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The Islander Feb 26, 1916

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Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 48        THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY. FEB. 26. 1916.        Subscription price, $1.50 per year
LAYING THE CORNERSTONE OF DOMINION PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.-This^picture, reproduced from an old print appearing in Leslie's Illustrated paper of 56 years ago, shows a
drawing of the ceremony of laying the cornerstone of the buildings which have been destroyed
by fire.   The ceremony was performed by the Prince of Wales, afterwards JKing Edward VII.
COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED
The regular meeting of the
City Council was held in thn
Council Chamber* on Monday
evening. Present His Worship
Mayor Parnham and Aldermen
Bate, Banks and Henderson. The
minutes of the regular and special meetings were read and adopted. A communication was received from the Girl Guides, stating they were now fully organized and wanted to be officially
recognized as the Girl Guides of
Cumberland. This was received
and granted. The City Clerk
was also instructed to notify the
secretary of the Girl Guides that
the City Coum.il appreciated their
efforts.
The Provincial Secretary notified the Council that the recommendations had been carried into effect and Aid. D. R. Macdonald and Thos. D. McLean were
appointed License Commissioners
of the City of Cumberland for
the year 1916 and Aid. Thos. E.
Bate and N. McFadyen were appointed Police Commissioners for
the City of Cumberland for the
year  1916.   This was received
and filed.
The communication from F. A.
McDermott solicitot for the
Union of Municipalities desiring
information as to the miles of
telephone lines within the City
limits. It was pointed out by the
City Clerk that nothing had been
done in connection with the taxation of telephone lines, neither
did he have any knowledge as to
the number of miles. The communication was received and filed.
Notice of premium due amounting to $5.00 for City Clerks bond
was ordered paid. The following
accounts were referred to the finance committee for payment if
found correct:
Royal Standard Agency    $29.80
B. C. Telephone Co. .10
A. R. Kierstead 11.90
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.    13.70
Total $55.50
Aid   Banks reported that the
hose carts of  the Cumberland
Volunteer Fire Department were
now filled   with steel runners,
making it possible to pull the
hose carts the same as a sleigh.
The chairman of the Board of
Works in his report stated that
the City scales were ready for
use, the snow having been removed as requested, and that the
loads of coal weighed during the
past week all went over a ton. It
was suggested to weigh a load
periodically to keep the teamster
up to the standard.
The City Clerk requested information regarding the fuel oil
question and wanted to know
whether it was necessary to carry out the instructions given by
the Council, as il meant a great
deal of additional work, seeing
that the Federal authorities had
already imposed a half cent a
gallon on fuel oil.
Aid. Bate said the Council
might wait a few weeks before
taking any further steps. Aid.
Banks favored waiting and ascertaining how the half a cent a
gallon duty worked out.
Aid. Bate requested information concerning the new lighting
system   proposed   by the   1915
BASKETBALL.
In one of the most interesting
Basketball games that has been
witnessed in Cumberland for several years, the Canadian Colliery
office team defeated the 102nd.,
Battalion, of Courtenay on Friday night by a score of 30 to 11.
Both teams played a nice clean
game and great enthusiasm prevailed amongst the spectators, of
which there were several hundred. At half time the score
stood 18 to nil in favor of the locals, but in the second half the
102nd., with some pretty combination and some well placed free
shots rolled up a score of eleven
points.
Private Stiles was the outstanding star of the 102nd. He
was, however, well backed by
the ) est of his mates. Cyril Baker shone brilliantly for the locals and Hancock and Stevens
played well. Nunns and Mackintosh certainly played a good
defensive game.
Our first showing of Ladies'
Models and Misses' and Chil-
drens' ready-to-wear Hats will
arrive from the East next week
and will be on show Saturday,
March 4, at Campbell's.
Bible 31ass at 1.30 and Sunday
School at 2.30 p.m. will be resumed in the Methodist Church
to-morrow. Morning and evening
service as usual.
Council tut not yet installed.
Aid. Henderson, as chairman
of the committee on lighting,
said that he did not have the estimates at hand, and promised to
furnish the desired information
at the next regular meeting of
the Council, stating that there
were two suggestions, one to
light Dunsmuir avenue with 70O
candle power lights, and another
to change the entire lighting system with 100 candle power lamps
on side streets and 350 candle
power lights on Dunsmuir avenue. The former would cost
about $80 per month, and the
latter about $100 per month. The
matter was laid over until the
next meeting of the Council.,
It was decided to consider the
assessment roll for the year 1916*
at the next regular meeting.
Council adjourned. **!***
1
TWO
THE ISLANUrJK,
itJEKLANU. tf. U.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
'   THE FLAB.
*J\\t Jteiatttor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26th, 1916.
The Duty on Fuel Oil.
The Federal authorities have
not given the coal industry the
amount of protection that was
first reported.  Later information
from Ottawa reveals the fact that
a duty of half a cent a gallon has
been imposed upon fuel oil imported into British Columbia, but
the seven and a half per cent War
Tax previously imposed has been
removed.    The duty as it now
stands is half a cent on every
imperial gallon of fuel oil imported into this province.   Taking 35
gallons to the barrel figures out
17 1-2 cents a barrel.    This does
not give the coal industry by any
means the protection it demands
and is absolutely insuffic ent to
put coal anywhere pear a competitive basis.   All other industries
throughout the Dominion receive
the protection that enables them
to compete with the foreign product and grow fat, and why the
Federal authorities should treat
this Fuel oil question so cool and
half-hearted is beyond the understanding of the vast majority of
miners engaged in the coal industry and who depend on its
prosperity for their bread and
butter.   Another astounding fact
that stands out very prominently
is that the man who cultivates
the earth and grows apples receives a protection of 90 cents a
barrel, and the man who descends
into the bowels of the earth and
digs coal receives a protection of
17 1-2 cents a barrel.   We are
inclined to think that the Federal House at Ottawa needs more
mining men and less farmers. It
is the British Columbia miner
that buys the farmer's apples,
yet the policy of the Government
seems to demand the miner to
Warn
SPRING 1916
New Spring Goods Now Being Opened up:
Ladies' House Dresses,
Wash Skirts and Middy Suits,
Shirt Waists and Middy Blouses,
Silk and Satin Underskirts,
Velvets,
Dress Goods,
Dress Ginghams,
Dress Muslins and Ducks,
Crepes,
Nainsooks and Lawns,
Linens,
Galateas,
Tickings,
Towels and Towelling.
pay more for his apples and give
him no protection on his coal.
Pull together, brethren. We
are all here for the same purpose.
Then live and let live, The best
way to build up a town is for
each and every man to pull together and not strive to rend and
tear down. All the residents of
a town are partners, not opponents. In all likelihood the more
business done by your rival the
mo-e you will do. Every merchant who treats his customers
honestly and squarely will get
his share, and the more business
that can be secured by united ef--
fort, the better it will be for all.
When a town ceases to grow it
commences to die, and the more
people try to kill each other off
in  business and good name the
more rapidly will utter ruin come
to all. Stand together for the
advancement of every citizen,
and if a man shows the ability to
prosper do not pull him back
with jealousy or weigh him down
with cold indifference.
Efficient provision for first aid
treatment and the instruction of
employees in first aid to the injured should be a branch of safety work in every well organized
establishment.
□
Insurance does not replace
burned property. It is merely a
system whereby the misfortune
or carelessness of one becomes a
tax on all in the form of insurance premiums.
•uua#>jA. •********•
"Air, light, highways and water are the primary considerations
of civilization. It is the interest
of all that every citizen should
have as much of these as he
wants."—Frederick Harrison.
The rank and file of employees
must be made to feel that safety
work is their work, just as much
as it is of their superiors in directive positions.
Our first showing of Ladies
Models and Misses' and Chil-
drens' ready-to-wear Hats will
arrive from the East next week
and will be on show Saturday,
March 4, at Campbell's. $
DEMOCRACY CAN FIGHT
BEST. SAYS HAIDANE
Germany Has Organization But Lacks
Power Which People's Will Gives
—Ideas the  Great Need
Lord Haldane, the famous philosopher and former War Minister, offers
some criticism of some writings by
H. G. Wells on Democracy and War.
He writes:
Mr. Wells' acute analysis lays bare
several things that are beyond dispute. It is true that in conducting
war, democracies have often labored
under much disadvantage. But it is
Important to observe that this Ib not
necessarily so. The confidence of
France in her army leaders and the
thoroughness with which the French
nation has placed its resources at
their disposal, seem to leave little to
be desired. No doubt it is more difficult for a country of free citizens
to' organize itself than lt is for an
absolute Government to organize a
population which claims no rights and
is willing to obey. But the difficulty
ln the first case is, as the history of
modern France shows, far from being
Insuperable. Given faith in itself and
its cause, and also intelligence, a
democratic nation will organize itself
with a power which is unrivalled. For
the highest level of national energy is
attained where the people are penetrated with the enthusiasm and passion which direct responsibility brings
Into being.
If it possesses ideas and has great
leaders to choose from, a democracy
will not fail ln organization. Organisation even for war depends for excellence not on control from without
or above, but on ideas and leadership.
It was so in the greatest days of
Roma. It has been so with France.
Even in ideas and leadership a demo*
cracy can, as history has shown, ba
prepared in advance. The leadership
and the Ideas may arise in it as
easily as in an absolute State. Mr.
Wells seems to me to be right when
he goes on to point to the organization
which has developed in Germany as
being due, not to the centring of government in the Emperor, but to tha
characteristics of the people, and to a
form of State Socialism which thesa
characteristics have made possible.
I go further, for it seems to me that a
democratic country like our own is
at least quite equal of producing
something which ls based on individual responsibility and initiative, and
can give us the element that is really
valuable in the State Socialism of a
country like Germany without its
drawbacks.
Source of Organization
A free people will do all that a
people that is not free can if lt possesses compelling ideas. For history
shows that the compelling power of
Ideas over those who possess them
ls greater than any other compelling
Kower. The possession of ideas is,
i a vigorous people, the real source
of organization. It is so in the business of individuals, and it is so in the
business of nations. Moreover, where
Ideas are lacking no change in the
form of Government can make up for
their absence. I have long thought
and preached that the real problem in
this country *» the development of
thought and ideas everywhere, even
In our Cabinets. We are a very practical people ln the sense that when an
emergency comes we act with shrewdness and decision. But it ls not our
way to trouble ourselves about possible emergencies until they do come,
and then we are, as a rule, unprepared
to an extent that would be ruinous to
any but people like the Anglo-Saxons,
whose way it is to drive through at
whatever cost and unnecessary loss.
This war may in certain events help
us to better habits. If so there will
be some consolation for the frightful
suffering which lt ls Inflicting.
Where Germany Falls
I believe that all tha nations engaged have met with misfortune, due
to lack of ideas.    Germany suffered
■.rom the lack which is characteristic '
of oligarchies. She does not appear :
to have forseen the magnitude or the
risk to herself of the conflagration
Bhe was kindling. The outlook of her
war party was too restricted to admit
of complete grasp of the situation
with which she was confronted when
Bhe provoked a conflict with half the
world. The mind of her people was
too little disciplined by the sense of
personal responsibility for affairs to
enable it to control that party. In
this country we were defective in a
different way. Germany had ideas imposed on her, ideas which were too
narrow and which were ethically detective. But they were ideas, and her
people have been receptive to ideas.
Our own citizens have never been
receptive in the same way, nor has
It -been their habit to call on their
leaders to think strenuously for them.
When the time comes to take stock,
[ think the wonder will be, not that
we were so unprepared, but that we
were as well prepared as was the
case. For the public did not insist
that the unrest of Europe should be
the foremost subject of political consideration, nor was it ready to devote
the nation's energies to securing its
future in peace any more than in war.
The democracy in this country was
suffering from an indisposition to reflect, and, in consequence, was not disposed to listen to the few who preached.
■ Czar's Palace a Hospital
The winter palace of Emperor
Nicholas at Petrograd has been converted into a hospital for tha wounded, with 1,000 bedf. The row of gorgeous state chambers facing the Neva
River ls being used for wards. Only
the Emperor's personal quarters are
undisturbed, being maintained for his
accommodation when he is stopping
temporarily in Petrograd. The beautiful Pompelian gardens are being
utilised for baths.
Germany's Contractors Worst
. It is said that there have been far
more contract scandals in Germany
since the war began than in either
Great Britain or Canada. This is not
surprising in view of the revelation of
German deception and disregard for
the truth which the war has furnished.
OUR DEMOCRATIC ARMY
Where Clergy and Fnanciers Eagerly
Serve In Ranks
The different walks of life represented by the Canadian soldier/* is
an evidence that at last the war ls
gripping all sorts of men, and that
Canada is awake to her responsibility
in this great world-struggle. In the
ranks clergymen are found drilling
side by side with farm boys, high
school principals with fieshermen, and
managers of large financial concerns
with miners. In two battalions alone
there are three Methodist ministers
and one Presbyterian, all serving in
the ranks. An interesting Incident in
this connection is that of a private
who was manager of a large financial
concern in the east, and whose two
assistants in the business were at
one time lieutenants of his company
B.C.
PEOPLE'S KING GEORGE
At home King George and bis
Queen have opened nothing less than
an era completely new in the mutual
relations of people and Crown. King
Edward, as a great European gentleman, was concerned to hold himself
in close and constant touch with the
leading interests and incidents in
continental society and politics. Unaffectedly pious in the ordering of his
daily life, King George personifies the
strenuous industry, the love of work
for duty's sake, the self-sacrlflcu and
self-denial of which, in things other
than details of diet, he sets a daily
example. The old Anglo-Saxons were
remarkable for a patriotism quickened
and deepened by a lively faith. Of
such ancestors the King is a true
lineal descendant. With him, therefore, as in the case of his grandmother, Queen Victoria, Court ceremonies have taken upon them something in the nature of religious rites.
Royal interest in the dwellings of the
poor and'the nursing of the sick was
brought into courtly vogue during the
last reign. George V. is the flrst
King to have personally visited the
mechanics, artisans, and the factory
men of his realm ln the places of
their daily toll and to bave examined
the sanitary, social, and religious
conditions under which they work as
systematically as if he bad been trained for a factory inspector.—T. H. S.
Escott, in the British Review.
NO PRO-GERMANS THERE
Blackened Its Prisoner
Here is a lawyer story. A man was
charged with picking a pocket, and
when arraigned he pleaded "guilty."
The case went to the jury, however,
and thc verdict was "Not guilty."
And the Gourt spoke as follows:—
"You don't leave this court without
a stain on your character. By your
confession you are a thief. By thr
verdict of the Jury, you are a liar."
Universities of United States Decided
For the Allies
John M. Dent, the famous publisher
of educational and classical works,
bas visited fourteen or fifteen of the
leading State aad other universities
of the United States. He found that
the professors of literature <tnd history were' much more ready to talk
about the latest aspect of the great
war than they were to discuss futures
in books. One professor ln a leading
eastern university wrote him on
arrival: "You'll find it difficult
to make us talk about books.
We are all absorbed in the war. You
will find us more pro-Britith tr.an the
British themselves." The publisher
continued, "Again, in Wisconsin I
found the sentiment overwhelmingly
toward a firm stand against the attempt at domination by Germany. The
same thing obtained in California.
Everywhere I found German militarism condemned. All believed in ideals
Great Britain is fighting for. Personally, I do not think we have ever done
full Justice to the attitude of the Republic, seeing her delkate position in
this war. The universities are with
England and the allies almost without exception. Only in one case did
I meet with a university man who
called himself 'pro-German.' What
pleased me most was that all this
conglomeration of opinion was deliberately thought out after counting
the cost and considering all the various questions. Another Interesting
point is that quite the majority of
professors go to Germany to get their
Ph.D., and become more • less imbued with German life and influenced
by friendly treatment and the sympathy they receive in so many parts
of Germany."
 THREE
AMERICAN RED CROSS.
An appeal for funds for the
Red Cross, signed by Wood row
Wilson, President, and ex-President Taft, chairman of the Executive committee, has been largely circulated in the United States.
So far, $1,600,000 has been received by the Red Cross. FoUr
hundred Red Cross workers were
sent to the war zone in addition
to 4,000,000 pounds of hospital
and medical supplies and equipment of an estimated value of
$1,245,174. These goods were
forwarded in 150 shipments, aggregating 25,259 cases. It is interesting to compare Canada's
Red Cross shipments of 50,000
cases of supplies valued at $3.-
000,000. and cash contributions
of approximately $4,000,000, including gifts to the British Red
Cross. The funds of the American Red Cross are practically exhausted and large sums will be
required if the United States is
again to resume its Red Cross
activities.
Victoiia, B. C.,—In pursuance
of the policy of market expansion in the interests of the lumber industry, undertaken by the
Hon. the Minister of Lands, two
further bulletins, prepared for
the information of lumber consumers, have recently been
printed.fjTheyareentitled "British Columbia DouglasJFir Dimension," and "British Columbia
vVestern Soft Pine," respectively.
The former publication deals
with the qualities of the Douglas Fir' for structural purposes,
and cannot fail to be of interest
to architects, contractors and
others. The bulletin is well illustrated, the claims of durability being supported by pertinent
references to such buildings as
the Craigflower Farm near Victoria, erected in 1851, and the
Craigflower Public School, built
in 1853, Douglas Fir having been
used throughout except for the
roof of Red Cedar shingles, and
practically no parts of the buildings having to be repaired. Modern uses of Douglas Fir for
structural purposes are instanced
by reference to the Arcade building on Government and View
Streets, Victoria, erected in 1915
and the new Wharf Reception
Room, C. P. R. Dock, Vancouver, Another striking reference
is to the Niagara Gulch trestle
on the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
railway, built in 1896. Four
hundred feet long, one hundred
and twenty feet high, and on a
ten degree curve, containing
three quarters of a million feet
of Douglas Fir, the trestle was
still in good condition and good
for further years of service when
it was abandoned 16 years later
owing to alteration in the grade. FOUr.
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
HAS FIVE SONS IN THE ARMY.
Many parents have given one
or two sons to the Empire in the
present life and death struggle,
but Mrs. Geo. Brown, of Mary-
port avenue, Currtberland, has
live sons serving their King and
Country. In acknowledgement
of her sacrifice, Mrs. Brown has
received the appended letter,
which is self-explanatory.
Privy Purse Office, Buckingham Palace,   Jan. 26th..  1916.
Madam.—I have the honor to
inform you that The King has
heard with much interest that
you have at the present moment
five sons in the Army. I am
•commanded to express to you the
King's congratulations and to
assure you that His Majesty
much appreciates the spirit of
patriotism which prompted the
example, in one family, of loyalty and devotion to their Sovereign and Empire." I have the
honour to be, Madam, your obedient servant, (Sgd.) F. W.
PON SON BY, Keeper of the
Privy Purse.
Mrs. G. Brown, Box 72, Cumberland,—I certify this to be a
true copy of the original letter.
ARTHUR BISCHLAGER,
Vicar of Cumberland.
The five sons, referred to in the
above letter are now serving with
different battalions and located
at various points. Sergeant John
C. Brown, the eldest, is now with
No. 2 Tunnelling Company, England., the second son, Corporal
William, of the 7th., Battalion
Infantry, somewhere in France,
Matthew, the third son, is attached to the Machine Gun section of the 102nd., now at Comox, George, the fourth son,
Mining and Sapping with the
28th,, Battalion, Somewhere in
France, and Harry, the fifth son,
is now with the Machine Gun
section of the 62nd., Battalion,
now at Vancouver.
ILO ILO ITEMS.
THE BROKEN COIN.
Field.
Episode No. Fifteen-"The Deluge.':
Episode No. Sixteen-"Kitty  In Danger.''
Episode No. Seventeen-"The Castaways."
Episode No. Eighteen-"The Underground
City."
Episode No. Nineteen-'TheSacred Fire.'-
Episode No. Twenty-Danger on the High
Seas."
Episode No. Twenty-one "A Timely Rescue."
Episode No. Twenty-two--"An American
Queen,"
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ILO ILO THEATRE
PRO. CHANCED MON., TUES, THURS. ft SAT.
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For Sale CheAp—A McClary's
"Kitchener" stove, in good
condition. Apply Leslie J.
Aston, Shoemaker, Cumberland.
FOUND—In a starving condition, on Canadian Collieries railway between two trestles at
Happy Valley, one bay mare with
black points, small white star on
forehead. Owner can. have the
same by paying expenses.
J. S, DAVIS, Union Bay.
In the County Court of Nanaimo holden at Cumberland, B. C. in the matter of
Malcolm Newberg, deceased, and
In the Administration Act;
Take notice that by order of His Honor
Judge Barker, made the 12th day of January, A. D. 1916,1 was appointed administrator to the estate of the said Malcolm
Newberg, deceased, and all parties having claims against the said estate are
hereby required to furnish same, properly
verified to me on or before the 21st day
of Febrnary, A. D. 1916, and all parties
ndebted to said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness to
me forth with.
WM. WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 21st day of January, 1916.
TONIGHT    15TH. EPISODE      |
I "The Broken Coin" !
«
MATINEES TUES., THURS., and SAT., CHILDREN 5c.
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EVERY TUESDAY, One Number J
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"BLACK BOX"
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Serial in Fourteen Episodes.       |
BROADWAY FEATURES
Thursday.
BOLT THAT WENT TRUE
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Notice is hereby given that, thirty days
after date hereof, application will be
made to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the transfer of the licence for
the sale of liquor by retail in and upon
the premises known as the Union Hotel,
situate at West Cumberand, British Columbia, from J. N. McLeod to William
Jones, of Cumberland, British Columbia.
Dated this 19th. day of February, A, D.
1916.
J. N. McLeod, Holder of Licence.
William Jones, Applicant for Transfer.
AILERON
Rudder
RUDDER
The Long Distance Telephone Saves Trips.
It saves the many inconveniences and uncertainties
of travelling.
it enables you to get the same i esults with minimum
effort and without loss of time.
YOUR telephone is a long distance telephone.
D
j British ColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd.
BOW MACHINE
ENGINE     G0N'-        '
220 HORSE
Aileron
THE NEW FOKKER IRONCLAD. -Germany's Dreadnought of
the air, the r-okker bi-plane with its twin bu'let-proof bodies,
its powerful engines, its four machine guns, will carry 27 men.
FURS
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected la yoar lection
SHIP YOUR FURS DIRECT to "SHUBERT" the largest
house In the World dealing exclusively In NORTH AMERICAN RAW FURS
a reliable—responsible—safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existing for more than a third of a century," a long suc-
^exTS£ul>r-?^£d,Sf»s£53inK Fur Shippers prompt.SATIS FACTORY
AND PROFITABLE returns. Write for "tCbt fttmbtrt »Wpper."
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
WrHe ior tt-NOW-lt'a FREE
A B SHUBERT Inr 25-27 west austin a ve.
st-A. U. OnUDE.rvl,inC Dept.CMCHICAGO.u.sX THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
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St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study: Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastorl
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Sexagesima Sunday:
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
11 a.m., Mattins and Intercessions.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service  of   Intercession   on
Thursday at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
COMING EVENTS
The annnal Masquerade Ball
under the auspices of the Cumberland Volunteer Fire Brigade
will be held in the Ilo Ilo hall on
St. Patrick's day, March 17th.
The annual Hospital Ball under
the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland General Hospital will be held in the
West Cumberland Band Hall on
Wednesday, April 29th.
A Leap Year dance will be
held at Bevan on Tuesday, Feb.
29th.. in the Bevan Hall, Bevan
Orchestra will furnish the music
and refreshments will be served
during the evening. Dancing
commences at 9.30 p. m. sharp.
Admission, Ladies 75c, Gentlemen free.
The Spirella
Made-to-order Corset, of
the finest quality. Every
pair guaranteed.
For further information apply to
Mrs.  JOHN GILLESPIE,
West Cumberland.
Mr. George Barrass has enlisted as a bandsman with the 102nd.,
Battalion. This well known and
popular musician came to the
district eighteen months ago,
and as leader of the Harmony
orchestra, made a decided hit
with the local dancing public.
The original Harmony orchestra
was composed of Mr. Barrass,
violin, Miss Louden, piano, and
Mr. Oliver, drums. This trio of
musicians were always up-to-date
and always featured perfect time
Under the leadership of Bandmaster Wren we feel sure Bandsman Barrass will make a name
for himself. We feel sure our
readers will join in wishing him
the best of luck and success in
the future.—Courtenay Review.
The Courtenay public can look
forward to some good music in
the near future. The instruments
for the 102nd., Band arrived last
Saturday and they are without a
doubt the best ever seen in this
locality, and we have it on good
authority that they are the best
to be had.
Girl Guides to Parade.
The Cumberland Girl Guides
will parade to the Presbyterian
Church on Sunday evening March
5th. This will be the first parade
of the Girl Guides. Rev. J. Hood
being first chaplain they decided
to attend the Presbyterian
Church. They will parade to the
other churches later.
The Girl Guides meet every
Thursday evening at 6.30 o'clock
p. m., in the basement of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Patrol Leaders and Second's meeting will be held every
second Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church.
Bessie Stewart, Secretary.
By order, A. J. Taylor. O.C.
The services in the Presbyterian Church will be resumed as
formerly, 11 a. m. service, Bible
Class at 1. 30 p. m., Sunday
School 2.30 p. m. and evening
service at 7 p. m.
The firebell rang out loud and
long at 1.30 on Thursday morning, the Cumberland Fire Brigade
answering the c<ill in short order
and put the fire out in the Dallos
Block on Dunsmuir Ave, caused
by the upsetting of an oil stove.
The damages were very small
and the fire was put out by a
bucket brigade. It was not necessary to bring but the hose cart.
The city police arrested Angelo
Merlette on Saturday evening
and charged him in the Police
Court on Monday morning with
the stealing of a basket of groceries from the delivery sleigh of
Simon Leiser & Co. Merlette was
remanded until Wednesday when
he pleaded guilty and was sentenced by the presiding magistrate to three months imprisonment with hard labour. When
arrested Merlette had in his poss-
session the sum of fifteen dollar
and five cents. Chief of Police
Ward took the prisoner to Victoria to serve his term on Friday
morning.
LACO NITROGEN
LAMPS
(THE DAYLIGHT LAMP)
PRICE SCHEDULE:
60    Watts - $1.10
100
XX
-   1.25
200
X.X
-   2.25
250
XX
-   3.00
300
XX
-   3.35
350
XX
-   4.00
500
XX
-   5.00
1000
XX
-   8.00
Frosted Lamps 10% Additional.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamclware
. Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
NOW STOP!
Do not throw this adv. away,
-the most important announcement is still to come.
Do you realize what this
(P means to you ? 1 It means
that you will always have
that neat, clean-cut, well-
groomed effect. 1 Your
clothes will always look as
if they had just come from
the tailor's, spic and span,
neat, refined and giving the
impression of prosperity
and business power.
Remember I call for and
deliver the goods.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
1
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
1
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Herterson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No'games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m, and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
MAROCCHI PROS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOEMAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining lights of thu Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tories and in a portion nf the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term.
of twenty-one years at mi annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must ba
described by sections, or 1c<?b1 subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract, applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicatit himself.
Each applioation must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if tho
rights applied forare not available, but uot
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at tha
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights ara
not being operated, such returns shall ba
furnished at least onoe a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOauaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to  any
Agent or Sub-Asrent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B— Unauthorized publication of thia
advertisement will not be paid for.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.   1915.
READ   UP
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3,50
8.50
3.50
6.50
3.50 1
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45 j
j
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
Mon.
P.M.
4,35
4.10
4.05
4,00
3.55
3,50
3.45
3,30
Sun.
A.M.     P.M.
9.35     3.35
9.10 3.10
9.05 3.06
9.00 3.00
8.55 2.55
8.50 2.50
8.45 2.45
8.30 2.30
STATIONS
Cumberland
Bevan
Puntledge
(f)UkeTrail Road
(f)Courtenay Road
(f)    Minto Road
Royston
Union Bay
READ   DOWN
Sun.
A.M     P.M.
7.00    1.00
7.25 1.25
7.30 1.30
7.35 1.35
7.40 1.40
7.45 1.45
7.50 1.50
8.00 2.00
Mon.
A.M.
10:30
10.55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Tues.
P.M.
2.00
2.25
2:30
2.35
2.40
2.45
2:50
3.00
Wed.
A.M.
10:30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Thurs
A.M.
7:00
7:25
7:30
7:35
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
Fri,
A.M.
10;30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Sat.
A.M,
7:00
7:25
7:30
7:35
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
J TMU   18LANDKK, UUMBtKLANU, B. u.
SEVEN
y
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Aas't General Manager
Ml, $15,000,000    BESEBVE HIND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account Small accounts
are welcomed.   Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, with*
drawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S60
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
W»ll«»T*,of«*$eau,ty maybeonly|skindeep;
" «*lipc»|JCl o but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 1*V a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE STORE
SB
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't, help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling. Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN^BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing|Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSjERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on applioation.
[EOTABLIBHED 24 YEARS.]
MUZZLED GERMAN PRESS
No Wonder There Are Few Criticism!
of War-plotting Lords
Long before the war began, the
militarist ruling class in Germany had
dealt out smashing blows to the freedom of the press. Radical and independent newspaper editors have spent
many years in German prison for daring to express so-called seditious and
treasonable opinions. Even for daring to speak of the Kaiser as il" he
were an ordinary human being—let
alone a royal autocrat—a newspaper
would be liable to come under the
mailed fist of militarism. A German
editor once, commenting on one of
the Kaiser's hunting expeditions, said
the so-called wild boars were more
like old hogs, and the party had taken
all day to hunt one old hog to aeath.
For such awful Use-majeste the offending editor served a long term of
imprisonment. Even for exposing
and proving moral perversion among
some of the Kaiser's court and intimates, one fearless German editor had
to suffer durance in a vile cell.
The total terms of imprisonment of
all the editors nd writers condemned
under the German censorship, since
the present Kaiser came to power,
would amount possibly to several hundred years. It is therefore to be understood, since the war began, very
seldom has any opinion or sentiment
contrary to the policy of militarism
been allowed to appear in print. No
matter how strong the antagonism
among the common people to the continued domination of the swashbucklers and bureaucrats in Germany,
the censor will see to it that such
sedition or treason does not find vent
ln the public press. Occasionally,
however, there is a lapse in the watchfulness of the censor's office. The
Neues Vaterland, a paper said to be
favored by the German crown prince,
and edited by a well known writer,
von Tepper Laski, made the following
trenchant remark: "If you were to
ask confidentially any man who is
not a contractor for the war office,
or does not sit in a "patriotic" newspaper office, or has not become one
of its dupes, whether he would not
prefer that, the war had never occurred you would have to take those who
replied in the negative to a lunatic
asylum. The biggest war shouters are
to be found at home, and especially
among the editors of certain papers,
who have been found to be permanently unfit for military service."
These daring statements indicate
that once the German people get the
military bureaucrats under, as they
must someday, it is Just possible they
will Jump on them hard.
Mother Would Know
Cyril Maude, whose   interpretation
of the character of "Grumpy" has won
him wide popularity in Canada, tells
of two small pugilists.
Willie and Tommy held the following conversation recently:
"Aw," said Willie, tauntingly,
"You're afraid to fight—that's wot it
is."
"Naw, I ain't,"    retorted    Tommy
stoutly, "but if I fight my ma'll find
it out and lick me."
"How'll she find lt out, eh?"
"She'll see the doctor goin' t' your
house."
DEFENCE DUTY OF EVERY MAN
Ottawa, Feb. 19.- Premier
Hughes, of Australia outlined
the attitude of the Commonwealth toward the war in'an ad'
dress at the Canadian Club today. He declared, as a labor
representative, that preparedness
and compulsory service are essential for the security of any free
people who desire to retain their
freedom.
The Premier's address was
greeted with cheers. Among his
hearers was the Duke of Connaught, Governor-General of
Canada; Sir Robert Borden, Sir
Wilfrid Laurier, Cabinet ministers and many of the prominent
men in Canada. After praising
the "dauntless bravery of the
Canadians,"Premier Hughes declared ' that historic Balaklava
was not to be coinpared with the
charge of the 8th., Australian
Light Horse, where only fifteen
men survived out of 500. When
the order for the charge was given, ten hours before it took place
the men knew that for most of
them it meant certain death, and
they gave farewell messages to
their comrades in the trenches
for friends at home.
Australia has 240,000 men enlisted, he said, and 145,000 have
been sent to the front. By June
it is expected that 300,000 will b*
under arms.
Australians, the Premier declared, valued their democracy
and liberty, and were ready to
fight for them to the last man.
He said every man should be educated in the first duty of citizenship, which is ability to defend his country, his home and
himself.
"We could have purchased an
ignoble peace," Premier Hughes
declared. "The Germans were
prepared to treat Canadians as
an independent nation and to
confer a like favor on Australia.
Germany now knows that she is
fighting not only England, but
also the men of adventure and
resolution in all the British Dominions, who will fight to the
end alongside those who gave
them their traditions. We shall
not quit while life remains in us.
"The safety of the Dominions
of the Empire was due to the
British navy, and it is because of
♦he strengthening of the navy
that we live as free men today.
Had Britain been prepared as
well by land as by sea there
would have been no war."
Some day, he said, the dove of
peace will reign throughout the
land, but that day has not yet
come. When peace is declared
the free men of a free country
must still prepare to defend their
freedom, the Premier declared.
In his opinion this duty cannot
be left to a voluntary system,
but every man must be compelled
to do his share. EIGHT
THE ISLANDEK. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
FOR SALE—At A.K.Kierstead's
Blacksmith Shop, 5 sets Market
Sleds, $40,00 and up; also auto
wheels repaired.
Mrs. P. P. Harrison will not
receive until after April.
Mayor Kilpatrick of Courtenay
was here on a visit during the
week.
Kate Dailos, [daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Frank T)allos arrived
on Thursday.
H. Browning, assistant secretary of the ^Canadian   Collieries
left for Victoria^on Wednesday
• morning.
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. John
O'Conner ofiBevan, at the local
hospital on Friday Feb. 20th., a
son.
Mr. and Mrs.^Syd. Horwood
left for Victoria on Friday morning. Mrs. Horwood may remain
in Victoria forborne time.
The regular meeting of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Union
and District Hospital will be held
at the home of Mrs. Alex McKinnon on Thursday, March 2nd.
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. W» C.
Edwards of Cumberland, at the
local hospital on Feb. 25th., a
daughter.
The.Wellington ^Colliery Railway is now running two passenger coaches between Union Bay
and Cumberland. Last Saturday's
train carried 183 passengers.
Miss E. Gannock of Vancouver,
arrived on Sunday and has taken
the position of stenographei in
the Head Office of the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., recent-
y vacated by Miss Williams.
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. T.
Monks of Bevan, at the Union
and District Comox hospital on
Monday, Feb. 21st, a son.
Mr. and Mrs. William Jones
are moving their household
effects from Ladysmith to Cumberland and will take up their
residence at the Union Hotel,
West Cumberland.
M. Montreal, of Victoria, and
representing the Guardian Casualty and Guarantee Co. spent
the past week in this city in the
in!erest of the company he represent.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., accompanied
by Mrs. Lockard left on Thursday for Victoria and Vancouver.
Lance-Corporal, J. H. Vaughn
of Cumberland and son of Mrs.
E.G. Baldwin has been promoted
to draughtsman of the No.*2 Tunnel.ing% Company. Mr. Vaughn
left British Columbia with the
29th Battalion.
r
*  **********M****i****tM*>*>**^
THE   BIG  STORE
NEW SPRING GOODS
Black and White Shepherd Check, so fashionable at pre
sent for dresses, skirts, and children's wear.    Price ,35C. ft yard.
Navy Serge for Suitings, 56 to 58 inches wide, a really beautiful
quality at.     $2.25 per yard
Embroidery Linen, "Real Irlsh'" for fang JKk'at 65c'and 906c-
Bedford Cord, Beautiful quality, white only, Price 35c. ft yard
Kiddies' Middy Waists, LYoloPrr^
Ladies' White Pique Skirts,In g%qSa&KaS   at$1'
Children's Oliver Twist Suits, Ver^eatand 8martr 75c
Noinertrklr      The "Allies" line, a very desirable quality, and will     t*\(\g*
11 alllaUUIV,      make up beautiful.   Prices per yard 20c., 25c. and     **9*****>
LitiAno   A full line in navy, royal, pale blue, pink, khaki and white.   9(V
111C11C, For dresses, skirts, middies, the best.   Price per yard    **********
Pongee Silk,  Lroni?"ali^.for.8.u.mme.^w.ear:  35c per yard
PONGEE SILK, good quality, and wide width, at 50c. and 75c. per yard.
R %**£* Plrkfrk    A. uery pretty cloth in golden brown and two shades  t*\()r
1X1CC VvlUUl,   0f DiUe, ideal for dresses, skirts, and children's wear. Price a yd.   ********
«
Ribbed Cotton Hose,   For Children and Ladies, suitable for spring
and summer wear, a good hard wearing quality.    Price two pairs for 35c.
DreSS   Goods,   Grey and fawn striped, in new weaves. Per yard  45c
See .our leaders in D. & A. Corsets at 95c and
$1.00 per pair.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8

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