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The Cumberland Islander Apr 19, 1924

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 TXJT?
Provincial Ltbran
Janl'23
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1,1
With which te coawUaUaUd the Cnjberlaad Ken*.
FORTY-THIRD  YEAR—No.  16.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      SATURDAY. APRIL 19, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
TWO DEAD AS RESULT OF SHOOTING
MADDENED MAN KILLS
TWO; WOUNDS ANOTHER
IN DOMESTIC QUARREL
GARDENING CONTEST
FOR EMPLOYEES
Alfred Corbett of Courtenay shoots wife £"*
and Spencer Teed; wounds Mrs. Simpson
QUIETLY  SUBMITS  TO  ARREST
COURTENAY,—Deep gloom waa cast
over the district on Sunday afternoon
laat, when .Mrs. M. A. Celestia Co;-
bett and Spencer Teed were done to
death by bullets Hied from a thirty-
two calibre lver-Johnson revolver in
the hands of Alfred Corbett. husband
of the lirst named.
The deed waa enacted about fifteen
minutes after two o'clock in the dinning room of the cafe that the Corbetts operated on the Island Highway,
Courtenay, opposite tho Agricultural
Hall, in the building owned by the
Courtenay Orange Lodge, and, according to statements of eyewitnesses of)
tbe shooting, came as a sequel to a
quarrel In which Mr. and .Mrs. Corbett were the principals.
According lo Edward Malnwnrlng.
who was in the premises at tbe time,
in a statement made soon nfter the
tragedy, the Corbetts were quarreling and Spence Teed, who bad come
ln with Joseph Orr, thinking that Corbett was about to strike his wife, intervened, the result being tbat Corbett drew the pistol and shot him and
then turned the weapon upon bis wife
with the result as stated above.
Mainwarlng's statement Ih a follows:
"About two o'clock I went Into tbe
restaurant through thc store to tho
dining room. I saw Mrs. Corbetl and
spoke to her. This was shortl..
afler Corbett had knocked a tray of
dishes out of .Mrs. Corbctt's hands ain!
tho dishes and contents were scattered about thc floor."
Mrs. Corbett said "What do you
think of this Ted?"
"I saw the broken dishes and food
on the floor. .Mrs. Corbett wns spattered with food."
I asked, "where's Corbett?" I saw
no one else.
1 asked, "what's thc trouble?'
Mrs. Corbett replied, "I've finished
with this man."
I went Into the bedroom and saw
Corbett sitting on a chair and spoke
to him.
He sold, "we had a little dispute."
Immediately after this Teed and
Joseph Orr came In. Teed went
through the dining room and asked
"what's the matter?"
Corbett replied, "It's none of your !
business,   you   better  get  home   and
look after your own family."
Corbett then movod Into the store,
safe  and  put   it  under  thc  counter
.Mr.  Barlow, who wna in the dining employees at the picnic
room when the quarrel was going on,
got up aud left, and did not see tin
shooting. He had witnessed quarrels
between the Corbetts before and
thought that this one would soon end
ns the others did.
After tlle shooting. Teed ran to the
Courtenay Hotel, a distance of about
fifty yards .threw open Ihe door and
exclaimed. "Oh. Herd, I m shot, gel
a doctor." Blood was dripping profusely through his sleeve. It should
bo stated here tbat Hope Herd, O, W.
Smith and Dawson McColgan w.'.e
sitting In the hotel when Teed burst
through the door . Mr. Herd called
Dr. llrlggs .who responded Immediately. Teed had fallen In the hotel
hall, near the foot of tbe stairs and
despite eli'orts of (hose attending him
to get him to any who shot him, be
was too weak to respond to the question. His sweater was cut away and
his shirt rolled back, revealing a bullet wound over the right lung. He
(Continued on Page 6)
The second Home Gardening competition of flowers and vegetables
combined and for which generous cash
prizes will be given, is announced by
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited. All Comox district employees are eligible and there ls no en-
tec. In other words, employing lu Cumberland, Bevan and
Union Buy will be offered the opportunity of winning the following prises:
1st, $20.00; 2nd, (10.00; 3rd, (5.00.
One special prize of $75.00 will be
given the competitor having the best,
garden in the whole district.
The competition was promised the
in  1922 by
QUEEN CANDIDATES
ARE WORKING HARD
FOR FIRST PLACE
Thomas Graham, general superintendent and now' that the time for gardening has arrived It is hoped that a
large number will participate. Application forms for entries may be
secured at tho Cumberland. Bevan
and Union Bay offices.
Rules unit Kcgulatloiis
The following are the    rules    and
regulations for ihe competition:
1. This competition Is confined to
tbe Employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited living lu
Cumberland, Bevan and Union Bay.
2. All those wishing to enter the
competition must supply information
called for on application forms, which
can be obtained at the office of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited at Cumberland and Union Bay,
all entries from Cumberland and Bevan must be tiled with .Mr. Dick and
from Union Boy with Mr. Searle, Pay-
SECOND COUNT FOR
QUEEN OF MAY CONTEST
Each day as It rolls by, sees some- .t,>f>r*il.T.t*M"»   fipiti »-»        r> r-,
thing different In the way of raising -FLORENCE   SEHL   LEADS
money to help the candidates in Cum-
bcrland's Premier May  Queen  Con- The Ballot Box j„ the sec0|1(, week of the Mfly Quecn Con((?st
test and If hard work helps any In the waa opened by the aurjjt0rs at 4 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon of
final count, then all six contestants   tnjs week.
should be Queen. Friday being Good Friday ;ind fl ho,iday ^^ the ^.^
Miss Fanny Strachan, Public and from Thursday, the regular day.
nigh school candidate got the jump.        We understand that no small number of ballots were deposit-
on the others when she held a whist j ed in the box after 4 0.clock on Wednesday, which win be includ-
drive and dance In the Ilo-llo Hall   ed in next week-s coimt
last Friday night at which there wero For the information of Campaign Managers and friends of
over twenty-five tobies of whist. First the various candidateS the ballot box will be removed and opened
prize In the gentlemen's section was
won by J. Watson and Mrs. I. Gear
took ladles' first.
During the dance which followed,
two large baskets of candy were raffled and won by Mrs. Dr. MacNaughton and Hugh McLean who kindly offered them for auction,' Mr. T. H.
Carey acting as auctioneer. To add
a little novelty to tbe situation, a
mock trial was staged at which Mr.
Carey was charged with autioneering
without a license and although he
proved conclusively that be was not
guilty, Judge Charles Graham nevertheless fined him $1.00. Altogether a
most enjoyable time was spent and
the school candidate's total waa swel-
i ted by some 13,000 votes, (132.25 being
! the net proceeds.     Plump's Orchestra
j supplied music free of charge.
Miss Gladys Dando another caudl-
master nt those places, not later than :dBt8 mi „ very BUCCeaBfui dance In
llay '"• the Ilo-llo on Tuesday evening April
No entry fee Is required., 116tn,    A jg^ crowd wag preeent and
the proceeds at the door   and from
HOSPITAL BALL
EASTER MONDAY
The Hospital Ball, under
auspices of the Women's Auxiliary to flip Cumberland General Hospital will be held on
Easter Monday from 9.30 p.m.
to 2 a.m., In the Ilo-llo Hall
Tickets $2.00 per couple, extra
lady 75c. Refreshments will
be served.
Old Timers Will
Play On Sunday
The old time soccer players of Cumberland will meet the old timers of
Nanaimo in an exhibition game on the
Recreation Grounds here next Sunday
at 2 p.m. sharp and from all accounts
will undoubtedly show tbe young pin.,
ers how football used to be played and
should be played.
The local team has- a strong line-
of It.
Coe Jr., ought to put up a very Interesting brand of soccer. "Dick" has
tbe following players under his wing
and is confident of a win: Goal, G,
Shearer; R. Bock. R. Frecburn, L.
Bock, 11. Rutherford; R. Half, W. Mossey; C. Half, II. Farmer, (Capt.) I..
Half, C. Walker; O. Right, S. Jones,
I. Right, T. Gomm, Centre, W. Herd.
I, Left, A. Boothtnun, O. Left, W.
Sutherland; spares T. McMillan, .1.
Taylor, Danny Dunlop and \V, Walker,
linesman.
Latest Results In
Big League Ball
behind tiie counter. _
Teed went In and said, "you are not!u" nml umler "10 management
going to strike that woman while 1
am here." and look off his coat.
Corbett said, "This Is my affair, not
yourB," He stooped down and reached under the counter and when he
stood up he had a revolver and began
firing. 1 was between Teed and Corbett and if I had not ducked ho would
hnve shot me. 1 tried to grub lhe
gun afler the shooting. Five bullets
wero fired. Teed said nothing but ran
away holding bis breast. When I
tried to get Uie gun Corbett "broke''
it and threw It ut mc and I said,
"You're crazy, man."
Corbett said. "I'll  show you  Sons
of   what   you're   worth   around
here."    He then went ln the bedroom
and put 011 his hat and coat.
I said, "Where are you going. Cor.
bett, you must be crazy."
He replied, "Alright Teddy, go ln j
behind the counter and look after the J
store; leave me alone, I'll be alright.
He then went out. 1 went to the I
Courtenay Hotel and saw Teed lying j
on the floor. I never realized he was
so near death."
This statement was corroborated by
Joseph Orr and Harold Boomer, who
said that the quarrel that Mr. and |
Mrs. Corbett were embroiled In was
one concerning the keys to the safe.
Mra .Corbett hnd the keys and was
averse to giving them to Corbett who
wanted to get a letter out of the safe.
She finally gave' up the keys and Corbett opened tbe safe. It was then,
porhaps .thai, he took tht pin from the
3,
4. At least seven (7) entries must
be tiled from each of the above named
places In order to go on with tbe competition. Should there be less than
seven (71 entries from any one of thu
above named places, the Management 1 an(j jjr
reserves the right to Include the en- j
tries made among those made from
the other Iwo places. 1 ^e  tran3
6. All the work must be done by I ,jall(;e
the  competitor  making    application,, _
he may have assistance of member,,
of bis own family, but may not engage
hired or skilled help  In  connection
with tbe work.
ii. In addition to vegetables, small
fruits and ornamental gardening,
(lawns, borders, flowers, shrubs and
vines) ore included.
7. Gardens entered ln the competition must have not less than 10C0
square feet In vegetables (Including
small fruits) and 500 square feet ln
ornamental gardening (lawns, flowers, etc.)
8. Gardens will be judged about
the 3rd or 4th week ln July.
!i. Gardens made on old sod, or on
newly cleared land shall be enUtled
to a bonus of 10 per cent of tbe marks
awarded.
10. Thc prizes shall be as follows:
1st prize, $20.00; 2nd prize. $10.00;
3rd prize $5.00, In each of the above
named places.
One special prize of $75.00 wlll be
given to the competitor having tho
best garden in tbe whole district.
11. The judges will be brought in
from outside points, and their decisions will be- final.
1. Plan and arrangements, 10
points.
2. Quantity   and  quality of
on next Thursday afternoon at -1 o'clock.     See that your ballots
are deposited by that time to be included in the weekly count.
The following is the result of the second week's contest for
May Queen up to 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, April 16':
This week     Grand Total
Sehl, Florence  13540
Strachan, Fanny   7140
Dando, Gladys     310
Picketti, Mary   5730
Balagno, Josie   6000
Mitchell, Beatrice   4310
3 spoiled ballots.       Total Votes, 87,740.
Eight hundred books of ballots are in circulation representing
400,000 votes and if sold will make a total of $4,000.00.
During the coming week whist drives, concerts, dances and
house parties will be the order of the day to boost the candidate's
total. We hear the school children are going to have a grand
parade on Saturday in support of their candidate.
total
17170
total
15100
toatl
14350
total
13440
total
12180
total
11540
Cumberland Baseball Club Dance
und l'rtze Drawing May 2. Oh, boy!
What u lime.
I j First Report Of
Relief Committee
the sale of Ice cream went a long way I
in Increasing this candidate's lead.    I
Excellent music   was   supplied   by'
Mrs. C. Dando Jr., Miss Gladys Dando!
Colville Graham, .Mr. New-!
man and Leslie Dando, Harold Woods ■
of Seattle kindly relieved the latter at
for a   large  part of the
EASTER HOLIDAYS
JOHN HART RETIRES
The retirement of Hon. Hart, minister of finance, from the Oliver govern- j
ment came as a surprise to the gen-'
eral public, although lt has been
known by the minister's friends that
for years he has been neglecting prl-
vate interests ln order to follow the
wishes of his leader and party and remain at the head of the Important finance department. It Is safe to say,
without prejudice, that John Hart has
been the most successful finance minister In the history of British Columbia, and his retirement to business
life is keenly regretted, even by pollt-
| leal opponents. Even rabid opposi-
1 tionists In the Legislature have been
| forced to compliment Mr. Hart for re-
All the stores will be
closed on Good Friday
(tomorrow) and Easter
Monday. The business
men are also taking their
usual Wednesday half
holiday.
Corbett Guilty
Is Jury's Verdict
COURTENAY,—Provincial Const.
.Matthews was chief witness at Wednesday's final session of thc Spencer
Teed Inquest. He said, "When Corbett was charged with shooting with
intent to kill one, Teed, Corbett said,
, 'I done It, you would have done the
j storing the credit of the province and j same thing If you had been me.     I
lit will require a good man to fill hla  did It and the only one I've got to
i place.     However, the finance mtnls-
| ter will continue to give his advice
i and aid to the government.
CITY COUNCIL OUT TO
ENFORCE BYLAW 59
The City Council says the By-Law
i respecting  the streets and  sidewaks
crop. [ and the traffic thereon shall be en-
including both flowers and vegetables,
,10 points.
3. Selection or nsortment of varieties wilh reference to range of season and local conditions, 20 points.
4. Industry aud skill manifested,
20 points.
5. Neatness, freedom from weeds
and Insect pests, 20 points.
Total, 100 points .
forced among other things. This Is
to prevent dogs running at large tearing up the Boulevards and a nuisance
in general.
By-Law 69, which will be enforced,
says:
Section   2  Clause   (C)   The   word
| "cattle'' shall have the meaning assigned to It by the tresspass act, and
shall also  mean and  Include dogs,
Coast   League
Salt Lake 9; Seattle S.
Sacramento 5; Portland 14.
Oakland G; San Frnncslco 0.
Vernon 7;  Los Angeles 2.
National League
Philadelphia 3; Boston 4.
Cincinnati 0; Pittsburg 1.
St. Louis 4; Chicago 13.
New York 7; Brooklyn 1.
American   League
Chicago 3; St. Louis 2.
Detroit 5; Cleveland 1.
Washington 1; Philadelphia 0.
Boston 9; New York 0.
All competitors will start with 100 I cats, horses mules and soforth.
points and deductions will be made |    Section 39.    No person shall Buffer
on the above score card for defects.
!|
or permit any cattle to be at large
(and that means dogs), ln or upon
any street. Every cattle shall be
deemed at large In contravention to
this section unless harnessed to a vehicle or securely tied to some Immov.
able object or fastened to a rope er
chain and led by some person.
Section 68. Every person who
shall be convicted of an Infraction of
any section or provision of this By-
Law shall be liable to a penalty not
exceeding fifty dollars.
_^^^^ All Uiat ls necessary for the Chief
•i !■  ,   „, „,. TT „ ,.     . I of  Police  Is  to  lay  an  Information j
Hall, hall! The gang will all I* at ^^ „,, 0WMr of ^ iog pr(m,!
 —— tha Cumberland Baseball Clob Dane* I u,^ the dog w»a at large tad secure
Klondyke Night-May mh.Oh Boy!  and Prlre Dnwtnff May t. 'a conviction.
SPECIAL SALE OF
HATS ON SATURDAY
Mrs. Gldney, representing John the
Hatter, Nanaimo, arrived In Cumberland on Wednesday with a full line
of Ladles' and Gentlemen's Hats and
Faster Novelties. Mrs, Gldney Is located in the King Block, Dunsmuir
Ave, and will put on a special sale on
. Saturday.
look to Is God'."
At the time of thc arrest Corbett
was asked where the revolver was.
He replied, "Tbe gun Is safe." The
police insisted on finding the weapon
and Corbetl eventually said tliat In-
had buried tbe gun outside back of
•ho Cafe. Corbett picked up a shovel
aud led the way to the back of an oul
house. He began to dig nenr a slick
In the sand thut had recently been
placed there as a mark. Corbett hi
gan to dig and uncovered the revolver, a 32 calibre Iver-Johnson. live
chambers. Corbett said, "That ls the
gun," and on breaking the weapon.
found lt had live empty cartridges In
It.
The cafo was In on orderly condition except the writing board ou the
'phone, a piece about 3 inches broken off.     It wns lying on the floor.
In company with Constable John
Itussell on tlle way to police station.
a call was made at the Courtenay
Hotel to find nut the condition of
Teed and learned from Dr. Briggs he
was dead. "1 saw Ihe dead body. I
then charged Corbett with the murder
of Spencer Teed nud warned blm again
: In presence of Itussell and Sergt. An-
germnn of Ihe Mounfles."
After being warned Corbetl said, "I
am guilty." We advised him not lo
talk again.
A thorough Investigation  was Mien
| mnde of Cortictt'B premises.      Sergt.
( Continued on Pago 21
We, your Board of Trustees appointed on the 22nd February, lira,
to administer monies donated and
» | subscribed for the benefit of widows
1' and orphans bereft of their breadwinners as a result nf the lamentable
mine disaster on the 8th February.
1923, bog lo submit the following report.
Subscriptions to the Fund from nil
sources amount to a total of {9639.51,
and the amounts as received have been
placed to the credit of the Fund, including 11 widows and ."2 children
under lti years of age. In two cases
posthumous additions lo families have
since occurred.
lu accordance with a scheme formulated by your Trustees and adopted at a public meeting held on the 20th
.March 1928, the administration of the
Fund was adjusted to allow a monthly payment of $7 to each widow, and
$2 to each child under 16 years of
age .
A sum of (1000.00 was set aside for
special circumstances.
Final payments amounting to a total
of $892,00 have been made to two willows and their families who have left
the province.
Filial payments amounting to a total
of 1500.00 have been made in the
cases of two parents who each lost a
son.
Final payment of 3M has been made
In the case of a widow who lias since
re-married .
Special Cbrlatmoj gilts of J10 for
each widow and %i for oach child,
amounting to a total of $142.00 wero
granted from the special fund.
In two cases of postumous births,
a grunt of J.",o was made la each widow
for nursing oxpouses
The list of beneficiaries al the present date Includes 8 widows and -'»;
children. The monthlj payments
amount to 9108.00
No expanse has been incurred In
the administration of the Fund other
than $-'ti.-T, for necessary birth certificates and cheque book.
The thanks of tho community are
due 10 Messrs ('. T. Heyland and F. A.
McCarthy, Managers of the Hank of
Commerce and iho Royal Bank of
Canada respectively tor auditing Iho
accounts free of charge.
At Iho prosent rate of dlsbursomenl
it is estimated thai tho fund wlll n it
be exhausted for nnohter ft years.
Klondyke Night-May 13lh.Oh Boy'.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
MONTHLY MEETING
Tbe regular monthly mooting of the
Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland
[General Hospital wlll bo held on Friday afternoon, April 25th, In the Anglican Hull, commencing al 8 o'clock
sharp. E. M, Jeffrey. Secretary. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY,  APRIL 19,  1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland. B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY.   APRIL   19.   11124.
EASTER
Easter, the season of gladness is
at hand. You may have been keeping tab on spring days and longing
for the buds and blossoms. They
rarely tome until after Easter, and if
Easter is late then the spring is late.
But old Mother Nature takes care of
all things in due time and it is sale
now to build up your system will)
Grandma's Spring Tonic of sarsapar-
ilia .sulphur, sassafras and-anything
else Uiat Granny can dls out of her
meinoris. You may also get to work
on that ash pile in the back yard.
News Of Campbell
River
ON COAST IN
CONNECTION WITH
SQUADRON VISIT
CAMPBELL RIVER—Lieut . Commander R, O. D. Watson D.S.O., R.N.,
was a visitor to Campbell Itiver this
week, having motored up from Victoria with a party of friends.
Lieut Commander Watson is on the
Pacific Coast in connection with the
visit of II..M.S.Hood and the Special
Sendee Squadron of the British
Navy which is due to arrive on the
coaat about the 21st June.
Tho matter of the squadron visiting
Comox Harbor, when an opportunity
for the residents of the Comox district
to visit the squadron would be created, was taken up with Lieut Commander Watson, but he stated that us
the mission of this special service
squadron on its Empire cruise was of
a most important nature, the schedule of wills had been worked out to
the minute ond that It would be quite
impossible to deviate therefrom. Consequently Victoria and Vancouver
would be the only points at which
residents from this district would be
able to visit the fleet.
I TO ORGANIZE
SPORTS AT RIVER
CAMPBELL RIVER.—A long felt
want In the shape of recreation for
the young people of Campbell River
aud district is in the way of being met
by tiie formation of the "Community
Athletic Association. At a meeting
of this association held on the 15th
inst., the following officers were elected.
President, Mr. M, Ilaigh.
Secretary-Treasurer, R. McCuaig.
An executive council were elected
consisting of Messrs Palmer, Crawford. Masters, Verdier and Mesdames
Palmer, Oscar Thulin. Higgins, McCuaig aud Dr. .Millard.
The object of this association is the
creation of some organized sports in
the community and to work in con-
juction with lhe Hoard of School
Trustees In the formation of a properly equipped gymnasium for the
benefit of the school children and tho
adults, If the same enthusiastic
spirit continues as was evidenced ai
tiie above mentioned meeting, the accomplishment of tho objects in view
will soon lie realized.
SUCCESSFUL  DANCE
CAMPBELL RIVER,—A very successful dance was held in the Pavilion on Saturday the 12th, Moody's
Orchestra being in attendance. Many
visitors from Cumberland, Union Bay,
Courtenay and Headquarters attended, who, together with the Campbell
Itiver people, made a good crowd and
an enjoyable time was had by all.
.^ajgjafSjgja^Maraiafan^^
NEW
SHIPMENT OF THE
NEWEST
STYLES  IN C. C, A  La
GRACE
CORSETS    AND     LONG
BRASSIERES
*       0      *
JUST
OPENED   OUT   AN
EASTEIl
SHIPMENT OF LADIES'
FOOTWEAR
ARRANGE FOR
SOCIAL EVENING
CAMPBELL RIVER,—A meeting of
tho Campbell River and district ex-
service men's club was held at the
Willows Hotel on Saturday last. President Lewis was in the chair. After
the regular routine business, the question of holding a social evening wns
discussed and a committee was appointed to make the necessary arrangements, A very successful smoking concert was held on the 1st March
and it has been decided to arrange
another such evening.
Get the habit. Call at SparkB Co.,
Courtenay, for your battery, gasoline
md oil service.
Why Does Your Doctor
Advise A Spring Tonic
At This Time of Year?
0£D, varied, colorful, effective and smart —
All compelling and irresistible are the Easter coats,
suits and dresses.
You've heard about the new style themes for 1924—
the sauve slenderness of the new silhouettes, the rich
jmartnessof the new materials, the latest interpretations
of the Parisian tailored vogue—Zh(jjw you can see them!
You will discover that this collection comprises an
infinite variety of trim tailored suits for Madame and
Mademoiselle, and coats and frocks of more formal
attributes, too.
11   And, your pleasure in the new and authentic spring styles will be actually
increased by the richness of material and the modest prices set upon them.
This is the season when your system is trying to adjust itself to warmer weather. Your liver becomes sluggish and your bowels clogged up with
poisonous, sickening wastes. As a
result, many suffer from such symptoms as sour stomach, coated tongue,
bad taste, biliousness, irregular movements of the bowels, sick-headaches,
pains In the buck and sides.
Make this test! Cleans and lone
your liver and bowels with Dr. Thacher's Liver and Illood Syrup. Put
>our   stomach   in   condition—soothe
your tired and over-taxed nerves,
brace up your system and send purer
and healthier blood coursing through
your veins.
Notice quick difference in way you
look. eat. sleep and feel—improvement
in less that 11 hours. You, too, will
be satisfied ,aa others have, or no
cost.
Dr. Thacher's is sold and recommended by Lang's Drug and Book
Store In Cumberland and by leading
druggists in every city and town.
SksHWJffiMsi^ESHBE'asiajai
POLICE BUILDING , tlon or the   Campbell   River    Police
IS UNDER WAY \ buildings, has arrived with a crew of
tlve men, and wlll commence building
right away.     Mr. Moncrieff construct-
LAST FEW
DAYS OF
BIG SALE
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
CAMPBELL RIVER,—Mr. Moncrieff
of Victoria who was successful ln securing the contract for the oo
Corbett Guilty
Is Jury's Verdict
(Continued From Page 1)
onstruc-!ed the Courtenay School.
New
Shoes
At   New
Prices
Men's Solid Leather Work Shoes -  $4.50
Men's Miner Pit Shoes, new price $4.50 and .... $5.50
Men's Fine Dress Oxfords, in Brown, a nice easy fitter,
and good wearer    New price $6.50
Men's Fine Dress Bals, in Black or Brown, in the new
toe.    Priced to sell at $6.50 and $7.50
Boys' Strong Solid Leather School Shoes—if you want
value for your money, here it is at $2.95
The same thing in Youth's sizes, 1 to 5's $3.93
Boys' Fine Calf Shoe in Brown Calf, priced at $3.75
and $4.95
Ladies' Oxfords, Brogue style, low heels, suitable for
Misses and Ladies' 2V2 to 7's $4.50 and $5.90
SEE OUR WINDOWS FOR OTHER LINES
AND PRICES
Frank   Partridge
THE  CASH   CLOTHING  AND   SHOE   STORE
Cumberland Opptuite Port Office
j Angerman  found a slug In  front of
the kitchen range.    "In my opinion,
I this slug  was  the  bullet  that  went
through  the  shoulder  of  Mrs.  Corbett."     A search lor liquor revealed
one bottle of gin, 4 pitit bottles beer
and some empty beer    bottles.      Ill
I Corbctt's  bedroom  1  bottle    Johnny
j Walker red label with about two good
j drinks taken out. was found also 2
I full  bottles  of  beer.
I    Three  small  whisky  glasses,  that
I arc commonly called "Blind plggers
j glasses,"    were    found  In a drawer
under the counter; also cork screw.
j Glasses smelled of hard liquor. Tced's
' coat wns found in the store.
!    In conversation  with    Corbett.    I
spoke of  the  deceased  Teed.      Cor-
' belt said "If Teed had not come around
ihere on  Sunday,  this  never would
have happened."    He has had trouble
with Teed before and Ihat he was lay-
' Ing for him.
At the conclusion of taking evidence
lhe jury retired to consider what had
; been presented to them and return.
I ed shortly wltll the following verdict:
! "We find that Spencer Teed died Sunday 13th day of April 1924   nt   thc
Courtenay Hotel ln the City of Courtenny as a result of being shot with a
revolver   by   Alfred   Corbett  at  Cor-
bett's Cafe in the City of Courtenay
and we Hnd Alfred Corbett Guilty of
! the murder of Spencer Teed,     G. O.
Graham, F. Field ,J. H. Mclntyre, A.
Powers. G. O. Corlleld and T. Booth.
Jury.
The funeral of the late S. Teed who
was shot st Courtenay on Sunday last
at Corbett's Cafe was held on Wednesday afternoon at 8 p.m. The casket
bearing the remains was carried hy
pallbearers, representing tbe Orange
and Native Sons of Canada Lodges between lines by his fellow lodgo members from bis late home to coiner of
Cumberland Road and Lake Trail to
St . George's Presbyterian Church
nearby where a most impressive service was conducted by the Rev. W. T.
Beattie, iu the course of whose short
address he touched upon Ihe evils cf
the liquor traffic, attributing the
tragedy Indirectly to this source. Two
hymns were sung "What a friend wo
have lu Jesus" nnd Nearer my God to
Thee." with Frank Porter of Vancouver nt the organ. Organizations
represented at the funeral were tho
Courtenny Assembly Mo. 3. Native
Sons of Canada, Courtenay Orange
Lodge, Canadian Daughters' League
und True Blue Lodge ,whoso members
attended in a body.
The Native Sous of Canada, provided
three pallbearers, Percy Booth, fid.
Embleton and Wm. Iliiggurty; the
Orange Lodge provided three, Win.
McLellan, Wm. Berkley and Edward
Everett. From the church the cortege proceeded to Sandwlck Presbyterian Cemetery where the Orange Lodge
conducted the service In which the
Native Sons also paid tlielr last mark
ot respect, to Ihelr departed brother.
There wos a profusion of flowers attributed from each of thc Lodges, the
City and from many private sources.
FIRING THE LAST SHOT
The olllce stnIT of the Royal Bank
of Canada and their friends will give
a dance in the Ilo-llo Dance Hall on
Friday, May 16th In support of their
May Queen Candidate. Reserve the
date.     Particulars later.
Take a straight tip) Dont miss
(he Cumberland Baseball Club nance
and Prize Drawing May 1 SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
\J>
Cutting Down The Overhead
A. W. NEILL ARGUES FOR
THIS DISTRICT IN COMMONS
The present government spend* 17 per cent of its revenue on
salaries, as against 40 per cent spent by the Bowser admisitra-
tion.
London-England April-October 1924
THROUGH RAIL AND OCEAN
BOOKINGS
See U» For
FARES
SAILINGS, ETC.
E. \V. Bickle. Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
In a recent discuslon in the ouse
of Commons the Coniox Alberni member, A. W. Nell, delivered the following remarks in connection with the
coal question.
Mr. A. W. Neill (Coniniox-Alberni).
i heard the lion member for Cumberland (.Mr. Logan) say some time ago
that he did not want to hear anything
more about protection on coal, but he
seems to have a warm, heart for It
after all.
I hope this motion will not pass In
its present form, or that if it does
pass a very different interpretation
will be put on the term "national policy" than that which the lion member
lor North Toronto (Mr. Church) has
given It. Like other "national policies" of whicli we have henrd, it is
conceived only in the interests of one
section of Canada, and that is the
Bast. It is lhe old story again: East
is East and the West Is forgotten. It
Is a peculiar commentary upon the
widespread differences there are In
Canada and how difficult It is to evolve
a policy which shall be just to them
all, when we And the bon. member for
Cumberland saying that the mines In
his district are being shut down for
lack of more protection on coal, and
1 can say the sane thing of the mines
ii! my part of the country, but due to
(he fact that we have protection ou
coal. I have iu my hand a cutting
from a local newspaper. It Is a year
old, lint the point is the same:
Coniuiox mine No. 5 ceased operations on Saturday. This mine gave
employment to over three hundred
men and produced over one thousand
tons of coal per day. We understand
the reason given for the closing down
of this mine Is the depression in the
coal trade caused by the tremendous
importation of foreign fuel oil.
.And also, I might add, because our
market in tbe United tates is reduced
by the fact that there is a duty on
bituminous coal going into the United
States.
I might explain, as perhaps a good
many members of this House do not
appreciate lt, that there   are    three
classes of coal,    bituminous,    lignite
and anthracite, aud  we have tn the
United Slates tariff the only real sug-
| gestlon of reciprocity there is in ex-
I istence between the two countries, and
J that is, not a promise, not a. sugges-
1 lion, but an absolute feautre of the
i law, that when Canad aputs a tax, not
i on coal but on any one of these par-
I tloular classes of coal,    the    United
1 States retaliates by a similar tax on
that class of coal going into tbe Ulllt-
' ed States.     If Canada takes off or reduces that duty, automatically, without legislation, a  corresponding   reduction is mode in the United States
duty.     There Is no duty on anthracite coal coming into Canada.     There
is no duty on lignite coming into Canada, the duty being   taken   oil'   last
year in order   to   help   tlle   people
of Alberta to ship their coal into tbe
United  States  under this  reciprocity
LAMPS
ELECTRO-AUTOMATES
■ (AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS);
NO BATTERIES! - NO ACIDS!
55.00
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ...       -        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Do you get the fullest use of your telephone ? Of
course, you use it to call up a friend, or place an ordsr
with a tradesman, but do you always thinks of it wh»n
you need to do something personally? How many
times would the telephone save you time? If a business man, how much money would the telephone save
you? Many trips could be saved, if the telephone
were used instead.
The telephone gives direct and prompt communication with that personal touch which brings both
parties to a conversation close together. That is why
it has become one of the greatest factors of business
and social life.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
WILL   LAST   A   LIFE-TIME
Practical, Durable, Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Electro Automate Is an Electric Lamp made In France without a battery or refills, and ol a new conception. It ls a perfect
machine; the result of years of test ln the plants of the manufacturers In Switzerland and France :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces.     It is patented ln all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent magnet, based on new methods,
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the Induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, anil
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lamps ls very carefully carried out by
skilled Swiss clock and scientific Instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps are tight and dust-proof. They can be used
In all climates, Including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving a clear white light, without fear of the bulb burning out or the generator booming
warm.
All Electro Automate Lamps are guaranteed for six months, conditionally tbat they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
cost.    Lamps are provided with a pocket for extra bulbs.
This lamp is especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, automobillsts, dairymen, ln fact everybody.
They arc Indispensable on life-boats and rafts, where a light is
needed that will not be extinguished by wind or wave :: Every
mine should be provided with one or more of these lamps at Re
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or official
whose work takes blm ln and out of the mine at irregular Intervals. It ls the cheapest and best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate In their
engine room. It saves them from the annoyance and loss of
time occasioned by the unreliability of battery lamps when they
wish to locate trouble or find something in a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lamps because they are always standing
by ready and able to do their part In any and all kinds of
weather. They are hardy Utile fellows and will stand any
amount of knocking about, even to the bulbs, which are superior
to any others on the market:: Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps in preference to others, because they give a
never ending light and add less than a pound of weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and the snow or wet can
not short circuit them.
DIRECTIONS
The working oi Ibis self-generating lamp la very simple. Pull (he
lover completely and sharply with the fingers and let go, allowing
It to open fully In order to take another full stroke. Strokes
should be even and sharp for best results. This lamp Is the
only one of Its weight thnt will give a perfect light. The bearings of this lamp should be oiled about once a month.
SOLD LOCALLY BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
arrangement; bul there ls a duty, as
my hon. friend from Cumberland has
said, of 33 cents a ton ou bituminous
coal coming Into Canada to help the
coal mines of the Maritime Provinces.
The result ls that when we ship our
bituminous coal, and we mine a lot
of coal on Vancouver Island, to the
only large market w'e have, that is tho
United States, we are confronted with
this reciprocity duly of 53 ceuts a
ton. So If we could get free trade
in coal, the mines in British Columbia would be much assisted, the very
opposite condition to that presented
by ray hon. friend from Cumberland.
We are also in the peculiar position tliat we would be happy and satisfied if this government or parliament would give us either free trade
or protection—we do not care which
it is. If we hod protection against
fuel oil. then we would not mind the
53 cents a ton duty on coal. Hut if
they will not give us that then we are
out for free trade and taking off the
53 cents a ton on bituminous coal en.
taring Canada, because that wlll give
us a good market for our coal in the
United States. If this were done, we
would not have the condition I bave
depicted of our mines being idle for
three or four days a week.
1 would like while on this subject
to remind the government, because It
Is reminding them, they have often
been told It before, of the conditions In
connection with our Canadian government ships on the Paclllc ocean. Com-
mox coal, which Is situated In the district 1 represent, is absolutely the
best coal for steaming purposes that
can be got on the Pacific ocean. This
is no member's eulogy of bis own riding at all. I have under my hand
here the results of n drastic and long-
continued test made by the United
States government, which Is not likely to be sympathetic to alien conl, and
lhc result Is this: They find that the
Comox conl of which I am talking Is
thirty-six per cent better for steaming purposes than any other coal ou
the Pacific ocean. Now that ls the
decision arrived at by tbe United
States navy under very careful conditions . They had no axe to grind
in favor of one mine over another, and
after a drastic test they Bay that Comox coal for steaming purposes Is
thirty-six per cent better for steaming
purposes than any other coal on tho
Pacific Ocean I know when iho
British fleet was stationed at Esquimau, they used to keep quite a largo
fleet there, they invariably u*ed Comox steaming coal because they recognized Its superiority In that regard.
Vet what do we find? We find our
own Canadian government boats passing nil tliat mine on some trivial pro-
text of one kind or another. It is
too tar away they say. It means two
hours extra steaming for a boat that
is going to Australia. Two hours
would not make much difference on
a trip to Australia, surely, when the
coal is thirty-six per cent superior for
steaming purposes, 'lhese are some
of the. I was going to say childish, absurd reasons given. Another one is
that It is too dear, It is not too denr
for the Canadian Pacific Railway, it
Is not too denr for the Dollar Company, both very large shipping com-
cerns who are supposed to be very
good business men; but it Is too dear
apparently for our government ships
to buy our own coal, mined by Canadians, by Canadian machinery, It
ls a reproach, I think 1 might use almost a harsher word, but I will let it
go at that, to our government that
they do not patronize this coal.
I therefore hope, Mr. Speaker, that
If this resolution goes through in its
present form, the government in its
interpretation of it wlll take a somewhat broader and bigger view of tite
term "national policy" than 'was evidently intended by the hon. member
who introduced this motion.
TREK OF MINING MEN
Following tiie discovery of high
grade gold ore on the Onnnian river,
east of Lake Nipigon and close to the
lines of the Canadian National Railways, a trek of mining men lias occurred Into the new district and many
claims are being registered at Port
Arthur.
Unconlirined reports say an African
lion swallowed a flivver a few weeks
ago. He forgot to shut olf the engine, however, and shook to death In
lifteen minutes.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
(Night calls: 1.14X Courtenny
i
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
pro/npt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 1 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a %" valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
Deeds Speak Louder Than Words
The following is one ol' many unsolicited testimonials received:—
Gentlemen;—
Re Policy No. G572.
Your cheque for $521.00 was duly received last
week, and please accept my best thanks fur .same. 1
also have appreciated the very liberal addition tliat was
made to the face value of the policy.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) Walter Needham,
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
Waterloo, Ontario.
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemherton Bldg., Victoria, B. C. l'UUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY.  APRIL  19.  1921.
Cumberland's   First  Queen  of  the  May  Contest-
Help to make it a success—Boost Your Favorite
VICTORIA DAY
MAY 24, 1924
CUMBERLAND'S
PREMIER
VICTORIA DAY
MAY 24, 1924
EN OF THE MAY CONTEST
Under auspices of Cumberland General Hospital Ladies' Auxiliary
All Set -
They're
Off - - -
Bang! All Set! They're Off!
eleven  starters,  six  are  still
Out of
in  the
running,
Never before in the history of Cumberland lias a race attracted so much attention. All candidates are favorably
known throughout the district and all
the supporters are up in the bit to see
their candidate come in first.
Last week saw all the contestants running fairly equal and observers are
anxiously watching each week's standing as lhe race goes on.
Join in Uie crowd and get your share oi'
the thrills that await you—Every dime
makes the race more exciting.
iaa@H»Baav^:Fji.'.-¥#i?i3Haa^ja3Ma/eMBis/a
I    BOOST FOR CUMBERLAND'S
I
§ FIRST MAY QUEEN CONTEST
'aaiajEjaaHa'SJ^H^Jeisja/SMSHsiBia/a
NOMINATIONS CLOSED
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, SAW THE CLOSE OF NOMINATIONS FOR THE MAY
QUEEN CONTEST, WITH ELEVEN CANDIDATES NOMINATED.
Five of these candidates have withdrawn from the contest, leaving six still going
strong.    Pick your favorite and boost for her during the remainder of the contest.
Every week will see different places being taken by the contestants and every week
will bring new life into the race.     Get in and work for your favorite.
SATURDAY MIDNIGHT.MAY 17, 1921,  HAS BEEN SET AS THE CLOSING
DAY OF THE CONTEST.
No ballots can be received after this date.   Auditors will then count the ballots and
declare the winners.     The following week will be used in making preparations for
the dressing of the Queen and Maid of Honor.
CONTEST
CLOSES   MAY
17, 1924
CUMBERLAND'S
MAY QUEEN
CONTEST
CONTEST
CLOSES   MAY
17, 1924
CUMBERLAND'S
MAY QUEEN
CONTEST
Is Your A
Favorite |J
Leading ■
If not, why not get in and work for he;-
election ?
If you are satisfied with any ono of tho
candidates already nominated, "dig in"
and see that she secures enough votes
to put her "over the top."
Outside the satisfaction of seeing your
favorite crowned as May Queen, you
must remember that all the 'money
raised in this contest, after expenses
and prizes are paid goes toward extra
comforts for the patients at the hospital. This in itself should be incentive
enough to cause you to support a candidate wholeheartedly.
See Your Favorite Crowned.
I
IRST MAY QUEEN CONTEST I
BOOST FOR CUMBERLAND'S
i
•ffiMaiMarasii^iaisisEiaEiaiagraEjgHaijjj-gja
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Report and Accounts for the
year ended December 31,1923
FEBRUARY 14, 1924.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
1 beg to report that I have audited the accounts of the Board
of School Trustees, Cumberland, B.C.. for the year ended December
HI. 102:5.
1 append hereto a statement of Receipts and Expenditures
for the year 1928, together with the corresponding statement for
the Night School, duly certified.
There is a balance in hand at December .'il, 1923, of $3,738.33
on General Account and $107.:!■"> on Night School Account. I
have assumed, lor the purpose of the statements herewith, that
all accounts between the City and the Board were balancd up to
December ,'11, 1022.
It has been the custom, hitherto, for the banking transactions
of the Board to he conducted through the City General Account,
but this is now being remedied, and a spearate account opened,
through which all Ihe banking business of the Board of School
Trustees will, in the future, be transacted, as provided by the
Public Schools Act.
All outstanding accounts at December 31, 1923, as far as I
am aware, have been included in tho expenditures for 1923, with
the exception of a balance of $75.95, owing on a pianoforte, purchased for school use, in Ihe name of the principal. I understand
the teachers propose to discharge this liability.
In my opinion, the statement submitted herewith, sets forth
a true and correct statement of the treatment of the Board of
School Trustees for the year ended December 31, 1923, according
to the information and explanations given to me, and as shown by
the books and records.
Statement of Receipts and Expenditures for the year ended December 31, 1923
RECEIPTS
Real Property Tax Levy 11123 	
Poll Tax 	
Government Grunts: —
General    21,050.80
Special         350.00
Transportation          00.00
Liquor Profits I proportion!      631.17
Donations: —
Parent Teachers' Association   90.00
Hoy   Scouts     111.00
Girls' Club   3.00
Piano Account   ln0'00
Pictures Account   10.00
EXPENDITURES
ii.192.Ul 'Current Expenses:—
3,861.1
23,001.10
314.6U
Salaries
Teaching Staff
Janitor   	
Medical Officer
Secretary   	
Total  Salaries	
"cliool  Supplies  ...
Fuel    "''
Electric Lighting anil Water  "."
Fire   Insurance 	
Repairs, Maintenance anil General Expenses 	
Royston Transportation 	
Subscription lo School Trustees' Association und Convention   Expense   	
21,178.00
2,100.On
200.00
160.00
23,028.00
771.07
1,003.30
220 II
90.00
1,134.04
205.00
30.00
Improvements:—
New  Furniture      07H rl(i
Grounds     1,08260
Playground  Equipment       170.3s
Payments on Piano      IIS.In
Electric Wiring     305.00
27,187.25
2.4:17.54
Total  Expeditions  	
I December 31, 1023 Balance In hand
*3tl,8<W.H
20,684,70
3,738.35
tf.'l.WI.I:!
Night School Accounts
RECEIPTS EXPENDITURES
[ Government Grants
I Students' Fees 	
190.00  Teachers'  Remuneration
241.50  Janitor 	
Sundry Expenses 	
270.no
50.00
10.75
Total  Expenditures  	
December 31, 1923 Balance in hand
Signed on behalf of the Board:
Frank Porter, Auditor.
% 188.1(1
E. F.. BANKS, Chairman. Audited and found Correct:
A. McKINNON, Secretary.
330.75
107.35
*  188.10
FRANK PORTER. cjl
SATURDAY, APRIL  19.  1924.
1 HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
H                                                                            —■                                                                                                                        ^^ ~         e
|      yj News of Courtenay and Surrounding District a       j
Is-                                                                                                                                                               i                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            _ M
MM.lB'HKEilSISJiiB
MADDENED MAN KILLS
TWO; WOUNDS ANOTHER
(Continued From Page 1)
wus carried upstairs and laid on a bed
and further examination made by the
doctor and those assisting him. It
was found that a second bullet had
penetrated thc region of tbe heart.
Teed's shirt sleeve was then rolled
backhand on Ihe left arm was a wound
thut showed the bullet had passed
through the fleshy part of the lefl
arm just below the elbow. It was
evident thnt atler the Ilrst shot had
penetrated his lung. Teed, in an effort to protect himself had crossed
his arm over his left breast and in tliis
way received tbe bullet through  his road  between    the    two    constables  victims on .Monday afternoon. friend of Corbett.      It    is    surmised
arm   and  into  his  heart      He   was smoking with evident composure.     He :    Messrs. G. and C. Corbett. brothel's | that Corbett resented  Ihis  continued
slowly   sinking   nnd   his    wife    and was taken to the provincial jail where ' of tlio accused have arrived from Na- j action on the part of Teed .as noth-
dauguter were  notiiied of what hud he is now Incarcerated awaiting pre.  uaimo and Mr. Robert Squires of Vic-1 ing has appeared to show that Uiere
happened but before they arrived he liminary  hearing  on   Saturday  next,; torla,  uncle of Mrs. Corbett ls  also j was any other motive except Hint Teed
had passed away.. Hie 19th instant.     When Corbett left j here. had taken off his coat and presumahl
In the meantime the city police had til0 building after the    Blunting    he j    Spencer Teed  was born  in  Went-
been   telephoned   for  but  were '.not Probably hurried  tho pistol a short  worth    .Cumberland    County.    Nova
within  immediate reach.      Constable distance from  the  back door, for it  Scotia in 1S80 aud leaves besides his
Russel was out of town.     Constable wos rt«g UP bv Constable .Matthews. | widow, a. daughter, Miss Bella Teed i MANY WITNESSES ARE
was going to stop Corbett from lighting with his wife.
Matthews, of Cumberland, was notified and Immediately came down, accompanied by Sergeant Angeroian, of
tho Mounted Police who happened to
he in Cumberland at the time. They
went straight to the Corbett premise*
and arrested the man who had (lone
the shooting, who seemed not to tie
much disturbed, and walked along lh!
After the shooting Mrs. Corliett and ! of the B.C. Telephone Company's Stan', j
her helper Mrs. Simpson, ran for the i Courtenay, and a brother. David Leslie !
back door, screaming. They were | formerly a resident of Courtenay. but J
hurried Into Harold Boomer's car and  now of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
taken Immediately to Coniox Hospital |   s
where Mrs. Corbett who had been shot The tragedy of last Sunday brings
between the right breast and should- to a close a long series of unhappy
er, und In the right side, grew slowly   circumstances In the Corbett  house-
CALLED AT INQUEST
Furniture
Repairs and
Re-Upholstering
in all branches
Old furniture made like new.    No job too small or too
large.    First class work at reasonable prices.
Pictures framed, Furniture repaired, Re-upholstering
W. Emeric
MASONIC BLOCK, COURTENAY
P. 0. Box 2 Phone 177
weaker ns the hours passed, and at ,i
quarter to nine on Monday morning
all was over. Mrs. Simpson, though
grazed oil the shoulder Is not seriously hurt.
hold. In December 1922 when operating a tea room and confectionery in
thc Hawthorn building. Union Street,
Corbett suddenly decamped and was
away for some months when sudden-
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Try our 100 per cent Whole Wheat Bread, the only
physical culture loaf.
Always a nice seleetion of take* to ehoose from
which you know.
##<!>     First Clasa Certificate (Upper Grade) for
V     Bread    Making   guarantee*    the   quality.
X NOT HOW CHEAP, BUT HOW GOOD
#<§># The Holding-on-to Quality Shop.
f        The Courtenay Tea Room
LEADERS IN THE PIKET ELECTRIC
FISHING COMPETITION
SALMON COMPETITION
April 6, Harold Cliffe, age 14 14 lbs
TROUT COMPETITION
April 6, F. Dack 21bs, 12 oz.
j    Corbett appeared before Magistrate  ly ho turned up In Courtenay again
Hames on Monday charged with wll-; While ha was away Mrs. Corbett had
, lul murder but the hearing was  re-  embarked In thc restaurant and small
maiided  until  Saiurday  to give  him   grocery business opposite the Gaiety
! an opportunity to secure counsel. Theatre and was evidently making a
A coroner's jury comprising Messrs.  success of it when Corbett returned.
' G. 0, Graham, G.  T. Corliold, J. 11.   l'hey removed last autumn   to    the
| Maclntyre, P. Field, Augustlve Powers  premises occupied until last Sunday,
and T. Booth was called together and } where mainly through Mrs. Corbett's
viewed (lie premises where the shiot-   untiring  labors, a  comfortable  bual-
Ing occurred  and  the  bodies of the   iess had been built up.     She had a
,,..!  dean homey dining room and maijii
everybody welcome. She catered to
some extent to after theatre parties
ill her endeavor to succeed, this
meaning extremely lute hours on occasion. Her efforts were just crown
ed with success when this week a
tragedy changed ull. She was a member of Courtenny Assembly, No. '\
Canadian Daughters' Lengue and
took a very keen Interest In the u-
falrs of her lodge, by tho members
of which she wlll be greatly missed.
She is a native of London, Ont.
The late Mr. Teed was a well knowii
personage of Courtenay, and had only
last week received an appointment as
foreman of public works for thc city
of Courtenay. He was a member and
a prominent one, of Courtenay Orange
Lodge and also a member ol Cour'-
enay Assembly, No. 3. Nntlve Sons of
Canada.
It Is said that Sunday was not the
first time that Kir. Teed had Intervened in the Corbett quarrels, and that
up to a short time ago was a close
m w or
LA^DACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved. surveyta1
Crown lauds may be pre-empted bj
British subjects over IS years of ago,
mil by aliens on declaring Intention
'■ become British subjects, cuncil-
lonal upon residence, occupation,
md Imprev, ....-ui. for agricultural
purposes,
I'VI information concerning regu-
uUons regarding pre-emptions i>
in Bulletin >.*o. I, Land Series
Icli
low  :o fre-empt Land," copies of
in be obtained free of oharge
esslhg   the    Department   ot
,'ictorla. B.C., or to any Gov-
A sen i.
Is will be granted covering
ni suitable for agricultural
imposes, ami which is not timber
turn", i.e., currj Ing over 5.000 board
'e«t per acre west of the Coast Rang*
unl  S.unii  feet   per a en* east of  that
Applli
i  be  in
lions  tor  pre-emptions are
djiessed  to the  Land Com-
of the Land Recording Dl
Which  Die laud  applied foi
il, und are made on printed
pies of which ca,n be ob
•in ihe Land Commissioner
Pre-emptions must be occupied fo
ive years and Im pro V omenta mad*
u ■.mue oi $io per acre, including;
learlng und eii.tlvating at least Ave
ores, before » Crown Grant can b
■l fr
HEADQUARTERS FOR RADIO SETS AND PARTS
ALL BATTERIES KEPT IN STOCK
UP-TO-DATE STOCK OF FISHING TACKLE AND LINES TO
SATISFY   ALL   YOUR   REQUIREMENTS.
SEE  US  ABOUT  YOUR  ELECTRIC  WIRING,  RANGES  AND
PLATES FOR THE COMING SUMMER.
f
.1
<§><S><I>
<%>
ty i     Vnr more detailed information see
^1   ho    riiiiii'tin    "How    m    Pre-empt
Y : Land."
<^j PURCHASE
Applications are received for pur-
:huse uf vacant and unreserved
1 !n w ti la nds, nut being i Im berland,
i'or agricultural pui poses: minimum
mice of first-claBS (arable) landle $6
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
und Jli.ftO per acre, Further infor-
rnntion regarding purchase or lease
t Crown lands Is given ln Bulletin
No, Hi. Lund Series, "Purchase and
Lease ol Crowm Lands."
.Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
lumber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
inj be purchased or leased, the con-
aliioiiH including payment of
■eumpage,
HOMESITE LEASES
l nutii'veyed areas, not exceeding 20
teres cmy be leased as homesltes,
ondiHonal upon a dwelling being
•■<-. d in the Ilrst year, title being
• l-i.r i -li e afler residence and lin-
iro\!menl conditions are fulfilled
tin] land bas heeti surveyed.
1 ft
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
Joseph Orr was called, having beeu
a conipanoln of Teed on Sunday, He
would say that Teed had not been
drinking, at least he had had nothing from eight in the morning until
lhe time of the tragedy. Orr seemed
very uncertain about some of the
events of Sunday last.
Hulph White, a roomer at the Courlenay Hotel, told of being lu his
room 14, upstairs, at 1.46 when he
heard two shots, then a little later,
j three more In rapid succession.
COURTENAY.—An inquest, pre- '"'• Briggs told of his examination
sided over by the Coroner. Ur. T. 1*1 of Teed's body and the finding of the
llutters, was begun on Tuesday nighl I wounds and tbe bullets, evidently
to enquire into the death of Spencer j fr<"» " 32 calibre gun. There win a
Teed .who wns shot last Sunday after-1 wound In Teed's right breast. Hi
.noon. The jurors empanelled wer..-. j had followed the course of the bullet
J. II. Maclntyre, O. O. Graham, Tom!and found tliat It had penetrated thc
Uooth, Gus Powers, Fred Field and | lung, going right through and being
G. T. Cortleld. found under the skin at Teed's back.
.Mr. s. Lerov Cokelv submitted blue A Becond wound wils n"° through the
prints of the Interior of the premises jleft »rm- A "'"'« wou"« was '■> "' '
where the shooting occurred and then I n"ilon '"' U,e ,l"cx °r tllB »eart- ™'
retired.      Eric Barlow, clerk at the jl""1 ""'>' Pl6roed ""■' BeBn'     A bullet
Canadian   Bank  of    Commerce    was|nad been r°u,ld ln Teed's ""!l   	
called  and said  that he and Walt
T?ea
Wilh Ihe cream
g.        te« In!
m/oumili
;    Free Recipe Book—.Write thc Bor«
j den Co* LtiL, Vancouver.
Pearson had gone to the Corbett Itest-
aurant on Sunday to get their lunch.
They had been In there u short time
when they heard a quarrel going on
between the Corbetts. .Airs. Corbetl
had placed their order on dishes and
*vas on her way to the dining room
with the food when they heard n
crash as of broken dishes. Mrs. Corbett then came into the dining room
and said, "Well, hoys .you better go
over town and get your lunch." They
then gut up from the table and went
out. They had seen no shooting.
Walter Pearson was called and corroborated what Harlow hud said.
Harold Boomer, jitney driver who
had been in the restaurant when tho
shooting occurred told of the row
leading up to the fatality. Corbet;
and Mrs. Corbett had quarrelled about
the keys of the safe. He had asked
her for them and was refused. He
had after a time secured the key.,,
through the persuasion of himself
and Mrs. Simpson. Mra. Corbett had
handed the keys to him and he had
given them to Corbett. On his way
to the safe Corbett, In his auger had
struck the telephone desk with his
hand, breaking the desk. He had
followed Corbett to the safe and had
seen him open it. He then'drew
back a few feet and when Corbuti
stood up by the safe he kept his back
turned to Boomer for some time
Teed came in nnd went behind the
counter In the store where Corbett
was, and, taking off his coat, said to
Corbett that he was not going to
strike Mrs. Corbett while he was
there. Teed had come between Corbett and him (Boomer). Then there
were two flashes from the gun Corbett had in his hand. He would definitely say that Corbett had fired Uie
shots at Teed.     Teed then went out.
Edward Main waring wns put on tho
titand and told practically the same
story as he did on Sunday after the
shooting with the exception that he
said when the shots were fired he had
his head against Corbett's side as he
had ducked when he first saw the gun.
When he next saw Teed be was lo
the Courtenay Hotel lying on the
floor.
LEASES
l-'iir grazing   aud   industrial    pursues ureas not exceeding 640 acre*
may bo leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
t'nder the 0razing Act the Province) Is divided into grazing district*
ami the range administered under -i
Grazing Commissioner. Annua)
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
in established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers «nd travellers, up to ten
Mad,
Edwards and Orr
P.O. Box 62
Phone 17   m
AGENTS FOR
]     "Murray    Made"    Roofings,
|    Wallboord,    Wall Felt,   etc.
I WE SELL
I Lumber,    Doors,    Windows
! Shingles. Uth Glass, Hotbed
| Sash,  Portable Greenhouses,
1 Sanatllc, Gold  Seal  Congol-
! cum Rugs, Fir Veneer, Cor.-
{ tonwood, Hardwoods, Paints.
\ WhlteUid and Oils.
llilllllllltllliiilllilffllillllillllllll
BUILDING   MATERIALS   AND
WOOD-WORKING SHOP
Brick. Lime. Plaster, Cement, Sand
Gravel.
Courtenay, B.C.
AGENTS FOR
"Dnrretts"    Roofings,    Slatj-
aurfitced   Shingles,  elr.
WE MAKE
Windows, Frames. Doors,
Ilullt-lu Effects, Flower
Boxes, I.awn Swings, Store
and Office Fixtures.
Anything in wood,
l'hone 17 at our expense and
gel. our prices.
EASTER
^^
HAPPINESS
WE HAVE YOUR CAR READY FOR VOU
Corfield Motors, Limited
Phone 46
COURTENAY, B.C.
when the examination was made
There was no blood in the heart ami
none in the aorta.
Mr. O, W. Smith told of Teed's rushing in the hotel door while he and
H, Herd and another man were sitting there. Teed snid "I'm shot, get
a doctor." While Herd was phoning
for the doctor. Teed reeled against
a chair and staggered to the hall, on
his way saying "I'm done." Dr.
13riggs came to the hotel soon after
aud Teed was taken upstairs. He
could not speak after he fell, though
he tried. Ft, Herd corroborated this
statement. This was the last witness
on Tuesday night and the Inquest was
adjourned until 1.30 Wednesday afternoon.
Corbett was In the court and while
Mntnwarlng was giving his evidence
ns to Teed's actions, asked him (Main,
waring) if he had heard what Teed
had said to him (Corbett). Ho g»t
a negative reply. Mrs. Daisy Sarah
June Simpson, who had been a helper of .Mrs. Corliett at the restaurant
was the (Irst witness at the inquest,
but her answers were such thai Bhe
was excused. She had every appear-
ance of being completely unnerved by
thc incidents of Sunday lust in which
she wns lucky enough lo escape being shot.
The city hall where the Inquest was
held was crowded to the door. Uie
audience cramming right tip to the
jury's (able. .Air. William Squires,
fnther of the late .Mrs. Corliett. arrived on Tuesday from Everett, "Wash.
Two of Mrs. Corbett's brothers and nu
uncle are also here. Gerald Corbett, au adopted son. who lived with
Mrs. Corbett. in Courtenay for a long
time, is also here. Ceorge and
Charles Corbett of Nanaimo are here.
They are brothers ot the accused.
FULL COMMITTEES
APPOINTED FOR
FALL FAIR
COl'RTE.VAY,—A meeting of the directors of the Comox Agricultural Society was held on Tuesday night nt
their hall, the president. Mr. John
Crockett being in the chair. The following were alsp present: Mrs. Wallet
McPhee, W. Duncan. W. J. Cunn, A.
It. England, the Rev. J. w. Fllnton,
CJ. Edwards nnd the secretary.
On motion of Mr. Fllnton seconded
hy .Mr. Edwards, the minutes of the
last, directors meeting were read and
adopted.
It waa then decided to suspend the
(Continued ou  i'age Six)
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
W.M.MKIIIIiriKI 11,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT   CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenuo, Cumberland
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, II. ('.
Comfort   und   Homelike   service.
2ti  rooms, electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 16.
II. YVI'KS, Manager.
i^T.WHERRY
lAXINRMISTbTANNCR
Sets* hr pne, u,, „.
»»rfc—aasatl n r
be»aa.   au,
«2t Pandora Ave..
Victoria, Y c. - PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 19.  1921.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
®
ILfjigigifjiaigigigigigijaiaE^^
HIS HEARING RESTORED
The Invisible ear drum invented by
A. 0. Leonard, which is a manlaturo
megaphone, fitting inside the ear entirely out of sight, is restoring lhe
hearing of hundreds of people in New
York City. Mr. Leonard invented
this drum tx> relieve himself of deafness and head noises, and it does this
so successfully thnt no one could tell
he wns a deaf man. It is effective
when deafness Is caused by catnrrah
or by perforated or wholly destroyi d
natural drums. A request for information to
A. 0. LEONARD,
Suite 136, 70 Fifth Ave..
>'EW YORK CITY,
will  he given  prompt   reply,
1TI.I,   (OMJIIIIITEKS   APPOINTED
(Continued From I'mre .1)
i order  of  business   in   order  to  hear
; Mr. H. V. Collins ,who attended for
the purpose of putting a proposal be-
1 fore the directors concerning the use
of the hall by the Hoy Scouts, and the
grounds for training quarters. Mr.
Collins, who is the secretary of the
First Courtenay Troop, B. P. Scouts,
outlined  some  of  the  useful  service
• Mint  the scouts  would  he  willing  to
perform for the accommodation suggested.      After  a good  deal of dls-
cusion a motion put hy Mr. Duncan
and supported by Mr. England to the
following effect,  was carried:   "Thai
I a committee be appointed to draw up
an agreement with a view to granting
i the request of Mr. Collins for the use
I of the ball and grounds by the Boy
i Scouts   and   that   the   agreement   be
| submitted to the full Board for rati-
i ticatlon.     On motion of Mr. Fllnton.
j seconded by Mr. England, the following committee was appointed: Messrs
Duncan, Edwards and Thomas,    the
secretary,
A letter from the local postmaster
Mr. R, II. Perrolt, with a proposal
from the district superintendent of
postal service at Vancouver to place
n postal exhibit during the fall fair,
was favorably received. It was decided lo ascertain what space would
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
BfigKliaHlSISfBIEKIEIHSJE&'e^^
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
Made    from     Pure    Jersey
Cream.
IF IT'S JAM
INSIST ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made trom fresh fruit ln the
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
ustd In its manufacture.
IF IT'S POTATOES
DEMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Grown in the District and
graded according to Govt,
regulations. "Look for the
tag on the bag."
IF ITS EGGS
OCRS Kt\\t
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled and graded in accordance with the New Egg
Act.
OUR MILK DEPARTMENT DELIVERS MILK AND CREAM DAILY
he required and to discuss the matter
further at a later meeting.
Ou motion of Mr. Fllnton, seconded by the secretary, it was decided io
continue membership with the B. C.
Fairs Asociatlon for the present year
i    After much discussion and the rescinding of n  contrary resolution   it
was decided that the fall fair he held
I on the days  proposed  by  the    B. C.
j Fairs Association, September 25 and
120.
1 On motion of .Mr. Fllnton .seconded
i hy Mr. Tribe, the secretary's action
With regard to a communication front
I the Layritz Nurseries concerning tlle
! "Layritz" cup was endorsed.
A letter from tiie Live Stock blanch
of the Dominion Department of Agriculture re "Get a Bull' competition
i wns then discussed. The outcome was
that a motion of Mr. Fllnton, seconded by Mr. England, the following committee was appointed: The president
and Messrs Duncan, Hurford and Halliday.
Committees for the fall fair were
(hen appointed as follows:
Cattle—Messrs Rex. J.YV. Fllnton, J
Prltchard,  G.   Bigelow,  J.   McKenzie,
| W. Hunter and A. B. England.
Horses—Messrs A. B. Dundas. .1. II.
Parkin, F. G. Llddle and Wm. Wain.
Sheep and Hogs—Messrs G. II. Bates
Ted Williamson. T. D. Smith and H
M. Halliday.
Poultry—Messrs W. J. Gunn. M. S.
Stephens and R. E. Ault.
Hall- .Mesdames Brown. W. Grieve,
.1. Grieve. J. H. Parkin. Herbert Smith,
nnd Messrs \V. A. Riglcr nnd Arthur
Stewart.
Printing—Messrs Win. Wain, 11.
Herd nnd E. F. Thomas.
The flower show committees report,
the rules and classes as drawn up
with some completing details .was approved on motion of Mr. Fllnton, seconded hy Mr. England.
The work of the committee nnd subcommittee In connection with the complete revision of the fall fair prize
list was then commenced. Class "A'
came In for a great deal of criticism
owing to Ihe elimination of the Hoi-
stein section. A good deal or lime
«ns spent discussing this matter
without any satisfactory result. During the discussion members led, leaving the meeting without a quorum nnd
consequently no further business
could he trnnsncled.
Mr. Tribe brought up the question
of raising a loan for the purpose of
consolidating tho Association's indebtedness and outlined a plan for th"
purpose.
The meeting then adjourned tn
slant! adjourned until called hy the
president.
m
Gel lhe habit. Call at Sparks Co.,
Courtenay, for your battery, gasoline
hnd oil service.
WHICH SHALL IT BE
A MOTOR CAR OR A HOME?
.M)«cm PrcMles
.. _ 'Oeu.BMMylMMM
Kmp rtm KrwCtau, Ctaw and Healthy.
Write for Frac Ere Care Book.
BvtnCriltaM<TUM«CMltUoS«ei.tticao»
Alter all, which will live the longer
in the memory of the children? We
do not presume to dictate to you your
choice in anything, hut homes are
the foundation of n country and to own
one means an investment, a satisfac
tion, a aal'e guard for the fuluie gen-
| oration.
I Start today! Get a few thousand
: feet of lumber, even if it is only a
loxl2 ft and only one room; be your
own landlord and buy only your light
and water which will help to build
up your city.
Think ir. over. dome and see us
about the plans and details. Our
advice is free our estimates are frea,
and if our price is right then buy from
us. We are the people to buy from
because we known you are sure to
oe satisfied. Therefore see us about
any Kind of building material. Phono
at our expense.
We an Edwards and Orr, Court-
enay, practical meu selling building
material at the manufactures price.
TWO ASSOCIATIONS
WORK HAND IN HANI)
COURTENAY,—The directors of tho
Comox Valley Fruit Growers' Association waited on the directors of the
Coniox Creamery on Monday night
last to talk over the disposition of the
[small fruit crop this year. The subject was approached from all angles,
prospects for a cannery or winery, or
both being fully discussed.     The inan-
l ufaeture of loganberry wine was gone
into. The directors of both associations are working hand In hand and
exercising  the  greatest  co-operation.
, It wns finally decided that the cream-
crate fruit and jam berries and that,
cry   will  handle  this  year's  crop of
' final arrangements will be announced
in a short time.
Get the habit. Call at Sparks Co.,
Courtenay, for your battery, gasoline
and  oil service.
CHEVROLET
THE    OUTSTANDING    VALUE    OF     1924
The CHEVROLET, with it's oversize rear entl, and brake surface, valve-in-heacl
motor, unequalled for power and economy of operation, together with it's well known
reliability and fine appearance, is easily the outstanding, small car value for the year
CALL AND HAVE A DEMONSTRATION
BLUNT and EWART, Ltd.
PHONE fil
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
PHONE 61
Young Man!
We have just received a large shipment of the latest
styles in Men's and Boys'
CAPS
and
TROUSERS
both Tweed and Flannel.
It will pay you to give us a visit
McLEOD'S STORE
TELEPHONE 41
US
COURTENAY
REGULAR MEETING OF
FIRE DEPARTMENT
COURTENAY,—A meeting   nf   tho
Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department
wus held nn Monday night at the city
hall, Ihere being present Chief Piket,
Deputy Chief  F.   Dack, Secretary  L.
Cleland, William Cuoke. William Shilcock, J. Thomson and John Stevenson,
The chief discussion centred ou the
I acquisition of new equipment and it
j was decided to secure additional ladders,   respirators   and   belts .   The
members of the  brigade also talked
j over the  pipe  line across  the  river
j and were strongly opposed to the continued use of the hose on the brlge
as a water main.
Get the habit. Call at Sparks Co.,
Courtenay. for your battery, gasoline
and oil service.
CHORAL SOCIETIES
HAD REHEARSAL
FOR
Good  Meals
AND    BRIGHT    ROOMS
try th*
Island Rooms and Dining
Parlors
COURTENAY, B.C.
COl'ItTEXAY— Combined choirs of
Cumberland   and   Courtenay   Choral
Societies  had  a  very  successful  rehearsal in the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, on Monday night .   There were
'■ sixty  members  of  the  two  societies
present and  Ihey showed  that great
•tig I progress had been made in prepara-
■*-*' j Hon for the high class entertainment
I to he presented on  May 9th.      The
most umbitlous   program  ever  rendered in the district is being prepared.
It    includes    "Hiawatha's    Weddlug
Feast"  hy  Coleridge  Taylor.        Tbe
tenor solo  in   this    work    "Ouaway
S Awake," which is considered one of
I the  greatest  written,  will   be  taken
1 hy an eminent soloist from Victoria.
This fact alone shows bow earnest the
choirs are to present nothing but tlle
highest class of concert.     .Numerous
part songs  hy other composers  will
comprise the other part of the program which wlll be Interspersed with
solos by Ilrst class singers.
The combined choirs are studying
this program under the directorship
of Mr. 0. W. Slllence and every member has made some sacrifice In order
that tliis entertainment may be one
long to he remembered in the Valley.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS.   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143.
P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
ENLARGING PREMISES
CAMPBELL RIVER,—Mr, Oscar
Thulin. the proprietor of the Campbell
River Garage, is making extensive alterations and enlarging his premises.
i When finished, ihls will bo one of lhe
most up-to-the-minute garages north
of Victoria.     A complete line of partB
' and accessories Is kept In stock and
Mr. Thulin    has    also   secured    the
' agency I'or the Chevrolet and  Dod^e
j cars for this district .
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
i g      •~rrrJ | Union Bay Rosd f
SATURDAY, APRIL 19,  1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
The Mercantile Store Co
G. H. WYCHERLEY
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
To help the funds of the May Queen Contest, on Thursday and Saturday, April 17th and 19th, we will give you
ONE 10c. TICKET to vote for your favorite candidate, on every #2 cash purchase of Merchandise, with the
exception of Groceries. HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY to buy a Suit of Clothes, a pair of Shoes, Ladies'
Dress or Coat, or  Staple Goods and HELP YOUR CANDIDATE TO BECOME   QUEEN OF  MAY
WE   HAVE   JUST   RECEIVED   A   LARGE   SHIPMENT   OF   GENT'S   FURNISHINGS,    LADIES'
Wear, Boots and Shoes at remarkable low prices.     We pass these bargains on to you.   There is no old
soiled stock offered, but all new, just in from the Eastern Factories
Department 1-Groceries--J. McLennan in Charge    1    Dept. 4--Ladies' Wear-Miss A. Watson in Charge
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS,
BREAKFAST FOODS
Kollog's Corn Flakes OE/,
2 tor m\lOL
Kellog's Uran Flakes Oft/«
2 for tUUL
Puffed Wheat
2 for	
Puffed Rice
2 for 	
Shreaded Wheat
2 for	
35c
35c
35c
UP TO AND INCLUDING
TEAS & COFFEES
Alercantile's IJest Tea C(\„
(A Dandy)  per lb  OUC
:i lbs. for  tDl.YU
Itosedale Tea fiC«
Per lb OOC
3   lbs.   for   «d1.0U
90c
SATURDAY  APRIL  19.
CHEESE
Canadian Cheese
Per  lb	
Kraft Swiss
Per  lb	
CEREALS
Braid's Best Tea
Pur lb	
Lima Beans
Per lb	
Iluyo Beans
I lbs. for 	
Cream of Wheat OKn
Per Package  mtiOKr
Homan Meal V\n
Per Package  ODC
TTlson's Health Bran OA^»
2 lbs   Malkin's Best Coffee,
1   Percolator (J J  A C
for
No. 1  fresh ground Coffee
ground \
Per lb.
ground while you wait .1 jr.,
Sjinnll White Beans
3 lbs. for 	
Green   Peas
3 los. for	
Split Pens
3  lbs.  for  	
Lentils
Per lb	
Per Package
lbs. for
$1.20
Brown  &   Poison's
Semolia. 2 lbs for
30c
60c
10c
25c
25c
25c
25c
15c
35c
Dept. 2--Boots&Shoes«G.H. Wycherley in Charge
HERE ARE SOME KNOCKOUTS IN WORK BOOTS
Chriestle's Loggers Shoes (PI A  rn
Per pair  «D14»OU
All Loggers' Moves In Stoek.
Ladies' Sport Oxfords, low heel, 2 C*A  r/\
tone. Per pair  Wrr.DU
.Men's  Black  and  Brown   Shoes,   plain   toes,
"Hydro City'' (PQ f»A
Per   pair    <PO.DU
Men's Black and Brown Work Shoes, with toe
cap "Hydro City" tj*A /JfJ
Per  pair tp'Jr.OO
Men's Fine Dress Shoes, iiilllack
and Brown.     Per pnlr 	
$4.85
A smart Oxford for Dressy Ocea- (P 1 QP
slons.      Per pair  t&'xat/O
Astoria Oxfords and Leckie Oxfords (PQ If A
Per pair  «DO.OU
Ladies One-Strap Shoes, Cubln and (P/J PA
Baby Louis Heels. Per pair  JDO.DU
Boys' Strong Brown School Shoes (PQ CA
11 to 1.1U.. Per pair ..'. «5«J.OU
The same, in sizes 1 to a>/2 (Pi  (\~
Per  pair   tD^.ilO
A Fine School Shoe, sturdy and       Ot) n~
strong Price per pair up from
A FULL RANGE OF HEWETSON'S SHOES FOR BABIES & SMALL CHILDREN
Dept. 3-Gent's Furnishings--F. Telford in Charge
THIS DEPARTMENT IS RUNNING OVER WITH SNAPPY BARGAINS FOR MEN
WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THE "MAS" CORSETS FOR PARTICULAR
LADIES. THEY ARE THS LAST WORD IN CORSETS—STRONG, LIGHT AND
COMFORTABLE. WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED FROM A TORONTO FACTORY
SOME BEAUTIFUL VOILES AND SILK WAISTS. THEY ARE TOO PRETTY TO
DESCRIBE.     CALL AND SEE THEM.
Ladies' Trimmed and Untrimm.ed Hats
(MRS. KENNEDY IN CHARGE)
OUR STOCK OF HATS IS AT ITS BEST THIS WEEK. LOOK THEM OVER AT
ONCE BEFORE THE BEST GO. WE RECEIVED A SHIPMENT DIRECT FROM
TORONTO SATURDAY NIGHT OF THE LATEST   MODELS   NEVER   SHOWN
IN THE WEST.
Ladies' Silk Dresses, New Suits and Sport Coats
(MRS. GORDON IN CHARGE)
WE INVITE YOU TO COME AND SEE OUR  LATEST  ARRIVALS   IN   SPORT
COATS—YES, BUT YOU MUST COME SOON.   WE OPENED A PARCEL THAT
CAME OFF THE SATURDAY NIGHT TRAIN, AND BEFORE EIGHT O'CLOCK
WE HAD SOLD NINE OF THEM.    OUR LADIES' SUITS ARE THE TALK OF
THE CITY.
SILK DRESSES—WE HAVE A NEW DELIVERY AND THEY, TOO, ARE GOING LIKE RIPE CHERRIES.
THESE GOODS HAVE THE HALL MARK OF STYLE AND QUALITY AND ARE
MODERATELY PRICED
Dept. 5-Dry Goods-Miss Watson in Charge
LADIES! WE HAVE A FINE ASSORTMENT OF DRESS GOODS, IN RATINES,
WORSTED VOILES, MULLS, PRINTS AND GINGHAMS. TO ENABLE YOU TO
MAKE UP YOUR OWN DRESSES, WE HAVE ON HAND A LARGE STOCK OF
BUTTERICK PATTERNS. CRETONES, NIPIGON DRAPERY AND COTTON
CREPES—ALL NEWEST DESIGNS
Dept. 6--Hardware and House Furnishings
Wilton and Axmlulsler Hugs, any size.
Club Bags (PO OE:
Up from tDO.OO
$2.95
Men's Brown Tweed
Pants, A surprise Package. Per pair, only $1.95
Men's Grey Tweed Pants
Never before at this
price. Pair   $2.25
Men's Black Denim Overalls, great value, Pr $1.50
Men's Black Overall
Pants, Pair $2.00
Blue Bib Overalls, per
pair  $2.00
Men's 'Master Mechanic'
Black 9-oz. Denim, per
pair  $2.76
Men's Grey Mottle Pants
extra strong, pair S3.75
Master Mechanic. Khi'.ki
Combination Overall
Special for "Car" work.
Per suit   $4.i)0
"Master Mechanic" Bin:
Drill Shirts   $2.5(1
"Master Mechanic" Blue
Bib Overalls   $3.00
Men's Heavy Khaki Drill
Pants, per pair ... $2.00
Men's "Casey Jones'
Gloves. Per pair .... $1.00
Men's "Lucas" Hog Skn
Gloves, per pair .... $1.25
"Lucas" Horse Skin
Gloves, per pair .... $1.75
Special—Grey Flannelette Shirt, only .... $1.75
Latest in Gent's Smart
Summer Caps $1, $1.50
and up to   $2.50
Men's New Season'.;
Dress Shirt $2.00, $2.50
and $3.50
Gent's Summer Socks in
Black, Brown, Sand and
Grey, per pair 45c.
SEE OUR 'LANKY BILL' TIES, A REAL NOVELTY IN NARROW NECK WEAR
Rugs
Each   from
Linoleum hy thc Yard and Linoleum Hugs
All Wool Mattresses (PI j   FA
Yours  for     •Dll.uU
Suit Cases
I'p from ....
$2.75
ORDERS!
OUR MR. W. GORDON WILL CALL ONADnrDQI
YOU AT ANY TIME   AM)   (JIVE   YOUV-'lxL/JllwI
EXPERT ADVICE ON GROCERIES AND  GENERAL  MERCHANDISE;
EXPLAIN TO YOU OUR CREDIT SYSTEM
ALSO
ERNEST McDONALD AND WILFRED COLLING WILL RUSH YOUR ORDERS
TO YOU WITHOUT DELAY.     IF YOL CANNOT  CALL,  TELEPHONE   YOUR
ORDERS IN TO US.     THEY WILL RECEIVE   CAREFUL   ATTENTION
P.S.—DON'T FORGET THAT THIS IS THE CHILDREN'S STORE.
We have a new and splendid line of (PI   /jr Boys' Stralghl Pants (PI   ("A
lis, from  «51.00 Per  tinlr   . wJL.Uv
Children's Coveralls
Tho "Frolic" Suit
Each at '	
$1.35
Per  pair   	
Boy Scout Shirts
Bach      	
$1.95
Pants
I'll  from
$1.25
The Mercantile Store Co.
"The General Store With a General Purpose"
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
i
«i«RMm=,'i PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, APRIL 19. 1921.
You need not
hide skin
defects —now
Millions knozv this simple way to avoid them—to keep skin lovely, youthful
Do not make thc mistake nf
attempting to cover or hide skin
defects, It can never succeed.
Am! there is a better way—which
millions know:
This simple method to avoid
them—to keep the youthful radiance and clearness of schoolgirl
complexion.
For a week do this
Cleanse ihe skin regular!;
Made in Canada
say, to kc
plexi
But
ii lovely
I hor
t, youthful.
i  cleansing
skin.
My   with
i night be-
ie  creamy,
,.!   the
msc again.
try—apply a
rhat i> all,
not injured
nd and sun,
The .simple, correct way
Vuii cannot fin I a more eftec-
livt beauty treatment. Because
Palmolive Soap is blended of rare
palm and olive oils—famous for
mild but thorough cleansing
qualities since ihe days of Cleopatra. Aud it is inexpensive. En-
joy it fur the bath also.
Bul be sure you yet Palmolive
—which is never .^old unwrapped.
All dealers have it. Get some and
follow this simple method for
one week. Results will delight
you, even in tbat short time.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF
CANADA, LIMITED
Winnipeg Toronto Montreal
Palm and olive oils—nothing else—givt
Nature's green color to Palmolive soap.
KTSMSSJOI
Why lo*d Predominates
De You Know That—
theFordcrankshaltis machined
accurately loone thousandth pun
of an inch—
the Ford front axle is mnde to
withstand shocks and strains ton
times greater than are ever met
in ordinary usage—
the Ford car is composed of four
complete units: Power Plant-
Front Running Gear—Rear Running Gear—Frame-
only five movements c! hand
and feet are required to accomplish the shift from neutral to
high on a Ford car as against 15
on a selective gear shift car —
there is no possibility of failure
to accomplish gear shift in thc
Ford car. There is no chance
of clashing gears in the Ford
transmission —
15.000 operations are performed in the building of each
Ford chassis—
the entire building of a Ford
closed body requires 3S. hours
and 15 minutes during which
time the body passes through
the hands of 249 skilled body-
huilders, trimmers and finishers.
See Any Authorized Ford Dealer
CARS   ■   TRUCKS   <   TRACTORS cf-3jc
: SKEleHSIc^^
I
PRA YER and OPTIMISM
I!
How Much
Have You
Lost?
By Not Using Triplicate Sales Books
NO ONE LIKES TO ADMIT THAT UK LOSES, Yet serious losses that were unsuspected
have been discovered by users of our Triplicate Sales Books. When you fail to insure
against the loss of original entries, and time needlessly spent in checking, YOU LOSE.
OUR O.K. TRIPLICATE BOOK insures every original entry be retaining a full copy in a
bound book.     If a sales check is missing a full and complete copy is found in the bound
book.     By supplying such information alone O.K. Triplicate Books save thousands of
dollars every year for their many users.
ORDERS MAY BE PLACED WITH OUR AUENT WHO WILL BE PLEASED TO CALL
The Cumberland Islander
PHONE 35
P.O. BOX ISO
BSEN said "A thousand words will not leave so
deep an impresion as one deed." The Good Book
■tells us that "Prayer without Deeds availeth r.oth-
I jrg\" Is there any practical result in praying at nij-ht
1 and then going to sleep, satisfied, and leave the rest to
1 God? Pray in the morning principally for health and
P strength to do things, then go and do them. There is
i no better part of Canada than the West. There is op-
| portunity for all who have the power and inclination
1 to work. Every branch of business endeavor may be
1 developed. Re convinced of the existence of oppor-
I tunitics, then pray for health and strength to take ad-
I vantage of them. Don't lay clown on the job—follow
I up your prayer and optimism with real hard work, and
1      practical benefit must result.
1
BANK REPORT SHOWS FAIR
BUSINESS IN ALL PROVINCES
With tho winter almost al an end. tho strike, ami it is hard to predtct
business in the Dominion continues to j what the outcome will ho. In Ihe
show little change worthy of note, meantime, production is going on
In llrltish Columbia, the coast section steadily and buying power is being
Is  said  to  be  comparatively  active, given to the workers.
' tbe interior dull, and the lumber in-!
; dustr,« throughout the Province doing I
a good business.     The  Prairie  Pro- j
' vincen have bought more goods this
season that last in all lines; they are'
now getting to a time of yeur when |
new crop prospects will be tbe controlling factor in trade. Ontario'
liuda manufacturing and wholesale
business very uneven. Western orders I tne American Market, where a good
better than in  1923, but  the Eastern   demand is in evidence.     The outlook
' section of Canada hard to sell goods |B promising. The market for Cam)
to. The same applies to Quebec, in j products bus been rather inactive
the Maritime Provinces, more favor-  during the  past.-month, but  potatoes
I Ate to in i hi weather, logging operations were held up for some time,
but later heavy falls of snow en-
abled operators to increase their activity, and tho uet result has been
an exceptionally heavy cut In New
Brunswick, The English market for
lumber Is dull and it is expected that
most of the cut will be absorbed by
able conditions In the lumber, flshtug
and coal and steel industries have not
yet exerted an influence to stimulate
general business which continues to
be quiet.
In the East, collections    in    many
cases are not being well met.     From
Quebec west, they can be considered
fair, current bills being comparatively
well  paid  in   the  Prairie   Provinces.
To sum   up   .buying   throughout   the   Ince;
country has  been for immediate, re- J met.
quirements only, and credits have be^n I
extended with some care, so that, although   general   sales   are  not  large
and business  cannot be called prosperous, the situation has not tbe weak
features of recent years.
are llnding a ready market tn Cuba
at fair prices.
Recent advances in Ilsh prices have
not compensated for the low prices
obtained last season, and unless there
are indications of an exceptionally
strung market in the future, it is
probable thai the fishing fleet will be
reduced in  number still further.
Collections in tbe Maritime Prov-
ntinue to be only fairly well
Quebec
Maritime Provinces
Trade in general ha.> been some-
what : < V-. due to the sotbj fe re
ceived earlier by the miners' strike
in Cape Breton, and unfavorable lumbering weather. Both theso conditions have improved, and the outlook
for the spring months is encouraging.
The coal miners have been back at
work for some time, but have indicated that they are dissatisfied with
the wage   agreement    which   settled
P.P.HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  • ■  B. C.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.X.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
flOfl B.C. Permanent Loan Hl.lp.
1MI0NK 2S1«      VICTORIA, IU.
Agricultural conditions arc practically unchanged. Tbe demand for
hay has fallen off somewhat, but oats
bave been a little stronger. Business
in the interior of the province is being hampered by the breaking up ot
Ihe country roads. —
Conditions in the manufacturing industry are uneven. Many plants are
quiet. Orders have not yet come In
freely enough to warrant a feeling of
safety. This is believed to be a temporary condition and increased activity is looked for towards the opening
of navigation.
Wholesale business is quiet. He-
tail buying is of the hand-to-mouth
variety which characterizes tbe rest
I of the country, but in common with
, other sections of the Dominion, some
( optimism Is noted regarding the
, spring trade.
1 Collections are reported to be fair,
but some districts are making a poor
showing.
Ontario
! Heavy falls of snow benefitted lbs
I areas sown to fall wheat, but storms
| to some extent interfered with Ium-
I beriug, and this season's cut is likely
! to be smaller than was expected. Peed
i is plentiful on Ihe farms, and many
farmers, instead of fattening cattle
for sale, are turning their attention to
I milch cows .apparently seeing more
: profit in this end of the business.
i    Manufacturing industries as a whole
are probably In a better position that
they were a year ago, but very few are
running at full capacity, and spring
orders are slow in coming in. Dullness in the boot nud shoe, woolen and
agricultural implement industries i:;
offset by increased activity In the
automobile Industry, and improvement
in cotton lines, dour, paper and steel.
Wholesale business has been quiet
for tho past month .buying being for
immediate needs only. With many
shelves cleared by midwinter "sale.-",
retail buying iu many Hues of goods
may be expected to improve in Ihe
Spring.
Collections are still unsatisfactory,
and, all through tho Province, it ts
reported that renewals are Ihe order
in most cases. ,
Prairie Provinces
lu the WbBt, there is evidence of
brighter business prospects, Bank
clearings in every case show au increase over last year and wholesale
and retail business is better than It
was in 1023, Thi: past winter has
seen heavy snowfalls. The surface
ground has been In a favorable condition to absorb much-needed moisture
and with an early spring in prospect,
farmers should soon he on the laud.
The pasl. season's wheat crop bas
placed farmers in an improved position, but the continued low price will
havo the effect of keeping before them
the advisability of diversifying their
products as opportunity offers, Greater in teres! is being shown In dairy
stock, and this should result in a
gradual Increase of such fodder crops
as clover, alfalfa and corn Tho Increase in duty from 30 cents to 42
cents a bushel on wheat going to i!i
United States'ls viewed wilh equanimity, since it is believed that the old
rate was effectual in keeping out all
wheat except the quantity absolutely
necessary lo tbe linited State.; milling Industry.
Hills are operating
chiefly for export,
requirements will
substantially exceed those of last
year. Collections iu tho city districts
are improving, current bills being
•quilt' well met, but the amount of old
outstandings being reduced Is disappearing. Business failures show n
, marked decline over 1923,
llrltish Columbia
Genu rat business   on    the    Pacifl •
Coasl  may be said to have been fa r
, in   February   and  to have  improved
1 during March      Collections are slow
! in tho interior of the province, but arc
1 good near the coast.     Hank clearings
arc  increasing and  retailers aro optimistic   regarding   the   spring   trade.
The demand  for  lumber has  been
1 below expectations, and Japanese and
Australian   demand   has    fallen    off
somewhat    during     February     and
March, the California market also having been less active since the middle
of February. Water borne trade with
eastern ports provided the best business during February, wilh a promise
'of continuance through  March.    The
United  Kingdom continues  lo absorb
a substantial amounl of   clears   and
long timbers. Recently ocean Freight
, rates  to  the  Atlantic  Coast   via   tho
Panama   Canal,   afler   heing  appreci
ably lower than rail rates, advanced,
and  the  course of shipments  has a
tendency to change.     This increase
. has   been  an   adverse   factor   in   the
lumber trade.     While general reports
on the lumber industry do not seem
particularly optimlsitc,  all  the  mills
are busy and many of them are work*
ing two shifts.
Small catches of halibut, duo to bad
weather, bave not given the fisherman
much profit, in spite of steady prices.
Tbe herring catch has been satisfactory and the salmon market, wilh the
exception of Sockeye, has Improved,
although a substantial part of lhe
1023  pack remains  unsold,
Western   flour
at   full  capacity,
and   their grain
WHY OPERATE?
for APPENDICITIS. GALLSTONES, stomach and liver
troubles, when IIEI'ATOLA (Ious
Ihe work without pain and no
risk of your life nor loss of lime.
Contains no poison. Not sold
by druggists.
Mra. Geo. S. Almas,
Sole Manufacturer.
230 4th Ave. S„ Saskatoon, Sask.
Price ?6.50.       Phone 4855.
Pracel  post 25c.  extra.
i
}^MSMS!SMmiSiSMmiaWMSSMSBSlB
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
1>E>"NST
Willard Block
Phone 116 Cumberland
Res. Phone 70L Courtenay
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastry
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired palates and awaken sleepy appetites,
Fresh every day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Doughnuts
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Our Cream Cakes and Rolls are Delicious.
Hot Pics
Once you try them you always prefer them.
Hot X Buns
Place your order now
and don't be disappointed.
s SATURDAY, APRIL 19,  1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE NINE
1
of
Don't Forget the Big Event!
Cumberland Baseball Dance and Prize Drawing, May 2nd
Plump's Full o' Pep Four
ILO-ILO HALL
BUY YOUR PRIZE DRAWING TICKETS AT THE DANCE 25 CENTS EACH.
ISIEIHiSHiS
$1.25 per couple
RANGERS DEFEAT
THEMSELVES IN
ALLAN SEMI-FINAL
If ever a team won a game by luok
It was (he Soath K:id Juniors of Nanaimo when they defeated lhc Cumberland Rangers In lhe 0.13. Allan
semi-final last Saturday by tbe score
of 3-2.
At no stage of tho game could It ho
snid that the Nanaimo team was the
better of the two and tho three goals
that they secured were through errors
on the part of the Hanger full backs.
The repoit of tbe game In tbe Nanaimo press is not absolutely correct as it s atos that the three goals
scored hy the South-End team came
from players on that team. This Is
not Ihe ease as all three goals were
scored by Hanger players who wero
at fault ill their clearing, and a proper score would have been 2-0 ln favor
of the Devon boys. However, tlio
local fans although somewhat disappointed in tho result, were treated to
i one of tbe best games of Junior football tbat haa ever been seen in the
City for some time and was oven better than the last mix between th.*
two teams when the Rangers won by
3 goals to 1.
Promptly nt 4.30 Davo Wilson started Hie two teams oil' and Inside of f>
minutes tbe Ilrst goal was registered
. for Nanaimo  when   Auublnvole mis-
' kicked a pass from the left wing and
placed the ball ln the not completely
out of Walker's reach.     Had he left
i lt go Walker would have saved as be
' wns waiting In position to catch it.
Not long afterward Watson missed a
glorious chance to convert when  ».j
| crashed the ball over tho bar from a
I few yards out with only tbe goal keen-
I or to beat.     Half time came with tho
| Lower Island team 1 up.
The second period was repetition
of the first as far as playing goes with
the Rangers having easily the better
of the exchange. Luck, however, was
against them and It was not long before Marshall scored Nanaimo's second goal when he mlsklcked In in
attempt to clear. Tbe ball landed lu
the net where Walker again had no
chance to even make an attempt to
save. Oernn soon bucked up and
with a nice bit of football .Marshall
made up for his previous mistakes by
scoring his team's first goal. With
about live minutes to go Robertson
mnde the third misklck from which
tho Nanaimo centre had no difficulty
in placing the hall In the empty goal,
Walker having'run out ln a vain attempt to save. With only two minutes to go tiie Hangers made a sudden attack which netted them a corner from whicli Hobby Strachan headed In his team's second goal.      Full
i
ElglggiaiSMBIBIBBM
fffi^'igggaifMEPiBiarsiari
THEILOILO
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 18-19
ROB
ROY
Fresh from an 11-
months run in Glasgow. 10 months in
Edinburgh and 1 solid
year in London, comes
this big English Production.
Red with the blood of
McGregor, fragrant
with the romance of
the Heather.
The rising of the
clans, the attack on
Castle Stirling, Rob's
dive into the River
Forth, the burning of
the MacGregor's settlements are only a
few of the big scene*.
EXTRA
—ATTRACTIONS—
Our Gang Comedy
"GIANTS
vs.
YANKS"
and other features
ATTEND THE SHOW ON FRIDAY AND RE ASSURED OF A GOOD SEAT
MATINEE  DANCE	
SATURDAY NIGHT
SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
9.30
MATINEE
SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
 NEXT MONDAY AND TUESDAY	
Tom Mix in a Special Production
"North of the Yukon"
Big moments, including a fight with wolves, a
raging snow storm ,a dash over 400 miles of snow
covered wastes—A Tom Mix Special Production.
ItKfil'LAIt PRICES FOR THIS BIB SPECIAL
 WEDNESDAY ONLY	
Viola Dana and Milton Sills
in
"The Heart Bandit"
NEXT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, APRIL 25-26
The Rig English Racing Comedy
"THE SPORTING EARL"
NORTH of
sunt,
Jules thrthiriut
FOR LOVE OF A W0MAX, AND TO SAVE A FRIEND "8CA1UM0UCHE" MAY ."..(!.?
time came with the South-End team
lucky winners by the score of 3-2.
The Hangers offer no excuses for
their beating but to the average spectator lt was plainly seen that several
of their players were off form and it
Is safe to bet that if they had been
up to their usual standard the gam-
would have been decidedly different
as far as the final result is concerned.
rate, also in sealed parcels of general merchandise prepaid at letter
rate, posted lu Canada addressed for
delivery In the United States.
SCOTCH PHOTOPLAY IS
AT IL-ILO THEATRE ON
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
TOM MIX SHOOTS
RAPIDS IN CANOE
IN FILM OF YUKON
IVilllnin    Fox    Slar   Performs    Feat
Mini II»•• Hulked Seasoned Trappers fnr Years
NEW UNITED STATES
CUSTOMS REQUIREMENTS
Customs Declaration
The United States authorities require that on and after tho 1st April.
Customs Declaration—Form 91 11-
!>e attached to all parcels of general
merchandise (Parcel Post) prepaid
at parcel post rates, posted ln Canada
addressed for delivery in the United
dtates. Parcels weighing 4 ounce,
or less paid at the rate of 1 cent for
each ounce or fraction thereof naid
not have customs declarations attached.
Invoice*
They further require commercial
Invoices or statements of value be enclosed with books at printed matter
"Hob Roy" comes from tho Old
Country, established as the greatest
iiidience picture of all limes, playing
to record runs of 11 months In Glas-
jow, 10 months in Edinburgh, and one
iolld yenr In London. It is, undoubtedly, the most spectacular film ever
produced, numbering more thrills,
more heart throbs, and daring exploits than have ever before been assembled In a big picture.
The central character of the story
Ls Rob Roy MacGregor, chief of the
Clan .MacGregor, at Inversnnaid, fued-
al enemy of the Duke of Montrose,
branded as an outlaw, without name,
or name, or siller, but with all possessing a reputation as a lusty man
of battle throughout the length and
breadth of the Highlands.
John The Hatter
of Nanaimo
Ladies', Gent's and Children's Hats, Caps and Bonnets
Men's Hats and Caps—«11 the latest makes
LADIES
Get Your Easter Bonnet at Wholesale Price
All the newest shapes and styles.
The latest imported straws, Timbos and Silk.
E/ajaiSEEIBEEHSIBEIEEIEE^^
EASTER NOVELTIES
Nothing but Bargains.    Biggest Values on the Island.
Ladies, come and see our values.    Children's Hats in
all colors and shapes.
At Mrs. King's Store
Thursday  and  Saturday
Canada's Finest Barley
and Hops^-Perfectly
Brewed
and
U.B.C. Beer
Delivery is free to your home.
Why not order a case?
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
As a pnrt of tho crashing action
in "North of tlle Yukon," Tom Mix
undertook a stunt which Is abstained
.'rom by even tbe most Intrepid and
hardy men of northern Canada, Director John Ford was resolute on obtaining some scenes of a canoe being
dashed to pieces In a torrential Canadian rapids.
lt being lmposible to get a canoe
down to the rapids without human
guidance, Mr. Ford sent out a general
rail for the man willing to assume
the risk. Within a radius of 100
miles, inhabited by scarce five hundred people, all being venturesome,
sandpaper skinned, ivory skulled and
indomitable, not one applicant was
found. Mr. Ford thought Ibis extraordinary. It never before happened
that a director sent out n call for an
extra and didn't find himself submerged by half a hundred.
The delay caused by ihe unconquerable fear with which these unusually
brave men looked upon the cataract,
at length became intolerable. Tom
Mix offered his services. Thy natives hearing that someone was going
to attempt thc feat which none of
ihem dared approach, gathered from
miles around to witness, as they expected, an out and out suicide.
The racing water Bwopt all before
it, and either submerged or dashed
to fragments, any solid substance
thrown upon lt. Mix performed the
stunt and won the awe stricken admiration of tlio honest northerners.
The extent of the famous actor's
courage will be seen In "North of the
Yukon" when this William Fox special
production Is shown at the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Monday and Tuesday.
Get the habit. Call at Sparks Co .
Courtenay, for your battery, gasoline
and oil service.
Wbo can remember the good old
days when every man, woman and boy
In Cumberland knew how to hitch up
a horse?
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating  Engineer
see
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR   NEEDS  WILL   RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotol
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting lth Root at Onion Hay
every Sund: y Morning. Leave Cum-
b irlantl Hotel. 8 o'clock.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thc Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS. FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office a«2f» Bridge Sired. Vlctorin, II.C.
DR.   R.   U.   DIER   AND   DR.
W   .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor. of Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C. TEN
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. APRIL 19. 1924.
The opening announcement of Dr.
It. P. Christie and Dr. Arthur H. Wilkinson will appear next week.
Mr. Tom Kennedy of Victoria is ]
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. Mordy
for the holidays.
Local Briefs
Keep May 13th open.
Mrs. T. Rickson left Thursday morn-
lug for Vancouver.
STYLES THATKNTICE AND TN'TRIGUE arc featured in these
PICTORIAL REVIEW PATTERNS, v irh PI( TOGRAF included without extra cost. Vou should try the PICTOGRAF! It is flic last word
in dressmaking charts. Experience noi needed—horli women and children can successfully make a dress with the aid of the PK TOGRAF,
It tells vou exactlv what to buy, how to at* and I nu to make it.
The PICTOGRAF guarantees the chic and style of PARIS.
TRY A PICTORIAL REVIEJV PATTERN TODAY WITH THE
Biissmf
Mr. A. H. Webb of Nanaimo was a
week end visitor iu Cumberland.
Mrs. W. A. Owens, her daughter
Olga and Madge Bryan left Thursday
morning for Nanaimo.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Woods, of
Seattle are visiting in town the guests
of the former's mother, Mrs. Gibson
* •   * I and aunt Mrs. Merrilleld, at the Cum-
It ain't gonna rain no mo', hut there: berland Hotel.
Is going to be a live crowd at the ,  *   *   *
Cumberland Baseball Club Dance and i    Tho Hon.  Wm.  Sloan, minister of
Prize Ilrnwinir May 2. ' mines, has restored to Thomas Cun-
* *   • j llffe his second and third class coal
Mrs. .Margaret Mitchell and grand- [ raining certificates, which were sus-
aon will spend the holidays In Van- j pended at Cumberland in April.of last
couver. year. i
Mrs. James llaird is visiting her
daughter Mrs. Thomas Carney in Vancouver.
Keep May 13th open.
Mra. Wm. Merrilleld and son I.eslii,
accompanied by Mrs. C. DeCouer, re-
Mi'B. James Potter left on Thursday ! turned on Sunday night from a motor
morning to spend Ihe Easter holidays j trip to Nanaimo. where they spent the
In Tacoma. ■ week end visiting with friends and re-
*    *    • i latlvcs.
Polks, don't inisN It!  Cumberland *   *   *
i lluscball Club Dunce and Prize Draw,
| Ing May 2.
I Fun ls the spice of life. Attend ;
' the Cumberland Baseball Club Dunce!
; und Prize Drawing May 2.
CUMBERLAND  SENIOR  BASEBAI.I.
I CliUB
A VERY SMAItT RANGE OF LADIES'  DRESSES HAVE JUST ARRIVED
AND ARE ON VIEW.      WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION.     THE NEWEST
STYLES AS WELL AS THE .MICH   WANTED NEW MATERIALS.      OUR
PRICES FOR ABOVE  DRESSES AltE VERY  REASONABALB.
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
SPECIALS
FOR SATURDAY  ONLY
LADIES—Your unrestricted choice of a large stock of
High Grade Millinery $2.50 $4.75
LADIES—NOW   IS  YOUR CHANCE-NOT  ONE  HELD  BAC1C
FOR THE MEN
Men's G. B. Borsalino, highest grade hats, eRgular
$18.50, now  „  $9.50
Only six left
Morris' Best English make silk linings  $6.50
Sackville. English make silk lining $5.50
Biltmore, Canadian make, fancy bands $5.00
Cooper, sure fit caps anv size   $3.00
Other makes $2.00
JOHN THE HATTER
AT MRS.  KING'S STORE, CUMBERLAND
I
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
SIBIEJSIHBIBIBIiira^
KODAKS
Our Spring Shipment has Arrived
All thc Latest Models.
Take one on your Easter Holidays
EASTMAN PRICES
Slj^anitiEHiaiEIEIBIBI^^
Your Last Chance
To Buy Your Easter Goods
They're going fast—Buy Now.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
PRIZE DRAWING
May 2, 1921 llo.Ilo Hull
$100.00
IS PRIZES
Tickets 25c. 81 Prhes
1 Campbell Bros, value  $9.00
2 Royal  Candy,   value    0.00
3 J. Cameron, value   5.00
4 C. II. Tarbell, value   5.00
5 Matt. Brown, value   fi.00
6 Mercantile Store, value   5.00
7 Edward  W. Bickle, value .... 5.00
8 Alex McKlnnon. value   4.00
9 .1. Sutherland, value   4.00
T. Nakanlshl, value   4.00
B. Marlnelll, value   4.00:
Geo. Cavin, value   3.00 !
W.  Henderson,  value   3.00!
L. Frelonl, value   3.001
Cumberland Hotel, value   3.00
10
11
u
13
14
IS
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
.20
I 27
28
I 29
30
31
Sale Of Work
End Of Month
The Ladles' Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Anglican Church are holding ;
an afternoon lea and sale of work in i
the church hall on Wednesday, April!
30th, from 3 to 6. A feature of the I
afternoon will be the Home Cooking j
Stall. You are cordially Invited to '
be present at the Hall on Wednesday,
April 30th.
Get the habit. Call at Sparks Co.,
Courtenay, for your battery, gasoline
and oil service.
TENDERS
The  secretary  of the  Cumberland
Literary and Athletic Association will
receive tenders for tho calciminlng oi'
| the. celling and walls of the rooms In
Union Tailors .value  3.00 j tne club bulul|ng ,uillii April 30th.
Lang's Drug Store  3.00 j , .	
Cumberland   Tailors     3.00
Mumford & Walton, value .... 3.00
Marshall Music, value   3.00
Marrocbi Bros., value   3.00
J. T. Brown, value   3.00
King George Hotel, value .... 3.00
T. Rickson. value   2.50
Mann's Bakery, value   2.50
W. P. Symons, value   2.50
R.   Spltnll.  value     2.50
J.  Nlnatti,  value    2.25
Y. Ntikagami, value   2.00
L. R. Stevens, value   1.50
S. Davis, value  1.00
Tickets Will be  drawn at the
dance being held in the Ilo-llo
Hall
MAY 2, 1924
Plumps Orchestra Music 9.30-2
$1.25 per couple
"Get Behind Our Team and Boost!"
We take this opportunity of expressing our sincere appreciation to tho
above merchants for their hearty cooperation in contributing prizes towards  the  raffle.
CUMBERLAND BASEBALL
CLUB
TENDERS
Tho secretary of the 1924 May Day
Celebration committee will receive
tenders from Band Managers for
supplying music on the 24th of May.
About six (6) hours of Intermittent
playing.
Just  Arrived
Crosse  and Blackwell's   World
Famous Line of Pickles
Unequaled Quality at Reasonable Prices
2 sizes at 50c. and 75c. per bottle
Including Sour, and Sweet Mixed Pickles, Sour and
Sweet Mixetl Chow Pickles, Sour and Sweet Gerkins,
Pickled Walnuts, Small White Onion Pickles, English
Relish .
BISCUIT SPECIALS
Choice Mixed Cakes, per lb 35c, 8 lbs. for $1.00
Crisp Ginger Snaps. 2 lbs  ,  45c.
Graham Wafers, per lb.   25c.
Lemon and Orange Biscuits, per lb 40c.
Soda Biscuits, large package, each   25c.
6 lb boxes, each $1.00
Soda Biscuits plain or sweet, 8 lb boxes $1.15
Fancy Mixed Biscuits, per lb. 50c and 60c.
Full stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables.
Sunkist Oranges
3, 4, and 5 Dozen for  $1.00
Large, per dozen   85c.
Sunkist Lomons, per dozen  35c.
California Sunkist Grape Fruit, 3 for 25c.
Florida Grape Fruit, large 2 for   35c.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
',
.jawK
en you
cnan6e
'our .name
NevJ and olj friendi
will jl'o in $oiir choice
c\ Stationery an exprM>
snn rf flpisd toste and
CAMMV.
>ar tiWf good
WRITING PAPER
Spring    Cleaning
and when you commence, go to
TOMMY'S Hardware   STORE
For Wall Paper in all Qualities anil tho Latest Shades
and Patterns of 1924.
For Bapco Paints and Varnish.
For House Furnishings.
For decorations of all kinds and description, don't forget
TOMMY'S   Hardware  STORE
r
Cumberland, B. C.
FOR SALE
HOUSE    FOR    SALE-CONTAINING
seven bedrooms, parlor, dining room
kitchen, etc., heated by furnace--
two open fireplaces. Also wash
house and garage. A snap for anyone going Into tho boardlnghouse
business. Terms If required. For
further particulars apply to Mrs.
V. Marlnelll, Derwent Avenue     A.19
WANTED--TO   HEAK  FROM OWN-
er of good  Farm for sale. Slate
cash plrce, full particulars. D. F.
Hush.  Minneapolis  Minn.
FOIt SALE-A JERSEY COW AND
calf 8 weeks old. Apply to The
Islander,  Drawer 4110, Cumberland.
"PROVINCIAL  ELECTIONS   ACT"
Comox Electoral District
!     NOTICE ls hereby given that I shall
I on Monday, the 19th day of May, 1924,
i at the hour of 10 o'clock in the fore-
i noon, at the Courthouse, Cumberland,
hold a sitting of the Court of Revision for the purpose of revising the
list of voters  for the said  elocto: <l
district, and of hearing and determining any and all objections to the re-
'entlon of any name on the said list,
ir to the registration as a voter of any
ippllcant for registration, nnd far the
ither purposes set forth In the "Provincial Selections Act."
JOHN BAIRD
Heglstrnr  of   Voters.  Comox   Elec-
oral District .
Dated at Cumberland this 11th day
of April 1924.
■■II!
FOR SALE—TRAVELLING TRUNKS, j
leather kit bag, fishing rod, and
landing net. all in excellent condition; also splendid full pinto camera ■
(Lancaster) with accessories and
pair of held glasses. Apply Nunns,
204 Penrith Ave.
FOR SALE—LOT 66, SAYWARD DIS.
trlct, Campbell  River, property of (
Nunns Bros., two separate parcels
Of 10 acres each, with frontage on;
the river; one parcel of 14 acres;
one parcel of about 280 ucres.   The
above  will  bo  sold  cheaply.      Em- I
tnte of the  late F.  L.  NunnB, ono
parcel of 10 acres (good land) nearly all cleared  with shade(  beautifully situated on  the river bank),
with large bam etc.     For Information  otc,   apply  to  agont  If.   Pldcock. Campbell River,
8HILOH STOPS
THAT COUGH
Your grand-parenti used it. Safe,
•are and efficient Small dose
meant economy, and bringe quick
relief. Doei not upset the stomaefc.
Try Shiloh-80c, Wc and $1.20
IIIIIIIBI
The pupils of Mrs. Oliver and Mrs. Finch will present a
3-Act
OPERETTA
"GOLDILOCKS   AND
THE THREE BEARS"
In the
ILO-ILO THEATRE, CUMBERLAND
on
Thursday, April 24 th.
at 8.15 p.m. sharp
Admission 50c. Reserved Seats 75c.
Scat plan at Theatre Box Office
Proceeds after deduction of expenses to be donated to
the G.W.V.A.
iniiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii's
Spring Is Here— ,s
You Need A Tonic 1
To purify the blood, tone up your =
•tomach and make you feel bright \ ==
and healthy take jg|
Celery King
iWr^ltWJi   BOOK YOUR SEATS EARLY I
family-
three weeki.      Everyone  neede
spring tonic—Me aad We.	
Brew a cup for every member of the
-take three tlmei a week for

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