iei
on streams and lakes will bear his
we-ght he starts into the wilderness,
there to lead a hermit's life for seven
from the nearest habitation, the trapper tries to find two parallel streams
running near each other. Here h
pitches Ins home-camp, setting traps
along both rcvirs. The work of taking
months, Arrived at « point many miles
game from the traps is varied by catching fish, snaring rabbits, and capturing
musk-rats for bait and fond. Nnw and
then the hunter mny kill a wandering
bear—an event which may lend him to
a big store of wild bonny in a hollow
tree. In this utter solitude lives tht-
adventurer, perhaps forgetting the day
of the week nr the month nf the year,
lie fixes tho dato for breaking up camp
and fuming bnck to civilization by thp
condition of the fur on the animals he
takes or by the effects of sunlight on
the snow. Now and then hp will shoot
deer, or even a moose, for the sale
nf the rawhide, meat, and fat, which
latter keeps his traps from rusting.
A file servos him instead of a grindstone to keen uxor and knives keen:
nnd he washes his clothes through a
hole in the ice, drying them by an open
fire. The dazzling lylarp nf February
often brings snow-blindness: and a
month or two later the fast-thinning
fnr on his prpy shows that further work ,
is unprofitable. TTe then apcretes his
traps in hollow logs ready for next
season, trneks his load of pelts on the
wide sled, nnd trudges off through the
forest to the nearest post or settle
ment. Oa arriving, the trapper sells
his furs.
When the trading Benson is over, the
trappers en bach to thoir winter hn»,r
Ing grounds, which they do not leave
from October til! .Tune. Here they mav
hsvp a shark nr hut built of |o£<» which
will wmb.t. thp*n to withstand thp rigorous weather, but the location must be
ear the homes of the animals, where
hey can frequently examine the score
■r mure of traps and nets which are
mt fur their capture. The extreme cold
,-eather largely enables them to keep
he skins "cached" ot stored out of
oors until late spring, when they pre*
■are for their journey southward to
.met tho traders. The furs may be
tucked on ponies, on sledges, or in
»oata or otucr water-craft, for where
vaterways a're available these are used
a making the jouruey. As the traders
.ow advance further into the wilder-
IGS9 the hunters and trappers aro saved
muy a week formerly uceded lu mak-
ng their wuy to the nearest factory.
So many uro uow engaged at the vo-
atlon that the American fur trade is
.dually  greater  to-day  than  over  be-
ore, in spite of the immense tracts of
.vilderness formerly tho home of game
iiiimals whiih huve been settled by the
ivhitc men,   This is because by the pre-
ent system the hunters aud trappers
ei-ure much more value for their sains
han   iu   the   pust,  and   have  time  to
over a larger area uf the wilderness.
ioine of thu Indians iu the more north-
'idy sections, where the  furs are the
luest because of lho greatest cold, sel
.om or uever aee a white man or any
dgt)  of  civilization.    They   remain  iu
bu woods  from year's end to year's
:ud.   Tho pelts which they gather aud
hang  on   trees,  or  "cache"   iu  some
neve effective manner, are collected by
lialfbreed representatives of the trad
is whenever the opportunity offers.
Many curious instances of the man-
ier iu which the honesty of the Indiau
Manifests itself are cited in tho north
country.   One of the tales told is of a
native who, desiring food and tobacco
tnd blankets, broke into the store of
i remote trading-post which had beeu
locked and abandoned for a fbw woeks
.vhile the  white mau  iu  charge transacted business elsewhere.   The Indian
supplied his needs, but he left pelts for
payment for what he took; and mouths
later ho came back to ascertain if ho
liad left enough.    Except iu the matter
of price, the traders deal fairly witb
the Indians, uud ordinarily nothing but
good   feeling  exists   between   the   two
classes.   One Indian found a post closed when he went to it to dispose of his
•duns.     Being   unwilling   to   wait,   he
forcibly entered and left his pack, but
tothing with it to indicate his identity.
Thou he retired, fastening the door as
best he could, aud not until a year later
lid he rturu.   When ho walked into the
post  and  told  his story  the.price  of
the skins was handed over to him without question. The accouuts of the white
■nan  had  been cnrefully kept, and he
wus certain that uo claim but a just
one would be made. |
Hev. Father Manual AbaHcai, of the
Roman Catholic Lliurcu of the Holy
Angel. Chief uf i'ulive Anuuudu Run
aiul Sr, Miguel Morales ucted fur the
oiide, white at. Julio de la Turre and
Frunvibco U. t^uiius acted for lhe bridu-
giimm,
'lhe bride will iu a few days start
for Paris to joiu her husbaud.
NERVE AGONIES
pull
along the hanks "tracking," as it is
Called, When the portages are reached
the boats must be unloaded and the
curgnoa and the boats carried past the
rapids, doing down, it is possible to
■end the goods by land and "shoot"
the rapids in the empty boat sometimes. Going up, it is unload, carry,
tnd reload from end to end.
But if the men who do this part of
th'1 work havo a hard task, the lot of
the trapper is Infinitely harder. He
Kiust pursue the sources of his livelihood with the utmost cunning, varying
tiia methods, from lodging a bullet in
the vitals of '* bear or other large animal in such a way as will not injure
the pelt to setting tho subtlest of
snares for Bach wary ones as the little
ermine, only the jet black tail of which
Is Visible a? it whisks across the blinding snow. The ermine is very shy, and
It must be specially deolt with in order
to avoid injury to its delicate skin.
Bvsn t.h« smallest of the steel traps are
WSo
ALL xVBBVOUS DISEASES CURED
BY DR. WILLIAMS' PINK PILLS
Nerves that ure overworked or weak
quickly indicate their distress by pain,
That pain may bc neuralgia or Inflamed
nerves, usually affecting the head, but
ofton the spine and limbs. It may In-
nervous dyspepsia, easily started by
worry, excitement or weakness. Tt may
be St. Vitus dance, a common aftlictioi
among children, or neurasthenia, a con
dition of general nervous exhaustion
accompanied by acute melancholy.
Worst of all the pain may signal tho
early stages of paralysis or nervous dt
cay. All these disorders signify that
the hungry nerves are clamoring foi
nourishment in the form of good, rich
blood. The numerous cures of the above
named nervous ilium*-* and weakness
in both seres by Dr. Williams' Phil'
Pills, are accounted for by the fact that
these Pills actually make new, rich
blood and so supply the starved nervot.
ivit.b the vital elements needed tc
strengthen them. Mr. Wm. 0. .Inn**
West mead, Mnn., says: "A few year>
ago it was my misfortune to sutfer front
nervous debility, brought about through
a severe attack of tu grippe or inflii
enea, When the first effects were felt I
used to wake up in the middle of sleep
trembling tike a leaf, and in a bath of
cold perspiration. Later the trouble
ijrew so bad tbat I scarcely got a wink
of sleep, aud would toss about in bed.
/rowing so weak that I feared for my
life, A doctor was called in, nnd then
another, but without avail. I became
more aid more low spirited, and witb
out any apparent reasou would have fit*-
of crying. While ia this condition, a
pamphlet was given me telling whnt
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills had done for
others, and I determined to give them
a trial. By thc time I bad finished a
few boxes I began to get some sleep.
and this greatly encouraged me. Then
my strength began to return, my nerves
grew steadier and in a few weeks more
[ was feeling as well ns ever I did in
my life, and you may be cure I will al
ways gratefully recommend Dr. Wil
Hams' Pink Pillc to every one sick or
ailing, as they restored me to health
and strength after all other medicines
kad failed."
Vou can get theae Pillc from any
medicine dealer cr b/ mail at 50 cents
A box or oix botes for $2.80 from The
r>r, Williams' Medicine Ce., Breehvilla,
Oat
A REPORTER'S AEROPLANE BIDE
I'HERE aro plenty of reporters at tbe
aviation meets, but as their observations are usually made from
terra firmn, wo bave bo far had very
tew accounts of how it really feels to
lly. lhe mun who runs the machine
hns other things to think about, and
:s not usually a graphic writer. A cor
respondent of the Loudon limes, how
ever, recently took an air trip, being
invited lo go because he weighed 190
pounds. The aviators wero having a
weight-carrying contest. The wind was
blowing about twenty miles an hour,
and the rest of the competitors declined
to take the risk, so tho aviator and ihe
reporter had a ''walkover,'' but not
as tame au most victories of that kind.
We read:
The worst part of such a journey
for the novice is the waiting until
everythit.g is ready for the start. Tho
sensation of anticipation is not unlike
the feelii.g that oue has when one ia
wuitii g for u wounded boar to break
eover from tho corner into which he
is driven. But onco the propeller starts
lo whirl behind you all other thoughts
beyond the exhilaration of rapid motion vanisu. You have pript the struts
thinking that you will have to hold ou
like grim death, but you immediately
find that this is not necessary. Ihe
machine moves nloi.g the ground nt an
extraordinary pace and I only knew
that it was actually hying when I saw
the elevating-plane change from tho
horizontal. Of the motion of flight it
<s difficult to speak clearly. Even in
tho high wind that Mr. Grace was now
climbing, it was not more than the sen-
sat ion of a beautifully balanced motor-
enr. The earth—in this ease the sward
of the Lanark racecourse—seemed to
be racing away from under us, und in
a flash we were level with the first pylon
aud the judge's box.
"The mat hine was now up to 150
feet, and I became engrossed in Mr.
' I race's method iu flyii g. it seemed
to mo that his attention waB glued to
his elevating plane, with just moment-
uy glances out of his eyes to judge
the distance by which he had to thnn
each pylon in its turn. Wo were now
crossing fields nnd water. I could observe the gates, the wire fences, and
a man bathing in the water. Then we
went nround into the wind, Onr pace
immediately slackened, nnd Mr. Grace
vas working to keep his machine In
the air. As we crossed a rond we were
going so Slowly thnt I eould observe
the direction of the hoof marks of a
horse thnt Ind recently passed, Hero
all observation ceased, as Mr. Grace
wua now battling with the wind. We
had only 500 yards to traverse to cross
the wincing Pne. but thp dead weight
ngainst the wind was bringing tho ma-
hine down. Then there came ft gust
heavier than them all. Tt took the mn-
ehlne .'ust un the requisite amount to
cross the line, nnd we came gently to
earth. It hnd only been n four minute
■He. but it was certainly tbe most delightful fide that I have ever export*
"need. The only recollect ion thnt I
have that will describe the general sensation is that of exquisite motion."
A YOUNO COUPLE MARRIED BY
PROXY
MVRRIA0ES by proxy are yet allowed by law in Cuba, On Wednesday (says a Cuban newspaper, a
marked copy of whicli has been sent us
by a Toronto mnn now in Jamaica) one
of these weddings took place in this city
at the residence of Mrs. floler on the
Mnlecnn. when hpr daughter, Sta. Moni-
na Holer, becamo the wife of Mr.
Frnncis Rur,. son of tho well-known
broker of this city, who Ib now in Paris.
8r. Ri.x sent a power of attorney to
his fripnd, Speaker Orestes Porrara, and
another to Sr. Manuel Torres, flr. Torres
f-enrcsentpd the bridegroom at the wedding, aa Sr, Porrara was awav in Santa
Clara. I
The eeremonjr was performed by the
QUEER FIRE TRICES EXPLAINED
I MIU. tricks were practised in very
.     ancient   times.    The   first   known
tire-breather was a Syrian slave
named Kun us, a leader in the servile
war in Sicily, 130 B.C. He pretended
to hnve immediate communication with
the gods. Wheu desirous of inspiring
his followers with courage ho breathed
Hames and sparks from his mouth.
Iu order to accomplish this feat Eu
uus plersed a nutshell at both ends, and,
having filled it with some burning substance, he put it tn his mouth and
breathed through it. Thc same trick is
performed today in a more approved
manner, The performer rolls some flax
or hemp into a ball about the size of
a walnut, which he lots bum until it is
nearly consumed. Then he rolls around
it more flax while it is still burning
liy this means the fire is retained iu the
ball for a long time. He slips tins ball
iuto his mouth uuperceived, and theu
breathes through it. His breath revives
the fire, and he sustains no injury so
long as he inhales only through his nos
trils.
Various theories have been advanced
to account for other feati of this sort
performed by the ancients, observes
Harper's Weekly. An old ordeal was
thc holding of a red-hot iron by thc
accuued, who was uot burned if he were
innocent. Probably some protective
paste was used on the hands. The peculiar property of mineral salts, such
as alum, iu protecting articles of dress
from fire has long been known. An old
Milanese devised a costume consisting
of a cloth covering for tke body which
had beeu steeped ia alum. A metallic
dress of wire gauze was added to this,
nnd thus protected a man might walk
ou hot iron.
Pire walking it an ancient Oriental
custom, the origin of which is apparently unknown. It still survives in India, .Japan and some of the South Sea
Inlands. . The performance, sometimes
preceded by incantations conducted by
priests and followed by a feast, consists in walking barefoot over a bed
of stones which have been made red
or white hot by fire.
A tribe ou one of the Fiji Islands
was ouce persuaded to give an exhibition, and several Europeans went to
witness it. Oue of them, a Government
meteorologist, carried a thermometer
lhat would register up to fonr hundred
When the guests arrived they found
lundreds of natives assembled. The
oven was twenty-five or thirty feet long
and eight feet broad, and was shaped
like a saucer. The deepest part of the
depression was fifteen feet in length.
The preparations had beeu undertaken
long in advauce to avert any delay,
aud the visitors saw the stoues still
covered with embers.
Walking beside the pit before this
was done, the man with the thermometer recorded a temperature of one hundred and fourteen degiees. After the
stoned were uncovered he hung his instrument ' out over the centre of the
oven, »L ■.' feet above the stones, whereupon the mercury rose to two hundred
and eighty-two degrees. It ia said the
stoues were ''white-hot," and that low
ttaiues from several holes between the
stones could be seen leaping up around
them.
Two of the men who were to walk
across the oven were examined by the
Europeans before their daring act.
They wore garments about the neck aud
waist. Their feet nud legs were entirely bare. The soles of their feet wero
soft and flexible, showing that they had
not been rendered permanently callous
in any way.
In order to detect the presence of
chemicals that might have been applied for the occasion, various tests
wero made.
Finally, at a signal, the seven or
eight natives who took pnrt in the exhibition came down in single file to the
oven aud walked across the Btones from
one end of the pit to the other. They
spent less than half a iniuute there.
Immediately nfter they emerged the
Europeans again inspected their feet,
but could find uo iigu of burning or
blistering.
Several Englishmen have tried this
experiment, uue of them a British re
sident on one of the Society Islands,
lie stated that he felt something re
sembling slight electric shocks, and
that the tingling sensation continued
for hours afterward, but that that was
all. The tender skin of his feet was
uot even hardened by fire. Yet the
stonos were so hot that an hour after
ward green branches thrown on them
caught fire and hlar.ed np.
placed the offending finger in thc hinges
of his table, which was attached to the
cell wall, and violently raised the leaf,
with the result that the finger wae ab
solutely shattered and had to be re
moved."
Another ease, even more remarkable
iu its way, wus that of the notorious
American criminal, iJidwell, who waB
seuteuced to penal servitude for life in
connection with the Bank of Englund
forgeries.
"He was in good health on conviction, but uever did any active work iu
prison. Feigning loss of power in his
legs, he lay in ocd from day to day,
aud from year to year, defying all efforts of persuasion, and resisting all unpleasant coercive measures devised to
make him work. When 1 saw him at
Dartmoor at the end of eight or nine
years of his sentence, long disuse of
his legs had rendered him almost a
cripple. The muscles wero extremely
wasted, and both hip and knee joints
were contracted iu a state of semi
flexion, so that he lay doubled up in
a bundle. - Though he was examined
time after time by experts, uo one succeeded lu discovering auy organic disease, or any cause for bis condition
othor than his owu firmly expressed determination never to do a day's work
for the British Government—a threat
which I believe he ultimately carried
out.''
Probably the biggest cannibal orgy
on record is one of which Miss Beatrice
Grimshaw tells in "Tho New New
Guinea" (Hutchinson), "In 1858 a
shipload of Chinamen was being taken
down to Australia. The vess<4 wub
wrecked upon a reef close to Russel
Island (New Guinea). The officers escaped iu boats, but wore never afterwards heard of. As for the Chinamen,
numbering 326, the natives captured
them, aud put them ou a small barren
island, where they had no food, aud uo
means of getting away. They kept their
prisoners supplied with food from the
mainland, uud every now and then curried away a few of them to eat, until
nit but one old mau had heen devoured.
This ono succeeded eventually iu getting away, uud told something of the
story, which seems to have met with
general disbelief. True it is, however,
on the evidence of the sons of those
who did the deed."
A characteristic story of John Bright
is told by Mrs. T. P. O'Connor In her
new book, " 1 Myself." He wns at.
dinner oue night with an M.P: whose
wife by no means shared her husband's
democratic sentiments. John Bright
waB sitting near his hostess, and she
was rather annoyed at having him among her smart guests, and thought to
give him a direct snub, so she said during u pause in the conversation:
"Mr. Bright, this rug, I understand,
wns made by you, ami * am very dissatisfied with it. I have only had it a
short time, and it is very shabby and
badly made,"
'Is itf" said Mr. Bright, getting up
deliberately from the.table and taking
silver candelabrum which he put
down upon the floor and, getting upon
his knees, closely examined the carpet,
"You are quite right," he said, blithely getting up. " It is a bad carpet, and
1 will order my firm to send you au-
other in its place." And then he calm-
resumed his political conversation
and the dinner went ou.
ally succeed in accepting one of the
partners in crime, Hare, as a Crows
witness, bo well" had the firm covered
iheir tracks. "We always took can
when we were going to commit murder,'' said Burke when the game wat
up, "that no one should be present-
that no one should swear to seeing tbe
deed done. They might suspect, but
they nover saw."
Burke, who suffered the extreme pes-
ulty uf thc law, has enriched the Kng-
new  verb.    "To
LITTLE TALES FROM NEW BOOKS
'1MU-: Infamous Captain Morgan and
I hia piratical crew were sometimes
in tight places in Panama, and on
one occasion were reduced to eutititf
their leathern bags. "Homo persons,'
says one of the company, Kx.iuemelin
(whose narrative is reproduced in "The
Buccaneers in the West Indie*''., "who
never were out of their mothers' kitchens may ask how these pirates could
eat, swallow and digest those pieces of
lesther, so hard and dry. Unto whom
I only answer; That could they experiment what hunger, or, rather, famine is.
'.hey would certainly find the manner,
by their own necessity, as the pirates
did. First, these took tbe leather and
sliced it in pieces. Then did they beat
it between two stones and rub it, often
dipping it in the water to render it by
these means supple nnd tonder. Lastly,
they scraped off the hair and roasted
or broiled it upon the fire. And being
thus cooked they cut it into smnll morsels and ate it, helping it down with
frequent gulps of water, which by good
fortune they had right at band."
Malingering is common In jail, but
surely a case quoted from his own experience by Br. Quintnn, the Ute Governor of Holloway, in "Crime and Criminals" (Longmans) is a record. The
"hero" wss a vinlont prisoner who
feigned stiffness of the index linger to
avoid oakum picking. He was so angry
when the finger was forcibly bent that,
on retiming to his cell, he promptly
SA/Ms Cure
3airily •(•pt eviirihat cmii i
ie IWmI hJ tmmi*
 faeaU
SS  tMU
THE PART PLATED BY CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE IN FA-
MOUS MURDER TRIALS
'IMIE Crippen trial haB raised once
1 more the much debated question
of capital punishment, garnished
with the usual stock-in-trade of the abolitionists—the uncertainty of circumstantial evidence. And yet, if the question be thoroughly probod, it will be
found that many murderers would escape the just award of the avenging law
if circumstantial evidence were no long
er admissible. Those who premeditate
murder, as a rule, take every precaution
to avoid direct evidence. In the majority of cases the murderer is caught
in the toils of circumstantial evidence
which he alone has supplied. The pieces
of underclothing, the scrap of hair, the
portion of flesh with the scar of an old
abdominal operation—all these might
have boen destroyed by Crippen. Mulder will out. Falsehoods cannot be
woven into the fine unbroken web of
truth, A close examination reveals tin
Haws of the most adept criminal who
seeks to cover his footsteps. The so
called romance of crime lips in the ingenious devices by which the accused
endeavors to throw the sleuth hand uf
justice off the scent. They spin such
a mazy web that they themselves are
caught in its toils.
Who has not heard of theae famous
partners iu crime, whose figures hold a
place of honor in Madame Tnssaud's
chamber of horrors! The thrill of horror with which the public learned of
their gruesome traffic led to the passing
of the Anatomy Act. Here was an organized, dividend-paying partnership,
syndicated for thc supply of corpses to
the unsuspecting anatomists, nnd, ns a
mere incident in the ungodly trade, for
tbe forcible emigration from this world
of many poor waifs and strays, who, despite their helpless despair, clung tenaciously to life. Having selected au easy
and unsuspecting victim, Burke, the
diplomatist and soft spoken benevolent
friend, tracked the quarry to hia lair.
Here his partner smothered the shrieks
of those who protested against *' tIn-
deep damnation of their taking off;"
some, doped with drink aud drugs,
yielding up their spirits without struggle or alarm. The corpse was then sold
to good, easygoing Dr. Perkins, who
asked no questions, Old washerwomen,
Idiots, the flotsam and jetsam of the
streets, arrived ut this human abattoir
singly on foot, and found their way to
the dissecting table. Some, on tue pretext of having a drink, passed into tbe
murderers' den, never to emerge alive.
They were more valuable in death than
in life. Human wrecks whom no one
wanted brought $50 ea.ch when ready
for the hospital theatre. The very
helplessness and friendliness of tbe
classes preyed on proved to be the
strong card in evading suspicion. No
one wanted these poor, down-and-outs
in life; in doath thoir only markef value was ns subjects for the dissecting
knife. The score of victims to the ere
dit of these ghouls was forty, and all
seempd welt until Hare, avariclonc man.
took In lodgers. This proved his undoing. Even with the sworn testimony
of the lodgers, who were the horror-
stricken eye-witnesses of the murder of
victims, the prosecution could only In-
lish language with „^_^_^___
burke "--to Biuother, to get rid of
noiselessly—iB often used by the public
speaker aud Parliamentary debates.
without auy thought or knowledge of
its gruesome antecedents,
Tho notorious euse of the murderer
George Muilins, is a typical instance of
the lata! tendency of tho criminal to
weave the uoose for his own neck,
.Muilins was a policeman in Ireland and
also iu Euglaud. After leaving the
force he did odd jobs as repairing contractor, and in this capacity did work
for old Mrs. Elmsley, a penurious, auspicious old woman, whose house rente
from tenants brought her iu the comfortable weekly sum of $200. Thc murder of this lonely old woman leaked
out ou n Monday, and straighLly pointed to robbery as the motive. It waa
dourly the work of some one hungering
for the weekly rents which she had collected on the Saturday night. Midline,
the ex policeman, wua the oue being she
trusted, Search proved that the old
miser hud disappointed the hopes of her
murderer, 'lhe money wus afterwarde
found carefully hidden away. No cine
was found to tho murderer. The whole
tragedy seemed wrapped iu impenetrable mystery. A reward of #1,500
was offered, and the greed for money
led Muilins to the scuifold. lle came
forward to claim the reward, informing
the police that tho crime had been
committed by a friend uf his, named
EmtiiB. To the hitter's house Muilins
and tho police went, but uo clue wae
found. Unable to resist the glitter ol
the big reward, Muilins critil: "Yon
haven't half searched; look behind tbat
.-lab there," pointing to it large stone
in the yard. Under ihe slab was found
a parcel containing spoons belonging to
the murdered woman. The parcel wae
tied with a piece of shoemaker's waxed
cord. The eagerness of Muilins and his
indiscretion in locating tne booty led to
hiB arrest along with Emms, the latter was a shoemaker, aud Muling, with
u fur-seeiug cunning that failed him in
the end, hnd deposited the parcel in
his neighbor's yard, and to throw suspicion on uu Innocent man, hud got possession by some means ut a piece ol
waxed cord, wilh which to tie it. He
went to the scaffold protesting to the
last his innocence of the crime.
The mills of Cod ground slowly bnt
surely in the caso of Eugene A nun. He
murdered Uuniel < lurke, the mystery
of whosedisappearauce wus not at the
time unraveled. Time passed, uud the
name of Clarke was forgotten, save by
tbe oldest inhabitants. The lapse of
yenrs brought a sense of security, li
not freedom from remorse, to the murderer, Excavations led to the unearthing of a skeleton which set the memories of the older Inhabitants jogging
backwards to the fatal yeur of the die-
nppeuraiice of Clarke. Ao accomplice
of Aram's, who, like Muilins, unwisely
aired his superior knowledge, stubbornly insisted that tho skeleton was not
thut of Clerke, To buck up his theories ngainst some of tho in habitants, be
pointed out the Bpot where another
skeleton bad beeu found. The second
skeleton was unearthed, and Eugene
Aram was placed on trial for his life,
lle relied, like Crippen, ou the difficulty of identifying the remains, bet
the court and jury showed sound common sense'by sending him to the scaffold.
Anothor crime immortalized in literature wus the murder of his young and
eutitiful bride by John Hcunlon, u dashing young offlcor of twenty-live, of good
family, and a great favorite iu the
highest circles. Staying over at DubHa
on his way home to Limerick, iu the
days of the rumbling end uncertain
stage conch, be fell in love with tbe
niece of a rope-maker (ominous tradel)
rfnmeJ Ellen Connedy. After tbe marriage they went to live at Glln, County
Limerick," Ireland, where, within n fow
weeks after his marriage, Scnnlon determined to get rid of his beautiful wife.
He selected ns his accomplice u servant
mau named Sullivan. Inviting his wife
for a row on the broad waters of the
Kiver Shannon one quiet evening, he
did hod to death, and cast ber body into
lhe water. Presuming on his standing ns a "gentleman," he gave out thai
his humblv-born wife had turned out to
be of Indiuerent character, and hnd goat
to America. How Crippen-like the storyl
I he lady's character whs too well-
known, however, nod few believed thle
story. After a time her dead body wm
oust up on tho shore—mute witneee
ngainst her cruel husband. Like Crippen, Scan Ion hnd mutilated the body ol
his victim so that it would be uurecog*
nizable. Still the identity was estaD-
lishod .»y a sensible jur^r of her cobntry-
men. The case was tried before Huron
Smith, and he, fearing the great family
interest of the accused ordered Scat-
Ion to be hanged forthwith. Ills titled
relatives were unable to reach DublU
iu time, and Reunion paid the death
penalty. Out of these gruesome materials Gerald Griffon wove his finest romance; Dion Bouetcault his fiimone
"Colleen Bnwn," and Benedict's "Lily
of KiHarney."
WEAK, SICKLY BABIES
HAKE HONE WRETCHED
Nr/ home in buppy where llu-re is ■
nick baby. Tbe sum-rings of the littl*
one makes the whole household wretched, for what mother or father would
not rather suffer themselves tban to
see their little one suffer. But there if
nn reason for wretched homes becauM
baby is ill. Baby's Own Tablets will
cure all the minor ills of babyhood and
childhood; not only that, but an occasional dose of the Tablets will keap
baby well. Thousands of mothers hav«
found happiness through thc Tablet!
making their little ones well and happy.
Among them is Mrs. O. 0. Roe, of
Oeorgi-town, Ont., who writes: "X
can heartily recommend Baby's Own
Tablets as a help to the baby during
the hot summer season. We have used
them nnd are much pleased with thei!
esults," The Tablets are sold by medl-
Ine dealers nr hy mail at 25 cents. ■
hox from The Dr. Williams' MedielM
Oe., Brockvllle, Ont
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oh '(iNviuanw.io asuNVisi aiu THE ISliANDKR. CUMBERLAND. B.C
The North Amerinan Fur
Industry
ALA&GE proportion of tUo
whicli the world 'a poople wear
fur gurnienU btill cOtUOS i'ruui
North America, says Chambers's Journal, doapite tho great, changes which
have occurred ou that continent, on
poeially within tin, laat fifty yoara, by
tho nettling of what wm formerly u
wilderness, The vnlue of tho yearly
fur hunt on sea and land throughout
the world is about five million pounds,
Of this anumnt Canada and Alaska
contribute nearly one-fifth, not because
of tlte large numbor uf skins secured
by lhe hunters, but because bo many
of thfin are rare aud valuable, for we
must remember that tho souls taken in
tbe waters of North America a luu* re
present a very largo mnn each yoar.
The history of tho Hudson's Bay
Company might bo called a history of
tbe American fur industry; because,
■ince it was formed back in the seven
teeuth century, this corporation has
hud ita agcuts and hunters scattered
over an enormous territory, Over a
century ago it had no leas than one
hu lulled aud sitxy trading 'posts and
"factories"—the term factories mean
ing stations in charge of its factors or
bin era. It nut only obtained furs from
nioht of thm part of Canada which is
north and west of tho Great Lakes,
but many thousand pelts were received
from the Pacific North-West—that portion of thu United Btatos comprising
the states of Oregon, Washington, and
Nevada—at that rime almoBt unknown
to the white man. In those daya Win
nlpeg was the head-ceutro of the Hudson's liuyJJompany, too log fort which
It constructed bolng tho foundation of
the present city. No longer is this tho
head centre, for divlUzaticn has crowded the fur-hunter farther aud farther
nnrth, uutil Winnipeg ib only one of
tiie minor stations of the great corporation.
Seven hundred miles to tho northwest uf it is Edmonton, tho largest
Dim ket for "raw ' furs tu the New
World, the capital of Alberta, aud tho
most northern point on the North
American continent to be reached by
a continuous line of railroad. Picturesque yet modern, and an outpost of
empire, Edmonton in tho old days was
an Important settlement in that sec
tion, the extreme north western market
In the fur-country, lt was founded a
century or so ago by the old North
Western Fur Company, for a brief time
a competitor of the Hudson's Bay Com
pa/iy.
Tbe industry is no*- divided into
branches, Hut few r.f tho skins aro
Secured by the buyers diroot from the
binders aud trappers, most of them
being obtained through tbe fur-trailers
Who yearly make expeditions into thc
Wilderness, and obtain a "load," often
for a supply of provisions and clothing,
aud perhaps no monoy whatever
changes hands. In the spring, when
the iee aud auow commence to thaw,
the agents of thc big concerns, the 1'roe
traders and the few trappers who have
Cared to bring thoir fura as far back
as Kdmouton and Prince Albert, begin
to move back to the north couutry. Ibe
Objective point of many of the traders
it. Kort Resolution, a post ou Great
Slave Lake, nearly one thousand miles
north of hMmonton, aa thu trail leads,
and something like four hundred mites
■Out!) of the Arctic Circle. Fort Chip*
pewnyan, on Luke Athabasca is another
important post, also on the edge of the
fnr couutry; and there are a number of
Ioata iu the interior and along the Mac-
euzle River, winch flows from Great
Blavo Lake into the Arctic Hen, The
most, northerly post is Port MePhoraou,
Cn thi* Peel Kiver, two thousand miles
north of Etdmnnton, and approximately
oio hundred and fifty miles above tho
Arctic Circle.
Each company of traders takes a [
large supply of provisions and goods
for barter, in addition to its own stoek
Of food, guns, etc., and the journey In
Covering the thousand miles to Port
Resolution, or tho greater distances to
lhe more remote posts, is one of great1
diflicnlty and hardship. Tho first ninety miles out of Edmonton is overland
to Athabasca Landing, on the Athabasca River, where flat boatB and canoes are taken aud the trip tn the fur*
•ountry begins in earnest. The route
lies downstream all the way, Hince the1
Athabasca flows north into Athabasca I
Lake, which is connected wiih Great]
Bliive Lake by the Great Slave River.
Bnt there are many rapidB to b* avoided by means of long portages, so tbat
•ven  this part of tbo journey is not
too heavy for llie best specimens, whicli
he trapper must catch in snares oi
lender boughs or in some such wuy
Soniatlnies he puts a little grease ou hir
hunting knife und lays it acrOBB the sue
COSsicn of dots and dashes in the snov
which show an ermine has passed thu
way. Along comes tbe little white forn
ou its erratic course again. The greasi
ippeuls to it, and it begins tu lick the
blade of the knife; but, alas! tha
piece of Bteel is ley eold, and tho tin\
rod tongue is Instantly frozen to it si
tightly as to render futile all the frun
lie Struggling, The knife is too heav\
fur the little animal to carry awas
and in his own gnud timo the trappei
oomei and finishes his work.
IT he manages to take a silver fox
the trapper is iu great luck, for tin
pelt of - prime specimen uf that ani
nal is worth fifteen hundred dollar*
to the man who buys it down at Kd
•loiilon. and the very best will brinn
'he buyer as much ss twenty-five huu
died dollars. Rut the trapper gets few
-diver foxes, and foT theso he receives a
price mueh smaller than the figure at
which the white trader will eventually
make his sale. The animal of which
tho trapper will probably capture mosl
is the lynx. One firm of traders brought
eight thousand lynx into Edmonton last
summer, and these funned only a part
of tho total receipts. Others which arc
taken in large numbers are beavers.
beers, otters, wolverines, minks, martens, musk rats, musk-oxen, fishers,
weasels, and white, red, black, and
cross fox. Tens of thousands are trap
ped during the course of a season.
The hunter or trapper must carry
traps and supplies into the remotest
regions, where even lumbermen, are un
known. lie builds a low, wide sled,
holding three hundred pounds, nnd
loads this with pora, flour, undercloth
ing, and steel traps. And when the ice
on Btream8 and lakcB will bear his
weight be starts into the wilderness,
there to lead a hermit's life for seven
from the nearest habitation, the trapper tries to find two parallel streams
running near each other. Here he
pitches his home-camp, setting trans
along both revirs. The work of taking
months. Arrived at a point many miles
game frr/m the traps is varied by catch
ing fish, snaring rabbits, and capturing
musk-rats for bait and fond. Nnw nnd
then the hunter mny kill s wandering
bear—sn event which may lead him to
a big store of wild honey in a hollow
tree. In this utter solitude lives the
adventurer, perhaps forgetting the day
nf tho week or the month of the year.
Tie fixes the dato for breaking up camp
and turning back to civilization by the
condition of the fur on the animals he
takes or by the effects of surPght on
the snow. Now and then he will shr.nl
a deer, or oven a moose, for the sake
of the rawhide, most, and fat. which
latter keeps his traps from rusting.
A file serves Itim instead of n grindstone to keen axes nnd knives keen;
nnd he washes hi» clothes through a
hrde in the ice. drying them by an open
fire. The dazzling rrlnre nf February
often brings snow-blindness: and a
month nr two Inter the fast-thinning
fur on his prey shows tlmt further work
is un profits Me. He then secretes his
trnps in hollow logs ready for next
season, packs his load nf pelfa on the
wide sled, nnd trudges off through the
forest to the nearest pnst or settlement, On arriving, the trapper sells
his furs.
Whon the trading season In over, the
trappers' go bnck tn their winter hir.t
ing grounds, which they do not leave
from October till -Tunc. Here thoy may
have a shack or hnt built nf lou* which
will enable the-n to withstand the rigorous weather, hut the location must be
oar the homes of the animals, where
hoy vun frequently examiuo the score
<r more of traps and nuts whicli arc
et for their capture. The extreme cold
feather largely enables them to keep
he skins "cached" ot stored out of
uora until late spring, wheu thoy pre
■ure fur their journey southward to
iioet the traders, 'lho lum may be
ached uu ponies, on sledges, or iu
oats or otuor water-craft, for where
wtterwuys a're available theso aro used
ii mukii.g the jourucy. Aa the traders
.ow udvance further into the wilder-
teas the hunters aud trappers aro saved
lauy a week formerly needed iu malt-
i.g their way to the nearest factory.
•So many aro uuw engaged ut the vo
utiou that ih.' American fur trade is
etually  greater  to-day  than  over  be
uio, in Hjiite uf thv immense tracts of
ivllderness formerly tho homo of game
,annals which have been settled by thc
vhite men,   This is boeauso by the pre
ent system the hunters aud trappers
ecuro much tnure value for their sains
hau   iu   the  pust,  and   have   time   to
uver h larger urea uf tho wilderness.
Some of tho Indians iu thu mure north
'ily  sections, whore tho  furs ure thc
IUOSt because of the greatest cold, sel
om or never see a white man or any
*ign  uf  civllirtitlon.    They   remain  in
do  woods  from year's end  to year's
ind.    The pelts which they gather and
Hang   uu   trees,  or  "cache"   iu   some
nore effective manner, aro collected by
hatfbreed representatives of the trad-
is whenever the opportunity offers.
Many curious Instance! of tho mau-
ner In which tho honesty of the lndiau
uunifests itself are cited in the uorth
country,   One of tho tales tuld la of a
iative who, desiring food and tobacco
tnd blankets, broke into thc store of
i  remote trading-post which had been
locked and abandoned for a few weeks
ivliile  the  white  man  in  charge trail-
-acted business elsewhere,    Tho Indian
supplied Ins needs, but he left pelts for
payment fur what be took; nud months
later he came back to ascertaiu if he
liad left enough.   Except iu the matter
of price,  tho traders deal  fairly witb
the Indiana, and ordinarily nothing but
good  feeling exists between the two
classes,    One Indian found a post closed when he wont to it to dispose of his
skins.     Being   unwilling   to   wait,   he
forcibly entered and left his pack, but
nothing with it to indicate his identity.
Then be retired, fastening the door as
best he could, and not until a year later
Kev. Father Manual Abascai, of the
Uumuu Catholic L'huruu ut' thu Iioly
Angel. One! uf Police Artuuudu Kivu
autl br, Miguel Morales ailed tor the
Orldtt, While ar. Julio du lu Tune and
t'lmu-isco U. guiles acted fur the bridu-
gruoiU,
'lhe bride will in a few days stall
tor 1'aris lo juiu bur husband.
QUEER FIRE TRICKS EXPLAINED
IMHl'l tricks were practised ia very
. ancient times. The first known
fire-breather was a Syrian slave
named Kuutis, a lcador in the servile
war in Sicily, 180 B.O. He pretended
tu havo immediate communication with
the gods. Whon desirous of inspiring
his follower* with courage he breathed
flames and sparks from his mouth.
In order tu accomplish this feat Eu
nus pierced a nutshell at both ends, and,
having tilled it with some burning substance, he put it in his mouth and
breathed through it. The same trick is
performed today in a more approved
muniier. The performer rolls some flax
or hemp into a ball about the size of
a walnut, which he lots burn until it ia
nearly consumed. Then ho rolls around
it more flax while it is still burning,
tly this means the fire is retained iu the
ball fur a long time. Ho slips tins ball
iuto his mouth uuperceived, and theu
breathes through it. His breath revives
the fire, and he sustains no injury so
loug hs he inhales ouly through his nostrils.
Various theories have been advanced
to account for other feats of this sort
perfunited by the ancients, observes
Harper's Weekly. Au old ordeal waB
the holding of a red-hot iron by the
accused, who wa* uot burned if he were
innocent. Probably some protective
paste was used on the hands. The peculiar property of mineral salts, such
aB alum, iu protecting articles of dress
from fire has long beeu kuowu. An old
Milauese devised a costume consisting
of a cloth covering for the body which
had beeu steeped ia alum. A metallic
dress of wire gauze was added to this,
and thuu protected a man might walk
un hot iron.
Fire walking is an ancient Oriental
ustum, the origiu of which is apparently unknown. It still survives in In-
lia, Japan and some of the South Sea
Islands. . The performance, sometimes
receded by incantations conducted by
priests and followed by a feast, consists in walking barefoot over a bed
post and told his Btory the. price of
the skins was handed over to him with
out question. The accounts of the white
•nan had been carefully kept, and he
was certain that no claim but a just
mio would be made,
NERVE AGONIES
The traders come back to Edmonton
Bioro heavily laden than whon they
went away. Tho pelts obtained by
barter direct from the trappers or collected from distant posts are packed
In balea weighing about a hundred or
f> pounds eaeh, and loaded on their
«n noes and fiat boats. Then the fight
against the current all the wny back
to Athabasca Landing is commenced
Tow linen arc attached to the bigger
and heavier of the boats, and they are
pulled upstri-am by men who walk
tlong the hanks "tracking,'' as it is
Culled. When the portages are reached
th'* boats must Iw unloaded and the
Cargoes and the boats carried past the
rapids. Going down, it is possible to
fr--''; the goods by land and "shoot"
lhe rape's in the empty boat sometimes. Going up, it is unload, carry,
tnd reload from end to end.
But if the men who do this part of
th-' work have a hnrd task, the lot of
th** trapper is in finitely harder. He
must pursue the sources of his livelihood with the utmost cunning, varying
bis methods, from lodging a bullet in
the vitals of a bear or other large animal in such a way as will not injure
the pelt to setting  tho  subtlest   of
emires for such wnry ones ss the little
ermine, only the jet black tail of which
in visible as" it whisks across the blinding snow. The Otmlne is very shy, and
It must be specially dealt with In order
to avoid injury to its delicate skin,
Bven the smalloHt of the steel traps are
aaft&s
ALL AERVOUS DISEASES CURED
BY DR. WILLIAMS' PINK PILLS
Nerves that are overworked or weak
quickly indicate their distress by pain.
That pain may be neuralgia or Inflamed
nerves, usually affecting the head, hut
ofton the spine and limbs. It may be
nervous dyspepsia, easily started bv
worry, excitement or weakness. It ma\
be St. Vitus dauce, a common affllctioi
among children, or neurasthenia, a con
A it ion of general nervous exhaustion
accompanied by acute melancholy.
Worst of all tiie pain may signal the
early stages of paralysis or nervous dt
cay. All these disorders signify that
the hungry nerves are clamoring foi
nourishment in the form of good, rich
blood. The numerous cures of the abovi
named nervous diseases and weakness
in both sexes hy Hr. Williams' Pinl*
Pills, are accounted for by the fact that
these Pills act uu llv make new, rich
blood and so supply the starved nerves
with thc vital elements needed to
strengthen them. Mr. Win. O. Jones
Westmead, Man., says: "A few years
ago it was my misfortune to suffer from
nervous debility, brought about through
a severe attack of lu grippe or infiu
ensa. When the first effects were felt I
used to wake up ia the middle of sleep
trembling like i leaf, and in a bath of
cold perspi rati mi. Later the trouble
grew so bad that I scarcely got a wiutt
of sleep, and would toss about in bed.
growing ao weak that I feared for my
life. A doctor wns called iu, and then
another, but without avail. I became
more aid more low spirited, and with
out any apparent reason would have fits
of crying. While iB this condition, s
pamphlet was given me telling whnt
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills had done for
others, aad I determined to give them
a trial. By thc time I bad finished a
few boxes I began to get some sleep,
aad this greatly encouraged me. Then
my strength begau to return, my nerves
grew steadier and in a few weeks more
t was feeling aa well as ever I did in
my life, and you may be sure I will al
ways gratefully recommend Dr. Wil
Hams' Pink Pills to every one sick or
ailing, as they restored me to henlth
and strength after all other medicines
had failed."
You ean get theae PflM from any
medicine dealer er by wail at 50 cents
a box or six boxes for $2.50 from The
Hr. Williams' Medicine Co., Brockville.
Ont
d he rturn^ When ho walked into the | ()f  stones  which  have  been made  red
"or white hot by fire.
A tribe on one of the Fiji Islands
wag ouce persuaded to give an exhibition, and several Europeans went to
witness it. One of them, a Oovernment
meteorologist, carried a thermometer
that would register up to fonr hundred
When the guests arrived they found
hundreds of natives assembled. Tho
oven was twenty five or thirty feet long
and eight feet broad, and was shaped
like a saucer. The deepest part of the
depression was fifteen feet in length.
The preparations had been undertaken
long iu advance to avert auy delay,
aud the visitors saw the stoues still
covered with embers.
Walking beside the pit before this
was doue, the man with the thermometer recorded a temperature of one hundred and fourteen degiees. After tbe
stones Wjwe uncovered he bung his instrument''out over the centre uf the
oven, t.L •! feet above the stones, whereupon the mercury rose to two hundred
and eighty-two degrees. It is said the
stones were "white hut," and that low
llamcs from several holes between the
stones could be seen leaping up around
them.
Two of the men who were to walk
across the oven were examined by the
Europeans before their daring act.
Thoy wore garments about the neek and
waist. Their feet aud legs were entirely bare. The soles of their feet were
soft and flexible, showing that they had
not beeu rendered permanently callous
in any way.
Iu order to detect tke presence of
chemicals that might bave been applied for the occasion, various tests
were made.
Finally, at a signal, the seven ot
eight natives who took part in the ox
hiliition came down in single file to thi
oven ami walked across the stones from
one end of the pit to the other. They
s|K>ut  less than  half a  minute there.
Immediately nfter they emerged the
Europeans again inspected their feet,
but eould find no sign of burning or
blistering.
Several Englishmen have tried this
experiment, one of them a British re
•Orient on one of the Society Islands,
He stated that he felt something re
sembling slight electric shucks, and
■ lint the tingling sensation continued
for hours afterward, but that that was
all. The tender skin uf his feet was
uot even hardened by (Ire. Vet tin*
atones were so bot that nn hour after
ward green branches thrown on them
caught fire and blared np.
A REPORTER'S AEROPLANE RIDE
I'HERE aro plenty of reporters at tbo
aviation meets, but as their cbser
vat ions are usually mado from
terra firma, wo have so far had vory
few accounts of how it really fools to
ily. The man who runs tho machine
haa other things to think about, and
is not usually a graphic writer. A correspondent of the London limes, liuw
r, recently took an air trip, being
ited to go because he weighed 196
pounds. The aviators wero having a
weight-carrying contest. The wind was
blowing about twenty miles an hour,
■ind the rest of the competitors declined
to tako the risk, so tho aviator and tho
reporter bad a "walk-over," but not
as tame as most victories of that kind.
We read:
"The worst part of such a journey
for the novice is the waiting until
e very thi i g is ready for the start. Tho
sensation of anticipation is not unlike
lho feeliig that one has when one ia
wuttii g for a wounded boar to break
cover from the corner into whicli ho
is driven. But onco tho propeller starts
lo whirl behind you all other thoughts
hey und the exhilaration of rapid motion vanisn. You have grlpt tho struts
thinking that you will have to hold ou
like grim death, but you Immediately
find that this is not necessary, 'lho
machine moves along the ground nt an
extraordinary pace and I only knew
hat it was actually flying when I saw
the elevatii g ] lane change from the
horlftoi tal. Of the motion of flight it
•a difficult to speak clearly, Even in
the high wind that Mr. Grace was now
elmbiig, it was not more than the sensation ot a beautifully balanced motor'
enr, Thc earth—in this case the sward
of the Lanark racecourse—seemed to
be racing away from under us, and In
a flash we were level with the first pyl
and the judge's box.
"The machine was now up to 150
feet, and 1 became engrossed in Mr.
'1 race's method in flyi. g. It seemed
to mo that his attention was glued to
his elevating plane, with just moment'
uy glances out of his eyes to judge
tho distance by which he had to thuu
each pylon in its turn. Wo were now
crossing fields and water. I rould observe the gates, the wire foiiceH, and
i man bathing in the water. Then wo
went nround into the wind. Our pace
immediately Blackened, and Mr. Grace
vas working to keep his machine in
the air. As we crossed s road we were
going so slowly that I could observe
the direction of the hoof marks of a
horse that hid recently passed. Here
all observation ceased, ns Mr. Grace
was now battlitg with the wind. Wo
hnd only noo yards to traverse to cross
the winning line, but the dead weight
against the wind was bringing tho mn-
hine down. Then there came tt gust
heavier than them alt. Tt took the machine just up the requisite amount to
eros"B the line, nnd we came gently to
earth. It had only been a four minute
•i V, but it was certainly the most de-
'ightful ride that I have ever experienced. The only recollection that I
have that will describe the general sensation is that of exquisite motiou."
A YOUNG COUPLE MARRIED BT
PROXY
MVRRIAGES by proxy are yet allowed by law iu Cuba, On Wednesday (Bays a Cuban nnwspaper, a
marked copy of which hns been sent us
by a Toronto mnn now in Jamaica) one
of these weddings took plnce in this city
it the residence of Mrs, floler on the
Mnleeon. when her daughter. Sta. Monl-
na Holer, became the wife of Mr.
Francis Rur., son of the well-known
broker of this city, who is now in Paris.
Sr. Bit sent a power of attorney to
his friend, Speaker Orestes Forrara, and
another to Br. Manuel Torres. Br, Torres
represented the bridegroom at the wedding, aa Sr. Ferrara was away in Santa
Clara.
The ceremony wm performed by the
placed the offending finger in the hinges
of his table, which was attached to the
cell wall, and violently raised the leaf,
with the result tbat the finger was absolutely shattered and had to be removed."
Another ease, even more remarkable
in its way, was that of the notorious
American criminal, Uidwoll, who was
sentenced to penal servitude for life in
connection with the Bauk of Kngland
forgeries.
"Ho was in good health on conviction, but never did any active work iu
prison. Feigning loss of power in hiB
legs, he lay in bed from day to day,
nud from year to year, defying ull efforts of persuasion, aud resisting ull unpleasant coercive measures devised to
make him work. Wheu I saw him at
Dartmoor at the end of eight or nino
yoars of his sentence, loug disuse of
his legs had rendered hiin almost a
cripple. Thc muscles wero extremely
wasted, and both hip aud knee joints
were contracted iu a state of semiflexion, so that ho lay doubled up in
a bundle. - Though he was examined
time after time by experts, no one succeeded In discovering auy organic disease, or auy cause for his condition
other than his own firmly expressed determination never to do a day s work
for the British Government—a threat
which I believe he ultimately carried
out."
Probably the biggest cannibal orgy
on record is one of which Miss Beatrice
Grimshaw tells in "The New New
Guinea" (Hutchinson). "In 1858 a
shipload of Chinamen was being taken
down to Australia. The vessel was
wrecked upon a reef close to Rossel
Island (New Guiuoa). The oflicers escaped iu boats, but wore never afterwards heard of. As for the Chinamen,
numbering 326, the natives captured
them, and put them on a small barren
island, where they had no food, and no
means of getting away. They kept their
prisoners supplied with food frum the
mainland, and every now and then carried away a few of them to eat, until
nil but one old man had been devoured.
This one succieded eventually in getting away, and told something of the
story, which seems to have met with
general disbelief. True it is, however,
on the evidence of the sous of those
who did the deed."
A characteristic story of John Bright
is told by Mrs. T. P. O'Connor in her
now book, "I Myself." He was at
dinner one night with nn M.P: whose
wife by no means shared her husband's
democratic sentiments. John Bright
wag sitting near his hostess, and she
was rather annoyed at having hiin among her snuirt guests, und thought to
give him a direct snub, bo she said during a pause in the conversation:
"Mr. Bright, this rug, I understand,
was made by you, ami * am very dissatisfied with it. I have ouly had it a
short time, and it Ib very shabby and
badly made."
"Is itt'* said Mr. Bright, getting up
deliberately from the table and taking
l silver candelabrum which he put
lown upon the floor aud, getting upon
his knees, closely examined the carpet.
"You are quite right." he said, blithely getting up. "It is a bad carpet, and
I will order my firm to send you another in its place.'' And then tie calmly resumed his political couversation
aud the dinner went on.
LITTLE TALES FROM NEW BOOKS
"llHt; infamous Captain Morgan and
1 his piratical crew were sometimes
in tight places in Panama, and on
one occasion were reduced to eating
their leathern bags. "Some persons,'*
says one of the company, Kxuuemelin
(whose narrative is reproduced in "The
Buccaneers iu the Went Indies"), "who
never were out of their mothers' kitchens may ssk how these pirates could
eat, swallow and digest these pieces of
leather, bo hnrd and dry. Unto whom
1 only answer: That eould tbey experi
ment what hunger, nr, rather, famine is,
*hey would certainly find the manner,
by their own netessity, as the pirates
did. First, those took the leather and
sliced it in pieces. Then did they beat
it between two stones and rub it, often
dipping it in the water to render it by
these means supple and tender. Lastly,
they scraped off the hair and roasted
or broiled it upon the fire. And being
thus cooked tbey cut it into smnll mor
sels and ate it, helping it down with
frequent gulps of water, which by good
fortune they had right at band."
Malingering is common in jail, but
surely a case quoted from his own experience by Br, Qninton, the late Governor of Hollr.way, in "Crime and Crim-
nals" (Longmans) is a record. The
'hero" wss a violont prisoner who
feigned stiffness of the index ringer to
avoid oakum picking. He was so angry
when the finger was forriblv bent that,
on returning to his cell, ne promptly
SMofis Cure
■eleUr eteoa *A*%mim*
ike throat ead l«3a
csni calds, heals
sa cms
THE PART PLAYED BY CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE IN FAMOUS MURDER TRIALS'
'|MI.\ Crippen trial hns raised once
I more the much debated question
of capital punishment, garnished
with the usual stock-in-trade of the abolitionists—the uncertainty of circumstantial evidence. And yet, if the question be thoroughly probed, it will be
found that many murderers would escape the just award of the avenging law
if circumstantial evidence were no long
er admissible. Those who premeditate
murder, as a rule, take every precaution
to avoid direct evidence. In the majority of cases the murderer is caught
in the toils of circumstantial evidence
whieh he alone has supplied. The pieces
of uiiderelr.thing, the scrap of hair, the
portion of flesh with the scar of an old
abdominal operation—all these might
have boen destroyed by Crippen. Minder will out. Falsehoods cannot be
woven into tho fine unbroken web of
truth. A dose examination reveals tht
flaws of the most adept criminal who
seeks to cover his footsteps, The so
called romance of crime lies in the in
gouious devices by which the accused
endeavors to throw the sleuth hand of
justice off the scent. They spin such
a many web that they themselves are
caught in its toils.
Who has not heard of these famous
partners in crime, whose figures hold a
place of honor in Madame Tussaud's
chamber of horrors! The thrill of horror with which the public learned of
their gruesome traffic led to the passing
of the Anatomy Aet. Here was an organized, dividend-paying partnership,
syndicated for the supply of corpses to
the unsuspecting anatomists, and, as a
mere incident in the ungodly trade, for
the forcible emigration from this world
of many poor waifs and strays, who, despite their helpless despair, clung tenaciously to life. Having selected an easy
and unsuspecting victim, Burke, the
diplomatist and soft-spoken benevolent
friend, tracked tbe quarry to hia lair.
Here his partner smothered the shrieks
of those who protested against "the
deep damnation of their taking off;"
some, doped with drink and drugs,
yielding up their spirits without struggle or alarm. The corpse was then sold
to good, easy going Dr. Perkins, who
asked no questions. Old washerwomen,
idiots, the flotsam and jetsam of the
streets, arrived nt this human abattoir
singly on foot, and found their way to
the dissecting table. Some, on tue pretext of having a drink, passed into tbe
murderers' den, never to emerge alive.
They were more valuable in death than
In fife. Human wrecks whom no one
wanted brought $50 each when ready
for the hospital theatre. The very
helplessness and friendliness of the
(lasses preyed on proved to be the
strong card in evading suspicion. No
one wanted these poor, down-and-outa
in life; in death thoir only market value was as subjects for the dissecting
knife. The score of victims to the ere |
dit of these ghouls was forty, and all
seemed well until Hare, avaricious man.
took in ledgers. This proved his undoing. Even with the sworn testimony
of the lodgers, who were the horror-
stricken eye-witnesses of the murder of
victims, the prosecution eould only In* I
ally succeed in accepting one of Ue
partners in crime, Hare, as a Crowi
witness, so well" had the firm coverel
ibeir tracks, "Wo always took cue
when we were going to commit murder,'' said Burko when the game wu
up, "that no one should bo present-
that no one should swear to seeing the
deed done. They might suspect, bst
they never saw.*'
Burke, who suffered the extreme pea
ally of the law, has enriched the Knglish language with a new verb. "To
burko"—to sniolher, to get rid of
noiselessly—is often used by the public
speaker and Parliamentary debater,
without auy thought or knowledge of
its gruesome  antecedents.
Tho notorious case of the murderer.
George Muilins, ia a typical instance of
the tatai tendency of the criminal to
weave tho noose for his own neck,
Muilins was a policeman in Ireland and
also in Kngland. After leaving the
force he did odd jobs aa repairing col-
tractor, and in this capacity did worh
for old Mrs. Elmsley, a penurious, bus-
picious old woman, whose house rente
from tenants brought her iu tho cons-
i'ort able weekly sum of i'J.00. Tho murder of this lonely old woman leaked
out ou a Monday, and straiglilly pointed to robbery as the motive. It wu
dourly the work of some one hungering
for the weekly rents which she had collected ou the Haturday night. Muilins,
the ex-policcman, wus ihu one being she
trusted. Search proved that the old
miser had disappointed the hopes of bar
murderer, 'ihe money wus afterward!
found carefully hidden away. No clue
was found to tbo murderer. Tbe whole
tragedy seemed wrapped in impene-
41 mystery. A reward of $1,500
was offered, and tho greed for money
led Muilins to the scuifold. lle came
forward to claim the reward, informing
the police that tho crime hud bees
committed by a friend of his, named
I.iniiis. To the latter's house Muilins
and tho police went, but no clue wat
found. Unable to resist the glitter of
tho big reward, Muilins cried: " Voo
naven't half searched; look behind tbat
slab there," pointing to a large stone
in the yard. Under the slab was found
a parcel containing spoons belonging to
the murdered woman. The parcel wat
Lied wilh a piece uf shoemuker's waxed
curd. The eagerness of Muilins uud hit
indiscretion in locating tue booty led to
his arrest along with Kmms. The lat
ter was a shoemaker, and Mulliu*, with
a far-seeing cunning that failed him in
tho end, had deposited the parcel in
his neighbor's yard, aud in throw suspicion on an innocent man, had got pot-
session by some means ui a piece of
waxed cord, witb which to tie it. He
went to the scaffold protesting to tht
laat his innocence of the crime.
The mills of Uud ground slowly bnt
surely iu the case of Kugene Aram. Uo
murdered Daniel Clarke, the mystery
of whosedisappearauce was uot at tht
time unraveled. Time passed, and tho
name of Clarke was forgotten, save by
the oldest inhabitants. The lapse of
years brought a Beuse cf security, if
not freedom from remorse, to the murderer. Bxcavutious led to the unearthing of a skeleton which set the memories of the older inhabitants jogging
backwards to the fatal year of the die-
appearance of Clarke. Au accomplice
of Aram's, who, like Muilins, unwisely
aired his superior knowledge, stubbornly insisted that the skeleton was not
that of Clerke, To back up his theories against some of the inhabitants, be
pointed out the spot where another
skeleton hud been found. The sreond
skeletmi was unearthed, aud Kugene
Aram was placed ou trial for his life.
He relied, like Crippen, ou the difficulty of identifying the remains, bnt
the court and jury showed sound common sense'by sending him to lhe scaffold.
Am.ther crime immortalized in literature was the murder of his young and
beautiful bride by John Scanlon, a dashing young officer of twenty five, of good
family, anil a great favorite in the
highest circles. Staying over at Dublis
uu his way home to Limerick, iu tho
dnys of tbe rumbling cud uncertain
stage coach, ho fell iu love with tho
niece of a rope-maker (ominous trade!)
named Ellen Conuedy. After the marriage they went to live ot Clin, County
Limerick,* Ireland, where, within a few
weeks after his marriage, Scanlon determined to get rid of his beautiful wife.
lle selected ns his accomplice a servant
mau named Sullivan. Inviting his wife
for a row on the broad waters of tho
Kiver Shannon one quiet evening, he
did hed to death, and cast her body into
the water. Presuming on his stand-
iug ns a "gentleman," be gave out that
his humblv-born wife bad turned out to
be of indiucrent character, and had gono
to America. How Crippen-like the story I
I he lady's character was ton well-
known, however, and few believed thit
story. After a time her dend body wto
cast up on the shore—mute wit neat
against her cruel husband. Like Crippen, Rcanlon had mutilated the body of
his victim so that it would be unrecognizable. Still the identity wns established oy a sensible jury of ber countrymen. The case was tried before Huron
Smith, and he. fearing the great family
interest of the accused ordered Scanlon to be hanged forthwith. His titled
relatives were unable to reach Dublin
in time, and Scanlon paid the death
penalty. Out of these gruesome materials Gerald Griffen wove bis finest romance; Dion Boucicault his famoot
"Colleen Bawn," and Benedict's "Lily
of KiHarney."
WEAK, SICKLY BABIES
HAKE HONE WRETCHED
No home is happy where there is a
sick baby. The sufferings of the littlo
one makeB the whole household wretched, for what mother or father would
not rather suffer themselves than to
see their little one suffer. But there if
no reason for wretched homes because
baby is ill. Baby's Own Tablets will
cure all the minor ills of babyhood and
childhood; not only that, but an occasional dose of the Tablets will keep
baby well. Thousands of mothers havo
found happiness through the Tablet!
making their little ones well and happy.
Among them is Mrs. C. C. Roe, of
Georgetown, Ont., who writes: "X
can heartily recommend Baby's Own
Tablets as a help to the baby during
the hot summer season. We have used
them and are much pleased with theli
results." The Tablets are sold by medicine dealers or hv mall at 25 cents, a
hox from The Dr. Williams' Medicino
Co., Brockvllle, Ont THE ISLANDER. Ct'BIBERLANn. B.C.
Distress in the
Stomach
LETTER
NO.
4877
That Reminds Ne
Budreda of Thousands* of Bottles of
! NetvUine TJacd Every Tear for Curing Cramps, Diarrhoea, and Stomach
l'l !' '   "' Disorders.    I'.
j •       Deadly cramps—th. qyuiptouiH.arc u°t
to be mistaTuu.   SMdeul.r and without
:i:        warning   the   patient experiences sueh
agony in the Htomach as to contort the
,11 countenance and cause bim to cry aloud
lor belfi;
Theu. It is that
lho'    wonderful
power of Nerviline
can    mako   itself
felt-pit   euros   so
quickly, you would
think it was made
to : cure    erniiips,
and cramps only.
"Last'summer 1 Was stricken with a
(rightful attack  of crumps.    I fearod
tke pain in nly stomach would kill me.
*'My eyes bulged out. uud the veins
la.my  forehead stood out like whipcords.
**My .net* attracted a neighbor, wbo
eume to my nssistuuee, and iu a moment
or two handed mo half a teaspoonful
Of Nerviline in some sweetened wator.
"It seemed as if an angel bad charm
od away the pniu. In ten seconds I was
well. Nerviline lias a wonderful name
ia this locality, and ia coucbUirtd, best
(or crampH, diarrhoea, flatulence, stomach and bowel disorders. I urge all
my friends to use Nerviline.
"MANLEY M, I.KOARDE,
"Williamsburg.
No borne is safo or can afford to miss
tke manifold advantages of having Ner
Tiline on hand in case of accident or
emergent sickness, ln two sizes, 50c
aad 25e. All dealers, or The (Jatarrhe-
tone Company, Kingston, Ont.
PAItlvE: You'keep a joint bank account with your wi'c, dop'f yout
Johnson:   Writ,  yes;   I   deposit
tho money und she draws it out.
w
HY aro you so suro tbeije is no
such thing as a fourth' dimension 1"
'.'Because,"  replied the discouraged
fat man, "if tbere was I'd have it."
HE WAB A KIND KINO
TIIK late King Edward's good nature
was illustrated recently by a London correspondent at the Pross
Club In New York,
"The King," Haid the correspondent,
"was visiting RnlTord Abbey, and one
morning, iu company with bis host, Lord
Bavile, he took a walk over the preserves.
"Suddenly Lord Savile, a big, burly
asan, rushed forward and seized a shabby fellow with n dead pheasant protruding from the breast of bis coat.
" 'Sir,' he said to the King, 'this fellow is a bad egg. This is the second
time I've caught him poaching.'
"But the King's handsome face beamed, and he laughed his gay and tolerant
"'Oh, let him go,'Tie said. 'If he
really were a bad egg, you know ho
wouldn't poach.' "
MA, what are the folks In onr church
gettin   up a subscription fori"
"To send our minister on a vacation to Europe."
"Won't there be no church services
while he's goucl"
"No, dear." _
"Ma. I got $1.23 in my bank. Can I
give tlmtf"
Death from Fright—A shunter at
Claphnm Junction was stated at a But-
terseu (Etig.1 inquest recently to bave
tied from fright caused by a coupling
wbicb suddenly I snapped' wltb 4 loud
report.
KIDNEY
:V PILLS ^
ill   " -~~*'^
V4|   M\\V^n|5*. .
n|OMT s   O'5'. -
111! C T I J   *-
CIREfeNBArM: I got a turrible bad
i coidt. ',:
Qrcenbcrg: Vby don't you take
sonitthiugs for itt
Oroeubuum: Uow much will you git
met ■ ,
■ ■    ■   ■ •   •   #
DO you understand tbis building-loan
■cbeme'r'
"Surel  Thoy build you a house
and you pay bo mueh a mouth.   By the
time   you   aro   thoroughly   dissatisfied
with the place it's yours."
• •   »
THEM   New   York   folks  aron't   as
smart as they protend tu be," said
Hiram Bush on hiB return from the
city. "I saw a sign over a store door
that road, '(.'ast Iron Sinks.'   Woll, any
kind of iron will sink, by heck!"
• •   •
THE  nurse  was  leaving  her  little
charge  and  said  to  her:   "Now
don't be afraid, dear; 1 am taking
away the candle, but Gud will stay with
you In the dark."
"Nurse," askod the child, "wont
vou please leave the candle aud take
Godi"
.        .        *
NLY   hia   legs  wore   visible from
under   tbe   automobile   wheu_ a
friend sauntered up.    "Anything
the matter with tbe machine!" asked
the friend.
'No, indeed!" replied the voice from
under tho car; "I just cruwlod under
hero to get out of the sun."
0!
THE  real estate agent  had sounded
his praises of the new property to
the prospective buyer; and at the
Mid ho said: "The doath rate in this
suburb is lower than in any other part
of the country."
"I believe you," said thc prospective
buyer; "I wouldn't be found dead here
myself."
J .   .   .
THROWN from ber luxurious motor
ear tho fair girl had lain insensible
for many hours.    Now, however,
the operation  was over, consciousness
had returned, and she spoke faintly in
the darkened room.
"Yvonne."
"Yes, mademoiselle.'' The maid bent
over her.
"Yvonne, toll mo: did I or did I not
havo on my new silk stockings!"
...
TWYSICAL culturo, Father, ia perfectly loveJyl" exclaimed an enthusiastic young girl just home
from college. "LookI To develop the
arms I grasp the rod by ono end and
mme it slowlv from right to left."
""Well, well," exclaimed her father;
what won't science discover! If thnt
rod had straw at tho other end you'd
be sweeping! "
rnilK cuso concerned a will, and an
1'  Trisfunnn was a witness.
"Wns tho deceased," askod the
lawyer, "in (he blibit'of talking to himself when ho was. alone I"
'I don'i'know," Was the reply.
'Como, coiiie, you don't kpow, nnd
yet j'mi pretend 'tliat yoli wei'e Ultimately acquainted with bim!."
"'"\\;eli; sii4,    Miff Tht dr.tly, "I never
happened to bo with bim when he was
HE saw her sitting in the dark cor
ner and  kuew that  his chance
' ' i had'come.-     ,       '■
Noiselessly he stole up.behind ber and
beforo.she Vas aWare of his presence
lie had kissed her.
"Ilow dare you!" she shrieked.
"Pardon mo," ho bluffed readily;
"I thought you were niy sister."
Sho stepped out into the light. "You
idiot!" sho giggled. "I ara."
playing in Birmingham, Mrs. Wood met
Mr. Sulboru in the street. Thoy were
uear an ironmonger's shop when he
shook hands witb her and bade her
good-morning.
' Would yqu mind going in here witb
me! 1 want to make some small pur-
bases," he said,
tr.ho accompanied him.
He went up to tho counter and said:
'1 want 'Uacauluy's History of England.' "
The assistant said: "Wo do not sell
books, sir; thiB is an ironmonger's
sbop/!i .
"Well, Vm not particular." said
Sotheru, pretending to bo deaf. "I
rlm't care wlietbor it is bound in calf
or Russia."
"But this, is not a bookseller's!"
shouted tbo assistant.
"All  right,''  said Sothern.  "Wrap
It up neatly.    Want to bave it sent
down  to  the  hotel.    It's  a  present
wish to make to a relative. Put it up
nicely.'"
"Wo don't keep it," shouted tho assistant getting red in tbe faco, while
Mrs. Wood stepped aside and took a
chair in another part of tbe Mlop, almost overcome with suppressed laughter at the cheerful, frank expression ou
Sothern's face, and the mud, puzzlod
look on thnt of the assistant.
"Uo it up as if it were for your own
mother. I doii't want anything better
than that," said Sotbcrn. "I would like
to write my hamo on the flyleaf.''
Sir!" bawled the assistant at tbe
top of his voice, "wo do not keep
hooks."
"Very well," said tbe uctor, quite
undisturbed at tbe emotion he waB
creating, !'l will wait for it."
Under tho impression that his customer was either stone-deaf or a lunatic,
tbo assistant bounced off to tbo lower
end of the ehop and askod his master
to come, saying: "1 can do nothing
with tbo mun. I think ho must bo off
bis bead." Whereupon the p-inclpal
mnrcbed np to thc Bpot where Sothern
was standing and asked very loudly:
"What is it, sir! What do yon do
sire!"
"I want to buy a filo," returned
Sothern quietly—"a plain file about
four or flvo inche" in length.
"Certainly," said the principal, witb
a withering look ot his assistant, and
producing nt once the article which bad
been asked for.
with the wisdom end patienee to judiciously uso the whip. The average
driver appears to believe that it is the
accompaniment of a loud voice and
much bluster, while others use it most
freely when angry, the result of whieh
is to produco a like irritation iu the
horso.
...
Don't let tho colts nud young horses
run down ou short pastures; it don't
pay,
Colts should always bo. kept growing,
Good gronmiug improves tbe appearance of a liorse ami also helps to keep
him healthy.
Style in draft and road horses means
money every time.
Attend meetings of horsemen, if you
can, particularly if good horses are to
bo. on exhibition. Learn all you can
about horses und the kind most needed in your pnrt of tho country, and thon
try to do something to supply that neod.
Give the ■ horses some carrots or potatoes two or three times a weok. Somo
people call this fussing, but it pays,
Don't lot tho breeding maro got down
to- skin aud bone. It is bad for her and
bad for tho colt. Give hcr extra feed
and care.
Heavy draft teams hauling heavy
loads keep in good condition when kept
at the fast walking gait, and accomplish moro than wnen trotted part of
the time.
Collars should not bo changed^ from
one horse to another any moro than vou
Bhould change shoes with your neighbor.
A flue saddle horse was running down.
His teeth were floated, mado ov<jn, and
in just one month he wus plump and
ronnd aud sleek.
sleep ln one place, but make the pens
Biuuil, ami. the extra expense of making
more room will repay itself in one win.
tor. IB
I would like to hear at some of the
methods followed by other brooders, as
we can all help one another by getting
closer together and exchanging ideas.
We all make mistakes now uud then,
but Bhould try und profit by some of
them, and those made by others.
A man only prognoses as he tennis
from the experience of himself and
others following the same line of business. This is true of hog business as
well as many other linos of business.
STOMACH TORTURE
"FRUlT-A-TiVES" BROUGHT RELIEF
With the Horses
Or.Marters Female Pill
SEVENTEEN YEARS TBE STANOARB
fMteribed md reomnniewlwl -lor womon'* ail
wmU. e icifiititl<»nv |>r*|»rM remwly of provi-n
matt*. The rwult- (rom their ut«; are quick autl
ytnoanem.   Vet aalc at all drug «we*.
h"\
Keep
At His Best
... -JM-gtwjran
tUs sweetest song
only when he's tn
tie pink ol condition. Put him
tese, and keep
kirn there, hy
•ceding hlmon
BROCK'S
Bird Seed
He'll en)oy H
••re, thrive
■ It,  look finer end slug
    The seed Itself Is e sclen-
mliture—e perfectly hslanced
toad (or song-birds In this climate-
end the cake of Brook's Bird Treat ln
•eery package Is • splendid bird tonic.
Clve Dick e chance to prove It—.
el our expense. Mall us the coupon
Mow, Ailed lu, and wc will aend you,
ebeolutely (ree, one (ull else package
ef Brock's Bird Seed. 33
-ii if)   ijit U    j TTf Tei rjTr
' J%        NICHOLSON * BROCK
Ml Fruci. SsUmt.  ■   Tenet*.
For this coupon, ptsss* Mod im, tr*.
Of dure* or obllftt Ion on my port, on*
- ■•     ■—■ ot BrodrtJled S«4
'HII
HE conductor of the Charing Crocs
'bus pulled up his 'bus at ths
curb and waited for the women to
come down the stairs from tho top. All
camo down briskly except c.. very
Stout lady, who had been sitting o. w»j
She ciiuie down the steep and winding
stair very slowly. Her skirt flapped
around her ankles sud at every step she
stopped and thrust it cnrefully down.
Tho conductor waited with a borod ex
pressiou, llis hand on thn bell rope. Pill
ally be lost patience when the fat lady
stoVped for the fifth or sixth time to
thrust down hor billowing skirt, and he
burst out nngrily:
"Now, then, lydy,  'urry up, enhu t
yerf   Legs ain't no treat to ins!"
...
MH9.   DALTQN   had   become   very
tired from shopping, and slipping
 on- her-kimouo,-prepared borselr
for a period of rest. Iter colored maid
appeared  just  at  this  point  and  announced a caller.
"No, Anne." said Mrs. Dalton; "I
cannot see ber.    Please tell her to ex
cuso mo ns 1 am in uegligoe."    When
the message wna delivered Mrs. Dalton
heard her visitor laugh so heartily that
it even penetrated to her bedroom.
Calling Anne she asked thc maid tbe
causa of tbe hilarity.
I dunno, ma'am, I really duuno,
answered Anne. ......   .
"What did you tell borf" asked Mrs.
Dalton.
"Wby I done tole ber to picas*  w
you, as "ymi was naked as a jay."
.   .   *
JOHN WOOD appeared with
tbo same
company for severul seasons. On
ono occasionn", whilo the company was
I
lOnfiTTlOl
1^11 E show of draft hordes In harness
is certainly one of the best fair attractions, and may be made useful
and instructive. Exhibits of fours and
sixes are not only successful drawing
cards at a ticket office nnd of great interest to boxholders, but are object lea-
hods to breeders and teamsters, allowing
the result of judicious feeding, fitting
nnd careful handling.
Thrro might be another clans added
which, while uot bb interesting to box-
holders and casual visitors, would ho
of grtat value to breeders and men
.lirei'tly interested and anxious to know
which' breed possesses the greatest
strength, most natural energy and longest endurance at hard work. Four or
six hoi.ses wi-ightng from 1,600 to 2.000
pounds manipulated by an expert driver
and hauling an empty wagon do not demonstrate the -fttH- nWlity of those
horses, nor of the breed to which they
belong. A demonstration of working
capacity would be of intrinsic and prac
tical value to men who wish to invest
in the most serviceable horsos. Thc vni-
uc- of nny raco track horBe, either trotter, pacer or rniuier, depends upon bit1
performance or thnt of his get. "Why
should not thc drafter demonstrate his
value by performance in his Hue! A
severe public test would go farther iu
nettling the question than all the statements and flaming advertisements or
partizan communication.! ever written.
First in such a contest should come
purebred animals, for the reason that
no animal can impart qualities which
he does not possess nud which do not
belong to the breed which he represents.
Next to pttre-breds should come grades,
hnt with them positive proof of breeding should be required, so that ench
breed might have due credit. Regulations safeguarding the interests of all
should be made and strictly enforced.
The test should be severe enough to be
conclusive, in ordor to be of any value
to men desiring an honest test.
»    «   «
Horses on farms nro so frequently
worked in pairs that it is very neces-
sary that they should lit- well matched.
BV this is not meant that the team
should be closely alike in color, size nnd
general appearance. It is desirable that
her should be so, but this U only one
and* by no means the most important
part of the matching. It requires a
good deal of skill and judgment to
bring together a pair of horses that re
semwe each other in nil characteristics
sufficiently to work in harmony, und action comes first In this connection.
Stylo is required in the action of any
"lass c.f horse, nnd n team, each of
which stands up to the bit in about the
Bnmo way, is attractive to buyers, and
pleasing to the man who drives it.
A team ill matched In regard to action, strength nnd staying powers is a
liberal source of irritation, no matter
how nearly alike in color the horses may
ho. Proper action—that is, strong.
clean, vigorous movement of feet aud
legs—is highly desirahle, and if it can
be combined with general conformation
nud coIot, so much the better. Size, to
a certain extent, may be sacrificed for
strength and conformation, but only
within certain limit*.
CARS AND FEED IN WINTERING
HOQB
TNDOUBTEDLY there are better
_ methods of earing for and wintering hogs than some of us are practicing now, but if we all give our views
and methods to tho public, we eau all
derive some benefit from oni. another;
for the practical hog breeder and feeder
will always he on the lookout for pointers; he will sift out those good methods
that best conform to existing conditions,
und use the material he has on hand
or that which will be cheapest for good
results. None but a selfish breeder wiil
try and keep all the good things to himself. We should all try and help out
the beginners in the same business wo
are in, as there is nothing so detrimental
to any business ns to have a beginner
fall fiat. It is the young man that will
take our places sooner ot later, and if
started right he will, beforo we know
it, repay us in some way. It is useless
to talk to the Young Know-It-Alls, for
they will never aBk for advice, but they
soon learn by experience at a high cost.
1 consider the best way to get next to
one who wants to loam is to give our
views through the press, for then they
can take it for what they consider it
is worth or let it alone, und follow their
same old ruts.
Many successful breeders and feeders are always on the lookout for a better way than the one they have, and
if another method looks practical to
them thoy will try it, and for this rea-
WEDDED TO WOOD
IN the midst of the Hay of Bengal
is a little-known group of islands
called tho Nicobnrs. It i_ inhabited by a half savage people who have
an extraordinary taste for image making. They make images of everything
imngiiinhlc, carving them out of'wood,
nnd utilizing them an fetiches to keep
off bad luck and evil spirits.    For this
Eurpose they hung ttiem up in their
ouses, and sometimes the rafters are
fairly crowded with ttio wooden images.
Missionaries have made these people
at least nominal converts to Christianity. They did their best for quite a
while to discourage the business of
manufacturing " idoli."—regarding the
images aB corresponding to that description more or less. But the natives
refuso to be bruken of tbo habit, and,
without intending any irreverence, they
have' not hesitated to produce carveti
representations of angels, and of the
missionaries themselves, the latter being appropriately adorned with stovepipe hats.
SENDING PICTURES THROUGH
SPACE
A REMARKABLE development has
bcen accomplished in connection
with the telegraphing of pictures. Hitherto such work haB been
confined to cortnin newspapers possessed of the requisite financial ability
and enterprise to indulge in expensive
and deeply scientific devices of a delicate character, necessitating the services of a skilled operator. Now, however, it is possible for nnyone to pos-.
sess a picture telegraph nig apparatus
ud thus Becure quicklv pictorial illustrations  of far-off scenes.
This invention has been perfected
by Mr. T. Thome-Baker, whose telec-
trograph has superseded tlu* Korn apparatus for tbe transmission of pictures between London and Paris or
Manchester for the "Daily Mirror"of
London. It is n simplified modification
of tlte telectrograph, great Ingenuity
having heen displayed in its design
and operation so as to render it work
able by anyone. It is completely self
contained and occupies no more space,
nor weighs more, than a typewriter.
Closed, and with a strap, it can be car
rled over tho shoulder as if it were an
ordinary camera.
The single apparatus ean be used
both as a transmitter and receiver.
There is the revolving drum over which
the style moves, transmitting and receiving the  varied  tonos and   shades
DANIEL   SAUNDERS
Shoal Lake, Man., June llth, 1910
"For years I was bothered with persistent Dyspepsia and Indigestion, having
severe p.iins after meals and I tried everything tti.it I could get but the pain in my
stomich became no better,
A druggist recommended "Fruit-a-
tives." I did not give up any foods I was
in i ho habit of eat ing nor stop smoking—yel
"l-'riiit-a-lives" bas done wonders for nw
and I strongly advise all my friends tv
use it." (Signed), DANIEL SAUNDBM
"l-'niit-a-tives" is sold at BOc a boa,
11 for $2.50 trial s'ute, 25c. At dealers or
from l-'ruit-a-tives Limited, Ottawa.
constituting detail which build up the
desired image iu a multitudo of lines*
The apparatus works at high speed and
picture ean bo transmitted over tw»
or three hundred miles of line in a few
minutes.
Moreover, in order to meet special
requirements the inventor bas adapted
It to work in connection with wireles*
telegraphy. In this case the picture
is reproduced in broad outline bv meant
of closely followed dots, in tbi*
phase, tone, light and shade are nol
essential, a bare skeleton mi dicing
This application is especially useful f»
military and naval purposes. A plan
can be secured by photography, and
within a few minute?; %y coupling np
with tiie wireless, nn outline of the
drawing of the position can be in tbe
hands of tbe general.
The apparatus is similarly within tha
reach of private residents and commercial houses and should be useful i»
transmitting diagrams, sketches, and
drawings which have hitherto had to
be mailed or sent by train. It is only
necessary to call up the number required on the telephone line and request
the coupling up with thc wire of the
receiver, and the pictorial message cam
be quickly transmitted, thereby saving
severul hours of possibly valuable
time.
M   the elder  Sothern
Costiveuess and Its Cure.—When tbe
excretory organs refuso to perform their
functions properly the Intestines become
clogged. This is known as costiveness,
and if neglected gives rise to dangerous
-amplications. Parmolee *s Vegetable
ill-effeot/A speedy cure. At the
^■■^-^tliBifttioniiDf this ailment the suf:
feror should procure a packet, ot the
pills and put himself under a conrse ot
treatment. The good effects of the pills
' immediately evident
If a gentle horse be hitched to a tree
or other immovable object and commanded to poll, he will at firBt pull all
he can; the seeond time he will not pull
with qulto so much confidence ns at
first; while on the third or fourth at
tempt he will pull but little, or perhaps
net at all. To whip and urge htm to
pull would only start in him the habit
of balking. If a horse i» overloaded or
so exhausted that he cannot pull the
load, and In this condition ia whipped
and urged (9 go, he will balk; or if he
starts too" qmeltly and if pulled back
violently and whipped till confused and
excited,, the. habit of balking is begun.
Thus we see that this habit is purely ac
quired the same as kicking and other
habits for which Ibere can hardly be
anv reasonable excuse.
|    there are few men sufficiently gifted
son I t^nk it advisable to pass the good
metho**J5>loiig so thut all got a little
benefit t'jdm them; nnd we certainly can
all get-trome good by comparing notes.
One of the principal things in wintor-
ingbogs is the housing, ft is not necessary to have a high priced house;
many of tbe expensive houses will iu
the courBe of a few yenrs turn into
breeding place for most of the contagious hog diseases, pnless disinfectants
are continuously used.
What I considl'i1 the best is the individual hog house—OxS or 8x0—as they
cun be place.1 in Hue, and all but the
front covered with straw until spring;
It will make them divide np in bunches
of not mote than six or ei.dit in a pen.
If the doors are so that they open to
the south, and a small tight foncc
placed not far from them, they can be
left open most of the time for ventilation; if tue funds or time are not available, a well-built straw shed wiil be
better than some hog houses I have
seen, but it should be built so that there
!b enough ventilation. Tbe three Gilts
that were iu the winning Poland China
herd at Winnipeg, where tlte females
wero required to be' bred in Western
Canada, wero wintered with four others
vt like age in a straw shed 8x8. You
should by all means see that they have
a dry bod. Tt should be changed ut
least every two or three days, for the
steam produced in cold weather will
cause it to get wet and unhealthy much
sooner than it would in warm weather.
Next iu line I consider exercise. Have
their feeding places some distance from
Their sleeping quarters, even if you have
to- tako otf your coat now and then to
shovel a path in the snow to it. This
is necessary especially with the sows
kept for breeding. Exorcise will tend
to make them stronger] and then they
will farrow a strong and large litter
f the exercise is had long enough be-
ore brooding time.
It may be that the fall pigs will have
to be kept inside all the time through
the severe cold weather; if so, it will
lie well to have their quarters closo to
tho cow or horse barn; then they ean
tnke a run back of tht cows an hour
so every day. It will he time well
spent to see that they get this run.
Before winter s< ts ia it is well to feed
a rstf>n with a large percentage of oats
and other muscle forming feeds to make
them strong. They do not need to be
fat enough for market to stand the
rigors of a severe winter, but a good
supply of meat covering the body will
help keep up the animal heat.
As soon as it is cold the feed should
have more heating material in it than
is contained in outs; the lust available
in this country is barley chop.
In the corn belt they always food
corn to supply the heat. A little taste
of mangolds every dav will help to
keep the bowels in condition and keep
the digestion in good working ordor.
This is as necessary with live stoek as
oil ou nny kind of machinery. Bo always watch that part of your feeding
operations.
Pigs of uniform size should be kept
together, for if yon have smnll ones
among tho larger ones the little tellows
will havo to take the outside, or eold
sido, or they will pile on to» of the
others after they have gone to Bleep.
Do not make more than eight go to
When going nway from home, or at
any change of hubitat, he is a wise maa
who numbers among his belongings a
bottle of Dr. J. D. Kellogg's Dysentery
Cordial. Change of food and wnter bV
some strange place where there are »•
doctors may bring on an attack of dy«
seutery. Ho then hns a standard remedy at' band with^which to cope witfc
the disorder, und forearmed he can buo-
cesBfulty fight tbo ailment aud subdue
it.
Repeating Shotguns
USED   IN   THI   U.S.. ARMY.
TheU. 8. Army authorities know a gun; thai
le why, when they decided to equip tome troops
with repeating shotguns, they selected tbe Winchester in preference to all other makes. Tha
experts of the U. 8. Ordnance Board also know
a gun; that's why, after submitting a Winchester Repeating Shotgun to all aorta of tests, they
pronounced it safe, sure, ttrong and timple. If
you want a shotgun—buy the one whose
atrengtb and reliability led tho U. 8. Army
authorities to select It and tha U. 8. Ordnance
Board to endorse It—that's the Winchester.
RELIABLE    REPEATERS
Boft corns are difficult to eradicate,
but Hollcway's Corn Cure will draw
them out painlessly.
Dry Your Clothes on a Wet Washday
With a New Perfection Oil Heater
When clothes can't be hung
outside, and must be dried in s
room or cellar, the New Perfection
Oil Heater quickly does the wort
of sun and air. You can hang up
the wet clothes, light your Perfection Oil Heater, open the damper
top, and the heat rises and quickly
dries the clothes.
Do not put off washing to
await a sunny day in order to avoid
mildew. Dry your washing any
day with hot air from a
>ERFECT10]
Smokeless *
OlLHEATtfi
Abtolattb moblm mi oinlm
It gives Just as much heat as you desire.  It Is safe, odorlec*
ft has an antomatto-IocMng flame spreader, which
prevents the wick from being turned high enough lo smoke, and
is easv to remove and drop back, to the wick can be quickly
cleaned. Burner body or gallery cannot become wedged, because of a new device in construction, and can always be easily
unscrewed for rewicking.
An Indicator shows the amount ol oil In tht font.   Filter-cap doea not need
to be screwed down, but Is put In like a cork tn i bottle, tnd it attached to tht
font by a chain.    Finished in japan ornickel, stronMnd,Jur*blei *ell-made, built
lor acrviet tnd yet light and ornamental. It bas t cool handle and a damper to*.
tmUrs Bmr-*m.   l/ttctitymn. milt for iutrifiim <*c*/ar
to Itt uortit tttK) tl. tin
_tm THB    ISLANDER
Published  every  Saturday  at  Cumberland,  B.C.,  by
Ormond T. Smithe,
Editor and Proprietor.
AdratUing rates published eleewhere in the paper.
Subscription prioe 11.50 per year, payable in advanoe.
The editor does not bold  himelf responsible ter views expressed by
correspondents.
SATURDAY, JAN., 21,  191J.
THK ISLANDKH, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Sundries, Band Ball Rent     6.00
What the Editor has to say.
Although our Canadian Election law ia generally looked
upon as one of the best systems in the world it is yet far from
perfect, and although it may be laid down as an axiom that
majority rule should prevail, it yet remains a fact that many
representatives of the people in both Dominion and Provincial
houses and on Municipal Council boards, are really minority representatives.
As an illustration let us take the case of Mayor Morley of
Victoria, who, although he led his highest opponent by SOO
votes, never the less fell 800 short of having a majority of all
the votes polled.
In Germany, when there are three or more men running for
an office, unless the man polling the largest number of votes
receives a majority ofall the votes cast, the candidates receiv
ing the lowest number of votes is dropped from the contest
and another contest held, in which the electors have the pri
vilege of voting for the men receiving the most votes in the
first polling,
This system insures that every man elected to office must
be a majority representative.
Had the citizens of Victoria the privilege of choosing their
mayor under a system such as we have outlined, it is a certain
ly that Mayor Mosley would not  lie the Chief Magistrate of
that city today.
Last year ex-Mayor Macdonald of this city was elected in
a three cornered fight, and was a minority representative, and
had it been necssary for him to have secured a majority of all
the voter cast, it is probable that he would have failed, and another man would have occupied his seat as a Majority represt-
atives and as Mayor.
it is high time that the law was changed in the manner
we have suggested, so that the wishes of the majority Bhould
prevail as to who should represent them.
Cumberland  eity Council
Statement for the year 1911
Receipts.
Oath Bnluui* Brought
Forward from 1910 $333 90
Deg Tax
77.00
Drain Aoct'UUt
15.00
Hall Aeooiuit
298 B0
Polioe Court
528.00
Heal Estate Tax
8099.75
Sold Tax
662.00
Soales
18.50
Boavanger
1845.30
Trnde Licenses
8097.50
Watchman
681.50
$10857.95
Expenditure.
AdvnrtisinglAccount (52.50
Fuel UM
Drain Account, (Scwnr Bve
Law J80i00)    234.20
Tciol Account 19.72
DjgTags 3.25
Salaries
W. McLennan 1020.00
J.R.flruy 960.00
W.Brown 720.00
C.K rouse 267 00
J. A bran t 800.00
A.Mi'Kinnon.sialarT 360.00
Extra Brunt 1910 25.00   385.00
Eleotion Ace mil (Two
Elcolions) 79.40
Fire Protection Account 33.15
Roail Tax—Hrf nnd 84.00
Real Estate—JMiiml 9.00
Health Account
Dr MnoNnughton 125.00
A llPemey 40.90 165.00
Hall Account 13.00
Sciivangcr Account
News 5.00
K Alio 16.00
C.H.T.iI.ell   31.70
Isolation Hospital
A.E.McQuarrie
Incorporation Account
P.P. Harrison
Office Account.
Police Court Account
Witnesm ^'Expenses 15.00
WMnLonnaii 80.30
P. P. Harrison 47.50
Loan Account
Sehul Account
Trade License -Refund
Lieht A RepjiTs
Scale Inspector
52.70
163.40
66.00
T9.6f>
Sidewalk A/i
Interest A/c
Stable A/ct
B.Cra«'ftird
S.B.Ward
Campbell Bros.
Sundries
92M)
1000.00
2396 00
25.00
466.90
4.00
68 60
279-45
158.46
61.91
10.70
71.14 281.25
Sundries.
A.Maxwell 180.00
P.P.Harrison 50.00
Insurance Premium 46.50
Donation 24 May {und 25.00
CH.Tnrbell 22.55
T.E.liate 10.50
B.C Municipalities 10.00
Sundries 95.57        89012
Balance iu hand 381.41
Total 10857.96
The Victoria Board of Trade is urging the Post office authorities at Ottawa to repeal the departments regulations regarding the Sunday closing of Post Office lobbies in this province.
The departments promise to send a man to investigate the
matter "in the Summer" is riot very satisfactory, and stamps
the officials responsible as being about as sensible as the Lord's
Day Alliance fanatics, at who's request the abnoxious law was
put in force.
ASSETS
City Bldg. and Lots
Central School
Fire Hall and apparatus
Safe
Horss Waggon A Cart
Isolation Hospital
Real Estate arrears
Boaranger
Mrs Fank Sewer Repairs
Sewei Pipes on hand
\3>00.00
£lW.OO
1000.00
250.00
250.00
506.00
671.14
21.00
31.25
277.52
14000.00
901.71
14901.00
LIABILITIES
Sewer Loan Unpaid 1000.00
Overdraft on Royal Bank 2000.00
' Cert&ed as Correct
J.T.E.Palmer
City Auditor for  1910
3000.00
We would like to suggest to our newly elected Aldermen
that the first work that should engage their attention is the
consolidation and revision of the city by-law.
This is one of the planks of the Citizens League candidates
elected, and as they constitute a majority of the members on
the Aldermanic board it is up to them to carry out this promise
to the electors.
The by-laws of the City are in a disgraceful condition and
there ate hardly any of them that will stand a Police Court
trial.
It would cost something of course, but it would be economy
in the end for the city to have the various by-laws revised and
placed in legal form by the City Solicitor, and then have them
passed in their revised from by the council and the old ones repealed, and in fitture they might submit any proposed municipal by-law to their solicitor to see that it is put in legal form.
Beadnell & Biscoe
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Comox. B.g.
Sf a frontages and farming land for sale
FRUIT TREES
Not the Cheapest, but the Best
Catalogue Free
Vancouver Island Nursery Co.,
Ltd.
Somenos, V.I.
%-
Are you
A   JEWELLER
If not
a
wbo is ?
In either case you should be interested in thie
CHANCE OF A  LIFETIME
Carrying a full line of the very best
Clocks,
Watches
and Jewellery
Also a
BOOKSTORE IN CONNECTION WITH THE BUSINESS
The present owner is making lots
of money, but will sell at a sacrifice
on account of
AGE AND ILL HEALTH
Will sell on the buyers own terms
The building and lot are also for
sale cheap, or will rent on reasonable terms
Full particulars may be learned
by communicating with
"M" The Islander Cffice
Cumberland, B.C. p
THE ISLANDER CUMtlKUl.ANn, !!.<;.
THE BIG STORE
ftois Montli i
Stock-l"aktog
. , Tlm© .
•
WE OFFER A
Special Price
on all Men's and Boys'
OVERCOATS and
MACKINAWS.. -.
Men's and Ladies'
SWEATER  COATS and
SWEATERS
Greatly Reduced
LADIES' COATS-The very latest in
style, finish and material.   A special
reduced price on everyone.
This is a genuine offer and a splendid
chance to get  exceptional values at
lowest prices, as our stock must be reduced this month.
We want your Grocery Order I
(i%j
Mn
Simon Leiser
& CO. LTD.
"'"T^oV?'^ ZE_. C. BMDB
The Russell
AUTOMOBILE
The only Car Mude
in   America   with
the "Silent Knight
Valveless Engine,"
Also made in valve
. . , style . . .
Cleveland, Brantford, Massey-Harris, Perfect and Blue Flyer Bioy-
eles; FairbanKS Morse Gas Engines; also the Moore Gasoline
Lighting Systems. Oliver Typewriters. Repairing ofall kinds.
Iliryeles, Sewing Machines, Ijiins, sit'..     Scissors tind Skates ground.
Rubber Tin's for Baby Carriages. . Hoops Jor Tubs
THIRD STREET, CUMUERUXD.
IF YOU ARE THINKING OF BUYING A
i
i
BUY A SINGER
The BEST Machine  on the  Market
and sold on EASY TEEMS   	
JEPSON BROS., District Agents, Nanaimo, B. C
C, Setjrave, Local Rt'.jiresantative, Cumberland, 11. C.
k' ATi\f Aniy.. *iik' *■■"■■ r /^I'it-^-n .mv *is\a AnW a__i a^. a-K'-\
"ripy*tfHifr *8t *°-       ----- -
i<\y-VvS/^/vSirvW t-A-V\^.f "i V4^M V"i   Vv\. V"Vk ^"Vl  V^l ^r~v\
Gk IR. BATES
Handles property of all kinds
Farms, Ranches, Fruit Lands
in the Upper Country for sale.
Insurance Ayent <Hs Conveyancer
t.'.-or    OpiRftMoust.
COUBTENAV
•   \?U vCp QC^stS tX/C\_ fVvd> pj .'j- Pv'-^J1 £VW ft^-V^p (*\/"v_t (V
f
5
?
Mf
.1
"Leading Tobacco King."
Better known as
"LONG WILLIE"
Dealer In Fruits, Candy, Cigars
and Tobacco.
£3i. Billiard Room in connection
If you wish toniiiko your pinno oi
furniture appear ju^i like new, try »
bottle of lioylo'h Piano and Furniture
Polish, ll ia uu exceptionally good
polish ami you will not use any other
afler having tried it ouce. [i is pul
up in 7Bc aud #1.35 bottles—Kor sale
by Oha«S.'graro ut "the Islundei" oftii
Onniberlaud
P. PHILLIPS HARRISON
Barrister,   Solicitor   and
Notary l'ublic.
THB
CUMBERLAND
= HOTEL =
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
The finest hotel in the city.
»**»»»*»* -.-.-.-.m,-,-^-, --<n|-|-|n[-|)-J^|-LriJ-|J-|J-ir
Grocers & Bakers
Dealers in all kinds of Oood
Wet Goods
Best Bread and Beer in Town
Agents for Pilsener Beer
•'.*
H. M. Beadnell,
Comox, B. C.
f>et*i**S*>fS*m-—m>%
Agent for E & N.
Lands
Comox  District.
W6.00 DOLLARS REWARD.
Tho above will be paid to the per». n
giving infurmation which leada to the
convicion of the party or partiea wh"
■hnt and killed my mare colt on tho night
if Sspt., 4th, ill tho vicinity nf my 8. K.
cornor post. Address, J. Lawrence, Kye
Bay, Comox, B. 0.
Jia&AjZiPJlQZ_tJ,Qi.
Mah Lee
Laundry
P. 0. BOX 294
Satisfaction
Guaranteed
Near the Saw Mill
tT'P !",">?,r>?.?7.r> .V ■,rs.'.?^r> t
A^l   i;.   A-A A$\
I
GENERAL   BLACKSMITH
Horseshoeing a Specialty
Third Ave., Cumberland
-CORNER STORE
THIS IS THE WEATHER FOR
Rubber Footwear
Gum Boots
IN KNEE, SPORTING and
HIP LENGTHS
J. N. McLEOD
C. H. TARBELL
Stoves and Ranges,
Builders Hardware, Cutlery,
Paint, Varnishes, Arms and Ammunition, Sporting Goods,
etc.
— AGENTS   FOR:
The  McClary   Manufactuing  Co.
Sherwin-Williams Paints
SOLID * eOMFORT
-IS ASSURED.
if you use a LE33T3TT SPRING  and a "RESTMORI"   MATTRESS.   We carry a fall line of BLANKETS, COMFORTERS ud
FLANNELETTE SHEETS, PILLOWS and
PILLOW COVERS.
H»
The Furniture Store"
McPhee Block A.   McKINNON      Cumberland, B.O
Pilsener Beer
The product of Pure Malt and
Bohemian Hops
Absolutely no chemicals used
in its manufacture
sss; Best on the Coast s==
Pilsener Brewing Co..    Cumberland. B.C.
 J2
Valentine   Dance
Cumberland  Hall
February 14
UNDER THE AUSPICES OP
THE PYTHIAN SISTERS
THE |EH EWJ0 ffOTEL
JAMES WALTERS,
PROPRIETOR
THE POOREST OF WINES, LIQUOR A BEER
ALSO THE BEST OF CIGARS.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
•fe: T1TE ISLANDER. CITOBERLAND. B.C.
C © M T A I N S      MO      AU O M
Magic
Bakinc
MAGIC
BAKING POWDER
UD COSTS
FAVORITE
ETHAN THE ORNNARYKINDS
E.W.GILLEJT CO. LTD.   TORONTO, ONT,,
FASHIONS   AND
FANCIES
IT is amusing to ootfe the neomiiinly authoritative stntp-
meotfl thnt are made from time to time, to the effect
thnt the hobble skirt in dead and consigned to the enr
toutv Bhop for good nnd all; then proba .y the week after
we find the samo authority hedging on the previous state'
vent and assorting that, foolishly enough, fashionable wo
men seem still to wear it. The faet of the matter is that
tbe hobble skirt is not merely un eccentricity: it iH a style
—the style of thtj long, straight lines. Exaggerated, of
sonrse, it has been, by the placing of two obvious extreme
bands around the lower part of the skirt, but one must not
loee sight of the purpose of it all in condemning the means
osed.
flM**?*
<&fift
m
u^n
able effect when used as rovers and facings upon a jacket
of black velvet or as an edging to a tunic.
Again, wc have the long, close-fitting mantle of silk or
satin in very high favor until tho time cf furs comes round,
and perhaps' even after tbat. These garments, whish reacb
practically to tbe foot of the skirt, are in tho one piece,
uud aro loosely adjusted at the waist. They are plain aud
flat, without any adornment whatever beyond the big buttons of the same material in front, the fancy collar, and Ue
lining, usually mude cf blaek silk or satin, as soft and supple
uh possible. Thoy are lined with fho same material, but in
some delicate shade, Buch as fawn, cerise, pale grey, or white,
which may bc Been In tho revere, or not openly shown at all,
but merely disclosed by glimpses as the mantle swings open.
Thp broad sailor collar still appears in these, but the most
fashionable style of the moment is to bave enormous rovers
in front, entirely covering the breast aud falling in folds and
gathers like a huge ruffle.
The latest idea in millinery also is to trim hats with
the entire skins nf Btnall animals like the muskrat, marmot,
or polecat, the pelt being laid on flat over crowu and brim,
usually without auy artificial embellishment, such as a hoad.
Of course, with fur iu sueh demand, it is inevitable that
imitations fihould be largely introduced, and of these thc
common rabbit provides the moat uBual basts. They ean
do up rabbit skins so skilfully now as almost to defy the
detection of any but experts. Very mueh <it the sealskin
used is made in this way, which no doubt accounts for the
fact that this fur will be loss fashionable this winter than
it was this time last year, when it was all the rage. Rabbit skins, too, may bo made to imitate many other kinds
of fur, and, when well made np, fetch quite a high price,
even among the wholesale dealers.
TWO THOUSAND PHOTOGRAPHS A SECOND
WILL the problem of aerial flight be finally solved by
the cinomatographf To the average person, perhaps,
there seems no possible connection between the two.
When it is explained, however, that an apparatus has recently been invented which will enable cinematograph pictures
to be taken at the rate of two thousand a second, affording
opportunities of fully Investigating the flight of insects, and
thus arriving at a true understanding of tho many problems
met with in aviation, tho value of the cinematograph to the
aviator will be readily understood.
This cinematagraph is the outcome of experiments on the
part of a French scientist—Lttflien Bull, of Paris—who has
developed a most ingenious method, which greatly increases
the scope of tbe cinematograph by augmenting its speed.
Whereas the ordinary apparatus takes from thirty to fifty
pictures during a second, this high speed cinematagraph
enables as many as two thousand views to be taken during
this short interval,
The apparatus consists mainly of a pasteboard roll bearing on its circumference a photographic, film, which, under
the action of uu electric motor, rotates with extreme rapid-
FREAKISH HARNESS INVENTIONS
IN no other place in the world can
oho see such evidences of the im
meuse amount of energy wasted
over impossible or impracticable
^themes us in the Patent Office at Washington. Two of these inventions have
reference to tbo safety of those that
ride behind horses.
The first is an expedient to prevent
horsos from running away. The contrivance consists of a strong chain pass
cd ubout the forelegs of the animal,
and kept supported against his chest
by a lino secured to the dashboard, lf
the animal takes fright and run* away
the line is simply loosened, allowing the
chain to fall to the horse's knees. ThiB
is expected tc, throw him down and
break his legs.
Another still more ingenious' expedi
eut aims not only at keeping tho horse
from running away, but at protecting
him from exposure to storms and tc the
rays of the sun, and at saving the euer
gy wasted in descending hills.
With a bold stroke the inventor loft
all conventional methods behind. He
placed the herse under the wagon in
stend of before it, arching the vehicle
above him. Thus the animal is protect
ed from the weather and he does not
obstruct the view.
A strong canvas and leather band en
circles the horse's body, tbe ends of
it being passed upward through the bot
torn of the wagon and attached by
chains to a windlass above the flooring.
With this device, should the burse at
tempt to run away, er have to descend
a steep hill, the driver calmly turns the
crank and lifts the animal off his feet.
i
':■■/■
Black  Velvet Coat  with Chinchilla Collar aud Cutis
Now theso ImtiiU are not usod, but the elTi
luce is still there, and skirts are ns tight a
were. There is even less, too, of tho gathorei
a skirt of light material like mouBsollno de Bob
by the broad bund com plot ing tlu tout of the
■t the
llllllle
wae  introduced  lomo  week-*  buck
ef giving greater ease.    This could
eation, for it never looked  really
part of  the skirt has a  tend'ney   to bag
■ore full when the wearer was walking,
pro
thev
is of
pinched   iu
'kirt, which
if the  alleged   purpose
t be a sticcossful inno-
Black Velvet Hat with White Aigrette
ity. No mechanical apparatus, of course, is able to open aud
close the shutter of a photographic camera 2,000 times
second. Moreover, the ordinary illumiiiauts uro far from
possessing thc intensity required for producing a suflicient
impression ou the lilm during su short uu interval. Thc
inventor therefore avuils himself of the electric spark, which
unites two most essential properties, viz., instantaneous
irradiating uud enormous photographic efficiency. After
starting the apparatus the spaiks are seen to pass the mors
rapidly as 'ho speed of rotation of the roller becomes higher,
ami each spmk produces a photographic picture on thc portion of tho iiim which happens to be iu front of the object
being operated upou.
WOMEN IN TIIE FINANCIAL WORLD
1^1,AMINO marvel of womauboodl" is what ..awnon, the
:     Copper  King, culls the  lady  whose  insidious intrigues
Thus, while the winter fashions nre still undecided, we
ceo be sure of one thing. No mutter what var lottos oi dotal] may be seen, the general lines of the figure will lie slim
and straig.it. Thus apart from the cut of the skirt new
tailor mndis will differ very littlo in appearance from thoso
of last year. At the same time wo will huve a return of
draped and tucked corsage* instead of tllfl kiiiimn. blouse,
whieh has held sway so long. Thi-we will lie eut with the
sleeve in the piece, a short sleiive without joining nt tho
•boulder.
Before going any further, it may be ss well to tnontlou
a few of tne latest novelties.    In the tlrst place, a new and
exceedingly   smart   trimming   for   tailor-mades
efceepskin."   The  sheepskin   is  divested of its wool,  and
eersped  down with  knives in  the same maimer as kid-)
in  prepared   for gloves.    The   rwnJt   is  a  soft,  nnow-wh
behalf uf the Oil Trust hnvo luUly hecu agitating
the financial world of tho United States.
This red haired siren, whose red gold buir and exquisite
eomploxion nm her principal claims to beauty, is said to
roomvfl a big salary from the Standard Oil magnates to aet
as spy upon rival tlnaneiors, Hbe meets them at supper aad
wheedles their secrets from them. Hcr beauty is only matshed
by hcr knowledge of big MlTutrit, and her discretion in dealing
witb thom. Hie is already one of the great powers behind
the scenes in Wall Htreet.
The public at large is hardly yet awake to the fact that
woman bus arrived in the world of money making. It is, of
course, an old story thai there is hardly a profession or in
dustry which is still sii.Ted to the mere man. Whnt is not
yet realised is thnt woman has turned gambler, and tbat
there are many who dure to pit tbeir brains ngainst the most
astute financiers in the world.
An example in point is the famoes Mrs. Rawlos Reader.
Miss Ruwh's, us she was till 1901, was the daughter of a fine
and Ihe full  upper | old   Virginian  family, descended  from   Kli/.nbetban  settlers,
il  appear still   but who, IIko many other Southerners, had lost their fortune
aud become  impoverished.
Miss Hawles made up her mind to restore them, and some
fifteen years ago went to New York, starting ns stenographer
und typist. Her tnlents soon brought her out of tho ruck,
und she was appointed secretary to President McKinley's
Campaign Bureau, aud afterwards official reporter to the
Venezuela Boundary Com miss! on,
Next, we tlud her in London arranging contracts for the
Central London Railwny, and living in grent style at the
Savoy Hotel, where she gave splendid entertain merits.
In London she met and married Mr. Atholl Reader, an
Knglishmau wbo had held important diplomatic positions.
Mrs. Render continued her career by taking up the Hultan of
Lahore's railway projects aud financing them, nnd soon after
Iressed wards became interested in Peruvian mining concessions. She
is suid to have settled a South American revolution In one
day, nnd to have successfully fought thnt king of high
finance, Plerpont Morgan himself,   She is "nw president of
WHY I WAB NOI ASTONISHED
An Eastern Newspaper Man's Impressions of the Wast
(By T. W. King, in Canadian Courier)
IjlVERYONK who visits tbe Canals dian West seems to have an obsession that he hae discovered tbe
country. This is quite trying to our
friends who have to listen to us upon
our return. Indetd, bo one, not even
the volunteer who fought in Bonth Af
rica, or the man who onee lived in the
Yukon, is so liable to take the floor and
keep it ae the traveller returned from
the West. Bnt published accounts are
apt to be somewhat uniform in express
ing astonishment and admiration. Much
as I admire the West, I cannot suy that
I was greatly astonished. I think before going West that 1 had a pretty
fair idea ol its condition and prospects,
I was not stunned hy the sight of Winnipeg, having been long familiar with
the City of Toronto, I was not amazed
by the great fields of grain on either
side of tht? railway track, because 1
wns quite prepared to believe thnt one
hundred and twenty million bnshels of
wheat produced in three provinces must
naturally grow in the fields and he quite
visible to persons passing through that
part of the country. I think I had a
fairly accurate idea before leaving the
Bast of the else of the various cities
and towns between Winnipeg and Vancouver, although 1 had lumped Begins,
Edmonton and Calgary in uiy mind as
being about the same size, which was
quite unfair to one of the three. I will
not say which, as I may bave occasion
to go West again, 1 ean quite understand that people who have seen a town
founded must exult in its growth and
returning after a time be astonished to
find a substantial city of twelve or fifteen thousand where they had left a
few straggling houses. Bnt the traveller who arrives for the- first time at
Saskatoon or any othft* "toon ' sees
only a city of so many people, neither
larger nor better, although younger than
many other cities which he has visited,
Charles Dickens was probably unfair
to the United States of his day in
"Martin Ohuzzlewlt"; but the fleld was
ripe for a Satirist, and thero are features of life in tbe Canadian West
which invite some kindly, even though
it muy be an unwelcome criticism. One
encounters, for example, what may not
unjustly be termed a "pose" among
certain Western people. Because tbey
nre in the West they feel thut they mnet
nfleet what might have been racy of
Ihe soil iu cither Canada or the Vailed
Stutes fifty years ago. The pioneer who
lived with his family alone in tbe forest, fought Indians, killed bears, and
was only overtaken in old age hy people
and civilization, had a certain contempt
for some refinements of life and a rugged independence, nlmost indifferently,
bred by his lonely life of hardship, adventure aud privation. He was a type
aud more or less a law to himself, and
he had a certain right to he "wild and
woolly" in the midst of civilization, if
civilization insisted upon overtaking
him. But can we look with favor upon
anything erode or srass iu people who
"pioneered" not by blazing e trail
through the forest, but by buying tick
cts and sleepiug-ear berths from the
railway companies; wbo have never
spent a day or night outside of a well
populated town; who have never been
iu a house uot equipped with plumbing
and hot water, und who havo found nb
Bolutely no' difference i" their comfort
or environments by moving from On
tario to Saskatchewan or Albertat
I must protest ngaiusl tho affectation
of "hustle," about which we hear
much from the West. I think that
ipi* uu less inclined to hurry up tlu
further West you go. t'ertsinly the ser
ice found iu shops aud hotels would
not be tolerated for an hour iu tbe Kast.
is uncertain whether to be angry
or amused. At a good sized town I
went lnt* the harbor shop of tho principal hotel quite early in the morning.
Thero was a gentleman ahead of me, a
rather portly, fine looking man, and In
reply to his' good-morning I said, looking around me, for apparently uo barber was in sight: "I wonder what
chance I huve of getting shaved f"
"You are after me," ho said laconically, removing his eoat and collar. No
r.ue. appearing, ho then proceeded t->
shave himself. When ho had finished
and wiped hiB foco ho stepped to the
back of the chair and motioned me to
get in. Tho portly gentleman wns the
barber, and ho naturally shaved bim-
If before attending to a customer. At
Moosejaw I asked a bootblack to shine
my saoes, nt the same time mounting
a chair which stood on tht sidewalk
uear a barber Bhop.
"All right," he said. "Just wait
there a few minutes; I'm going in for
a shave."
M'litary fever iB quite acute in the
West, and amusing stories are told at
ihe expense of tho newly-fledged officers. Oue gallant major at a church
parade is said to have marched hiB bat
talion into tho wrong church. But a
few moments later, although the service was well under way, he re-formed
bis soldiers and marched them out
again.
People undoubtedly have made money
in the West quickly, and the opportunities there are better fur many people
than they are in the East. I do not
doubt that some men are doing well in
tbe West wbo would starve to death in
the East. For a time I labored under
the impression that anybody who came
West and Hayed loug enough would
automatically become a millionaire. I
inferred it must be automatically because I could not see that the men who
lived by their pens were any better paid
—or, taking everything together, were
as well paid—us their brethren ia the
East, wbo usually fall short of acquiring au even million. Still, it is die.
concerting to be told "if yon bad beeu
here tbree years ago yon ceroid havo
got that lot over there for tbree dollars
and a half, aad today it la worth tbree
hundred asd fifty thousand dollars."
Yon feel you would eertainly have been
there if yon bad only known it. One
Buuday we were at Battleford, tbe ohl
capital of the Northwest Territory. It
is situated in a beautiful country, but
for years had no railway connections,
and meanwhile a new Battleford—North
Battleford—haB grown up on the other
side of the river. Well, here at Battleford wo were shown the first issue of
the first paper printed west of Winnipeg. It preceded Hen. Frank Oliver's
Edmonton Bulletin by tbree years. It
was not a large paper then, and it hi
not a large paper now. It is still iu
possession of the family of Mr. P. 6.
Laurie, the able mnn who founded it,
but other papers founded by bim, in
Ontario, for example, proved better
money-making ventures than tbis first
newspaper in the Canadian West. Even
Mr. Oliver would probably have dono
as well in a financial way had he never
gone West. Tbe man who walks in
midwinter from Edmonton to Winnipeg
will not long remain a poor man in any
part of the country.
One drawback to the Western visit
is the obligation the visitor is under
of loohing at wheat fields and giving
an opinion as to how many bushels it
will run to the acre. I was honest
enough to admit that I did not know
wheat from onts or outs from barley,
bnt it availed me nothing. I was called upon to hasard guesses until I was
driven to fremy. Sometimes I would
guess two bushels to the acre, and if
this seemed too low I would guess two
hundred the next time I was asked.
What I most objected to was getting
cut uf tbe automobile in the dust,
climbing fences and standing in the
growing grain, looking nt it in a voeaut
manner and trying to be enthused. It
was a grent relief to strike British Columbia, where they did not seem to have
any grain. I also became somewhat nervous on the subject of real estate values. When a man would Bay, "Do you
see that corner lot over there? It waB
sold for two dollars and forty cents two
years ago; what do you think it is worth
nowf" I would be at a Iosb what to
suy. If I guessed five dollars or some
liko amount iny interlocutor would be
come indignant, and yet he would seem
disappointed if I named a figure like
two million dollars. I finally hit upon
the expedient of always saying "one
hundred thousand dollurs," Sometimes
it seemed absurd ty low and sometimes
a little high, but I positively refused to
become excited wheu a different amount
was mentioned,
Bnt the Western people are all right.
If they did not boom their country no-
one else would do it for them. It may
not be a get rich-quick proposition, but
it is surely a get enough to eat proposition, which, nfter ull, is whut we are all
of us after.
"pills like a nir m
So Hank ud Drastic ut Many FMk
u to Seriously Injure Health
In a letter written from him hone lt
Valencia, Mr. Marsh Selwyp doea eea-
vice to thousands by drawing attention
to the injoriee indicted upon delicate
poople by drastic purgative pills.
"For a loug time I suffered from cos-
use or pills. Like many another, I mate
the unwise choice of using; pills that
were like lightning in theii- activity. )
began to be filled with intestinal ism.
turbanccs, constant rumblings, gas ia
the bowels and diarrhoea. I grew pall
und emncintod. Then tho doctor told
me drastie irritating pills had onset
catarrh of the bowels, an almost incur*
able disease. Explaining my situatiea
to n friend, he advised a trial of De.
Hamilton's Pills. I speedily expert
euced the hauling and curative efTeet
thoj exert on the Btomnch, liver ail
bowels. The intestines, freed from irritating drugs, rapidly regained natural
tone, tne bowels acted as if nature aai
not Dr. Hamilton *e Pills were at work.
I know it will be of value of thousand,
to know that a pill as mild and curative as Dr. Hamilton'a ia available te
tho ailing."
Kor bowel disorders, eirk headaeha,
constipation, Uver and stomach da-
rnugement, there is no pill so invariably
sure to care ns Dr. Hamilton's Pilla.
Kef use a substitute. Sold in ilia boxee,
nil dealers, or Tka Catarrhoioue Co,
Kingston, Out.
sible opportunity for displaying thea^
as anyone ean understand; and the same
principle applies to a handsome man."
KITCHEN PHILOSOPHY
A PHILADELPHIA man wai in i
distress  one  morning  not  long
since by reason of tne delay ia
serving hie breakfast.
"I wish you'd go to the kitchen,"
suld he to hie wife, "and see what tag
trouble is. I've an appointment ai
nine."
The wife complied with this reqneaa,
When sho returned to the dining reo^
the husband observed a strangely met
uncholy expression on hor faco.
"Well," asked ho, impatiently, "did
you tell the cook that I wanted aq
breakfast immediately! "•
"1 did."
"And what did she sayf" '
"She said," responded Uie wife,
"tbat 'we all have onr dieappoiat-
ments.' "
leather, something liko mode.   Thll show, up witb remark-; a mining company with a capital of two million! sterling.
Relief for tho Depressed.—Physical
nnd mental dopftsslon uminlly have
their origin in n disordered slate of tho
Stotnnch nnd liver, ns when these organs nro deranged in their Action the
whole system is affected. Try Parme-
lee's Vegetable Pills. Thoy revive the
llgo&tivo processes, net beneficially on
the nerves and restore the spirits as no
'ither pilla will. They are cheap, simple
and sure, and tbo effects are lasting.
MATCHES MADE BT MUSIC
4   CHURCH choir is one of Cupid's
tV    most happy bunting   grounds,"
affirms a tenor who sings iu a
fashionable London church.
'1 believe thnt if statistics were
obtainable on the subject it wuuld be
found that of single people who join
church choirs a larger proportion get
married within a year tban among an
equal number of young people that
might be selected nnywbere else. Hing
'ng, even if nbout things celestial, sets
the deepest of all emotions going, and
hearts chord witb each othtr just a*
voices do.
"If the singer doesn't discover an
fidlnity in n fellow-singer 'it. is prettj'
apt to be found iu tho congregation. Ir'
a woman has a sweet voice, u face to
match, und a figure to go with tlic other
wo attract ions, she kus the best pes
Tamr Drassist Will Tell Toa
Mnrlaa Kye Hamad* Relieves Sore Byea,
BtrengMKnu Woak By««. Doesn't SmaiC
Booth™ Ere Puin, and Bells tor Hie. T#
Murine In Vour Kve* and la Baby*
Byea for Boaly Eyelids and Granuluuoa.
CUBED OF LAME BACK WHEN M
Mr, Samuel Martin, of Svrathroy,
Ont., pusttod twenty yenrs of his liloi
in misery, Buttering torturcB from lama-'
back. He tried nearly nil advertised
remedies aud household recipes, but ra-'
ceived .no benefit from any of them.
Home months ng". seeing Gin Pilli
advertised, Mr. Martin purchased a boa.
The relief, which Mr. Martin experieno-
ed alter taking ono box, wns so greal
that he knew he had found the rigkl
remedy ut last. He used two mora
boxes, nnd is now completely cured.
Fifty cents a box, six for $2.50.   At
nil dealers.   Free sample if yon write)
tho   National   Drug   «   Chemical   Oa,
(Dept. R. P)., Toronto. ,
Shi/ohs Gun
a sickly ..... foaSka.
f IkfMl sad In. J..
HUl,    ttA.lt
at cuu.
DYEING
bAiWN
gav* Monty
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We guarantee the
perfect quality and
absolute purity of
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the manufactured
SweetCaporal
Cigarettes.
Catching a Tiger Shark on the South
Carolina Coast
HK  wus called Spotted Jack, from
thu numerous splotehps of dark
color tlml iniuri.i-u hit* huge Uuuy
from head to tail, llis sine, too, hud
Increased from the moderate length of
sixteen feet to that of forty, uh yarn
Sfter yarn would bo spun by the excited
fishermen concerning the depredations
Committed by his lordship among the
flsbn.g tackle on the reef and also
smui.g the set Hues put for his capture.
1 saw him once, while lulling fur red
bass on the shallows, It wan only u
glimpse of two huge ti uh protruding
some two feet out of the water aud the
(lorpeller like motion uf the big tail us
t worked—forcing the lung, dark body
swiftly amiss the treacherous shoals
Into the deep and safer waters of the
shannids,
lliere wus no denying it. He wub a
nuisai.ee and a menace to tbe fishing
Interests of the season, and, unless
Some moans were adopted tu rid the
beach uf his presence, uur favorite pan
time would be at un end, for this smuttier at least. Severul attempts hud
been made to catch him—big set lines
being usi'd, baited with full-grown mullets. Itut the fishermen uever seemed
to consider his great size and strength,
or the rigs put uut may huve bt-eu old
Sud rotten. Some reason wub always
advanced by wuy of explanation by
those whose repeated attempts hud affrays resulted in complete failure, and
Still he lived and spread havoc along
tne lishing grounds. lie invariably
Same off victorious—each time leaving
three or four expensive rigs smashed
St the end of the fight. It was useless
to attempt to laud him with the ordinary line. Something stronger must be
osed—a strong quarter-inch line und
tw«> bundled feet in length. Steel books,
ton, with (limit) leaders to match. This
Would be my outfit. And I lost no time
Id getting It up. Big lines they were
Snd beauties, but I needed just sacb
S rig. Fourteen or perhaps fifteen feet
In length, he would prove an ugly customer, even with the aid of Bteel and
hemp, backed hy three Btrong men and
S big stake ot log conveniently near at
hund. to tako a turn around when tbe
-Strain proved too great.
Thus I figured out the cost of battle,
ss we went iuto camp that night. It
wus late—too late on the tide to put
Out the big lines theu. So we content-
•d ourselves, my man and I, with discussing our plans for the following
dny, while we carefully examined our
fining gear.
The streaks of early dawn found us
Op und on the move. Assigning to
t>ave the task of putting out aud sUk
Ing ihv big lines, I pushed on to the
plough that separated the fishing
fruunds from the main beach, and.
Crossing waist deep, found myself on
tbe big reef known as Southest Break
Cr—a  long,  low  sand bar that  reached
annoying crabt and small fish. Another
hour passed, and still our lines rode
straight out in front of us. This was
liacourugiug. As for me, my legs gave
out aud i was tired and disgusted with
ibe monotonous routine of throwing
out and winding up again, without a
single bite to encourage uie. Where tbe
lisli bad gone to I knew not,
However, the water on tbe bar was
not yet deep enough for bass, and, after
ull, we had the whole duy ahead of us
and the best of the tido to tisli out. So,
witb tbese cheering reflections, I retreated to higher ground, and, being
somewhat exhausted, sat on my box
uud dozed—lulkd by thc soothing sound
of rippliug water that unceasingly
swept in and as unceasingly retreated,
carrying with it the annoying little
minnows tbat viciously nibbled at my
white toes as thoy lay half-submerged
iu tbe soft sand aud shallow water of
iht. reef. Fifty yards away, like
statue cut out of ebony, stuod Dave,
my faithful friend and servant, with
drooping bead and closed eyelids—bim
self a victim to the seductive inllueuce
of the hour and tbe narcotic effects of
tbe salt sea air.
Away out, somewhere in tbe mysterious depths of that great heaving mass
of waters, lay our hues. Armed with
six big steel hooks, each baited with a
mullet and anchored wilh great sinkers
of some two pounds each, and bo eon
structed as to withstand tbo undertow
and thus keep tbe rig in position. Fear
ing thut I might lose my line by having
it jerked out of my hand duriug one of
my cat naps, I made a noose, through
which I inserted my hand; then, tightening it somewhat around my wrist, I
ouce more gave way to the drowsiness
that for the lust two hours had takeu
complete possession of me. Turning up
tbe collar of my coat to protect my
neck aud throat, I endeavored to keep
awake awhile—heartily wishing myself
ensconced amongst, the blankets of my
tent, nestling snugly amid tbe distant
saud dunes of the Point. The crash
and roar of the breakers grew fainter
and more remote. My senses grew confused, and soon I wns dozing soundly
—ouly to be ruthlessly awakened by a
jerk tbnt almost dislocated my arm.
The next moment I found myself pulled from my seat into the shallow water
aud being rapidly towed to sea at a
rate that almost took away my breath.
At first I attempted to make a stand—
iligging my toes into the sand and bracing for dear life. Hut I might just as
well have pitted my puny strength
against that of a tugboat, as to attempt
to turn the big fish at the end of my
line.
It did not take me a seeond to realize
what hud happened. I had hooked
many a shark, clam-cracker and other
hi avy and hard pulling fish frequenting
this    coastline,    but     nothing    wh>
faront h>N»«d-^«aiNW«d Blr th could approach tlmt* of this
only by the highest tides. Owing st | m «llt niUHBter\l,mt WH8 Bure|y m
tb, endless white fringe of l'«';"''»Kswiftty taking me out bevoud my depth,
breakers selected the calmest«,£ Shar/or de$, artHJgi,lg Lm\i_
*nd whirling my heavy sinker throe ^ &wers-o..e wai aslad as the
«r four tunes around my head   Ihu led, 1)t|li.rB ',t     „   fc ,   ( rf
It fur out into the creamy white waters
■Of tho shoal—there to stay until lifted
bv Homo of the scaly inhabitants uf the1
wef.
Dave, having now Mushed his task
of putting out tbe shark lines, arrived
Spoil the scene. He was very much concerned at having wm tbe big spotted
fsb. he said, some distance down the
beueti and heading our way. He wns
cure of trouble, for his right enr hud
- been ringing all the morning, "and
dat shore am au on failing sign." Accordingly, hh is the custom of tbe superstitious blacks, he made a cross upon
the sands, spat upon his Une, and heaved It far out intent upon getting the
frst bite and landing the first bass,
I now searched every inch of the
Wblte sweeping wuKto before me for the
big fins and mottled body of Spotted
Jiiek; but, us it was still dark, I saw
«0thlng to alarm me; so hopefully sur-
mined that he had taken some other
route—leaving us to enjoy our fishing
Without interruption.
The flood tide flowed in sluggishly,
taking n long time to cover the tail of
the reef aud fill the slight depression
thereon, in which we expected to have
tbe best sport and catch the most fish.
Consequently wo had a long time to
Wait—patiently standing in the chilly
wnter tit four o'clock in the morning,
With a raw breeze blowing from the
South enst which penetrated tbe innermost recesses of the body and caused
one to sigh for the sheltered seclusion
Of tho ever warm myrtle thicket and
protected sand dunes of the Point. This
was » job for which we hud no liking,
snd Pave showed signs of weariness as
be rolled up hts line and yawned, while
Walking to his fishing box for the pur-
■pose of replacing the bait stolen by the
Ready-made Medicine.—You need no
thysician for ordinary ills when you
ave at hand a bottle of Dr. Thomas'
Eclectrtc Oil. For coughs, colds, sore
throat, bronchial troubles, it is invaluable; for scalds, burns, bruises, sprains
It is unsurpassed, while for cuts, sores,
-fllcers and the like ft is an unquestionable header. It needs no testimonial
other than the use, and that will satisfy
*ayone as to Its effectiveness.
ipp« ___
Yelling for Dave, nnd vigorously cou
testing every inch of my seaward jour
ney took up all my spate time. Mj
fish was fighting to gain deep wutei
while I strained every nerve in my
body to turn his head uud coax him
shoriwnrd. The line cut iuto mv wrist
fearfully, and I made several fruitless
attempts to loosen up the slipknot, bul
never succeeding in accomplishing any
thing, gave it up and exerted all m\
st reugth in trying to part it. In
this I likewise failed. Things were
uow tfricing a serious turn. Utiles* 1
eould detach myself from the line, I
would surely be curried beyond my
depth and drowned. Even now, I was
half strangled by tbe ducking 1 got
every few minutes; for the short rollers, racing shoreward, would bit mo a
-tap that would completely submerge
my entire body from head to foot. Then
I would pop up un thu other side, only
to see a straight bar of white line cut
ting deeply through the next wave—a
line, too, made of our famous long
stapled Sea Island cotton, strong and
tough as a bar of steel wire. I groaned
in spirit, for I well knew thnt it would
cut through my wrist, even to tho bone,
before there would pnrt one fibre of the
tough and closely spun cotton cord. No
—thero was no earthly chance of its
parting. This I knew, and my heart
almost stopped beating as I thought of
what the very next few minutes might
bring about. Diet Henvensf I could
not die with just a smnll line, a mere
cord, between me and freedom. Break
It t would, even if the blood flowed
and the flesh tore apart. Thoroughly
excited, T continued to yell ut tbe top
of tny voice for Dave, hoping he would
come to my rescue. Deeper and deeper
grew the water, ns the great fish slowly
forced me out into the great swash of
big, choppy sens, each of whieh lifted
tne clear of tbe beloved bottom and so
deprived me of foothold—my only
means of retarding his seaward progress.
Turning mr head to one side, to avoid
the fearful slap and buffet of an incoming wave, I caught sight of an object
struggling amid the flvlng spray and
veiling as only an excited black can
yell. Aht the sweet music of those
veils!   Ohl the love that welled ap in
my heart when I heard David's cheery
■ oice shouting words of eucourageineui
is he flourished aloft a big sheath knife
and breasted the short waves of thi
oauk, on his way to tbe swash beyond.
'Hold um, Bosh!" ho yelled, between
,'uspe. "Try for turn um, alarse Cecil.
Jak big spotted debill lie shore done
got you dis timet I'm coinin' all 1
itui!" Theso words came to me acrost
j. vast field of whirling white foam aud
oroken water, but obi the music of it
ull I,
Still I tugged and fought—now
strangling, now gasping, as euch giant
wave would deluge mo on its wuy to
.be distant beach. A minute more, and
i. boo David's black hands grasping tbe
stout cord and fuel bis big shoulder at,
it jostles against mine in a frantic ef
i'ort to stay tbe outward rush of the
uuw thoroughly frigbteued fish.
"lhe first chance you get, Dave, foi
God's sake give me the knife!'
"Ves, Boss, I ready, sab. Shore,
fust chancel" he replied, as we dogged
ly fought aud tugged, while the cross
teas of the bunk buffeted us about au
libitum. Giddy from the whirl auu
•.wish of the onrusbing breakers, oui
neads swam und *o felt weak and faint
ircm tbe strain of the heavy pull. Up
and down the big reef we ruced. Oui
to the surf Une; then in again we work
ed panting. Now almost drowned b)
iu avalanche of spray from some un
perceived wave; anon gasping foi
iireath, as tbe salt spray would be fore
od into our heaving luugs. AU the
while losing ground, foot by foot we ad
v-anced further into the great stretch
of moving, swaying green wuter of the
channel, with never the ghost of a
chance to check his outward run and
.nuke a stand for even a moment. Oh!
for tho knife in the darkie's band! 1
bad not time to reach for it and he less
lo let it go and hand it to me. My
left hand was always employed in eas
iug the straiu ou my right wrist; other
wise the Une would have soon cut cleui
through to tho bone.
Now a jerk throws us forward on oui
faces, far beneath the surface of tbe
tide. Dave is the flrst to regain hit
feet aud I see him fumbling for tbt
weapon I um so anxious to possess. I
muster up enough breath to shout out,
"Quick! The kniftl" Theu down
again we go together. A moment ol
feurful ear-ringing aud again we are
up, frantically coughing the water from
throat ami lungs, i feel that tbis can
uot lust long. "Try for turn um.
Boss! Try for turn umi We gwiue
lor drown!" comes in gasps from mj
dusky companion, and I know thut be.
too, is failing. Even now I am on the
point of giving up and quietly drown
iug, just us a puppy or kitten would il
repeatedly pushed beneath the surfnee
by the baud. I feel weak aud dazed-.
But, eveu as I give up, my fish seem*
to weaken for tbe first time since hook
od. The great strain of a moment ago
suddenly relaxes snd the white streak
of line falls and disappears in the whirl
und sweep of white water that rtshe-
across the great bauk; my fish, to all
appearances, has escaped; but, expert
enced as I am, 1 know tbe contrary.
No such good luck! He ia merely run
uing in witb the line nnd in ul! probubi
lity will be amongst us in a jitfy. Ap
prehending being toru to pieces by hit
sharp teeth, we beat a hasty retreat
shoreward — straining waiy*e. deep
against the undertow and n.,v/ng a
fearful outcry, to intimidate 'L.a. if
possible. Our progress, uf course, is
slow and tedious, while bis would be
us swift as a swallow's.
Now, too, was my chance for cutting
my wrist clear, ('ailing for the knife
(which was handed me before the
words were out of tny lips), I quickly
slashed the stout cord nnd wus once
more free. I had had enough fishing for
one day; so I fought my way steadily
through the surf for the beach, some
seventy five yards away and glistening
ia the noonday sun.
Being uow free, I direct my attention
to lengthening our lines, thereby add
iug a hundred and fifty feet to my ul
ready long rig and proportionately in
creasing our chances of lauding hiin
safely ashore without the former risk
of being obliged to follow bim iut.
deep water. My arm beiug ulso re
leased, I could let go when tlu
struin grew too great for my bauds.
Ves; I was now safe and bent on revenge! With two long lines—some 35i)
leet—und my hand free, I felt sure
that he was mine. Now, catch bim 1
would. So, letting tbe coil drop in the
tide, I grasped tbe end firmly aud
awaited the outward rush that 1 kuew
would come, sootier or Inter, as he
shoaled. But tbe swash still separated
us from tbe mainland und I felt I wits
crowing too soon. Waist-deep still,
with plenty of wnter to float a big fish
all around us and with my skin creeping and momentarily expecting tbe grip
of bis powerful jaws, we struggled on.
Suddenly there arose close by a gieat
whirlpool of white water and u cloud
of spray, out of which popped two enormous dorsal fins. A piercing yell from
Davo and a freezing of my heart'»
blood! But just then, thank heaven!
something alarmed him, and he wus oil
again—taking tbe slack as he goes out.
Out seaward he darts, while we tug
and strain at tbe long lino that burns
hnd gnaws at our bands like heated
wire.
"Let go, Boss! for Gors'mighty'i
sake, let got He too much for me!"
pleads Dave, disheartened at tbls uew
reverse.
Hut I refuse to quit; my blood is up
and I urn determined to fight it out to
u finish. For a second ( get a glimpse
of his ugly body as be glides tli rough
a great, glassy roller—only to be lost
the next moment In n seething smother
of foam as the big sea breaks. What n
beast he is! and so hideously mottled!
Ugh! the sight of his baleful goggle
eves and shovelling snout t Out, out
to the end of 850 feot of good stout
line he swims, churning the sen into
foam ns he feels tho cheek. Ah! now
he starts shoreward again and wc pull
him in quickly, doing our best to get
him shoaled. This time I feel sure he's
ours—but again he Stops, working the
dead weight tactics on us nnd refusing
to   budge   a   single   inch. Fire  long   lie
hssds shoreward once more and I am
lulling him in through a big wave
.vbeu up goes his tail and down goe:
iis heud. There is a whirl of white
.vuter and a great volume of epraj
-boots skyward. The whole sea Beenu
full of sharks, so quick is he in hit
novements. He must bave struck
ho sand in bis downward plunge auo
hus become frightened into a renewed
.dl'ort to escape. Back to Bea be goet
with remarkable rapidity, in spite ol
mr united efforts—taking the skin oli
mr hands with tbe slack as he flies,
"Dave," I cried, "haul in with all
your might! This is his lust spurt.
Don't quit me now," I pleaded, us nn
ompanion grumbliugly berated tho hoi
•ord which had burned iuto his tougli
Once more, waist-deep in the heaving
water, shoulder to shoulder we jostle
tnd bump each other. Now jerked al
nost on our faces; now buffeted about
iy the angry cross-seas that came it.
hrees and fours, until I felt beaten and
.eady to throw up the sponge in des
;)air, while Spotted Jack Bailed serene
iy through the green seas, apparently
is fresh as when flrst hooked. Tbi
•utile length of two loug lines had
ieen paid out; the water was getting
[toper; and it was uow simply a mattei
if tbe strength of the harness. stop
-ve muBt—and stop we did. Stretch
stretch, stretch! while we hung on ami
lug onr toes iuto 'the soft sand of tlu
lottom. Would be never stopf Minute*
soomed like hours. I could not stand
it much longer, and still the line
stretched and grew taut as a harpstriug.
(hir feet fairly plough the bottom, u-
we are ruthlessly dragged seaward. Now
ve come in contact with some hugi
ltppery obstacle, deeply imbedded ii
he ever-changing quicksand of thr
lue. To this I cling with a deathlikt
,-rip and call upon Dave to do tbe same.
V quick turn around one of its projections and tbe job is complete.
"Dat stop um!" cries Dave, between
jasps, as the mammoth shark swings
dde on and makes a mighty dive—tu
soon vault high above the horizon Uue.
Up! upt into tbe blue air he flies. Thei.
lown again into his native element,
imidst a cloud of feathery Bpray, he
sinks from sight. Onee more we start
.and ward, across tbe vast expanse of
leething water—waist-deep aud put
iug forth the best we have in us.
Inking in the slack as we hustled;
igain getting miserably entangled ii.
he heavy line that wound itself around
mr feet; staggering against each other
iu our mad haste, and all tbe time
'earful of seeing two big fins and gog
trie eyes pop up agaiu from the tttmb
ing foam around us. Now we've only
i few yards; theu the deep swash. Ugh!
hat deep water! What might not be
vailing therein for us? Where was the
sharkI
Ah! a jerk answers the question. The
line again runs out. Feebly tbis time—
giving us no trouble to check it. Yes;
there ho is, slowly swimming in—worn
•ut or drowned, us the flshermen style
t. Now, for tbe first time, we note his
huge proportions, ns he shoals in tbree
:'eet of good green wuter and rolls slug
Jisbly about iu the shallow sweep of
be surf line. How the water flies, as
lie raises bis big tail aud brings it dowu
igain.
"Walt on de tide, Boss. We can't
novo um, sab," punts Dare, as be sits
it rest,while little rills of perspiration
base each other down his ebony cheeks
iud fall into the shallow sweep of sea
iround his feet. As for me, I am barm
less. The reaction has set in, and I am
,lad to drop flat on the hard sand beach
tnd gasp for the breath that was so
liudly needed in my exhausted lungs,
the question now arises, How to de
-patch himf We dare not approach
,lie fish; ho is cross and still very much
■live, and I would uot venture withiu
en feet of him, shoaled as be iB, for ull
he money iu tbe country. Ever aud
igain he makes feeble efforts to turn
i award, but bis day bus come and we
ire masters of tbe situation. Dave
■ roposts going to camp for tbe Winchester. A wise suggestion, to which 1
cudily agree, and arter a few minutes
lie is back agaiu aud anxious to shoot
he big fish, for he is fearful of its
getting away and equally desirous of
getting the liver to use as a charm
iguinst evil spirits. So, taking a cure
ul uim, he sends a bullet ploughing
through the big head aud another iuto
the body. A few convulsive shivers,
ind thrashings of the huge tail, attest
Dave's true eye and steady hand. 1
now decide to leave the carcass whore
it is until tbe receding tide should
leave it high aud dry. Then, after
refreshing tbe inner man at camp, we
are to return and measure our prize,
aud, if possible, remove tbe lower jaw,
to take home as a trophy of war.
In two hours we ure back, to And
our fish some twenty feet on dry laud.
He is a monster all right, and curiously mottled, being different from any
specimen I have ever seen, His jaw
I hacked away, and succeeded in laying
open my hand in two places white doing so. He had evidently strayed afar
from bis native wuters—probably the
Oarrlbean sen or Gulf of Mexico—and
hud taken up his abode around our fish
iug grounds, t should bave liked to
weigh the body, as ho appeared to have
the girth of a small pony, and, upon
measuring, proved to be sixteen feet
live inches—a length twice as great as
any usually met with nrouud our coast.
There nre no doubts of his having been
uble to drown us both, withiu ten
minutes of our hooking him, hud the
hooks not entered high up in his upper
jaw, very close to the shovel shaped
part of the head—a placo known to
every fisherman as a tender sput in a
shark's head. This chance hooking.
I believe, saved tny liff:, us he was not
able to put forth a half of the pro
digious strength at his command and
thus got worn out by hia own exertions,
Since then, I have never attached
my line to any part of my person. One
such experience ib certainly enough for
mc, and I have learned wisdom at the
colt of a nerve-racking adventure.
neighbor happens U be within fighting
.ibiauce.
However, it must not be supposed
hat all insect conflicts aro started in
.his way. Battles which start through
he songs of insects are always confined
,u one species, for there would be uo
sexual rivalry, for instance, between a
spider and a grasshopper.
So fur, from personal observation, 1
havo found that the grasshoppers are
by far thr most .Titabie clan* vt infects
l thong themselves. They seem to enjoy
:ghting better than eating, nud ire
(iiently fight until ench has lust one nr
nore limbs, and sometimes uotil oue
succeeds iu killing the other. So great
a their interest in these deadly battles
hut tbey will allow themselves tn bc
ilcked up and carried about, continuing the conflict in one's hand in the
nost unconcerned manner Imaginable.
The katydids constitute the loss quar
elsome members of the grasshopper
utnily. Their fights are far and few
ictwcen, but extremely violent when
nice started. I remember vividly u
'Httle between two of these insects
.vhich I witnessed several years ago. It
Happened close to tne edge of a small
latch of woodland where several trees
and beon cut and the stumps left standing from two to three feet above tbe
ground. To the top of one of these
-tumps a large katydid and hie mate
Imd crawled, perhaps to onjoy their
honeymoon. As I stopped to watch their
ictions for a minute, a third katydid,
■ccing the happy couple, and feeling
omewbnt jealous, shrieked an insult to
hem from a nearby Btump. The offend-
mI insect never uttered a sound, but,
leaving hiB mate, flew direotly to the
dher stump, where a fierce conflict ensued, ending only when the insulting
•ne had bcen torn to pieces by his more
mwerful rival, much to the satisfaction
if the female katydid.
The most furious of all insect battles
tuke place between colonies of the
nound-building ant. Their huge nests
iro situated cIobo to the edges of shaded
wood paths, sometimes near together
ind at other times not within severul
hundred feet of oue another. Here the
•nine colonios will live, year after year,
tt peucc or at wnr with one another,
until nature's own forces wipe them
out of existence. Picture to yourself
wo of these cities equal in size and
lopulutloii, and situated about one bun
ired paces from each other; observe
their countless numbers, equal to tbe
population of two capitals. The whole
■•pace thut separates them, of twenty-
'our inches, appears alive witb prodigious crowds of their inhabitants. The
following account was given by M.
tluber of a battle which be witnessed
i grent many years ago:
The armies meet midway between
their respective habitations, and thero
ioiu battle. Thousands of champions,
mounted on more elevated spots,
engage in single combat, and seize one
another with their powerful jaws:
still greater number are engaged ou
lo»th sides in taking prisoners, which
make vain efforts to escape, as if
conscious of the cruel fate which awaits
11 hem when arrived at the hostile
formicary.    The spot where the battle
BLOOD-POISONING FROM
OUT FINGER
Serious Condition Believed by Zam Buh
Mr. Jaa. Davey, 7Hti Ellice Avenue,
Winnipeg, says: "A few mouths since I
was cured of a poisoned fiuger through
tbe timely use of Zam Buk, I cut a
deep gush across the knekkle of tbe
right hand, in opening a lobster can
one evening. I suffered at tbe time with
the soreness and pain ,but had uo ides
it would become a serious wound. However, in ubout two days I wus greatly
alarmed, as my whole hand and arm to
ibe elbow becamo inflamed, and the finger was much discolored, showing signs
of blood-poisoning. I'he pain was dreadful, uud I was forced to leave od my
work and go borne.
"The wound on the knuckle had bees
poisoned through the dust and dirt
about the furnaces ami boilers. 1 then
decided to start the Zum-Uuk treatment
aud, having first bather tbe cul, I applied tbe healing balm, It soothed the
pain almost immediately, uud the next
duy tbere win u greet Improvement, Is
a week's time, through perseverance
with Zam-Buk, a complete curt' wae
brought about."
Scores of similar cuscs could be quoted, and the wisest precaution is to keep
a box of Zam-Buk handy aud apply it.
immediately a cut, or burn, or bruise
is sustained.
Zam-link will also be found a sure
ure for cold sores, chapped hands, frost
bite, ulcers, eczema, blood poison, varicose sores, piles, sculp sores, ring worm,
inflamed patches, babies' eruptions ana
chapped places, cuts, bums, bruises uud
skin injuries generally. All druggist*
and stores sell at SOc. box, or post free
from Zam-Buk Co., Toronto, upon receipt of price. Refuse imitations and
substitutes,
and press into^ place. In case of a pal-
ley, draw the leather around tightly as
possible; lay und clamp.
SMALL, SWIFT, SURE
rpiIE power pulley is au electrically
A operated winch recently designed
to enable quick coaling of warships. Apart from its original destination it may, however, be used for s
multitude of other purposes both on
land and on board ship.
This pulley is designed for a load of
sixty pounds at u lifting speed of sis
feet per second. Four seconds arc
thus required for lifting the whole
basket to a height of twouty-three feet
—taking into account the acceleration
in starting und the slackening in stopping. The motor is sufficiently strong
to stand temporary overloads up lo one
hundreds  pounds.
Apart from its simplicity in operation, uud high working speed, the power
pulley is especially valuable because of
its euse of transport, the more so as on
the modern ships of the Dreadnought
type the fleck should be clew red as fa?
ns possible for military operations;
Tlu*   motor   is   started   by   a   simple
switch without a starting box. A simple
device allows the hook  when empty ts
nost  rages is about three  feet  in di-fbe lowered  as for as desired,  so that
Unless worms be expelled from the
system, no child can he healthy. Mother
fi raves' Worm Kxterminntor is the best
medicine extant  to destroy worms.
nens.ons; a penetrating odoT exhales
on all Bides, and uumbers of ants are
here lying dead covered with venom,
while others, composing groups and
uhatns, are locked together by their legs
br paws, and drag one another alternately mi opposite directious. These
groups are formed gradually. At first
a pair of combatants seize each other,
and, rearing upon their hind legs, mutually spurt their acid; then, closing,
they fall and wrestle in tbe dust. Again
recovering their feet, each endeavors to
hug off bis antagonist. If their
•strength be equal, they remain immovable until a third gives one the advantage, botb, however, ore often succored at the same time, and the battle
still continues undecided; others take
part ou euch side, till chains are formed
uf six, eight or sometimes ten, all
hooked together, and struggling per-
ihiueimisly for the mastery. The equilibrium remains unbroken until a num-
'ier of champions from the same nest
arriving at once compel them to let go
heir hold, and the single combats re-
cuittmrtice, At the approach of night,
.■acb party gradually retires to its own
ity; but before the following dawn the
combat is renewed with redoubled fury,
Hid occupies a greater extent of thc
ground. These daily tights continue
until heavy rains separate the combat-
nits, and tliey forget Iheir quarrel, and
'ouce  is  finally   restored!
Tbe anger of honey-bees is frequently excited against tlieir own species,
many a mortal combat taking place,
louietimes within the hive, sometimes
fithout, During these battles the bees,
like lhe grasshoppers, arc so eager, that
it is impossible to stop them without
administering a comparatively hard
blow of the hund. Their one object in
ihese civil broils is to pierce their cue
lilies with their stings, the stroke of
which, if tt once penetrates to the
muscles, is mortal. The conqueror is
not always able tu extricate his weapon
utter one of these engagement*, and,
when this Is (he case, both insects
perish. General actions sometimes tsk
place between two full swarms.
Friendly Intercourse will sometimes
prcvttil between the bees of two differ
-nt hives lor severul days at a time,
but sooner or later one will become
rritated with the other, aud again a
leadly buttle will be the result of the
aell meant friendship.
Many death ■struggle's take plaee be
tween insects of different families, The
mud-wasp stores hcr nest with young
spiders for her own young to feed npou;
but let. the little spiders grow up, let
t betn build their powerful webs, and if
a wasp becomes entangled among the
silken   strands  a   battle   ensues   which
suits in the wasp's death more often
thuu the spider's.
So it goes throughout the insect
world, the strong preying upon the
weak and tho cunning upon tke simple.
Ited, Weuk, Wrnrr, Wittery nre*.
Relieved By Murine t^ye Uutuuuy. . ry
Murine For Vour Eyu Troubles. Vim
Will Like Mur.no. it Booth's, Bflc Al
Your liriiBR s.s. Write For Kye Books
Freo.   Mur.no Kye Kcmcdy Co., Toronto.
WARS OF THE INSECT WORLD
1^11 E insect world sounds peaceful
enough when the whole earth vi
brutes with its monotonous songs;
yet these insect melodies which make
the Slimmer days lecm bo drowsy ium
peaceful to the human mind arc, in rea
lity. makins insect life whnt it is: one
continual civil wnr. These songs are
prompted by deadly sexual rivalry, aud
packages at any depth muy be reached.
JOINING LEATHER TO IRON
TO glue leather to iron, paint the iron
with some kind of lead color-
say white lend and lampblnck.
When dry, cover with n ctiment made
as follows: Take the best glue proctir
uhlo; soak it in cold water till soft;
then dissolve in vinegar with a ninder
■ite hent, and add one third nf its bulk
of white pine turpentine. Thoroughly
mix, und by means of vinegar make if
lhe proper consistency to be spn ad with
a   merry  tune   will  often  end  in  the III brush.    Apply the cement while hot
singer's   death   if   his   nore   powerfuHdraw the leather on or arenad quickly,
THE  RAVENOJS   RAT
A RECENT flood in the Ohio Rivet
drove  the  big,  grey   river  rats
from    its   shores   and    retaining
walls through sewers to the stores una
residences  of   Middlcport,   Ohio.
The morning after the Hood had
reached its highest point, a stream of
waler broke through the ceiling of a
meat shop in thut town from a resile nee above. A hurried investigation
-bowed that a rat bad gnawed away
more thuu half of a two inch lead pipe
leading to u sink ubove. The cuttings
were left uu the ceiling where the rat
Had firm footing and u good place tc
ivork, Evidently the rat was after thft
;reuse lining the inside of Ihe pips.
I'o reach that it was but uecessury to
.•ut u small hulu iu the pipe. Why did
lie rut go un uud cut the pipe more
Iniu hull in two auu for several inches
iip uud dowuf
A careful examination of tbe sectlcp
tf damaged pipe shows conclusively
but the rat wont ut the job in a
.vorkmjtiilike way. After cutting a
nule timing!, to the cavity, it cut from
•ueh side with upward strokes from
lie lower jaw, euch stroke of the sharp
teeth leaving distinct marks.
ONE BETTER
ll'HKN  a young mun   proposes yos
VY     should  always   be   careful  and
test   his   love,"   cautioned   thft
conservative chaperon.
"But I go one better, auutlot" twit-
tered the pretty girl. "Uo you see this
tiny buttleI''
"Ves.    Does it contain perfume!"
"No; it contains ucid. 1 test the engagement ring."
IT IS NEWS WORTH
StVIHQ TO THE WORLD-
HOW   RAVAGES   OF   KIDNEY   DISEASE ARE CHECKED IN
QUEBEC.
Mrs, Julion Painchaud, for seven years
a suttered, finds quick relief and
complete cure lu Dodd 'a Kidney
Pills.
Whitwortb, Temiscouata «'o,, (^ue..
Nov. 28 (Special)—Wltb the coming of
winter the ravages of Kidney Disease
are again felt in this province, and the
fact thnt a sure cure is vouched for is
Ibis village iH news worth giving to ths
world. Mrs. Julien Painchaud is ths
person cured, aud she states withuut
hesitation tbnt she found her cure is
Dodd 'a Kidney Pills.
"Kor seven years my heart and Kidneys bothered me," Mrs. Painchaud
states. "I was ulways tired and nervous. I could not Bleep, My limbs were
heavy and I had a dragging sensutiOB
across tbe loins. My eyes had dark
.■rides under them and were puffed and
swollen. I was so ill I could hardly
drag myself around to do my houso
work.
"A neighbor advised me to tiy
Dodd's Kidney Pills, and I found relief
in the first box. Six boxes made me perfectly well."
If you have any two of Mrs. Pais-
chand's symptoms your Kidneys ars
liseased. ('ure them and guard against
serious, if not fatal results by nslss
Dsdd's Kidney Pllle. ■■
THE ISLANDER, CtlMllEKLAND. B.O.
We have recently received a
Carload of McLAUGHLIN
Carriages and Buggies,
and are prepared to quote
lowest prices and best terms.
give us a call
McPhee &
Morrison
General Merchants, Courtenay.
f
Practical   Watchmaker
All Work Guaranteed
I
a
. . NEXT TO TARBELL'S, . .
Dunsmuir Ave   : : :   Cumberland
ClI.ti.iN A sKSS-HfiiNI' uisiiiicr
NOTICE m lien.iy given, in acenrd
mice wuh the Stmut.s, that Pniviuoi 1
Revouue Tux. and nil nurueil taxi a
and iiic iiic tux, nn.l ach ol lax, uimil
and levied under ihe "Assessment Ac',"
an 1 amendments, areduo mi . payable on
tiie 2nd day uNmnnry, lllll- All laxs
enllioiible fr the Unix Asa ssnient
Distriot. aru due aud payable at my ef-
liee. situated at the Uuvemmeiil Ullkes,
Oumberlaud, This notice, iu terms of
law, ia equivalent tu a personal demand
by ine upon all persona liable for tuxer.
Dated at Cumberland, B.O tbe 13ih
lay of .laiiuaiy, lull.
JOHN BAIHP,
D.'pniy Aawtaor and Collector,
Comox Aiscument District,
Cumberland Post    fflce,
CANADIAN  PACIFIC
RAILWAY
re.   SERVICE
S  S. CITY OF   NANAIMO
(ok othkr STKAMKK)
weather and other   circumstance*
permitting will bale
North Bound
Leave Vnncouver fi p in. Mnmluyt
Arrive NiMiiumo i) uu n.m. Mondays
Leave Niumiiilb to p.m. Moliilaya
HeHVur Crt-ek      f
nuiuiuui Isi.mil     f
Arrive Union liny fi.HOa.iiii Tiiesrtajd
Li-avo Uitlim itiv in ::n n.m. Tuemlayi.
Arrive Comox II.Id ;i tn Tut's.luya
South Bound
IjBavB Comox t.l(ip.m, Tuosdaya
Arrivi* Ulllmi l!<iy 2,00 p.m. "I'u*-.(l;iy«
Li'ilvo Union Bay 2.16 p.m. Tuwdayi
Hi'iniiiui Island     f
Bvavur Creek      f
Arrlvtt NiHiniuifi ui p m. TuMilayn
Leavo Nanalmo 11.00 p.m. Tuesday*
Arrive Vimciiuvor 1.80 a in. Wutlm-tiluys
f   linlinites (lag stop,
Kor ruled ami further particular! call or apply
to
H. W. BRCDXB,      W.   MoOIRR,
GBN'L. P. A., Agenl,
Vancouver,   B.C.     Nanalmo,   B.C.
S. G. HANSONS
10'J pullet... h.vtchi.'<l'l40<i
[rum Jan. I to Mav 31. laid 37580 m__a
which aold at wholesale price*
nel        •        .        . $1019.12
eoat ul feed lor earn* period     311.PS
t 808.07
Average prolit per bird lor
ISldaya        •        •        ■
UlillS I'OK HATCHING,
.Itar.ll
April
Hav
June
Par 19.
i::.iw
:uki
•    2.M
- 2.uu
13.01
Per 100
SI5.U0
I...ml
I2.;m
lu.mi
HILLCREST POULTRY FARM
DUNCAN, Itl). Jt
Cumberland Public & High
School Statement 1910
EX  KNUITUHK
Toarhere salary
Janitor
cu nager
Hi'iitlnif Kurnaco
Nuw Tl,-sk»
ita inim Printing & Hiinilrien
Tolnl KxreniUllire
lies cci fully Biibmltti d. T.H.Cnrey Scerelnry
Giriiifud Lorrue*. Jan it'll
J.T Is, Palmer,   Clly Auditor
tew m
it.0 10
iki.iio
tew oo
171 no
...in'.;;,'
10271.0'
The
Third St. & Penrith Avenue
MAXWELL & HORNAL
Proprietors
All kinds of hauling done
First-class Rigs for Hire
Livery and team work promptly
attended to
Looal /itjtnit tor
The London & Lancashire
Fire Insurance Co.
Oet rates before instirin _ elff
where
Office: Cumberland
Bk. I
YOUR NAME IS
— GOOD.—
Anything
in the
Jewellery     -_.
Line
A&JLGVk.
MATCHES
Sold
on & Small
Monthly
Payment
STODDART
THE     JBWELLEE
Next door to Royal Bank, opposite Postoffice
^          ^
A FINE LINE OF NEW
MA TE RIALS JUST RE-
:   :   :   ClUVED   :   :   :
P. DUNNE
Up-to-date Merchant Tailor
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
Winning* Numbers
IN THE  DRAWING, ON
.. Saturday are ..
FIRST PMZE S73.   218SD,
tahe  Magnet Cash Store  Lf
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Capital $5,000,000
Reserve 15,700,000
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
Drafts Issued in nny currency, payable all over the world
SPECIAL ATTENTION paid to SAVINGS ACCOUNTS, and Interest at
highest eurrant rates allowed on deposits or $1 and upward!
CUMBERLAND, B.C., Braiioh -   —   —     OPEN DAILY
COURTENAY,B.C.s,il,l!i.,ml, OPEN TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
UNION WHARF, B.C., Sub Brunch-OPEN THURSDAYS
H. F. Montgomery, Manager
CROWDS
continues with unabated fury at the International Salvage Co's selling out sale of the Model Clothing stock on Dnn
smuir Ave. which continues for only a few days more.   Sale For 5 Days Only.   DONT DELAY,   ACT QUICKLY
$15,000   Worth
of Clothing
Butchered
Frv*eu'rsor Men's orYonthi Clutbw, all
to mult h
$2.98
Thi- imt.   i-  pnMMvcly »<    !i   rfl
ItiuDi j r< fundi dim]    i»i   1  -
A Hm-Ml'm'nr   « or y      '
irn'ch p"« ti v Ij* "
nifiindud al uny tltnoaurl _ Lh   *■**.
Iv,.f,.   ■       >n It   li  -  il-
I. 1. \;
.    ,       i■ lit
4.98
6.88
ri.s r(ituu.e :;      ik-1   l ialhl
P irliculai lv in this Oracle! ■ ' " m«t««hi i  »-Mt<>  ■■•• t • ■■• >■   • n-
Ol  BUlts we nave I lie yrvm-l .,,.,,„,„  -  ,
.   : sui plus  Here we liavel  ■ "   - i■ ■    i> t;
pi'epHied  it line ol' whieh I \\, .,* \„,.„  wul.,|, gSc   .. ■.    .  .,
we ai e truly Proud.
•.•'mo -o-»<- 1-0'    \[,.,,. ,,,„]  ]„,),•,., 1 „.
mrol cl, wm ii i" .;;.■• pair i ri
Q.<
i,    :   >■..   b ni- 11.1.
Salvaue Trice
10.80
Ircfn   1   iii-
i'«' i : i
![\\tui*   r,'.i.   I'muruidi r«l   S'j-^p tu\t*r*t
rr«i.t;a--o, r,.,'.,-
1 ity niw i'i-r w.iHi nn'1 tl m •   ■!■■ m
on i-n 1 th, worlh in $1; >nle ii'.tu
r ri'ttt ia TifK «' rth Sfin ,  nnv :..■
L'i iio/. iivi'I'iiIIh, wrii'tli 7."''',    m ! • :"'•■
lii) h.iz ii-. «, ii'lli nOo A 7fii', mli 17.
Mi'ii- 1 1 -,.,:.. I,,, i|, ,-,"■• . .now I'.'i'
I (  v v.   .....I   1 i  <».'      |Hn'* Mifi nml Miff worth 8<li  nulf fi"o
ll..SNail(l   I4r..l>     ||:..i f   |„„a worth u|i  Ui  »3.Bu
• l» 1" ?I.7S
Min--fi -iiiil siill' Inns, Dunliip mnl
■.  ' \" 'i\   I ,.'.„!' ^'itl'mfZa'       K""x "'"I"'1' wn«li ^:i -»l- 08d
Salvage   price
l'i y lir> wi nl fl:.    ...now 2£n jlm' lii f »o»W put. »uili ff. rn      '
l.:.p :"..0  A ill   II   ll! IOW    l-ii: ••< * It'.flS   ]
i\i iii; iS:9 j» 1 iii U vi illi n- U.fU f'" '      'I'll-  »u      i. IV    uv *   48
,,...." i._ \ ' ;  '■•v" [ ■ '.ii'it* ,'itiyjt-
Ki ■   i ■■• i \-1 ;'l     fi' ti f",; i   v  '.. c       i, w ..
• ■ yu ovtii ■•■.    i-l, ;r.i v j i9 * '
A •i,.mi >v, ,i| i,H0
18
li
S hi ■       • i , ,  ,      ,    ,
81.00;   i   u   . > ..I
C     it   li'a   in .-    I.t.i  1  .1-    uv   f8
>!  .'   I  - ' ,    ,   i      ■■         $   60,
I.      -'i     m nl s'j.-n    ■
■'■ i-' t-I. rs v. i I <■::   . ,,.
M    '«l.luh n,|i li   t. ■   nl 7 6i'i      I 48
Mi    '   I'M  li - in |i|  gll;   ,    .             . i_
ii-' 'I i. '«    nil   b :      nbbid  i'.
brnkiii aiiWH! >mIub 50.;   ,.,« .,  , \-L
-'■*   •' /. i i'i   I -iiuy   lii a .   nil   c- li i-,
llllllll 'Sir umi 36o;    llllW  ».llll y III  I
T.'i il ■/. ul< vi ■ vnl 60u ni #1 fill; i ,.w 8Bn
Min' lun. li...'» Hmili K'l nil; n. w H (io
Slmi'a buoti wm III tu H 60,    u ,» g'.MID
v       |   . (
M        I i.i
,11 4 8
ii- nu
ll, I .If •■ ill    ,,
 CU .1 12.48
Warning;—Owing to llm inngniliidu i f thifl selling mil sale wn can "" y«u l.n 1 aware i f oil i c call tl  •- ■ Bin
Our Quiirnteej -Waiws  noh imrohn-Gr ills lute wilisfno  mi   W- -,il • • V   ,
Iti fr
io Extra Salespeople here to s
r unrmiiT
' " nn   h  hirg" Iwlil letl ra ub ve (he iloor
in I Ul     I v |! vor, -i-lf.
Iy your wants
■
:,.-i     ■'*■
m ■-:■
•       --.I.
il wi ■  ■  wm-i
The World's Greatost Bargain Givers. Selling oat the Mo \.\ Cloth a:' C t    If, STOS.ii OPEN EVENINGS.
| ) I r ISTS~—t-\ TTTlr?-        -A-"V. '•iwu —qqi> jh-oao,, ux Ga'nxoe4aad News.

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