BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Aug 23, 1929

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0224705.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224705.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0224705-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0224705-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224705-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0224705-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0224705-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0224705-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0224705-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0224705.ris

Full Text

Array =ss=S3H««eo3Hesf3S5e«eaa53e
Cumberland Islander
At the Ilo-Ilo
This Week End
FORTY-EIGHTH   YEAR—Xo.   34
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
CUMBERLAND.  BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY,   AUGUST   23rd,
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS  PER ANNUM
Successful Joint
Meeting of Board
Of Trade And
Canadian Club
Assembly . Addressed By Noted
British Financier;  Many
Guests Present
One of the most enjoyable meetings
of the Canadian Club was that held in
the supper room of the Native Sons'
Hall on Wednesday evening in conjunction witli the Courtenay and Cumberland Boards of Trade. Hon. G.
Marler, Canadian Minister to Japan.
was to have bcen the guest of honor
and speaker ol Hie evening but through
,
Cumberland Hod and Gun Club hold ] AQUARIUM
their first official shoot for trophies
on Sunday, August 25th at 3 p.m. The
Frelone Cup will he the first trophy
competed  for.    This competition  will I
be open to all club members and will
be a 50-bird shoot.   The next event i
will  be for tho Club cup a 50-bird
shoot  for Class  "B"  members.    Tho ;
second high gun in each event will be
awarded a beautiful silver spoon. All l
shooters not competing In Class "A"
or "B" will shoot a 25-bird shoot for .
spoons.
Xo doubt there will he some very
good shooting in tlie competition as
some of the member Bare now killing
25 straight. The club shooting ground
Is now considered to be one of the
best in tlie province. A new automatic trap of the latest design is In-
FOUNDATION
IS BUILDING
The tug boat Khuenalin left Chemainus on Friday last towing a scow-
load of lumber. The tug is owned by
members of tlie Aquarnrium Foundation who are building a new settlement on the east side of Gallano Island.
. delay in his itinerary could not till   stalled in cement and the trap-house
is built according to regulations.
Largest Coal
Distillation Plant
In World Opened
the engagement and through the good
offices of Mr. Payne, secretary oi the
Vancou* er Board of Trade, Lord
Queenborough, who is louring Canada
for the pui'pose of making a personal
Investigation of investment possibilities for British capital, was prevailed
upon to fill the breach. With his
Lordship was Mr. H. B. Thompson, war
time Food Comptroller for Canada and
they were accompanied by Mr. C. H.
Dickie, M.P. for Nanaimo.
After the usual sumptuous supper
served by Mesdames M. McPhee and
Sutherland, the president, Mr. Wm.
Eadie, called upon Lord Queenborough j
as the chief speaker of the evening.     ;
Lord Queenborough prefaced his ad- \
dress with some experiences of the ]
early days. As a young man he had'
come out from England to the North!
West forty-eight years ago to engage] heard
in ranching, his destination being a!
small    community    in    northwestern
Iowa and his first job on arrival had 	
been to shovel snow for the Illinois [ to this coast of .Major W. MacKanzf'
Division of
Liquor Profits
Is Authorized
Cumberland Cheque $3,651.08;
Courenay Cheque $2,607.18
for Six Months' Period
Central   Railway   at   $1.50   per   day. j representative   of   the   Bussey   Low
However,  said  His  Lordship,  it  one. Temperature  Carbonization   prtreess.
Tho  distribution  of  liquor  profits
to the various municipalities in the
province has heen authorized  by or-
der-In-eouncil, which was signed on
Plant   Will   Consume   Between llhe re'"''" °( Hls Honor "'0 Ll"u-
600 and 700 Tons of Coal Per  tenant-Governor   to   the   city   this
Day, Turning it Into 450 Tons  weok-   Tllcre '» divided among the
of'Smokeless    Fuel,    20,000  seventy-three municipalities. ombrac-
Gallons of Oil and 20,000,000  lnG city, district, township and vil-
Cubic.Feet of Gas. i!aEe corporations, Stiss,situs, cover-
  ; ing the six months ending March 31,
Once more .Mr. A. W. Neill has been j 1923.
trom.     This   time,   evidently i    The City ot Vancouver is tlle reolp-
reading   an   announcement   In   last  lent of by far the largest amount in
week's  Islander, describing the visit   tho  province,  receiving  tlie  sum  of
1280,523.49.
There has been some delay In the
 ,,w,.....,L-   ua.uuui«a.ii.u   ijiucess,   making of the distribution  which is
came out voiina enou^li one quit lily, , , , . ,.,,.,     ^ ....
conformed 'to the ways of the country.! mn' !°cal niembeI" Mfd». us flltmS a | explained by the Department of Pi-
Mrs. W. Devoy
Passes to Her Rest
.Mrs. .Mary Jane Devoy, the beloved
wife of William Devoy passed to her
rest on Thursday morning, August
22nd at lhe Cumberland Genera)
Hospital, after being a patient in the
local Institution for lhe past three
weeks. The deceased, who was in
her 48th year. leaves besides her sorrowing husband, a family of young
children to mourn her passing. The
funeral will take place from the T.
E. Rank-; Undertaking Parlors on
Sunday afternoon at I o'clock for
Interment in the Cumberland Cemetery, with the Rev. J. R. Hewitt officiating.
The deceased was a native of Scotland and came lo Canada twenty
years ago. Along with her husband
and family she had been a resident
of Cumberland for a great manv
years.
Coal Production
Shows Decrease
For the six months ending June 80,
l!'2!t .the production from the coal
mines on the Island was as follows:
Canadian  Collieries   (!».  Ltd.—
I!t2!)      1928
Tons     Tons
Comox   Colliery    140,581    L*7,97J\
Extension   Colliery   .. 61,433
South Welling'n Xo. 6 34,433
Wellington-Ex. No. 8	
Wellington-Ex. No, 0     4,427
Residents of the Upper Island will
be in teres'ed in the announcement
that Nanaimo will be linked with Vancouver by a twice a day air service,
probably this next week. Providing
the price of a ride up in the clouds fs
not too expensive there are bound to
he lots of Up Islanders who will fly
high once iu a while.
Mi.Mil
31,480
0,642
9,197
From   there   he   drifted   to   Montana! clipping taken from Trade and Com-
where one went where hc liked, did
what he liked and shot over other people's properly when he liked. He then
went back to St. Paul and about 1886
found himself in Winnipeg, first to row
ln a regatta and again when they had
a big boom on. He was not caught in
the boom, for, said he, if one wanted
to make money in land one must anticipate the boom. Later he fount!
himself on Wall Btreet in New York
where he stayed for live years and
.during tliut time was associated with
others in founding the Dominion Steel
Company which had later meant so
jnutdi for Canada.
During Ins stay in the United States
he had gol to know such men as Jim
Hill and Tom Lowry who were doing
big tilings lor the country, aud just at
tins time they had their first great
men in Canada, whom he did not know
in tluse day* but had the pvAile^e oi
knowing when they came back after
forty-five years to live in England;
such men as Lord Strathcona and Lord
Mount Stephen.
As to his own business over here he
lisd come back after forty-eight years
io see for himself what he had always
.sensed in his own mind, to sec the
great prosperity whicli they were enjoying now and whicli they had just
begun to enjoy and which he was quite
satisfied was based 011 s°hd foundations and would continue lor
period to come.
The shortage of crops would make
some difference to the farming community but he saw tremendous enthusiasm in other industries. They
were finding some of the most wonderful mines in the world in what was
.formerly a land of forest and rocks.
His, Lordship said that if there was
one thjpg more than any other that
jkept people working and dunking together it was what he termed mutuality of investment and he stressed the
importance of ail parts of the Empire
working with the Mother Country in
the interests of the Empire. The war
arrested the flow of capital and thc
flow of men to Canada for a time.
Partnerships were broken and fresh
alliances were made and men like
himself were doing what they could
to re-open these channels.
The Unhed States, he said, had
brought a great amount of money and
brains to help develop some of the industries whicli were Starting in this
country. He had nothing to say
against that; it was good for Canada
and was good for the United States
or they would not be doing it; but they
were getting the cream of these good
things and they should like to see
some British capital coming into the
country so they could enjoy with it its
great prosperity.
The Old Country, he said, had had a
hard time on account of the collosal
debts created by reason of the war;
it had been necessary to raise capital
to hcli) Improve conditions throughout
Europe. That had taken a great deal
of available capital but the country |
Itself was slowly coming around.
England could not think as they
thought; she must study far more |
closely the international side or questions and could not take quite the same
view of questions as they could in Canada. She had had a hard and stony
.road to travel, but he felt quite sure
the roads wrrc opening up much more
smoothly. In going about he noticed
the people in tin- Old Country were
better clothed, far better nourished and
far happier than at any time in his
recollection.
His Lordship was certain that the
respect for their law and constitution
was deep in the consci.nisnc.ss of the
people. Since the war there had been
three chances of government, two of
them being labor governments and the
present labor government was going
to be given by the people of the country a fair chance to make good and
they were perhaps just as patriotic as
the rest of them. He thought that
they were extraordinarily stupid in the
attitude they took in the great strike,
but as a whole it had probably been
a good thing for the country; it was
the people of the country who killed
the strike much more than anything
the government of the day had done
towards it.
As to the Old Country's debt to Can-
merce, of August 10th, 1929, describing the
Opening of Largest ('mil
Distillation Plant
The opening of a new low-temperature carbonization plant by Lord
Eniley. M.P,, at Glenhoig, near Glasgow, on the 19th Inst., marks the beginning of a development which may
have important results fn th * direction of restoring prosperily to the
coal mines, cheapening fuel tor house- j VW far exceeds that of the correa-
hold and industrial purposes, reliev- j ponding half year, covering a similar
ing  unemployment in  the mines,  re
liance as due to the fact that as the
division i.s now made upon the basis
of the daily attendance in the schools
of the municipalities, there had to be
obtained from the superintendent of
education his certificates covering
the school attendance in the municipalities up to the end of June las:,
when the schools closed.
The division now made Is 1 ased on
the largest returns from liquor profits
that has yet been  obtained.
This amount,  which  is  $6.-2,919.4S,
ducing or eliminating lhe necessity
to purchase from abroad vast quantities of oll.and clearing the air of
the destructive cloud of smoke which
perpetually hangs over the great industrial cities of Great Britain. This
plnnt, the largest hi the world, will
consum0 between 600 and 700 tons of
coal each day, turning it into 450 tons
of smokeless fuel, 20,000 gallons of
oil. and 20,000.000 cubic feet  of gas.
An announcement was made that
during the next two years the Bussey
naa- j company the owners, intended to
j erect in Great Britain at least twenty
plains, which would mean an expenditure of not less than £3.000,000,
and would give employment, directly
and   indirectly,  to  more  than  50,000.
The opening of this plant from many
points of view is historic, heraldina
a new era in bhe utilization of coal
aud foreshadowing possibilities of
immense developments in industrial
enterprise. Hitherto coal has been
used almost solely as a fuel, but with i
the Glenhoig process It is to be used
purely as a raw material from which
a number of valuable products will
be extracted. At the opening ceremony stress was laid on the fact that
coal distillation hag now advanced
from the purely experimental stage
tu the realm of definite commercial
enterprise which should contribute
to a solution of British Industrial
difficulties.
Money Voted For
Approach to The
Wharf_At Lake
Mr. A. W. Neil! fiends Word to
Board of Trade That $2,000
Has Been Set Aside
by Government
Word was received from .Mr, A. W.
Neill. M.P. for Ihls district In the
Federal House that $2,000 had been
voted liy the government to build the
three sections of the appruanh to
Jocks Point. Lake Cumherland. This
amout of $2,000 is the result of the
untiring efforts of the Cumberland
land Board of Trade, with the assistance of lhe local member aud the
favorable report or the engineer Mr.
J. P. Forde. We are glvun to understand that tlie work will be proceeded with as soon as possible audit
goes without saying that the wharf
lo he built at Jock's Point will be
of the greatest value, both lo large
numbers of tourists using tho lake, the
men working in the logging camps at
tlie head of the lake and local residents, who make Lake Cumberland
their playground.
ada. this was so great it would last
forever in history.   When thc call to
(Continued on Page 8i
period of six months ending March
31, 1928, when the total distributed
to the municipalities was $»: 9.479.69.
The amount distributed from March
31, 1928 to Sepiemher 30, 1928. was
$541,112.80.
The distribution of the liquor profits will be altered somewhat following the division made to the municipalities now, lu keeping with the legislation   passed   last   session.
Basis of Distribution
The rules governing the distributions up to the present have provided
for an amount being granted out of
the clear profits to the mothers' pension fund. After that was disposed
of, there was a distribution made of
50 per cent to the Government and of
the remaining 50 per cent, 35 per
cent went to the municipalities, and 15
per cent went to the hospitals of the
province.
Iu future there will be none of the
profits earmarked for mothers' pensions nor for hospitals. These will
be supported out of the general revenues of the province, but at the same
time the Government will take a larger proportion of the total profits than
in the past ln orderlo make up for
the added cosls which will be placed
upon it. The municipalities will
therefore receive their proportion mi
a different basis which will be 23
per cent of the total profits.
On the division now made it would
appear that something like ?1,950,-
000 was available from liquor profits
for the half year after disposition
was made to the mothers' pensions.
Of this nmount the municipalities are
now receiving their 35 per cent and
15 per cent will bo set asldo for hospital service.
A mounds Per District
The distribution now made to tho
various municipalities Is on the ratio
par day school attendance of .012922-'
2661.
/The municipality of the city of:
Cumberland receives $3,651.08 and
Courtenay's share will amount to
$2,607.48. Other cities on tli i Island
participating in the liquor profits Include, Duncan. $20,886.40; Ladysmith,
$2,942.56; Nanaimo, $9,342.1); Port
Alberni,  $2,894.83;   Alberni,  $1,061.03.
Great anxiety was fell at the week
end tor the safety of three Cumber-
landers who set out on Sunday morning last about.'! o'clock in R. C. Lang's
power boat. "Sheautogo" for Vancouver. It had been felt that the mainland would be reached easily by Sunday night an das no word had been
received from* he adventurers by
midnight on Monday, grave anxiety
was felt for their safety. The wires
were kept hot in an effort to gain
some information. Eventually a phona
message was received stating that
bad weather hnd been encountered
aud it had heen necessary to seek
shelter. One of the party who went
along, as explained to tho Islander
reporter, as unstable ballast was put
ashore early on Monday with strict
Instructions to send a wire to R. C.
Lang, notifying hfm of the safe arrival in Vancouver. The bright lights
of the city must have been loo much
for the unstable ballast as he failed i
to send a wire but retrieved himself j
by sending a night letter, which was j
received hours nfter the phone mes- ;
sage from Walter Hudson, captain of
the boat. Jock Setveiison went along
as engineer, aud Aubrey Dyke wns
the other member of the crew.
Coal Creek
Menaced by Fire
Totals    881,756
Qrauby O.M.S. & P, Co. 88,121
B. Wellington Coal Co	
Dlam'il  Jubilee   Mine	
Plddlok   Mine „    1.24G
Little Ash  Mine     3,261
Hound Island Mine 133
UIclKirdson  Mine        133
Lantzvllle Col, ltd      587
872,121
96,897
8,757
nn
683
6,140
Cumberland
BadlyLighted?
Adequate Street Lighting for a
Small Community
Total
93,338    100,608
Total   for  Island  ....605,722   031,109 I
Baseball v. Cricket
Ball Tossers Beat Cricketers at
Their Own Game
The mud
A few short weeks ago, a prominent business man from across the
line, was il visitor to Cumberland and
as his business had muoh to do with
lighting systems In his own state, he
was much Interested in Lhe lighting
systems of the various towns in B.C.
Arriving in Cumberland one night by
ear fairly late, he was heard to exclaim as he got out of the ear. "This
i.s the darkest hole on the American
j continent and absolutely the worst
lighted front street 1 ever saw." The
remark set us thlllktug and ever since
We have been looking around to se?
If the remarks of our American friend
New Champion
Discovered At
Competition Held
Sunday Last
Mr. Ed. Morris Upsets AH the
Dope of the Wise Ones
A most successful fishing competition was held at Lake Cumberland
on Sunday last, confined to members
of the Cumberland Rod and dun club.
That it was tlie most successful held
this year goes without saving. Chief
Interest centred round the contest for
ihe biggest catch for which the magnificent cup donated by the Gibbs Tool
and Stamping Works, ol' Vancouver
was the trophy to be presented to the
winner. And what contest,
wise ones predicted that the
liable. Joe
away with i
of the seas
.Morris, one
of ihe
ner.    .Morris
but he is of such a quiet ;
hut i
ch   talked   of  cricket   ganic
between   the   Cumberland   Cricketers
and the Cumherland baseballers took
place   on    Wednesday   night.     The
cricketers put the baseball men in to
bat first and the style of some of the
sluggers sttandlng at ihe wickel was
most   comical.     The   Idea   had   got
abroad   amongst   many   in   Cumber- j of t
land  that  a   baseball   man  equipped
with  a  cricket   bat   could   knock   the
leather off the ball-    The only hnlts
that were knocked out of the ground
came from Sam. Gough, a local crick-
| eter.   Some of the much vaunted batters of the baseball nine, never even
| saw the balls delivered by II. Taylor
i anil Ver non-Jones, the whole side bo-
: ing dismissed for 41  runs.    It should
I have been  quite an  easy mntter  for
I the   cricketers   to   have   knocked   off
j the   required   runs,   espeeilaly   from
j the "losh" tossed  down  hy  Lockhart
1 and   McFarland.    Lockhart   got   two
j wickets enrly on.    His first ball, well
on the leg side hit Dando ou the leg
I is lots o
glancing ove
Cltj   a  few
article,    re
j for   a   small
Ml  the
Did  re-
iury,   would   walk
he biggest surprise
leason  was sprung when  Ed.
one  of the  darkest  "horses''
ontest was returned the win-
Is an  ardent fisherman,
nd retiring
disposition   that   one   hardly   knows
of  his   ability  to  lure  Uie   wily  fish,
it,    We must ndmit there I The   rules   distinctly  stated   that  all
join for Improvement and J fish  entered  for the contest must be
caughl ou Gibbs' tackle, bul  whether
product of this enterpris-
r firm ihat was respon-
great  number of  llsh
High  Wind  Fanned  Flames of
'Uncontrollable Conflagration
and just managed to tip the bails off.
H. Taylor was given out to a ridiculous l.b.w. decision and Jack Vaughan
given   as   run   out   when   he   wns   as
  ! safe as  ever  he could  bo.    Millburn
Cal   Creek,   mining  town   of  tltej™ als0 glvc"   '" w'  "'"   ""  (au"
Crows Nest Pass Coal Company was   <,oul"   "e   f"""u   wlt"   llu'  ",,1|,irc'H
one- more threatened  with destrue- ] deolsion in "is ''"se-   a°"e"  ' Sa'"
tin,, by lire at the week end, whet, ! Boothman were the only two halter,
high winds tanned the flames of un-   "' ra"" ""ul,l° llsl,rt!S 1""1 the crlck-
.   ,. ., „       .. .  .    .       cters' innings closed for 35 runs, los-
controllable   conflagrations   bringing! *
, .     .1      i   „ ,   ,.    i Ing out bv fi runs.    I hid the cricketer.-
great   danger   to   the   homes   of   the -     a
miners. Coal Oreek is known to doz
ens of Cumberlanders who can reud-
a copy of lhe American
lays ago, the following
((equate street lighting
community by John F.
Pierce,  attracted our attention.
"Street lighting In communities of
5,000 and under, especially in the
business section or on those streets
that are a link in llu* trunk system
. lias not kept pace wilh
the proportionate standard of illumination set by the larger and more
progressive cities. This negligence
Is due >o (I) lack of appreciation of
the value of well-lighted streets, (2)
the one-track or shortsighted minds
of some of the citizens who believe
thai  they  should   not   be  taxed  for
large or "special'' lights, which they
argue, "are only going to benefit the
abutters and the 'foreign motorist."
and (•!) the assumption that the town
Vannoi afford It."
"A well lighted community attracts
attention   and  commands  the   respect
inly   of   Hie   people   within   its
I  but  of everyone who has
o  visit or pass  throughput
uot
boundar
occasion
it   was Mu
Ing Vane
Sible   for  the
caught or the
the angler is li
to say, howevi
lutely the best
rd to i
and  wiles of
ty.    Suffice It
it  was  abso-
ontest staged by the
Rodand Gun Club. In Addition to Mr.
Morris winning the cup, the club decided to give the puller of the winning
boat, a prize to the value of $5,00 and
this was won by A. Merletti. Mr. Joe
Gordon one of the club's [nthuslastto
members was awarded a special prize
for the biggest fish of the day.
The contest started from Quartz
Creek aud many members had journeyed Ihere taking their families along
with them. Tho executive of the club
looked after all the young folks attending by providing free Ice cream
for all. Looking at last Sunday's
contest from every angle It is conceded that It was the best the club had
held and Incidentally a now champion  fisherman has been  discovered.
Ily sympathise with residents of the
interior mining camp. Almost every
year, the camp is threatened with destruction by (ire and many local residents have been through many stren-
unous limes there.
On Sunday afternoon last, an exceedingly high wind sprung up reviving the fire which had burned in the
vicinity of Coal Creek for a few days
| before. By 10 o'clock on Sunda;,
night, the fire had gained such rapid
headway that, the town was threatened.
Women and children were rushed
by train to Fernie, some five miles
distant, where the Mayor had relief
parties organized to take care of the
refugeso .having lhe Veterans' club-
rooms, Victoria [Tall and Oddfellows'
Hall In readiness to relieve the situation.
Some of the old surface building:'.
were burned and the fact that the
fire did not jump the narrow valloy
saved   the town,
Reports coming from the Colliery
early in the week, conveyed the informal ion that with the wind subsiding, the situation wns less menacing. Although the mines resumed
operations on Monday morning, very
few men  reported for duty.
been half serious, it would have been
quite easy to have knocked Up 185
runs. II. Taylor took four of the
baseball wickets and Vernon-'.Tones
six. Arthur Boothman took siv of
the  cricketers   wickets.   Lockart   3,
We understand the return game
will he oily of baseball on lhe recreation  ground  on   Friday  night,
Police Court News
A very successful tea ar.d whist
drive was held at the home of Mrs.
J. Baird on Wednesday evening hy
the lady foresters when six tables
were In play. During the evening
Mrs. Baird served delectable refreshments. In the final count lo decide
winners at whlst, Mrs. Boll received
the firsl prize, Mrs, Slaughter tho
second, Mrs. Morgan being awarded
the consolation.
On Augusl ITtli, hefore police magistrate W. A, W, Hames, two men.
Nick Kerpan, I.T.C. Camp, Campbell
Itiver and Joseph standen Venables
were charged with driving to the
common danger and lined $10.00 and
costs each.
On the same day, Norman I). Lawrence of Vancouver was hailed before
Btlpendary Q. Robert Hates, charged
with operating n motor car without
driver's licence, and was lined $5,00
and costs.
On Monday of this week. William
Vass, of Sandwlck, was brought hefore magistrate W, A. W. Hames nnd
charged with driving to lhe common [ .,   rc,w  years  ago  and
danger and was lined 10,(in and costs.) ||notypo  school   in   the
Former Member
Of Islander Staff
Weds in Vancouver
Cumberland Girl Becomes Bride
of JVIr. James Francis
Hough
A wedding of great local Interesl
was solemnized in Vancouver on Wednesday evening, when the Rev. Mr.
Martin, of the Wesley church united
in marriage, Hannah, daugL(ter of
Mrs. II. Harrison, of Cumberland and
James Francis, youngest son of Mrs.
E, Hough, of Nanaimo.
The bride, who looked very charming was attired in a beautiful Imported gown of blue and blego gcorgotte
wild shot taffeta hfll In matching colors and carrying a bouquet ur golden
ophellii roses Miss Wlnnlfred Cnl
nun, niece of the bride acted a i
bridesmaid, being charmingly nttirei]
in a rose beige georgette gown witli
taffeta hat to match and carrying n
bouquet ui pate pink opbella rose:)
Mr. Cyril Newman, formerly of Cum
berland, acted as groom imau, I-** j I
lowing the ceremony, the happ1
couple len for a nair of tlie eastern
slates and on their return will make
their home in Victoria.
Mis* Hannah Harrison, tlie brld
is well and favorably known hi Cumberland, where she has lived all her
life. I'p until a short lime ago -ii
was a member of the teaching
of the Cumberland Public School,
whilst the grom i- also well known
here, being at  one time a  member of
the mechanical stair ot the Cumber
land  Islander.    Mr.  Hough  left  hero
fl
that   municipality.     Tne. advertising
effect cannot bo disregarded or minimized.     Proper   Illumination    gives
one  tlie  impression  of a  live  up-'o-
date,   far-sighted   town.     Municipalities,   like   business   organizations,   di.
not  stand  still   they  go cither  tor- j Local   Nine  Try
ward or backward.    Competition he-j
tweeu them Is keen, and communities I
vie with one anoiher lor commercial
supremacy.       Numerous     offers     are j
made in prospective industries to locate within lhe town, the local civic
organizations meet regularly, talk,
plan.and discuss methods of making
their town the Utopia, ever reaching
out for something blg( something
great ihat will put their community
on the map, and oftentimes overlook-
inj* something else local in character,
such as Improved sireei lighting, that
will produce the same result in the
end a better and more prosperous
community,
Proper illumination iu the business
district Is uot a luxury to be paid fur
by a few. bin a necessity to be paid
fnr by ihe community as a whole.
It is [be magnet that attracts shoppers and slops trade from going out
of town. More mnooy spent in the
community means a better assortment
of merchandise, larger stores, and
oventually increased properly valuation, if ibe merchants prosper and
heir community  will do like-
Cumberland Cubs
Defeat Courtenay
'ing to Arrange
Game With Courtenay"
Seniors
grow,
wfso.
Tlie    Cumberland    Cubs    defeated
Courlenay in a twilight league game
played on Sunday last by a score of
six to two. Sutton pitched the first
two innings for Courtenay but was
then relieved in favor of Keg. Laver.
The locals had the edge on the ranchers right from lhe start and one of
the big features of the game was the
steal of T. Hoi. of the Cumberland
team from third to home, lhe crowd
giving the son of Nippon a big hand
tor his feat.
Tucker James also made good with
tin* fans, pis hitting being a treat to
watch. Tucker got three safe lifts
tor as many times -t the bat. Tiie
Cubs have now played ten games,
won eight and lost two and are looking forward with much pleasure to a
home and home game with Ihe Cour-
tonaj seniors, The locals take on
the Courtenay juniors again this coming Sunday at Courtenay, game to
commence at six o'clock.
Followln
Bhorl
of  hist
Pi
:   III,
all I
justl
PI
idii
immuii-
onslfled i
idaya game
BROWN—To Mr. and Mrs. William
Brown, of Penrith avenue on Friday,
August  23rd,  a  daughter.
On Tuesday last, before stlpondary I wards being employed in Patterson,
magistral! G, Robert Bates, Tom I N.J, for a year or two, Returning to
Muroaka, of Deep May, was charged | the coast, he obtained employment on
with   failing   lo   report
and was fined ?">."'> and costs
accident
the North Shore Review later mi going  to Victoria,  where  he is at   pre-
atreei lighting on the main street?
Any expenditure <>( publli funds that
un! i orrespondingly Increase safety
convenience of Hie public, and police
protection i- Justifiable Accidents
are reduced by adequate slreoi lights
becouso the) Increase tlie vision of
the automobile drive,. UN vision de-
pen I- upon the Intensify nf approaching headlights nnd or his own, and
upon an even distribution of Illumination from Hie ■tie"! lights. Qroater
vision tor the motorist, greater con-
\< ji nn 11 i'N thi' pedestrian who has
to cro thi -in et and better police
protection, nre til reel result', of hett. r
Illumination, h is o well known fact
that motorists do noi upecd through
brlghll] lighted districts because
thcli Un nse numben ran b,. eaajly
read, aid thai crime is noi committed
Where there is plenty ol light We
know thai shoppers are attracted to
the lighted districts and that merchants reporl new faces lu stores on
Saturday evenings, Boiler window
display-' result and many automobiles
stop on the street, which will in time
make a serious parking problem,
(ourtenay
Cumberland
3 1 1 0 1 0 1    6 in
sent a member of the mechanical staff
of the  Victoria  Daily Colonist. I of research
Thr   many   friends  of  Mr.  and   MfB. j pulverized l
Greater Use Of
Pulverized Coal
Is Proposition
Vancouver, Aug. 2>:   Before a large
gathering   of   distinguished   engineers
and mining men, al I tn i pc< lal luncheon ol the Mining Institute here today. William N. Kelly, consulting eil-
glneer and marine surveyor, Vancouver, described the development of the
pulverized i oa] Industry thnuighout
the   world.
Coal   consumption   in   British   Col-
uml'ia has been falling off lu recent
years, du  the  increasing use of
California fuel oil, and in view of tho
sine of ih,, coal milling industry iu
this pro vi nee. the opportunities in
the uses of pulverized coal should be
or lirst Importance in colliery people, said Mr. Kelly, ll would pay industrial consumers of coal products
t<i experiment and enter into the Held
to the possibilities of
. Mr   Kelly stated.    Re
Hough In Cumberland will wish them   suits
the best of luck In their new venture. | dlture-
Maine,I
in   view
vould   justify   expen-
of efficiency. PAGE TWO
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,  AUGUST  28rd,  U>2!)
I-.        n ■ ill I        which may form a pattern for Pacific coast adop-
I HP I.IIITlhfir Pnn    Q anilPr t™. is an outstanding example of successfully
I IIU IjUIIIUUl IdllU   IbldllUCI   oper'atM pubUc utility* The total investment of
: the Ontario commission in power undertakings
and hydro-electric railways is $211,217,181 and
the investments of the municipalities in distributing systems and other assets is .'i>8o,9SG,2k!7,
making in power and hydro-electric railway undertakings a total investment of $297,203,769.
.The total revenue derived from tliis capital investment in the fiscal year 1928 aggregated $36,-
1 :ixs :!!)■>
PUBLISHED  EVERY   FRIDAY  AT  CUMBERLAND,   U.C
EDWARD W. BICKLE
ONE THOUSAND NEW ROAD SIGNS
A WORK which will do much to make British
Columbia's highways more popular with the
tourist i> bi ing carried out by the Automobile Club ol' British Columbia in the placing 1000
road signs in the interior on highways that have
never been previously marked.
This is an important function and could be
followed up by tie.' municipal councils through
the marking ,,( important streets in all leading
centres.
While every town and city likes to have the
tourist stop and see the place they cannot stop at
every one. and il would be of great aid if some
of these places would mark the route nf the highway fight through  Ihe town.
A well-developedand administered town cannot afford ii"! to hame ils streets marked, as it
saves endless confusion.
ln Vancouver a unique street marking system
has been adopted, where the single standard
street light is usi d, ll is done by the use of glass
plates around the base of Ihe light, which are
automatical!, illuminated when the lights are
turned on. ll is a simple, yet artistic method
which could be profitably followed.
HYDRO ELECTRIC  DEVELOPMENT
BRITISH COLUMBIA water powers are to be
made the subject of a systematic survey during the next few years, not only in districts
tributary to cities l«it in the most remote regions,
it has been announced by the provincial Minister
of Lands. Thus is given assurance that the government is alive lo ilie situation which is developing wth the rapidly increasng demand for hydro-
electrical resource's for industrial purposes in the
province. It is interesting and significant to note
that careful and intensive study is to be given to
the suitability id' a hydro-electrical commission
similar to the one in Ontario for British Columbia.
Thc Ontario Hydro Electric Power Commission.
:188,:!!)2.
The function of the commission is not only to
use its bestendeavors to provide for the people of
Ontario, at cost, an adequate and reliable supply of electrical energy, but also to ensure that
the cost of the electrical energy to the consumers
shall be at the minimum consistent with the financial stability of the enterprse. It has ac.com-
plshed this to the extent that the electric power
rates to the people of Ontario are the lowest in
North America. Last year it was stated that
power used for domestic purposes in Ontario cost
the consumer less than 2 cents per kilowatt hour
while the average cost in the United States was
given at in excess of 7 cents, lt was recently intimated by the chairman of the commission that
these electrical power rates may be placed on a
si ill cheaper basis.
A feature of the commission's work in recent
years has been the extension in the field of rural
electrification, in which substantial progress has
been made. Practically all rural electrical service
is now given through rural power districts which
are operated directly by the commission. For
the purpose of electrical service in rural Ontario
rural power districts are formed in the more
closely-settled portions of tlie province traversed
by transmission lines, a typical rural power district covering about 100 square miles. There is
now more than $7,200,000 invested in the rural
power district systems established by the commission. Towardsthis rural work the Ontario
government, pursuant to its, policy of promoting
the basic industry of agriculture, has contributed
50 per cent of the cost of the transmission lines
and equipment, or about .$3,500,000. About :!,71)0
miles of transmission lines have been constructed
to date, of which 029 miles were constructed in
the |iast year, a mileage which exceeded the con-
struction of any previous year. There are now
31,000 customers supplied in rural power districts.
—Agricultural  industrial  Progress in Canada.
] On Tuesday evening the home of
:Miss Gladys Miller was the scone ot
a very, jolly party given ln honor of
her thirteenth birthday. The children
: thoroughly enjoyed themselves during
jlhe evening, playing gtimes of all descriptions. The following won prizes:
; peanut contest: first prize. Lome Murdoch; second prise, .Iran Somerville.
dumb church, prize. Cleo Gibson; Donkey party, first prize, Httshie Miller;
second prize Thelma Waterfleld; consolation, Tommy .Somerville; bean coolest, prize. Marie Buchanan; egg con-
Itcst, Helen Sommerville. After the
games the children sat around the
table which was nicely decorated with
l gladioli and sweet peas and in the
centre of which was the birthday cake
| with its thirteen candles. The little
[ hostess cut the cake and several of the
I guests were delighted lo find money In
their portions. Master Lome Murdock
shared the important place at the
table with the hostess, flic occasion being his fourteenth birthday. Miss
Miller was the recipient of many lovely
gi.'ts from her friends. Those present
included Masters Lome Murdock,
Hughle Miller and Tommy Soinmer-
.ille and Misses C'?o Gibson, May Graham. Thelma Waterfleld, Jean. Helen
and Mable Sommerville, Marie and
Etta Bannerman. Betty and Dorothy
Malpass. Barbara McNeil and Gladys
Miller.
A surprise party was held at the
home of Mrs. Win. Robertson for Miss
Olive Robertson ol" Ladysmith. the occasion being her returning home after
a month's holidays with her aunt. Mrs.
Dave Robertson. Thc evening was
spent in games alter whicli the little
.ntests were served with dainty refreshments which was followed by ice cream
which was enjoyed very much by all.
Prizes were won by the following:
Pinning tlie tail on the Donkey—Girts.
flrst, Olive Robertson; consolation. Annie Green; Boys, first. John Harvey;
consolation, Harvey Hurd, Cat Game
—Girls. Alice Jackson; boys. Sammy
Stockand. Guessing contest—Girls.
Lily Waterfleld; boys. Sammy Stockand. Those Invited were Violei Robertson. Alice Jackson, Kitty Jackson.
Beattrlce Hurd, Dot Smith, Mono
Spencer. Annie Green. Charlotte Hof-
flnze, Cissy Stockand, Rosena De Con-
ick. Lily Waterfleld, William Robertson, Harvey Hurd. Ronald Hatfield,
Andrew Harvey. John Harvey. Jackie
Graham. Tommy McMillan, Tommy
Stevens, Willie Slaughter, Clyde Lewis.
Archie McMillan. James Jackson. Sammy Stockand and Tommy Green.
Courlenay Locals
Mr. P. J. Cox. of Port Alberni, with
Mrs. Cox. who havi bcen quests cf
Mr. and Mrs. John Sutherland at Royston and Cumberland, paid a viist to
Courtenay yesterday before returning
to their home in Alberni.
Miss L. JoUn.su;!., oi Valdez Island,
is visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Ray
Dawson.
Mr. Frank Movitz went over to Vancouver last week to meet a sister from
Illinois whom to h id noi ■ ■■ in for over
twenty years. She was a member of
an Arts Tour party of 245 people. On
the boat which brought the party over
from Seattle waa also a Cook's tour
parly and as they all walked down the
gang plank, Frank had .some job in
picking out his sister,
Wins B. C. Championship
Master Harry Kerton, who went
over to the Vancouver Pair and took
with him hi: m : I i ht, stayed over
to take pari In the model yacht races
on Monday and in the class in which
he entered his b o had the good fortune to win Hi'' cup representing thc
B.C. Championship. Harry's boat won
the cup al the races held here last
year.
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. McPhee and
family left on Friday of last week to
spend a vaaction in Victoria.
Mr. O, F. Smith and children are
visiting  in   Vancouver.
Mrs. O. T. Corfii id and family returned yesti rday I Wednesday) from
Victoria where they have been summering.
Miss Minnie Lelghton, who is following her profession of nursing at
Ocean Palls. din .   a  vacation
at the home of 1   r p; rent . Mr. and
Mrs. George B, Li ghton.
Mr. U Clark m ai a visitor to the
Vancouver Exhibition last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D, Cairns,
while on their honeymoon, were visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs,
James Cairns this week.
Mrs. R. McCuaig and Betty left on
Friday for Vancouver from where they
sailed on tlie Aorangi for their home
j in Honolulu.
; Mr. Alex Chalmers has purchased
j the home of Mr. A. R. McLeod in the
I Concenla Subdivision, Lake Trail.
I Mr. Sid. Williams, of the Searle
Shoe Store, left on Tuesday for the
I Prairies. On Monday evening the
i young people of the town met in the
j Native Sons Hall to bid this popular
| member of their set good-bye. During
I the evening, which was spent in games
| and dancing, Sid was presented with a
1 pair of military hair brushes and a
clothes brush in a leather case.
Mr, Wm. Rickson went over to Vancouver on a business trip at the weekend.
Entertains at Bridge
On Tuesday afternoon Mrs. Theed
Pearse entertained at two tables of
bridge. Out of town guests were Mrs.
Bishop, wife of the eminent California
ornithologist; Mrs. Hariand Smith.
wife of the Dominion archaeologist.
Ottawa; Mrs. T. G. Mitchell, of Watford, Ontario and Mrs. Chapman, of
Massachussets.
Miss Gladys Roy who is in training
at St. Paul's General Hospital, Vancouver, is holidaying with her mother
Mrs. D. Roy of Royston.
Mr. Herb. Roy returned Friday last
alter spending a short holiday in Vancouver and sound cities.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Booth returned
on Wednesday after a two weeks' vacation in Vancouver.
Mrs. Gilbert, sister of Mr. Wm. Shil-
cock, is spending a few days in Courtenay, the yuest of her brother and
Mr. and Mrs, W. R. Cooke.
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Wallis and
family left last Friday for Victoria
where Mr. Wallis has accepted a position on the High School staff.
Mr. N. A. Maclnnls, principal of the
Courtenay High School, has resigned
his position and accepted .. position on
tlie staff of the Burrard High School,
Vancouver.
Corrections
One or two slight errors inadvertently appeared in the report of the prize
winners at the flower show held last
week: In thc City Vegetable Garden
Competition Mrs. W. Bennett was flrst.
Mr. G. W. Edwards second and Mr.
Herbert Smith third. In the City
Flower Garden Competition Mrs. Ray
Dawson was first. Mr. Herbert Smith
second and Mrs. Dauncey third. In
■ the Gladioli class, six varieties, named
Mr. C. W, Leedam was awarded second
prize, Mrs. R. R. McQuillan being third
Union Day
Mrs. Mugford of Vancouver is
spending a vacation in town thc guest
of Mr. and Mrs.  L. Magnone.
After visiting in town for the past
two weeks, Miss Muriel Stevenson returned to her home in Vancouver on
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Leithead returned
home after spending the past two
weeks in Vancouver and Sound cities.
A very enjoyable surprise party was
held Oh Monday evening at the home
of Mrs. P, Winlcrburn who is leaving
shortly to make her home in Victoria.
Games were played and a very pleasant evening was spent by all.
The Ss. Waikawa bunkered here on
Monday and sailed lor Sun Francisco
via Ocean Fails. Thc Canadian Miller also bunkered here on Sunday and
sailed for Montreal via Victoria.
Mr. and Mrs, G. P. Berry were visitors in town on Sunday the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. F. Brown.
SURE!
Ma gives
the children
J^^l*.^:.!*.^ ii.-t'A~V
>7i < ''KT vV*5*
Comox Jersey Ice Cream
"lieciiuse it is so rich in pure Cream." But tho children
are more interested in the cold, smooth, lustiness of
Jersey Ice Cream and so will you be once you sit down
to enjoy this wonderful treat.
AT YOUR FAVORITE VENDORS
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
i*ftn-
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Slimmer Train Service
■'Confederation" leaves Vancouver
10.30 a.m. daily for Kamloops, Jasper,
Edmonton- Saskatoon, Regina, Brandon Winnipeg, and Toronto making
close connections for all Ontario and
Southern points.
"Continental Limited" leaves Vancouver 9,ii0 p.m. Daily for Kamloops,
Jasper, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Montreal, making close
connection for .Maritime and United
Sates points. This train carries
through standard sleeper to Chicago
via Dulutfa and also through standard
sleeper to Kelowna via Armstrong and
Vernon.
Summer Steamship Service from
Vjiii corner
Alaska sailings every Monday 8.00
p.m. via Prince Rupert.
I'rinco Rupert, Anyox and Stewart
sailings every Wednesday and Saturday iat S.oo p.m.
Weekly sailings to Queen Charlotte
Islands,
The GEM
BARBER SHOP
Opposite  llo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B. C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber &. Hairdresser.
Children's hair cut any slyle 35c
Ladies' hair cut any style 5Uc
ILO-ILO
THEATRE
SCOTTISH LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
Overs nnd Dry Clennei'B
Special family ' laundry rate.
Orders left at the Ritz Cafe,
'phono 150, Cumberland will receive prompt attention. A trial
order will convince you.
Telephones: Courtenay, 226
Cumberland 150
P. P. Harrison
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courlenay             Phone   253
Local Office
Cumherland  Hotel   in  Evenings
Telephone 116R or 24
m bottle-fed babies
FHEB BABY 1130X8
Write The Borden Co., Limited, Dept.
B-U, Homer ArciKlel'.Lljj., Vancouver,
for two Buby Welfare Books.
On Monday. August 12th. -before
stipendary magistrate E. W. Bickle,
James Menzie Thomson, charged with
lieing intoxicated in a public place
(Royston Dance, Saturday, August
10th), was fined $25.00.
if Si
:$    FOR SERVICE — LATEST SANITARY METHODS     3:
visit 9:
Minto
Mrs. James Monks and Margaret left
by stage on Monday on a little holiday
visiting Victoria, Vancouver, etc., before resuming the duties at the school.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Hutton returned j
from Vancouver on Sunday last.
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Carter and par- j
ty had an outing to Port Alberni last
Sunday, incidentally trying out thc
new car.
Mr. John Pearse was home for a few
days over the week-end, Art hazard
being responsible for a short shut- j
down. He left for Alberni on Wednesday, his father, Mr. T. Pearse. accom-'
panying him to spend a few days in j
that district
The Central
'Barber Shop
ij
A. GATZ. Trop.
fi Next 10 Shorty's Pool Room
,' For Ladies and Gents.                              ji:
fi Meliorate Prices                                             Cumberland, B.C.       {■
ft »:
FOB SA1E—FBUIT FOR CANNING.
Plums, Green Gages ami Italian
Prunes, all fi rents a pound. Order now and will deliver when ripe.
Peach Plums ready now. Rossiter,
Nob Hill Orchard, Comox 2l
KING GEORGE HOTEL
Good Service
Reasonable Charges
CENTRALLY  LOCATED
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surecon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
RILEY'S TRANSFER
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
; •   '      PROMPT ATTENTION      ^V;
David Hunden, Jr.
Friday and Saturday
August 23 and 24
NORMAN
KERRY
THE
BONDMAN'
hy SIR HALL CAINE
Filled with Ihe salt tang of
tho Isle of Man and the hot
sun of vine-clad Sicilv.
Monday and Tuesday
August 26 and 27
MADGE
BELLAMY    .
"Mother
Knows
Best'
»
COAL     -     GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
—     WOOD
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX MAXWELL, Proprietor.
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Love Starved!
. .ar.d when Ihe one great
love steals into her heart
. . with thc lirst kiss fresh
on her lips . . . torn away
from her sweetheart's arms
.... because ....
MOTHER
KNOWS
BEST
Gdnqberlaqd
; Commercial
| lli',Hli|ii;irur>
Kates
lUaMinahk
Hotel
ACCOMMODATION TIIE BEST
Itooms Steam Heated
IV. llEltltlFIELD, Prop.
Phones 4 and (il
Cumberland, B.C.
Automobile Side  Curtains Repaired
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Also Harness Repairs
E. L. SAUNDERS
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
■^CONFEDERATION
Daily from VANCCUYtito ICRCNIC
Weds, and Thurs.
August 28 and 29
VICTOR
McLAGLEN
"Captain
Lash"
A Simon Legree among
men; a shorn lamb with
women — Ihat is Captain
Lash, hero of a thrilling
story of sea and seaports.
THE splendid appointments
of the CONFEDERATION
afford luxurious relaxation.
Serving all the principal cities
on the prairies, this last word in
modern rail express fulfillsevery
desire for speed and comfort
Through Ihe
aloe-inspiring
Fraser Canyon
in daylight.
fl-vriQNfi
Al.l.S'llX!. equipment,
radio and the world*
famous CNR Perioiwt
Service.
"Continent at Ltmit*Jm
■iusual Oiiilyarfc50p.ro.
Canadian National
Furthtt Information from E. tv. Hlckle, telephone 115, Cumberland, ll.C, or
write (". V. Enrle, Hlstrlot I'litneiiger Agent, Vlrtorta, ll.C.
Friday - Saturday
August 30 and 31
John
Barrymore
in
"Eternal
Love" FIUDAY,   AUGUST   23rd.   1020
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE THREE
<
A/f
y-^2t:^^
TAX  SALE
Comox Assessment District
NAME OF PKltSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION
OP  PROPERTY
1  3   S
Suhd. Lot 5304, Plan 5093.
Kraskow. Fred     Lot 2. Block 6 	
Perry, Mrs. Eveline Nelson     Lots 1 & 2, Block 7
63.00 6.85       13.75
180.00        16.74       13.75
Errico. Guiseppe
Subd. Lot 5305. Plan 5094.
Subd. Lots 3 to 6, Blk. B, Plan 5725,
Lots L, M, N. O ..	
SAYWARD DISTRICT
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Wednesday the 11th day of September, 1929, at the hour
of one o'clock in the afternoon at the Court House, Cumberland, B.C., I will sell at public auction
the lands on the list hereinafter set out, of the persons in said list hereinafter set out, for
delinquent taxes unpaid by said persons on the 30th day of June, 1929, and for interest, costs,
and expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale, if the total amount due for period ended
December 31st, 1927, and the interest thereon, together with costs of advertising said sale, are
not sooner paid.
LIST OF PROPERTIES
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
IIORT DESCRIPTION
OF  PROPERTY
2 a  »
RANGE 1, COAST DISTRICT
Allison Losing Co. Ltd     Lot 1001 	
Jumcs, F.  N  Block "B" o£ Lot 1454 .
Hartfield. Melvin R     Lot  1700  	
Ward,  Michael    Lot 1331  ....
Ward.   Michael       Lot  1832 	
NANAIMO DISTRICT
Hornby Island
Pearse. Theed   N'.j of NW!, ot Section 11
Pearse, Theed  L'.' ol S'.V , ol Section 12 ....
Pearse, Theed   E',a ol NEVi of Section 12 ....
Pearse, Theed   bE<, of Sec. 12 	
75.00 6.96 13.75
133.50 12.39 13.75
8.30 .93 13.75
18.00 1.65 13.75
24.00 2.22 13.75
53.00 5.72 13.75
53.00 5.72 13.75
44.72 5.09 13.75
100.38 12.07 13.75
NELSON DISTRICT
Subd. of part of Lot 20, Plan 1841.
Maruya. Isematsti Estate    Lots 1 &2 ...
Wheeler. Albert     Lots 3 & 4
24.34 2.61
24.34 2.61
13.75
13.75
Subd. of part Lots 20 & 20A.   Plan 1840.
Maruya, Isematsu Estate  Lot 12   9.74 1.07
Township 11, Plan 551
Ibbotson, Albert    Fr. NE1, of Section 30 1102 ac.j ._  34.80 3.77
Township 11, Plan 551.   Subd. part Section 30. Plan 1930.
Herd, Thomas H  Lot 7   9.00 .81
Morgan. David    Township 11. Plan 551,
P.ircel B. ol Fr. SW'i of Sec. 31 .
4.00 .44
NEWCASTLE DISTRICT
King, Henry Louis   Pt. Pel. A ol Lot33. South of and adjoining Plan 2459  (.7 ac)    18,00
1.68      13.75
Subd. of W. Pari of Lol .'i(i, Plan 2076.
Olds,   B.   A    Lots 1 & 2 .
Holt, Mrs. Agnes C    Lot 4 	
66.00
24.44
4.69
2.46
13.75
13.75
GROUP 1, NEW WESTMINSTER DISTRICT
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Co.
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Co.
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co., Ltd. ..
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.,
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.,
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co..
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.,
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.,
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co..
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.,
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.
McGraith, M	
Lot  520  	
Part Lol 022 (1281 acresl 	
Lot 501  	
Lot 502  	
Lot  503  	
Lot olij 	
Lot   500 	
Lot 507  	
Lot 555 	
Lol  50iJ 	
Lot  570   	
Lot  571   	
Lot  572   	
Lot  573  	
Ltd     Lol 574    	
     Lot 15, Blk. 2. Plan 2732, Savary Isd...
Ltd.
. Ltd.
Ltd.
. Ltd.
. Ltd.
. Ltd.
. Ltd.
Ltd,
Ltd.
Ltd.
Ltd.
Lol   1373, Plan  1353, Savary Island.
Cahlll, Edwin D     Lot "A" 	
Marlatl, C. R     Lot 0, Blk. 3, Plan 5205, Savary Isd ...
Maslin, J	
Hanson, Axel R.
Subd. Blk. 2. Lol 1123, .Map 5557
      Lot "B" 	
      Lot   1474        	
Osborne. Francis Preslon
Subd. of lit. Lot 1012, Plan 1077
      Lot "B"   	
Hendrickson, John   Lot 1015
Brocks Scanion O'Brien Co., Ltd. Let  1730
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co.. Lid  i..    .   :,
Biuuks Scanlon O'Brien Co., Ltd, . i-	
Brooks Scanlon O'Brien Co., Ltd  i...   .. -
10.76
07.50
119.25
34.50
103.00
1.98
9.06
11.07
3.18
14.22
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
Subd. Lot  1170, Plan 5238—Subd. Lol "A", Plan 5506.
Edmonds, John      Lot 2
Subd. Lot 1172, Plan 5015.
Marlatt, Charles R     Elks. 7 & 8 	
Golhard. Henry      Lot  4719  	
Subd. of Pt. Lot 4936, Plan 1910.
Donley, Robert, Olaf Olson & M.
ohristenson 	
Ellis, Robert B	
Lot "A" ..
Loi  5010
457.42
43.00
5.00
18.00
43.25
4.84
.56
1.65
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
Subd. N'/i of Lot 5107, Map 5714.
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber &
Timber Co., Ltd     Lot 5
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber &
Timber Co., Ltd    Lot 6 ..
Crockford, William F     Lot 7 .
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber &
Timber Co., Ltd Lot  10
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber &
Timber Co., Ltd    Lot 12
Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Si
Timber Co., Ltd    Lot 14
Crockford. William F   Lot 24
120.00
136.64
136.64
76.86
Drummond,  James
Subd. Pt. of Lot 69, Plan 1076.
 Lots 14 to 26, Block 1 	
05.71
159.04
23.04
33.40
39.97
72.47
72.47
63.50
126.20
40.77
40.77
24.56
Douglas. Mrs. Myrtle     E. 40 acres of Lot 74, lying between the
E. boundary of said Lot and the E.
boundary of T. L. Lot 49	
Subd. of Lot 114.
Roberts. Pauline Margaret ..„     Lot 2  !	
Lain, Chas. Horton   Lot 117 ICortez Island) 	
Mason, c. D  Undiv. V. Int. in Lot 128 (40 acres) ....
McKenzie, Mrs. S  s. 33.33 chs. of Lot 130 (200acres) 	
Neal, Arthur   Lot 205 	
Nockland, Simon O  Lot 237  	
Paterson, Daniel   Lot 730	
Wilcox, Jas. S: Mrs. Ethel V  Lot  871   	
Peterson, Hilda   Lot 898 	
Murphy, Rowland   Lot 903  	
12.50
134.75
104.00
150.00
48.72
24.00
14.00
7.00
40.50
206.13
Township 3.
Armishaw. John E.
Badham, Arthur C.
WI-.- of SW'.i Sec. 28, Pt. E's of SEV4
Sec. 29 (157.5 acres) 	
Township 6.
NE'i  of NE'4 Sec. 34 	
CORTEZ ISLAND
Subd. Pt W'/2 of SW'/4 of See. 33. Plan 3379.
Ballantine, Mr.s. Gladys G Lot "B"   7.0
Barrett. William L S'.i of NW',4 of Sec. 40 ,
Barrett. Mrs. Mary  SWS of Sec. 40 	
Murphy, Rowland  Fr. NE 'A of Sec. 49 	
RUPERT DISTRICT
Ling Que   Pt. Sec. 68 	
McLachlan, Charles  Lot 328 	
Morton, Albert E     Lot 1445 	
52.32 West Vancouver Commercial Co     Section 1, Quatslno
84.44
40.65
264.00
24.54
13.75
302.29
770.40
71.73
13.75
855.88
li4.75
10.65
13.75
139.15
120.00
11.16
13.75
144.91
177.75
16.53
13.75
208.03
06.75
8.97
13.75
119.47
224.25
20.85
13.75
258.85
120.00
11.16
13.75
144.91
118.50
11.01
13.75
143.20
156.75
14.55
13.75
185.05
214.50
19.92
13.75
248.17
58.50
5.43
13.75
77.68
105.00
9.75
13.75
128.50
90.00
8.37
13.75
112.12
66.75
6.18
13.75
86.08
21.00
1.95
13.75
30.70
45.00
4.17
13.75
62.92
56.00
3.87
13.75
73.42
16.07
1.53
13.75
31.95
150.00
13.95
13.75
177.70
MALCOLM ISLAND
Hilton Adam    SE'4  of NW'/.  <& EH of Fr. SW!4
Sec 1, Eli, of W!5 of Fr. SWVi (except
W. 5.5 chs.) Section 1
E!i of SWW  of NWV.   (except W. 5.5
chs.) Section 1 	
Engen, Paul K  E'/j of Eli of Fr. NE'4 of Sec. 12 (4 ac)
Mateoja,  John    E'i of NEK Sec. 21 	
Hilton, Guslave
Sointula Townsite Addition, Map 816A.
      Blocks 23 & 29 	
Township 3.
Bornstein. Bertha, Yates. James Stuart Meyer. John T. L., John Bedllngton Harold Levy, Henry E., Fell,
Marion Virgiriie 	
Hett, Frank C. & Kingston, Georgina ..
Und. 6|7 Int. in Wis and W'/j of E'i
Sec. 33 (411.43 acres) 	
Und. 1[7 Int. in WVi & WO of E!i of
Sec. 33 (68.57 acres) 	
Township 5.
Bornstein. Bertha, Yates, James Stuart Meyer, John T. L.. John Bedllngton H. Hett, Frank 0„ Kingston,
Georgina and Levy, Henry E	
Township 5. Und. 0 7 Int. in Sec, 5
(548.6 acresl  	
Fell. Marion VIrglnle
Township 5. Und. 17 Int. in Sec. 5
(91.4 acresl  	
Bornstein, Bertha. Yates. James Stuart Meyer, John T. L., John Bedllngton H. Hett, Frank C, Kingston,
Georgina and Levy, Henry E	
I Fell, Marion Vlrglnie 	
Bornstein. Bertha. Yates. James Stuart Meyer, John T. L.. John Bedllngton  H.   Hett.  Frank   C,   Kingston.   Tp. 5, Und. 6|7 Int. in Fr. Sec. 17
Georgina and Levy. Henry E     (5.2  acres)
Tp. 5. Und. 6,7 Int. in Sec. 8 (430.2 ac.)
Tp. 5, Und. 1,7 Int. in Sec. 8, (71.8 ac.)
1570.20
261.80
Fell. Marion Vlrglnie
Tp. 6. Und. 1;7 Int. in Fr. Sec. 17
(.8 acresl  	
Township 6.
The British Columbia
ment Agency Ltd.
Laud ,t Invest-
121.40        13.18      13.75 148.42,
32.49
120.31
144.07
51.43;
180.97'
Subd. Pt. NE'/4 See. .!(). Composite Plan 2746.
Darling, Mrs. Lena     Lot 3
Jackson,  George     Lot 1, Block 20. Plan 810
De Veulle, Jane A.   Lots 3 & 5. Block 15. Plan 700	
McKenzie,  Alex Lot 13, Block 15, Plan 700
Prlestlng,  Charles  A. Lots 13 & 15, Block 31. Plan 700
514.42
61.59
19.31
33.40
Thomson, Leonard Cedric   Lot "B"
DeVeulle. Mr.s, J  A
Inzumi. Wolicl
Broadljent, 11. W	
Broadbent. II. W	
Broadbenf, H. W	
Broadbent, H. W.
Lomas. Mrs. Catherine
Stevenson,  William
Lots 2 & 4. Block 33. Plan 700
Lots 13 * 15, Block 18. Plan 1329
Lot 14, Block 33. Map 1329 .
Lot 3, Block 28. Plan 1329
Lot 4. Block 43, Plan 1329   	
Lots 15 & 16. Block 48, Plan 1329 	
Pt. of SE'.i of Sec. 31 Registered under  17664-C 	
Township 9.
Lot 1. Block 65,Plan 810A 	
Subd. Fr. E(/2 Sec. 19, Tp. 11, Plan 761.
Quatslno Land k Improvement Co     Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 1 	
Quatslno Land & Improvement Co   Lots   1 lo 11. Blk. IA 	
Quatslno Land ,V Improvement Co    Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 2 	
Quatslno Land ,t Improvement Co   Lots 1 to 13, Blk. 2A  	
11.23
12.55
12.57
7.04
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
2.13       13.75
12.62
32.17
13.97
3.69
2.23
1.82
.78
3.75
65.17
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
13.75
3.58       13.75
509.10       13.75
84.87       13.75
644.24       13.75
112.99       13.75
522.32       13.75
88.71       13.75
1.18       13.75
83.60
210.49
Successful Joint
Meeting
{Continued from page one)
4
144.98
162.94
180.21
232.94
162.96
97.65
27.65
161.12
149.92
177.72
66.16
39.98
29.57
21.53
58.00
285.05
16.86
1.96
13.75
32.57
15.43
1.78
13.75
30.96
206.13
65.17
13.75
285.05
7.42
.63
13.75
21.80
181.20
16.86
13.75
211.81
12.00
1.36
13.75
27.11
4185.00
389.66
13.75
4588.41
9.86
1.11
13.75
24.72
17.50
3.42
13.75
34.67
10.50
1.00
13.75
25.25
7.97
.75
13.75
22.47
2106.27
364.20
1280.00       349.04        13.75        1642.79
38.38
3.01
13.75
55.14
3.00
.27
13.75
17.02
6.00
.54
13.75
20.29
6.00
54
13.75
20.29
6.00
.54
13.75
20.29
5,00
37
12.75
19.12
5.00
,37
12.75
19.12
6.28
.59
13.75
20.62
5.00
.37
12.75
19.12
5,00
.37
12.75
19.12
5.00
.37
12.75
19.12
7.31
1.10
12.75
21.16
3.98
.65
12.75
17.38
7.31
1.10
12.75
21.16
4.71
.72
12.75
18.18
arms came they gave great contributions of men and money. Because of
that great sacrifice he felt that the
bonds of Empire had been cemented
closer than ever and the British Empire was probably stronger than ever
before in its history, largely due to the
example set by Canada in the greatest
crisis in the history of the world.
Mr. II. B. Thompson Speaks
Mr. H. B. Thompson was then called
upon. Mr. Thompson said he was no
stranger to the Comox district. He
had first seen Comox as a deck-hand
on a boat coming to Union Bay for
coal in 1B93 when Mr. Mike Manson
was weighmaster, and he had been
here on several occasions since that
time.
In our school books said Mr. Thompson, we had learned that England's
greatness was based on her coal and
iron deposits. Vancouver Island had
500,000 acres of coking coal, large deposits of iron, the two things which
made England great, and on top of
that the Island had the greatest stand
ot timber in the world, other valuable
mineral deposits and fisheries that
were practically untouched. Ten years
ago if anybody had predicted the pilchard business of the West Coast they
would have heen laughed at but ten
years from now the fishing business
would far exceed their expectations. So
that, on top of the iron and coal we
had three other great resources which
should in years to come make Vancouver Island as commercially great as
England.
It did nobody any harm, said Mr.
Thomps, to look ahead and see what
could be done to help the other fellow, as in helping the other fellow if
he succeeded aud prospered, they must
all benefit by it. If one sat down and
analyzed the success of a district tt
generally sifted down lo a certain body
of men who stood shoulder to shoulder
until they made it a success. The
city of Seattle was a notable example
of this spirit. If any project came
along that they thought was right the
only thing to do was to get together
and help that project along.
But there were certain things they
had to look squarely in the face. One
thing was that the province of British
Columbia imported seventy-five per
cent of their meat and at thc same
time were inviting people to come to
the country. They were also importing three and a quarter millions tins
of fruit and the same amount of canned vegetables. They should grow
more and surely could grow enough for
their own requirements. In this connection the speaker said one could
hardly find a more magnificent exhibit
of fruit and vegetables than they saw
at the Victoria Exhibition, mostly
grown on Vancouver Island.
The butter imports into British Columbia, he said, exceeded seven million pounds and most of his hearers
were surprised to learn that although
they told the outside world what a
wonderful island that was for dairy
produce, they only produced 15'.;, of
the butter eaten. However, he thought
that better days were coming as the
people were beginning to take these
things to heart aud understood them
better. He instanced the processing of
strawberries, which had been brought
about by scientific research which he
said was a great help in these problems.
With reference to coal, Mr. Thompson said that from liis observations
there was no greater advance in industrial science than in the advance
in steam. With the commercial use of
pulverized coal there was practically
no limit to any area that could produce coal of a good quality at a reasonable price. In Many places
throughout the world hydro-electric
plants were being junked and pulverized coal used. He thought that within a measurable period this district
might be the centre of a great industrial area owing to the power that
could be raised by the production of
that coal. It did not matter how black
a thing looked there was always a
silver lining to the cloud and within
the present twenty years he predicted
an era of great developmnt on the
northern  Pacific  Coasl.
Mr. J. M. Mitchell very ably proposed a vole of thanks to Lord Queens-
borough, including in thc proposal the
hearty thanks ol those present' to Mr.
Thompson.
The chairman, before bringing the
meeting to a close called upon Col. C.
W. Villiers who said with reference
to the coal situation they had the coal
and the men lo dig it but at present
had the unfair competition ol fuel oil.
He had been told the railways would
not use coal because of thc danger
from sparks but spark arresters were
as good now as they were before oil
was used. He agreed with Mr. Thump-
son as to the Industrial development
by furnishing cheap coal and, if necessary, money lor worthy industries.
Lord Qlieenborougb wns born .March
14, 8181,,of ilie lair General Lord Alfred Henry Paget, I'M., fifth son of
Field .Marshall tin- first Marquis of
Anglesey, ho married first hi 1SUG,
Pauline, daughter at ibe late Hon.
William C. Whitney, Secretary of
State for tin* United Stall Navy; second, hi Hi::.. Edith, daughter oi William Starr Miller, oi New York.
He was educated at Harrow and
lived for many years in ihe [Jutted
Suites, ranching in the Northwest,
and later living in Now fork, lie is
director of various hug-' commercial
undertakings and i> proBldenl of the
Chlhuahau A; Paclflo Railroad. He is
a member of the government committee   on   detention   and   delay  ut   purls
of neutral shipping, ami a member of
the executive committee of ihi' Tariff
Reform League and ihe Central Land
Association.
He is a director of Slomen's Hrotli-
ers ft Co., Limited, ami Siemens
Brothers    Dynamo    Winks,    Limited,
and other companies, lie contested
Cambridge in 1808 and was iiigli sher-
iir di' Suffolk in 1908, lie is a member of the council nt ihe Vachl Racing
Association and was member of Parliament for tint University of Cambridge  1910-17,and   resigned  in  1917.
He is a knight of Justice of Saint
John of Jerusalem; president, Industrial Settlements (Incorporated),
I'rcsioii Hall. Maidstone; president,
Eastern Provincial Division of National Union since iinto, ami Parliamentary Prvolnclal Whip for Eastern
and Hume Counties Blnce 1011.
He is also Honorary Fellow nf
Corpus Chrlstl College, Cambridge;
governor of Guys Hospital; president
of tiie O-oneral Miller Hospital at
Greenwich, and a member of tbe
council   of  the   Zoological   Society   of
London, PAGE FOUR
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,   AUGUST   23rd,   1929
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION
OP PROPERTY
E * I
S -s I
RUPERT DISTRICT—Continued
Subd. Fr. Eft Set-. li», Tp. 11, Plan 761.
Quatslno
Quatsino
Quatslno
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatslno
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatslno
Quatsino
Quatsmo
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Quatsino
Land St
Land &
Land Sz
Land Ss
Land &
Land &
Land &
Land Ss
Land &
Land &
Land St
Land &
Land &
Land &
Land Si
Land &
Land .V
Land &
Land &
Land &
Land .V
Land &
Land &
Land St
Land &
Land &
Land &
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co,
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Improvement Co.
Olson, Armine Oscar
Muir, J, N. Estate 	
Panes, Kate A.   ..
Carlin. Mrs. Cecilia H.
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 3 . 7.31
Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 4                7.31
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 5      7.31
Lots 1  to 20. Blk. 0     7.31
Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 7                   7.31
Lots  1  to 20, Blk 8   7.31
Lots  I to 20. Blk. 9 7.31
Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 10 7.31
Lots 1 to 10. Blk 11 6.89
Lots 1 to 20, Blk 12 7.36
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 13 7.34
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 14 7.34
Lots 1  to 6, Blk. 15 2.18
Lots 1 to 5, Blk. 10 1.84
Lois 1 to 10, Blk. 17 3.67
Lots 1 to H. Blk. 18 5.07
Lots 1 to 20, Blk. 18 6.88
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 20 7.33
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 21 7.33
Lots 1 to 20. Blk. 22      7.31
Lots 1 to 18, Blk. 23 G.58
Lots  1  to 6, Blk. 24 1.85
Lots 1 to 22. Blk, 25 7.98
Lois 1 to 15, Blk. 25A 5.39
Lots 1 to 12, Blk. 20 4.35
Lots 1 to 27. Blk. 27 9.89
Lots 1 lo 28. Blk. 27A   10.43
Township 33.
SW,   Sec. 28   30.00
Township 36
SE'i  of SW4 Sec. 20   30.00
SW'i  OF NE*i, NWVS Of NW-,i, SEM
NW',, S1^ of SW'i of NW'i. WW Of
SW!'., NW'i of SE'i, Sec. 20   195.00
Ett of SE'i & SW1/. of SE'i of Sec 36 54.00
Township 6.
The British Columbia Land St Investment Agency Ltd           Section  21   	
John. Bedlngton H     Undiv. 3 16 Int. in Sec. 14 (120 acres)..
Lee, Francis Valentine Toldcroy       Undiv. 9 16 Int. in Sec. 14 (360 acres) .
Temple,  Ernest        Undiv. 410 Int. in Sec. 14 (160 acres)..
Lee, Francis Valentine Tolderoy      Undiv. 'i Int. in Sec. 15 (160 acres)....
Jones. Richard        Undiv. 'l- Int. in Sec. 15 (320 acres)..
Temple, Ernest Sz Lee. Francis Valentine Tolderoy      Undiv. li Int. in Sec. 15, (160 acres).
Jones,  Richard Undiv. 'j Int. in Sec. 22 (230 acres)..
Temple, Ernest St Lee, Francis Valentine Tolderoy      Undiv. l, Int. in Sec. 22, (115 ac.) 	
Lee, Francis Valentine Tolderoy       Undiv. V, Int. in Fr. Sec. 22 (115 ac.)
Lee, Francis Valentine Tolderoy            Undiv. 9 16 Int. in Fr. Sec. 23 (exclusive of Indian Reserve) 299.3 acres ...
Temple.  Ernest       Undiv. 4 16 Int. in Fr. Sec. 23. (exclusive of Indian Reserve) 133 acres 	
John, Bedllngton H     Undiv. 3 16 Int. in Fr. Sec. 23, (exclusive of Indian Reserve) 99.7 acres 	
Lee. Francis Valentine Tolderoy      Undiv. 9 10 Int. Fr. SWl,i Sec. 26, (exclusive oi Indian Reserve) 13 acres ....
Temple, Ernest  .      Undiv. 416 Int. in Fr. SWH Sec. 26,
(exclusive of Indian Reserve) 6 ac...
John, Bedllngton H     Undiv. 3/18 Int. in Fr. SWtt Sec. 26
(exclusive or Indian Reserve) 4 acres.
Temple, Ernest St Lee. Francis Valen-    Undiv. H Int. in Fr. EMi of SE'i Sec-
tine  Tolderoy        tion 28, (7.5 ac.) 	
Lee, Francis Valentine Tolderoy ....     Undiv. W Int. in Fr. E& of SEW Sec 28
i7.5   act	
Jones,   Richard     Undiv. '/j Int. in Fr. EV-j of SE'/, Sec.
28   (15 ac.)        	
Elliott, McLean & Shandley      Subd.   of   Pt.   NEW   St   SE'i   Sec.   31.
Plan 1329. Block 63 	
COAL LANDS
Rupert  District.
McLachlan. Charles
McLachlan. Charles
Millar, Mrs. Mary A.
     Lot 321  . .
     Block A of Lot 323 	
COMOX DISTRICT
Subd. of Pt. of Sec. 1, Plan 275.
Lot 5   :	
Matthewson. William A.
Woods, Thos. Jr.. Chas
Subd. of pt. Sets. 6, 7 & 8, Plan 2525.
.     Part of Lot 1        	
Norlo. Francis J.   .
Whittome, J. II.
Millard. Mrs. M. P.
Scotl,  ntiowl   Estate
Stevenson. Mr.s. Mabel
Poster. Capt, Ld. It.
Simister.  Fred
Sc Evelyn     Southerly pt. of Sec. 23, Reg. under
'27185 I [except part W. of road)
Subd. pt. of Sec. :i(i, Plan 1532.
Lot  5   	
Lots 6, 7 & 8	
Part of Sec. 42 (except NW 2 acres E.
,v N. Rly. »»t Comox Logging &
Rly.   RW) 	
.   NW 2 acres of Section 42
Comox Townsile, Plan 104.
Lot 25 (except E. 10 feet)
..    SE 10 chs. of SW 20 chs. ol Lot 107
Parcel A of Lot 120
458.88
262.37
0807
28.03
Subd. of part Lot 134, Plan 17115.
,.    Lots  22  to 41   (Inclusive)   k   Lois  43
to 47  i Inclusive i 6'
Subd. of Lot 137 & pt Lol. 201. Plan 2836.
Crease. Dr. A. L.
Woods, Thos. Jr., Chas
Cadger, Mrs. Annie
Calms,  Thomas  Estate
Lot   1
Urquhart.  William'
Bell. Mrs. Peri .. .
Woods. Thos. Jr., Chas & Evelyn
,t Evelyn    .. .    Easterly 14.75 chs. ol Lot 145
     NE1, ol Lot 150
Lot   157
Subd. of Lol 15K, Plan 1911.
Lots io to io (inclusive) 	
Lot   103
Lol   105
Kendall.   William
Hardie, Thomn    Estate
Smith,  Percy
Subd. of pt. Lol 166, Plan 1845.
... Lot 12, Block D 	
... Lot   181 	
48.00
48.00
17.04
18.40
108.00
24.00
10.48
108.00
Subd. of pt. Lot ISO. Plan  11!).
Lot B oi Subd. of Lot 2, Plan 2234
Lot 3  (Plan 4491  	
18.15
15.80
13.75
13.75
51.84       13.75
32.35       13.75
0.37       13.75
3.12       13.75
5.42 13.75
5.42 13.75
1.07 13.75
2.07 13.75
12.20       13.75
2.70       13.75
.03       13.75
12.20       13.75
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.03
12.75
20.67
1.11
12.75
21.22
1.10
12.75
21.19
1.10
12.75
21.19
.32
12.75
15.25
.26
12.75
14.85
.55
12.75
16.97
.72
12.75
18.54
1.02
12.75
20.85
1.10
12.75
21.18
1.10
1275
21.18
1.10
12.75
21.16
1.00
12.75
20.33
.28
12.75
14.88
1.25
12.75
21.98
.85
12.75
18.99
.75
12.75
17.85
1.85
12.75
24.49
1.85
12.75
25.13
226.90
83.55
1280.00
355.84
13.75
1649.59
180.00
39.54
13.75
233.29
540.00
118.62
13.75
672.37
240.00
52.72
13.75
306.47
240.00
52.72
13.75
306.47
480.00
105.44
13.75
599.19
240.00
52.72
13.75
306.47
345.00
80.27
13.75
439.02
172.50
40.18
13.75
226.43
172.50
40.18
13.75
226.43
443.80
104.57
13.75
567.12
109.50
46.31
13.75
259.56
149.70
34.86
13.75
198.31
12.00
2.92
13.75
29.27
j.70
1.34
13.75
20.79
4.20
.06
13.75
18.91
11.40
2.62
13.75
27.77
11.10
2.57
13.75
27.42
22.50
5.21
13.75
41.46
40.33
7.04
13.75
67.12
524.47
308.47
NAME OF PERSON ASSESSED
SHORT DESCRIPTION
OF  PROPERTY
Subd. of Lot 191, Plan 442.
Frey, Louis      Lot 2, Block A	
Biggs, John G     S'i of S'= of Block E	
Hart, Mrs. Lyman      Pt. of Lot 217 lying E of Pel. C & SW
of road 	
Subd. of Lot 227, Plan 1289.
Baker, John         W'i of Lot 12	
Urquhart, John K   Lot 247 (except W. C. Rly. R W) 	
Township 4—Plan 552C.
Collard, Lieut.-Col. C. E    Fr. NW', of Sec. 29 	
Barrett. Henry W. L     SW1, of NW', Sec. 32 	
Township fi—Plan 552E.
Holmes, Cedric C    SW1,  of SE', of Sec. 26 	
18.00
1.65
13.75
33.40
23.65
2.20
13.75
39.60
28.38
3.29
13.75
45.42
31.00
2.96
13.75
47.71
49.30
5.83
13.75
68.88
135.00
13.56
13.75
162.31
60.00
5.59
13.75
79.34
41.94
3.76
13.75
59.45
Bevan Lumber k Shingle Co.. Lid
Township 9—Plan 552G.
B'. of NEW & SE'., of Sec. 6 (240 ac.)
Township 10—Plan 552H.
Fr. Section 29 	
6236.25     1761.15       13.75       8011.15
Township 9—Plan 552G.
Luxton, Mrs. M. Q. O    NE'., of SW1.,. W'5 of SWW of Sec. 16
Walkem, Mrs. Charlotte     E. part of SW', of Sec. 21 	
Milllgan, Miss Rose     SE'i of SW'., of Sec. 32	
Township 10—Plan 552H.
Urquhart. John K    Part SE'., of Section 36 	
300.00
59.10
13.75
372.85
68.97
6.36
13.75
89.08
68.97
6.36
13.75
89.08
4.17       13.75 62.92
TIMBERLAND
NEWCASTLE   DISTRICT
Grant Bros. Logging Co     Block  223
RUPERT DISTRICT
McLachlan, Chas  Lot 322
McLachlan, Chas  Lot 324
McLachlan, Chas  Lot 325
McLachlan, Chas  Lot 326
McLachlan, Chas  Lot 327
McLachlan. Chas  Lot 329
McLachlan. Chas  Lot 330
542.92
49.66
13.75
606.33
583.61
54.74
13.75
652.10
371.74
38.06
13.75
423.55
020.73
57.78
13.75
692.26
299.22
27.74
13.75
340.71
1005.42
99.14
13.75
1178.31
1053.81
98.13
13.75
1165.69
598.68
58.08
13.75
670.51
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., tliis 26th day of July, 1929.
JAMES L. BROWN,
Provincial Collector, Comox Assessment District.
HEALTH SERVICE
of the
Canadian Medical Association
6.00
.55
13.75
20.30
149.10
17.31
13.75
180.16
134.00
15.14
13.75
162.89
42.00
4.67
13.75
69.42
75.60
8.53
13.75
97.88
40.53
3.68
13.75
63.96
7.08
.61
13.75
22.04
89.09
45.50
67.17
67.17
32.76
34.22
133.95
40,45
25.16
133.95
Questions concerning Health, addressed to the Canadian Medical
Association, 184 College St., Toronto, win be answered personally
by correspondence.
MATERNAL  MORTALITY
Some weeks ago.an article was
published, under tlie above heading,
which concluded by urging that the
provision of adequate medical and
nursing care for every mother, both
before and during her confinement, be
accepted as a national policy, and
that every community in Canada bestir itself to see that auch service
were made available for each mother
in the community. Since the publication   of  this   article,   requests   have
come   for   information   as   to   what
might he done, and an opportunity
I presents itself lo reply,  in a  second
article,   to   the   questions   suggested
hy the previous one .
In a country so widespread ami so
varying in population and in climate
' it Is Impossible to lay down a plan
| which would be suitable for all. The
; hest that can lie done is to state what
! should lie provided and then to urge
'the communities, who know their own
'conditions, their particular needs and
! their resources, to work out a plan
I suitable to their locality.
i    Every    expectant    mother    should
! have ante-natal care which means an
j early   examination   and   supervision
during her entire pregnancy by her
physician. At the time of her confinement, she should have her doctor
aiul also the services of a graduate
nurse. The properly qualified nurse
does uot lake the place of the doctor,
but, working under the doctor's directions, she is as indispensable ns
is the doctor himself. There is also
need lor hospital accommodation for
those cases which cannot lie properly
cared for at home.
When a community is ready to face
tills problem, or when some interested
persons are willing to make an effor.
to do something, it is advisable for
them to consult with the county ov
district medical society and with the
Heal tli officer. The lay group and
the professional group should work
together In making a study as to particular needs and regarding plans for
the future. Representatives from the
local nursing profession should, of
course he included in such a conference.
•The apparent impossibility of doing
everything that should he done id
no reason for deterring a willing
group from doing their utmost at pre
sent. Progress is made by small steps
just as surely as by cocasional leaps
and bounds.
Wandered for Days
Without Food
Sayward, Aug. 17.—On Tuesday
night, a young man wandered into
Mr. A. H. Vise's clearing at the extreme upper end of the inhabited part
of this \ alley. He was quite exhausted and incoherent in his speech, making his very limited knowledge of the
English language difficult to understand. But from what Mr. Vose could
gather, he must have been for some
days wandering in the woods without
lood. and. having ^one off the trail
from one 01 the camps operating at
Menzies Bay. had struck thc trail from
Forbes Landing to Sayward. He was
cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Vose and
taken to the Wharf to catch the Union Steamship Venture going south on
Wednesday night.
Mr. C. Wa Sillence
Appointed Organist
Mr. C. W. Slllence, who Is well
known in tlie district as an organist
and conductor, has been permanently
engaged as organist and musical director of the St. George's United
Church. There is a lot of good musical
talent in the district and besides working up a good mixed church choir,
some attention will be given to male
choir work both In quartette and chorus singing. It is also Mr. Sillence's
intention to organize an interdenominational choral society, for which he
is working out a rather ambitious programme. Local music lovers and es-
specially those who have sung under
his baton will welcome this news.
Judges Have
Been Appointed
Good Attractions Being Arranged for
Fall Fair
The directors of the Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association
met on Friday evening to make final
arrangements for the Fall Fair which
is being held here on Labor Day, Monday, September 2nd. The question of
added attractions was discussed and
amongst other tilings it was decided
ask Mr. O. P. Johnson to take
charge of a horse-shoe pitching tournament. This event proved a great
attraction at the 1st of July sports, the
pitching of Johnson himself being
somewhat of a revelation. Mr. M. S.
Stephens was added to the sports committee and was authorized to make
arrangements for a baseball game between teams in the junior league; also
to make arrangements for aquatic
sports. It was also decided to stage
a Highland dancing contest, this event
also being a good attraction.
The association is putting up a cup
for the Women's Institute exhibit, entries for whicli are coming in from the
Denman Ifjland.Hornby Island, Comox,
Lazo Institutes and possibly others.
Judges lor the Fair just appointed
by the Department of Agriculture in
Victoria are now anounced as follows:
For horses, sheep and hogs, Professor
R. L. Davis, Victoria; Cattle, Mr.
Wesley Mclntyre, Sardis, B.C.; Poultry,
Mr. F. M. Garland. Vancouver; Fruit
and Vegetables, Mr. B. Hoy, district
horticulturist, Kelowna. B.C.; Field
Crops. Mr, W. Sandall, Victoria; Domestic Science, Mrs. A. J. Randle,
Vancouver.
j Entries for the hall will be received
I up to eight o'clock p.m. Saturday, Au-
j gust 31st, when all entries will be plac-
j ed and judging will take place. Live
■ stock will be brought to the grounds
before ten o'clock Monday morning,
September 2nd. All paper entries
should be in the hands of the secretary, Mr. E. Felix Thomas by Wednesday next, August 28th, when his
ofTice will remain open until eight p,m.
but it is hoped that entries will be
made much earlier than that date.
COMOX FALL FAIR, Mon. Sept. 2nd
Board of Directors and S££H3H2S22E£S35£S^
Officers for ithe Year 1929. raooaeMaHaeesBaHaH^^
Hon. presidents: his honor r Randolph Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Swine, Poultry, Farm and
BRUCE, Lieut.-Governor ol B.C., MR. ALEX. " ' "
vSSS^L^t MRSMRMwLAWBSPAUL Garden Produce, Fruit and Flowers
1st Vice President  MR. J. W. STALKER
2nd Vice President.. MR. JOHN CROCKETT
Hon. Vice Presidents: Mr. T. H. Mumford. Mr.
Wm. Baikle and Mrs. C. H. Bcall. £\ d*0/\/\/\       f Tfc     • -_
Secretary                     MR. E. FELIX THOMAS I IV At*        \/   IIIIII I fi WV17t^C
Treasurer   MR. J. H. MACINTYRE VF T V 1 iPmiUUU        111        I   I I&VU
DIRECTORS
Mesdames Walter McPliee and Walter Brown
£*£& v. Hl,ffora:''DWM.°seno"'cA'w:        Domestic Science Classes    Women's Institute Exhibit
Leedam. Janus  Reld, Tom.  Stewart,  Herbert ( _, lf
smith and w. a. urquhart. Sports, Horse Racing, Bronco and Steer Riding
FiNANCE-Messrs. 'j. h. Macintyre, w. a. b. Trade Exhib its, Concessions
Paul. R. U. Hurford.
PRINTING-Mcssrs.  F.   F.  Thomas.  W.  A.  B. ara=B«M3eS=«eMW3>^^
Paul and J. H. Maclntyre.
HALL—Messrs. c. w. Leedam (chairman), F.
H. Bullock, E. R. Bewell. O. W.  Edwards, _- <i « sr*      o
Herbert Smith. Tom. Stewart, D. Steel, C. W. All        4-Yee n.        C«M        rt-P       4 1-a s\        12 n * «•
Shannon, C. Rive and Mesdames M. O. Fair- /ill IIP        Til II        III IIP        ^MIF
bairn. A. Kerton, Theed Pearse. V. Shopland, /All        HIV        1   Ull        171 HIV        1   Ull
R. R. McQuillan. D, Steele, and Miss J. McPherson.
"DutrS w. A. mXrlnMnl' CATERING BY THE COURTENAY WOMEN'S INSTITUTE.
CATTLE—Messrs, J. Reld  (chairman), R.  U.
Hurford,  John   Pritchard,  W.  A.   Urquhart,
Bruce  Towlcr,   Hugh   Morrison,   and  C.   H. M=83MeMeaaet3MBMM?^^
Hughes.
HORSES—Messrs. A, R. England   (chairman),
J. Casanave, A. B. Dundas. Herbert Bridges, r*      m     • ^1 A i      O fl ■ 1
Dr. Liddle, W. T. Wain and P. Whalen. r fltflfPS    l^lOSf*     AUf?USt    Z.ISTY\
SHEEP  AND  HOOS-Messrs.  John  Crockett IjIIU ICO    V1U8C    "UgUSl    «iOUl
(chairman), D. Evans. F. H. Bullock, C. Idiens. A. R. England and Ted. Williams. -- . vrt.  Tr/,rTn   mermnwr,^   ,,/.,„,
POULTRY-Mcssrs.  W.  J.  Ounn   (chairman),                                 ,           MAKE  YOUR  ENTRIES NOW.'
W. A. B. Paul. M. S. Stephens, R. E. Ault, J.
W. Stalker, Arthur Smith, N. A. Pritchard
and O. W. Powis.
Casanave, A. B.' Dundas. Walter Chile. Waiter £j.   T E/L1A     1 tlUMAb,   oCCrClSrV
Brown. Bert Grieve, Wm. Douglas, Wm. Hagarty, J. W. McKenzie, Herbert Bridges and PHONES, 151 and 24L, COURTENAY, B.C.
Walter Woodhus, p. Booth. Wm. Rickson and i wvaiwui, ob
R. Bowie. FRIDAY,   AUGUST   23rd.   1U2S
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PAGE FIVE
CAUSE kM EFFECT
Everybody decries the frequency
of the Forest Fire —• even the
people who cause them. Too
much time is spent in bewailing
the effect, not enough in analysing the cause. PLAIN CARELESSNESS was the cause of
Eighty Per Cent, of our Fire
Losses last year.
PREVENT FOREST FERES - YOU GAN HELP!
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
iSMJ^iV yyyj:i? V- y .1? ?.!'y'-'-'}-3 '-'.'- '-■-•'■ ;.: '-■}- 5j;j!5S!2Vi5J
H»EK«^i>i5-ii=i—:— -,—■,iw...H--ia-H&ss(Wicco5B-
Do you  buy     ^
the Cheapest    •
Don't ba misled by an inferior article which
is a few cents cheaper.   There is only
one quality
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE
HOTPOINT
Start the SUMMER right with a
HOTPOINT ELECTRIC IRON
only
$4.95
only
sold by the
Cumberland Electric
Lighting Co., Ltd.
=1
\ I
Graphic Description Of
Lake Cumberland
The  "Wanderer"  of  the  Vancouver Daily Province
Visits District
In the course of his wanderings
through the Province, "Wanderer"
writing in the Vancouver Daily Province has some nice things to say about
Comox Lake, or as the residents here
now call it Lake Cumberland, lie
says the lake Is one of the most beautiful of the scores of Inland water.-,
which are scattered throughout the
northern area of the island. At any
time of the day it is goodto see, hut
In the early morning especially it Is
at Its very best.
The sun is then shining westward
up the lake, and full on the Glacier,
twenty miles away, As the light
comes brighter from the Bast, every
hue of tlio rainbow plays on It, from
deep purple, through delicate pink
and scarlet rose to a shimmering
white. It lies perfectly balanced in
a loop of mountains whose sides are
thickly clad with age old llr and
cedar.
The water Is still as though sleeping, Its emerald surface a perfect
mirror in which the mountain, glacier
and forest ure reflected witli such uncanny accuracy that one is tempted to
play with the idea that tihe real substance of the scene is below and not
above the water.
And   there   In   that   setting,   with
timber limits extending for scores of
miles' around, the logging activities of
the Comox Logging k Railway Company are carried on. This concern
is one of the oldest In the business in
British Columbia, and is a subsidiary
of the Canadian Western Lumber Co.
In the Comox Lake, dislrict alone It
has been engaged for twenty years.
In the course of my wanderings
along the Island Highway I had heard
several times that the company was
.about to commence a new series of
operations on the lake, and that there
would be some Interesting things to
see In the way of up-to-date methods
of logging.
After receiving an invitation to ga
up the lake from M. Robert Filberg,
"Wanderer" says:
Nothing Is done on shore except the
actual felling and hauling ou the
timbers into the water, All the camp,
including bunk houses, cook house,
guest quarters, office, flllng shop and
everything else is built on rafts made
of huge logs. Then when it is necessary to move to another spot, the
tug conies along and hitches on to
this floating town .and away goes the
whole works sailing merrily down or
up the lake tothe next place.
Tlie equipment of the camp seemed
to be aboui the last word In trying lo
make life as decent and comfortable
as possible. There were twenty hunk
houses, each 15 by 40 feet, with a bed
room at each end for four men, and up to sec the lake and rest in it.- cool
In Hie middle a sort of lobby shut. Shade. Comox is an Indian name
off from them by doors, and furnished ! meaniug the land of plenty Pish
with a good heavy stove and benches, berries and game are all abundant
There were plenty of shower baths i and good. And when day is over a
with hot and cold water, a drying- ' great calm descends upon the waters
room for wet clothes a long zinc sink ; as earth rolls on through the mystery
where the men may wash up, and of night to the bhe dawn of another
another room with wooden tubs for' day.
washing clothes.    Xo excuse for any ' ■ ■
man to suffer discomfort or .nn Correspondence
there.
Coming hack again to the logging
end of the enterprise, the way the,!
logs  were  being  put   into  the  water
was Interesting.   First of all the trees .	
are felled and the branches chopped! VICTORIA—British Columbia's ed-
off, then they are ready. Out in the ; ucatlonal advantages are being ex-
lake a huge raft had been built con-1 tended  to the boy nnd  girl of high
Courses for High
School Students
taining a  million   board  fee!   of log--
j school  age ar.d  qualifications on the
,    ,    , , ... .frontiers    of    provincial    settlement,
two tiers deep, lashed together witb j whea lne schoIastic term opens next
fourteen miles of steel cable. j month   throughout   British   Columbia
\ vmmk i-i prrt iiiiii there wil1 b0 inaugurated, for i«e first
\ ME.Ulfc l«.[ fJSKl iiii.ii. Ume   in   Canada,   a   complete   high
-...,, ,     .      ., ..[school course by correspondence.   An
on this Is erected what they call nouncement to this effect is made by
an "A" frame, culled so because it j Hon. Joshua HInchcllffe, Minister ot
Stands up like a giant letter A. with , Education.
Under  the  direction   of  Dr.   S.  J,
Willis.   Superintendent   of   Education.
believed, prove to be  highly satisfactory.
•We felt," sai,d Hon. Mr. HInchcllffe in announcing thc new courses,
"that similar opportunities should be
made available to the sons and daughters of the men and women who are
pioneering on the land, in small mining and lumbering camps and in remote hamlets along the Coast as are
accorded to boys and girls in the cities.
The sturdy pioneers who are doing so
much to develop British Columbia will
no longer, we hope, be compelled to
send their children away from home
or deny them the advantages of a
High School education."
71
Cumberland and Union
Waterworks Co., Ltd.
ESTIMATES GIVEN ON ALL PLUMBING
AND REPAIR WORK.
Phone 75
A. B. CLINTON, Manager.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials.
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS   DOORS,
BHINQUBS,
KILN   DRIED   FLOORINGS
AND FURNISHNGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE  WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited
CUMBERLAND, B. C
PHONES J N'el1' ca"s: 13,|x c,,ur,en'lJ,
I Office:  153 Cumberland.
UftUMr.m
The One Radio That Combines
Quality and Service at a Price
In the Philco, super service
und quality are most surely
there , . . hut instead of paying for that extra enjoyment,
you pay only for the actual
material, labor irnd a small
profit. Ask yourncaresl dealer
to demonstrate the Philco
for you.
DistributorsJor British Columbia
VtNfDUVCII     o-d       VICTORIA
cross-plecea at three different levels
in Its total height of 1711 feet.    From ,      , ,	
" .   and Mr. J, W. Gibson, otllcer m charge
tills runs a heavy steel cable anchored 0f the new department, a staff of cd-
u a big tree high up on the hillside, ucatlonal experts worked during tlie
rue «ratt also holds bite powerful don- summer holidays preparing the les-
Key eii«ii.e aud is kept li.mly iu place f0™ covering the^entire curriculum of
,   '     .„. ,      „ ' . . . .  ] high   school   studies.     These   lessons
hy "stiff legs,   great heavy logs which L        ^ completed .lM(, Uu, macnln.|
run from it to the shore. ory for the operation of instruction by!
The choker men. those who ih Itch  correspondence has been set up.   Thel
the logs to the cable, ure ashore and I Hrst student  has been enrolled in the j
high up on a stump sits one of their ! "'f on,.of !l W™***1, B! ?"-"'
:     In ad respects the courses are slm-
number so that-he can bob everything | ilflr to those of lhe regular n,gn
high schools, and correspondence pupils have similar opticus and objectives. They may choose to study in
preparation for junior matriculation;
entrance to Normal School; commercial course, or for personal develop-
When  he does it, one sees power  ment  and general culture.    The op-
aplenty at work.   Three or four whole j tions extend to subjects as in regularly
Provincial News
Approximately $30,000 will he spent
this year iu laying a permanent hard-
surfaced road from Argyle Street to
Roger Creek, In Port Alberni, and the
City Council has decided to make an
early start on the project, The job
will he curried out under supervision
ofa Public Works Department engin-
eer and with government equipment.
Port   Alberni   will    bear   the   cost   o[
widening, straightening, grading and
filling, whirh Is estimated to involve
aii expenditure of about $11,000.
logs, men and engine. In his bands
he holds un electric contact connected with the whistle on the donkey,
and by a system of whistles Instructs
the eiigineman what to do.
trees weighing many tons and con
taining thousands of board feet of
lumber, are hitched together in one
huge bundle. Then at the signal tho
cable hauls on them, dragging and
wrenching them sometimes from far
up on the hillside down to bhe water,
where they crash in with a mighty
splash which sets everything rocking
for a few moments.
established schools.
The Department supplies the usual
free textbooks and provides, at the
lowest possible cost, the books that
students in city high schools must buy.
No fees are charged and thc only additional cost to correspondence pupils
is for the postage on lessons sent in
for correction.
Por a number of years the Department of Education has conducted correspondence   courses   in   Elementary
.       I School work.   Su successful have been
Then ensues a job sometimes done   the ^^ ^    u _.. dedded tQ ^
{illicitly and quietly,  and  sometimes  tend the courses to cover High School
to the tune of language slightly tore-  subjectx
ible but quite picturesque and fitting.]    Scores ol letters on the Departmen-
Ocoasionally   the   sling   man   in   hl3  ,tal Ales bear testimony to the manner
• f .    ..    .. , 1(  In which parents regard the worth of
work and wrath goos into the drink | tne schQQ. courseSi   0ne r.llnei. writ.
up to his waists, but the weather is j ing to  Mr. J.  Hargreaves,  oilicer in
warm and he thinks nothing ot it.      ; charge of the elementary courses, last
! week said, in part:
COMOX—"LAM) OF PLENTY". I    "Due to the carefully selected stud-
I ies and the patient manner in which
Over all hovered the quiet ami calm : her faults were detected and corrector nature in  loveliest mood.    Down   ed,  I am  firmly  convinced thnt our
from the glacier standing sentinel-like I d<"WMer Bpt far more educational value  from  this course  than  she   would
have received in school.    Annie says
lover   all    tumbles    the   Cruiekshank;,
River. To the right runs a deep valley leading to Strathcona Park, and
to the left another going off In the direction of Alberni. Away In the moan-
ENJOY LABOR" DAY
Get That New Set Of
•3rd
Gum-Dipped Tires NOW!
LABOR  Day—the  last   three-day week-end
for the season—enjoy it to the utmost on
Firestone Gum-Dipped tires.
Firestone tires will take you there and bring
you back. Manufacturing features such as
the patented Gum-Dipping process by which
every fibre is insulated with rubber to eliminate internal friction, mean complete freedom
from tire troubles,
she  hud  no difliculty  In  passim;  her
Entrance Exams, and ranked well up
In her class."
Various systems of advanced school
correspondence courses, including that
tain tops are dozens ot other lakes or of Australia, were minutely examined
tarns, ao I was told by one who hasjand the best features were adapted to
been over it all in an airplane. Then j the requirements of British Columbia.
there ia nn auto camp at the foot of j 7hl! experience gained in the success-
,,,„,„, „„. ,     „, . _ xul operation of the provincial eelmeti-
tho lake, used by citizens of Cumber-1 lary sohool com,cs „kk,d ,„ compUlrig
land and hosts of visitors who come l a plan of instruction that will, it Is
i
around
i e him
Firah
V „/;/.
Before the holiday rush starts, dri'
to your nearest Firestone Dealer and 1
equip   your   car   with   a
new   set    of   Firestones.
You,  like   thousands  of
others,    will    find    that
they give the utmost in      /
mileage,   safety   and  K'c'
economy. -12 Sl^'n^-TuCXe'iZrk
Made in I uimllton, Cannon, by
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD.
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
■ "f^pr %/^/ fW*9
Buildi the Only
Phone 8 HARLING & LEDINGHAM AGENTS        'Phone 8
Fair Day Sports
PROGRAME
Official opening by Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, M.L.A.,
on the grounds at 1:.'!() p.m.
Baseball—Courtenay-Cumberland-Union Bay—
1st game   1:45 p.m.
Snd game   4:01) p.m.
Horseshoe Pitching (V.r. O. P. Johnson, supervisor—
Make your entry with Mr. 1'. L. Anderson, 2 p.m.
Highland Dancing (Mr. Walter Brown in charge)
  2:30 p.m.
Shetland Pony Race  2:45 p.m.
Race for Ponies not exceeding 14VJ> hands . .. 3:00 p.m.
Wrestling on horseback (3 in each team) . . :!:20 p.m.
Bare back and saddle obstacle race .... 8:40 p.m.
Horse race over low hurdles (open) 3:55 p.m.
Rolling Pin throwing contest, for married ladies only,
Mr. Wm. Douglas in charge.    Rolling pins supplied.   Throwing wil be at dummy and the lady
who hits her man most times wins the prize.) —
  4:00 p.m.
Husband calling contest (Mr. Wm. Douglas in charge)
  1:15 p.m.
Calf Riding for boys under IB years of age      1:20 p.m.
Broncho Busting and Steer Killing       I ;30 to 6:30 p.m,
Swimming and Log Rolling (Mr. M, S. Stephens in
charge) 5:30 p.m.
50 yard swim for girls under 16
50 yard swim for boys under 16
100 yards swimming race (open)
Big "Whoopie" Dance
at Night in Native Suns' Hall
(when special prizes will be drawn)
Official Starter: J, W, McKenzie. Jr.
Official Judge: Wm. A. Urquhart
Official Announcer: Walter Woodhus
For the Fall Fair Sports Committee;
H. S. Baker (Chairman), J, Casanave. A. B, Dundas, Walter Cliifc, Walter Brown. Bert Grieve. Win.
Douglas, Wm. Hagarty, J. W. McKenzie, Herbert
Bridges, Walter Woodhus, P. Booth, Win, Rickson,
R. Bowie and M  s. Stephens.
This programme subject to change.
Delivery lias been taken by the
City of Victoria of a new gasoline
motor pumper (or the Ore department . Costing $16,500, tlie pumper
will deliver sou gallons a minute with
a pressure of 120 pounds at the pump.
Itural school districts of ihe 0. &.
X. Hallway dlslrlcl have been notified
''>' die Depart m of Education that
1I|L' a lint of slants to be made by
she Government to each teacher's
salary will in inline be reduced to
?680 a year. Previously all ur nearly
all the salary of each teacher was al-
lowed. The boards were advised that,
at the last session of tbe Legislature
changes were made in the School
Act whereby tho distinction between
schools iii the B. k N.| Hallway Belt
and other rural school districts In
the Province was removed.
At a largely attended meeting called by business of both Alberni and
I'ort Alberni. a resolution was passed
applying to the Dominion association
for a charter tor Tori Alberni Hoard
ot Trade. Al a recent meeting of
the Associated- Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island held at Victoria!
tihe Port Alberni board was found to
be without standing, not having applied for a charter. At tbe local meei-
Ing It was decided that a district
board of trade should not be formed
at the present time. Thirty names
were signed and the application for
th8 charier will be made out In tho
name ot Port Alberni Hoard of Trade.
Victoria City lias asked the Federal
Government's approval for a proposed seaplane base on the south side of
the harbor, near Raymur's Point. The
siie for which a license is asked Is
wii.liln live minutes' drive of the heart
of ilie city. Complete provision for
Hying boats is proposed, If the site is
approved.
The fernie Council nla recent meeting passed a motion authorizing the
Parks Committee to clear anil level
a pari of the ground in the city park
so that it may be used asan einerg-
| ency landing place for airplanes.
Births
To Mr. and Mrs. Leo Suvoie, of
Hornby Island, on August I4i.h at St.
Joseph's Hospital, a son.
To Mr, and Mrs. George Mitchell, ol
Merville, :it St. Joseph's Hospital on
August  19th, a son
To Mr. and Mrs. William Shields, of
Courtenny. on August 21st at St. Joseph's Hospital, a daughter.
Little Itiver
Mr. John Woods of Victoria is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Thos, Bambrlck,
of Little River.
Mr. and Mrs. A. B Dundas of Sandwick are holidaying at Little River the
guests ol  Mrs. J,  E.  Hudson.
Petty Officer J. B. Emery of H.M.CS.
Vancouver is visiting the district and
is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Vogel.
Pick Pierces
Cable
but Service is
Saved
Workmen) oxcarntlfig at
Ruronbyi iItoto tliroo pick
ho 108 hi a liHi.pjilr nmirr-
irminhj willlo mi WodltCS-
tiny, Vugiial ll. l.itrliilt th.*
picks oni] puncturod Oio
protecting metal Bliontii and
■I lit imt dnningo tho wires
vWl li in. llovfCTCr, had the
I w 11 c r reiiMihie-l exposed
moisture would Iihtc outer-
•■il. nml ns ii rcnii inn (otophones iron Id Iuito boon put
out ot' order.
Thanks to s\ ly notion
of telephone men Uie service was tint Intirriiplctl.    A
enblo splicer vna hurried
lo UlO scene ami mntlo tlie
necessjirj     repairs    bofom
any serious I motile developed.
B.C, TELEPHONE CO. PAGE SIX
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,   AUGUST   23rd,   1929
aesastftse—- rcec"»cva«Ofc^aHaBncc>«BeHCffi»;
Fall Arrivals
The Fall season with its many new lines and novelties
has already arrived, und day by day sees new Roods
being opt ned for your inspection.
LADIES COATS
Although it seems earlier than usual, we have already
on view quite a showing of the now Fall Coats, we will
be to  have you look  them over, especially
pleasing are the lines of tho outsize coats for the ladies who require a large size. Tweed Coats with fur
collars are \ iry smart and a welcome change from
what has bet n shown previously.
Ladles' New Fall Hats
\V, ai ing quite an assortment of smart felt
hats for earlj fall, they will be on display in our millinery di partmi nt.
Fall Sweater Coats
A good : ii iy of now sweater coats are on view, in the
smaii colors whioh harminise with most shades.
NEW FANCY WORK
Already the ladies see visions of Xmas appearing and
the fancy work is already being selected for that occasion, wi ha\ ■ quite an assortment of new lines, with
several Bamples to show the desired results.
School days aro just around the corner, and mothers
are busy bi lei ting the garments suitable for the Boys
and Girls for that day, we invite you to see our large
selection of goods which will make it easier for you
to get them ready for school.
SUTHERLAND'S
Dry Goods Store
±^vzrz>±~.??!^ar^sttattzttaa!=ttaaei£ai
Inter-City Rapid Transit
FAST THROUGH FREIGHT SERVICE
Cumberland to Victoria and Way Points
Cumberland Personals
Complimenting .Mrs. .1. Smith, who j Mrs. Clark,
is leaving Cumberland ihis week end ; her parents,
a number of friends gathered at the
home of .Mrs. E. L. Saunders and
surprised Mrs. Siniih liy holding a
farewell party. Cards and games
were enjoyed by the guests and (luring the evening. Mrs. Mort, on behalf
of those present, presented to Mrs.
Smith a beautttul umbrella and numerous small gifts us a small tolie i
of esteem. Tho recipient was very
much affected and In n few well chosen words thanked thorn all for their
kindness. She also thanked Mrs.
Saunders for the lovely refreshments
served and told ihem that no matter
where she went or how long she remained nhseiii trom Cumberland she
would always remember them. Accompanied by her daughter Dorothy.
Mrs. Smith leave., tomorrow io make
her home In Vancouver.
Miss  Margaret   Lowe,  niece of Mr
nnd  Mrs. T.  Il   Mumford,  who has
1 n their guest at Gartley Bench tor
ihe pusi two weeks returned to her
Inline in Victoria last week end.
if loco, U.C., is visiting
Mr.    and    .Mrs.    Alex.
Miss Olgu Owen, of Vancouver,
daughter of Mr. w. A. Owen is spending a vacation with her father in
Cumberland.
Mr.  Fred  Pickard,  gov
quor vendor al Cumberli
irnment 11*
ul 1? away
Miss Hilda V
girl anil fur t
member nf the
Penticton Publl
holidaying here
atson, a Cumberland
e pasl few years a
leaching staff of the
Schol. who has been
with hev mother left
on Monday for Van
will spend a few (11
Montreal where si
one year under the <
ers system.
Mr. and Mrs.
G-ranby are vh
Lockner, .Ir.
uver. where she
before going to
will   teach   tor
change of teacb-
j.  Lockner, Sr..  of
iling   Mr.   and   Mrs.
Mrs. William Lewis ami family who
have heen visiting relations at Port
Honey returned to Cumberland on
Sunday last.
Wc
lay Night—Leave
uosilay  Noon.
PHONE CUMBERLAND 77
iO-      *t**       -*t>      *9P-      -^
Furniture Moving a Specialty-
VJCTORIA PHONE 74S2
-let us quote you a price
Fifty Years of Progress
®
fifi
Locomotive number 5900, greatest in -.li" Briti ih Empire, one
of a fleet of tw i ' for "•<' •>" tnc
heavy grades of the Br tish C ilum-
bia monntaii i       bet" re
leased for si r. ni  I anadian
Pacific Railway.   Oil-bunting and
weighing  ci i   th.v.'-'i'iarlers
of a million |i nds "'•'■< engine
and tendi r and 1 ii B a length oi
98 feel ov< •• a !. I Eurnishes an
overwhelming contrast with the
wood-burning
form"   wh   h to   Winnipeg
from Mirmeapo Ety-two years
ago next ; l to!
Tractive effort of the Countess
was 9,0(10 lbs., as  -ompared with
that of 7S.000 lbs. of thc 5900.
The latter represents the latest
developments in locomotive engi-
ncering and was built to specifications turnlshetl by tho motive
power and rolling stock department of the Canadian Pacific
Railway.
|     Mr. and  Mrs.  William Hutton  who
I have been visiting In Vancouver and
} Seattle returned last week.
Mrs. F. McCarthy, of Nanaimo. who
has been spending some time here
with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Wilcox, has returned lo her home.
Mrs. J. J. Potter and Leslie returned on Wednesday from Vancouver,
where tllcy were the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas, former residents
of Cumberland.
Mr. ami Mrs. \V. Cough anil family
i arrived by cur from California on
j Thursday on a visit to Mr. and Mrs.
| Sam. Gough. Mr. (lough states that
lhe hnd a wonderful trip, travelling
j by cir all the way. covering a little
j over 1,000 miles at a cost of a little
over $17.00 for gas and oil.
I    The  Cumberland   cricket   team   to
' play against Denman Island on Sunday at 1:30 has uot yet been definitely
chosen but will he picked from the
| following:  J.  Idiens. J.  L, Hrown, F.
Iv. Hall, S. Gough. II. Taylor. J. Ver-
i non-Jones. (1  Guy.  C.  V.  Dando,  J.
Vaughan,  T. Carney, W.  Whyte  ,T.
j 11. Mumford s. Boothman.
•    .    *
.Mrs. Wheeler, of Vancouver, formerly  ol Cumberland,  who has  been
returned  to  her  home  on   Saturday j
the guest of Mrs. N. Pearse. of Minto. I
last. ;
I
$
i
I
!
= SPECIALS = 1
for your
PICNIC BASKET
Picn c ' 'i Bi i nil . 86c, 3 for . .$
Chri 11   ' i'   ; im Wafers, 1-lb. packet
Far/-. Mi ed Bi cuita, 10c por packet, .1 for
Crisp 1 . 30c per tb„ 2 lbs. for .
Ca Pi ache .  Ap 'icots,  Fruit. Salad
and I ; Una for
Pi tb I or 1 .:   ' , 3 tins for
Horse ; ll 'Hals), per lin
N. I',. Sardine . 3 tins for	
Veal i i . ... tins, 25c por tin, 2 for
Pink  Sainoui   (Halo.  'J   for
Kippen . ■', tins for    	
Jellj Powder, packets, -I assorted for	
Lemoi.      Powder, per tin .
Lemon Juna and Orange Syrup, pint bottles,
makes 20 callous
1.00
85c
50c
25c
2ric
25c
45c
35c
25c
30c
25c
25c
FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES
♦♦
|
tt
Walker. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wilson
of Nanaimo are also guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Walker.
Miss Vera Plcketti has arrived
home from San Francisco. j
• •    .
Miss Josephine  Peroui, of Vancou- j
ver and Mr. John Pickettl, of San
Francisco, arrived Iii Cumberland 0:1
Saturday and will spend a vacation
here.
• *    •
Misses Josephine Freeburn anil Ed- .
nn Conrad returned to Cumberland
on Sunday after spending the past
two weeks In Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. tl. J. Richardson and j
son John, aocotnpanled by Messrs. |
Norman Robinson nml H. Unifies 1
motored to Nanaimo on Saturday last 1
returning Sunday evening.
.    *    •
A well known figure ln Cumberland ill the person of Mr. Joseph
Hirst, who was hern in Nanaimo
sixty-four year, ago anil who hail
heen residing in Parksville for a
number of years passed to his rest
last week etui in ihe Nanaimo Hospital, anil was interred in the Nanaimo Cemetery mi Monday last. He
Is survived by his widow and ', children. Three lumbers also survive,
James and George, ot Nanaimo and
Albert of Parksville and one sister.
Mrs. 1., A. Rogers, of Nanaimo.
Mrs. .1. Sinilli and (laugher. Dorothy leave Cumberland tomorrow for
Vancouver where tbey will make their
home for smile lime.
Miss Phyllis Uurrows has resigned
her position at the Cumberland General Hospital nml is staying wilh
friends at Royston Ueuch.
• •    •
Mr. C.  Bennett, of Prince Rupert
and Miss Jessie Smith, of Nanaimo.
are guests of Uie latter's uncle and
aunt. Mr. anil Mrs. W. Merrlfleld, of
the Cumberland Hotel.
. . .
Mrs. Frenner. of Rustic Cottage,
Wilson Creek, is the guest of her
sister, Miss Harriet Horburwy.
• • •
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, of Ilazelton arc also visiting Messrs. Joe and
Jack and Miss Miss Harriet Horbury.
brothers ami sisters of Mrs. Anderson.
Messrs. Jack Halliday, J. H. Robertson, anil Fraser Watson left on
Thursday afternon for a week-end
fishing trip to the Upper Campbell.
• •    •
Miss Nellie Walker and Miss Margaret Jones, of Nanaimo, were the
guests ot Mrs. J. Baird for a few-
days.
The pioneer work which hud been
done by the Cumberland crciket club
ilurlng the past two years is beginning to show results. This week end
a game will be played against Don-
man Island. Tbe game will be played
ut Cumberland, on the "V" ground
and is expected to start at 1:80, thus
giving the Denmanites time to gel
gack to the island before darkness
overtake them.
»    •    •
City Workmen were busy during
the week repairing tlle sidewalk just
below Uie posi office. A bad step has
heen graded off so tbut now there Is
no necessity of anyone complaining
aboul  tripping over the walk.
• •    «
The contractor is busy on the foundation ror ilie building for .Mr. Victor
Bonora mi Dunsmuir avenue, next in
Mil.can's Jcwelery store, and which.
according to rumour win be Cumberland's new liquor siore.
.    .    •
Hurling H Ledlngbam's new gtirag"
nt the corner of Dunsmuir avenue ami
Fourth street is Hearing completion
the Btucco men putting on ibe nnlsh-
ing touches today. Gasoline pumps
will  probably lie Installed' ibis next
week.
Mr and Mrs. J. Gillies and two sons.
Misses D. Gillespie and A. Hull anil
Mr Patrick of Vancouver arc visiting
Mr! and Mrs. T. E. Banks at Gartley's
Bench.
Mrs   E. S   McNamcs and daughter
and Miss Mable Gomeviy of Vancouver are visiting Mrs. Kit. Brown.
.    •    •
Mr. J. Boshnrt left for his home in
Vancouver on Wednesday.
* *    *
Miss A. Forrest of Ladysmith arrived
it: town on Saturday.
* *    •
Mr. and Mrs. Gtfcbs returned from
a holiday in Vancouver on Sunday.
Master Russell Cox left this morn-
ir.; (Thursday! for his home in Seattle.
• •    •
Mrs. C. Harris left on Tuesday to
vi it with her parents in Vancouver.
Mrs. T. Graham. Miss Janet Grail: 111, Mr. T. R. S. Graham and Mrs.
D ivldson motored to Victoria on Sun-
dr.y returning Wednesday.
Mrs. M. Stewart entertained on
Tuesday at a small supper in honor of
h r son's filth birthday.
Mr. James Yates and Mr. Lewis
own of Coleman. Alta.. motored
■in Coleman to Cumberland and
ring their stay here were thc guests
" Mr. and Mrs.' Sam Hal field of West
itmbetiand.
«    •    *
Miss  Olive  Robertson  accompanied
. her father, Mr. Alex. Robertson and
Ir. and Mrs. Sam Hatfield, of Cuin-
rland, motored to Ladysmith on Sat-
rdny.   Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield return-
i on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. ('has. McDonald, who
have been visiting at Campbell River
returned on Sunday last.
•    *    *
Friends of Wade McLaughlin, a
brother of Mrs. Gordon Covin, will
be sorry to hear tlinl lie has been ill
In the Prince Rupert Hospital. He
Is expected at Ills home In Fanny Hay
shortly.
Miss   Nettle   RobortSOl
ii   week's  holiday   with
Beaton at Courtonay.
is  spending
Mrs.   Angus
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Strachan and
rurally motored to Ladysmlth on Sun
day morning lasl taking Mrs. Frank
Martin and children back to their
home nfter vlHltlng relatives and
friends here. Mr. und Mrs. Strachan
returned the snms day.
Look at these
EXTRA
Specials
1 Head Lettuce
1 lb. Ripe Tomatoes
1, do/,.  Bananas
'/i doz. Peaches
Vi doz. Pears
$1.00
Mrs. J. Bond gave a. very enjoyable
farewell party on Tuesday evening at
tl e home of Mr. T. Lewis in honor ol
Master Russell Cox, of Seattle.   The
e\ening  was   taken   up   with   games,
j Audrey Lewis winning first prize and
Reggie   Lewis   second   prize   for   the
guessing   competition.    Refreshments
were served from a table made lovely
with pink and mauve sweat peas.   After refreshments the kidcics presented
I Master Russell with a gold slick pin
' and he. In turn, thanked his friends
■ kindly for their parting gift. Those
' present were Kenneth and Cleo Gib-
; son. Frankie, Eddie and Bobby Weir.
! Reggie and Coral Lewis. Audrey and
Leslie Lewis. Phyllis Newman, Katherlne Hill and Russell Com.
'    Mrs. A. W. Evans returned to Victoria on Sunday after a week's visit
with Mrs. J. C Brown.
*     *     •
| Mr. and Mrs. D. Bannerman and
family and Miss Ellen Hunden returned from Vancouver on Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell Morgan returned from their honeymoon trip on
Sunday.
Mrs. Mitchell and family returned to
Ladysmith on Saturday.
■ Messrs. J. Dekmey. Strang and Raf-
1 ters left on Thursday last for Quall-
1 cum where they will spend two weeks
doing survey work.
Mrs. J. C. Brown and Miss Jessie
1 Brown left on Sunday, the former for
j Victoria and the latter for Ladysmith.
j Mrs. Delaney and family returned to
! Ladysmith on Saturday.
1 Mr. Harold Conrad returned trom
1 Vancouver   on   SaUtdray.
Margaret R. Mitchell |
Phone 98
L.A.B.
Teacher of Pianoforte
and Theory
TERM COMMENCES
SEPTEMBER 9th
Teleiihnne 180      Re Idonce 207
Derwent Avenue
«s-5isia»aEi-iCiS~Ciasaai=c
-THI.Kl'IIONK-
I  TAXI
,♦   MA ROWN'S GROCERY 1; Charhe D;;ton
.♦
For Service
For Quality
' ♦    -
m
Meets noat at Union liny Every
Sunday Morning
(i bars P. and (J. Soap
1 can Magic Cleaner
2 packets Lux
fi School Scribblers
1 School Pencil
$1.00
FREE FLIGHT
In an Aeroplane
OR FIVE DOLLARS
for one set of Aviation Chocolate
Bar Cards
5c
AVIATION BARS
5c
Lang's Drug Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
"*a^       "*^^'       ?t't\a>       ^O^       ***^^       "**-»*       ^tW*'       ~^^s*       "*^^'       ■*^^. .   *l
i
I FINER   MEATS
Ji The  freshest,   most  wholesome  meats,  consistently
« priced to please, will be found at our store.   If you
11 have not time for a personal call—"Shop by phone".
i Sixty seconds at the photic will bring the freshest
l\
ft finest meats to your door, post haste—Just
g ask central for 66.
a
| Wilcock &Co.Ltd
| "The Family Butchers" j
\[ Phone 66 Cumberland     i
1 It
A School For Little Children
ANGLICAN CHURCH
will be opened in Cumberland in September in
mornings daily.   Notice of date and
place given later
English Subjects, Drill, Kindergarten, Games and
Occupations.
ELLEN C. WATSON, COMOX, P. O.
w
♦
The Crisp
♦ Nutritious Full
♦
Sized Loaf
Tasty and wholesome, Mann's Bread is a body builder
and the most delicious sandwiches can be made for
your week-end out from our pure wholesome bread.
Mann's Bakery
SATURDAY' SPECIALS
Custard Pies Baked lo Order.
Lemon   Pies Lemon   Tarn
Apple   Pies Raisin   Pies
i  '
The
DAIRY
EXTENSION OF TIME
NOTICE is hereby given that the
time for the reception ot tenders tor
Fishermen's Flouts, Prince Rupert,
B.C., is extended to Wednesday. September 11, 1929.
By  order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, AugUBt it, 1029-
„:i Phone 08
Cumberland
IN  MKMORIAff
in loving memory of James G.
Lockhart, who died in ShaughnesBy
.Military Hospital, Vancouver, B.C., on
August 19th, 1922, aged 24 years.
Sadly missed.
Just when his days were brightest,
Just when his hopes were best,
Just in the pride of manhood.
He was taken to his rest.
Inserted by his father, mother,
brother and ilitors. *
j!      THE BEST UNDER
THE SUN
Get out under the health-giving rays of old sol and
keep young by indulging in your favorite sport. Your
days will be much more enjoyable if you buy your
grocery needs from
Mumford's Grocery
If you get it At Mumford's It's Good
Everything for the Picnic Basket.
Phone 71 Deliveries Daily
I|ia5-s-SEi5S=-ss5=s=s-SBj=»>3c^^
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Parfltt of Victoria spent the week-end in town vls-
IlinB with Mrs. S. Horwood.
Miss Gladys Roy who is In training
in the Vancouver Geenral Hospital Is
visiting with her mother at Royston.
Mrs. \v. Bruce Gordon and Mrs.
Robertson returned from a few days
visit in Victoria on Saturday.
Miss Ida McFadyen left last week
for a two weeks' vacation on the mainland.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0224705/manifest

Comment

Related Items