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The Islander Nov 20, 1915

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Array 0
V
ItwMt
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 34        THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, NOV. 20. 1915.     ^Subscription price, $1.50 per year
CONSCRIPTION ABROAD
(From the Pacifi<£Coast Mechanic.)
A great feeling of dread fills
the soul of every man, woman
and child where conscription prevails. In this lamentable year of
war in Europe a great nation
stands trembling on the threshold of conscription. The mother
of the household, the father, the
son, the daughter and the wonder eyed babe, clinging to mamma's
knees, are all aware of the impending danger that may snatch
away the bread winner and send
him out to the post of danger.
It is a terrible condition, this
sometimes involuntary forcing
into a struggle, of which, too often the worker knows little or
nothing or cares less but when
the Nation is in danger necessity
knows no law and the father and
son must shoulder the rifle and
go forward to face the blast of
machine gun and the horrors of
asphyxiating gases.
This country knew conscription
and draft in the later months of
Civil War. Ever since the establishment of the labor unions it
has known draft and conscription
The walking delegate and the
business agent is the spotter, the
czar who compels the worker to
join the militant closed shop organizations. There is no freedom
of action and no liberty in the
circles of labor, once the bosses
of labor obtain the upper hand,
and *hey are never satisfied until they control the political offices
the petty judgeships and the
police courts that they may enforce their conscription drafts
through the use of the club a"d
the sand bag and force the laborer into the ranks of the union,
whether he wishes to join or not,
This blind conscription, this enforced slavery, this regular taxation of unwilling members, goes
on from month to month find
year to year and the same forces
used to bring the worker into
the ranks, this same slave driving method is employed by
the shop steward, the walking
delegate, the business agent to
ensure the labor chief a continuance in office.
In some states, notably in New
Jersey and in Connecticut, the
methods of the old time political
rings are employed and the laborer is pratically told how to vote
at labor conventions, the intelligent man is sodden in drink, the
unwilling bludgeoned into line.
4
WHERE THE HARDEST FIGHTING IS GOING ON,
rt    tfS*   '"*.» •-'.
LF-P /*. 105W1TZA
iH!I7,
This map of Serbia shows well the extremely mountainous character of the country and also the railroad lines. With foes on all
sides except the south, and an insignificant stretch of boundary on
the northwest where Roumania adjoins, Serbia has a battle line
almost as long as that of Russia. Montenegro on the west, of
course, is fighting on the pide of the Serbs, but in Albania the situation is such that the Serbs hnve put 20,000 soldiers into the ccuntry
to put down disorders.
MASQUERADE BALL
A Masquerade Ball will beheld
in the West Cumberland Band
Hall on Friday evening November 26th, under the auspices of
the West Cumberland Conservative Band, Mr. W. H. White,
Conductor; assisted by the Cumberland Symphony Orchestra Mr.
J. H. McMillan, Conductor; dancing will commence at 9 p. m.
sharp and those competing for
prizes must be in thehall by 10 p.
m. as the judges will commence
their duties at that hour, James
Walker will act as floor manager
and for the convenience of those
attending the masquerade from
outside points a special train will
leave Cumberland after the dance
for Union Bay and intermediate
points. Admission. Gent Maskers $1.00, Lady Maskers 50c,
spectators 50c.
The prize list will be as follows;
Best Brittania, goods valued $5.00 at T. D.
McLean's, $2.50 cash
Best Red Cross Nurse, cash $4.00.
Best Dressed Lady, cash $4.00
Best Dressed Gent, goods valued $5.00 at
Campbell's Bros.
Best Representation of the Allies, cash $4
Best National Costume, lady, cash $4.00
Best National Costume, gent, goods valued $5.00 at Simon Leiser & Co.
Best Flower Girl, goods valued $2.50' Chow
Lee.
Best Comic Group, cash $6.00
Best Topsy, goods valued $2.50, A. H.
Peacey.
Best Hobo, hat at People's Friend Store.
Tombola prize, spectators, $3.00 cash.
the weak are frightened by
threats ancl if that te not enough
the threats are carried out. One
of these days the great big dreaming giant, labor, will awaken and
shake off his chains and the shop
steward, the walking delegate,
the business agent will be thrown
off as a pestiferous gnat might;
be and labor will devise some
other method in its organizations
to do away with the envelope pil-j
ferers every pay day.
Gradually, the methods of the
labor unions through their walk-
delegates, their shop stewards
and their business agents and
the conscription and enforced
draft methods of these worthies.
in turn, has made the worker, in
and out of the unions, lose confidence in the leaders of labor.
CAUGHT PiTLASVlFING
Courtenay^ Nov. 17-—Deputy
Game Warden Dawely, with his
fellow official, W. R. Carter, of
Alberni, capture! a Japanese
named Yamamato and a chinaman named Mah Sing, while they
were hunting for deer near
Headquarters by means of headlights. Before Magistrate Willard
each was sentenced to fine of $50
and costs or in default of payment to serve two months hard
labor. This is the first conviction
for this offence-'-here this year.
Last year after several convictions, this dangerous practice was
stamped out entirely, and it is
hoped by dealing firmly with the
matter no.v to eradicate it.
RECRUITING SUCCESSFUL
London, Nov. 17—With only
a few days left before Lord Derby's recruiting scheme must give
way to some form of conscription men stormed London's recruiting offices yesterday until a
war record was reached. Men
with s;lk hats, and boys jostled
one another to be enrolled as soon
as possibly. Some times.they
came in batches from the same
business houses. This rush to the
colors is not confined to any section, but from every part of London came reports of records enlistments.
Notice is hereby given that
the Board of Directors of the
Union and Comox Dis'rict Hospital intends to apply one month
after date to the Registrar of
Joint Stock Companies for the
Pro zincs of British Columbia at
Victoria, for permission to change
the name from the Union and
Comox District Hospital to the
Cumberland General Hospital.
E. D. PICKARD, Secretary.
Dated at Cumberland B. C. this
5th day of November, 1915. wo
ra.Hl ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, U. (J.
CE OF GOOD CHEER!
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
(Ii)? Jaknfar
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3*5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20th, 1915.
What the Years Show.
For years we have seen men
accumulating great wealth from
the accursed liquor traffic-thirty,
forty, and fifty thousand dollars
in a short period of time. Whiskey was free and we cried, where
.will this end? Unbridled and unchecked, the end was inevitable
ruin. We said try license law;
anything must be better than
this. But what have the years
unfolded, a mitigating of the
terrible curse? Nay, it is absolutely free rum, adulterated beyond computation, with an open
allurement for the young that
cannot be given to legally criminal
acts. It is like the frogs in Egypt,
implanting itself everywhere,
carried to our homes, all about
us, under our feet, an offense to
our sense of sight and smell.
"The evil is sanctioned by the law.
We are now all rum-sellers by
our agents. We have the thirty
pieces of silver, the price of our
fellow-men, but we are taxed a
hundred fold more to buy potter's
field to bury our physically dead;
and also to provide prisons for
the physically living, but morally
dead. Worse a thousand fold are
we than if we held the clothes of
those who should starve to death
these children of the living God.
Such a death would not increase
the guilt of the thoughtlessness
murdered, and would not disgrace
the mother, the wife or the children of the victim. Slowly, and
after watching carefully both
systems for years, have we come
to the conclusion that absolute
unqualified prohibition is our
only safety. Government must
as thoroughly control and be
responsible for the making and
dispensing alcoholic poisons as it
Railroad and Teamsters' Coats
Special in Railroad and Teamsters' Coats, in Clive Khaki, a coat
that keeps out the water all the time. You cannot get the legs
of your pants wet in this coat.    Its waterproof qualities are
exceptional.
Fall Overcoats
Men's heavy Overcoats in Curly Cloths and Tweeds, in the
newest -puts.
Raincoats
Men's English Rainproof Coats, in all sizes, at popular prices.
Sweaters
Special values in Ladies Hand-knit Sweater Sets, made-to-order
with Sweater Coat and  Toque to match, in shades of reds,
browns, greens, blues, tango white and black.
Ladies' Raincoats
Ladies' Card  Velvet Raincoats in fawns and greys, in new
styles at popular prices.
Coatings
Coatings suitable for Ladies and Children's Coats, in Checks,
Serges, Astrachans and Bearskins.
Dress Goods
Newest fabrics and novelty weaves in Dress Goods in all the
leading shades.    Serges. Poplins, Ladies' Cloths, Satin Cloths,
Ratines' Novelty   Stripes in silk mixture fabrics in all light
shades suitable for evening wear.
I
is for coining gold and silver or
printing currency. Nothing short
of this should be our aim.
The First Glass the First Step.
There is down in the depths of
my heart a sadness forthe youths
who have taken the first glass of
intoxicating liquor, and thus
made the first step towards destruction, influenced by the
thought that to indulge only in a
glass of wine once in a while, or
to play a game of cards now and
then just for fun, there would be
no harm come from it. Thus persuaded in their minds, they imagine they are so firm and strong
that they will control their appetite for strong drink, and that
they would not be led off by slight
indulgence.
But this supposed innocent in
dulgence has its deadly influence
to call for one step after an
other until they find themselves seated at the gambling
table in some den of vice or calling for intoxicating drinks at the
bar of some loathsome, filthy saloon, filled with fumes of tobacco
smoke and the very atmosphere
they breathe laden with with the
poisonous odor of whiskey and
other drinks, and listening to the
sickening oaths and obscene language coming from the lips of
its drunken inmates.
Go with that sad, brokenhearted mother to the door of
felon's cell, behold the tottering
form, swollen and bloated features of a miserable wreck of humanity she still calls by the endearing name of son, who was
once strong and vigorous,  and
felt himself just as secure as you
do, and had started in the busy
field of life to battle bravely; but
the tempter was too powerful and
he was persuaded to take the first
glass, and consequently his bright-
young life was blighted, and his
heart was filled with shame.
Feeling he was now degraded
and disgraced, ruined forever,
and it was now too late, he had
fallen so low, he made no effort
to reform, but continued to drink
day after day, year after year,
without one intelligent effort to
free himself of this horrible habit.
This picture is not overdrawn. It
seldom fails to follow the first
glass.
..... ^     ■ mt**.
In the end the liquor traffic
will abolish temperance, or temperance will abolish the liquor
traffic.
5 1 THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[established 24 years.]
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hade, son, fr oprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsexer Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTE
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,500 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applioant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaut himself. >
Each application must be aceompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal mining rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include t'-o coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available sur
face rights may be considered necessary
for the workins of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanacre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,   or to   any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
GET ACTION
-TELEPHON
To write or talk, that's the question ! Three minutes
of quick, decisive telephoning, or three days of indecisive corresponding ? 1 Settle the matter now 03' a
telephone call! Costs much less than dictation, typing,
stationery, stamp, and the time lost!     Much less!
Take a talk trip by telephone.
British ColumbiaTelephoneCompany
i
4J
CHIEF CANADIAN CHAPLAIN AND HEAD OF ARMY P.O.
Captain Murray, who was connected with the Toronto postofflce,.
volunteered for service at the outbreak of war, and was put in
charge of the postofflce arrangements of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.    Col. Rev. R. M. Steacey, chief chaplain with Forces.
THE LUMBER INDUSTRY
Victoria, B. C—The serious
situation confronting the lumber
industry of the West owing to
chronic overproduction and ruinous price-cutting, received a great
deal of attention at the Pacific
Logging Congress and the annual
meeting of the Western Forestry
and Conservation Association.
Both of these meetings were held
in the lumbermen's building at
the Panama International Exposition at San Francisco.
Conditions in British Columbia
were dealt with in a letter sent
to the President of the Association by the Hon. W. R. Ross,
from which the following quotation is made:—
"It is with regret that I find
myself unable to attend your
meetings at San Francisco, j de-
particularly to be present at the
discussion of conditions affecting
the lumbering industry.
It seems to me that there has
been definite progress during the
present year.
Discussion of what is wrong
with the industryis becomingclear
and effort along definite lines is
beginning to take shape. Trom
this side of the line weare watching with great interest your v. orl;
of replacing demoralization by
organization and of endeavoring
to secure to wood its legitimate
market.
As you know, no government
is so closely identified with the
lumbering industry as is that of
British Columbia. Present prosperity, public revenue and future
development in this Province depend very largely on the profitable marketing of our forest
products. Hence the situation of
the lumbering business is viewed
with the greatest concern by the
government, and every method
of restoring the industry to sound
health is being studied by us.
For the moment we are concentrating upon the conservation of
lumber markets, to secure to our
products their full legitimate
market, and check the shrinkage
in consumption from which wood
has suffered so seriously in the
past few years. Government campaigns of advertising have, in
the past, been of considerable
affect when applied to immigration or the marketing of fruit,
The official campaign we now
have in progress is, 1 believe, the
first one that has been launched
on the lumbering industry. We
intend to push the work vigorously and to use the most effective
and modern methods of publicity.
Pamphlets, newspaper articles
and advertisements, farm building bulletins, moving pictures,
and adaptions of some of the fertile ideas so successfully developed in the Forest Protection
Movement in the West will all
be used in an intensive artillery
fire directed at the consumer.
We are fortunate in securing the
hearty co-operation of the agricultural authorities and other
agencies now active'y engaged
in pushing the better-farm-rg,
more-lumbering-consuming move
ment." FOUR
THE    ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
y,i><Xss*vaiCii\*KQiSM*K
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WE   WRITE
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.insurance!
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
DISTRICT AGENT
|      OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
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I National Fire of Hartford
I Equitable Life Assurance
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THE ISLANDER BUILDING
Phone 35 or 78.
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IFTHE LIQUOR TRAFFIC J
AIDS BUSINESS
 Why Do The	
Railway Companies and Commercial Clubs
when advertising a City or Town
-TELL ABOUT-—
Schools
Libraries
Mills  '
Railways
Churches
Banks
Farm Products
Natural Resources
Climate, Etc.
AND SAY NOTHING ABOUT
Breweries
Distilleries
Saloons
"Cafes"
Gambling Houses
Brothels, Etc.
8     People's Prohibition Movement
s Cumberland, B.C.
c.txi*&*&xxi*-yii*^
FURS
Gef'More Money" lor your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in yoar section
SHIP YOtTR FURS DIRECT to "SHUBERT" the largest
house in Ihe World dealing exclusively in NORTH AMERICAN HAW FUHS
a reliable—responsible—safe Fur House with an unblemished reputation existinc for "more than a third of a century," a long successful record of sending Fur Shippers prompt,SATIS FACTORY
AN"D PROFITABLE returns. Write for "Zl)t feDutat Shipper."
the only reliable, accurate market report and price list published.
Write lor it-NOW-ifs FREE
AR  SHIIRFRT Inr   25 27 WEST AUSTIN AVE.
. o. onuDUvi, inc. Deptc 69 Chicago, u.s.a.
HER MAGAZINE STORY
How Bob Found His Long Lost
Ruth.
By ADELE  MENDEL.
"Come on to bed, Robert; it's past
midnight," said his roommate, Kenneth, as he knocked the ashes from
his curved meerschaum pipe.
"Just want to read one more story
and then I'll be with you," answered
Robert, settling himself comfortably
in the huge leather arm chair.
"One would think you were a lovesick maid, the way you devour those
.magazine stories," growled Kenneth.
"I'm not a love-sick maid, but maybe I'm that kind of a man," said Robert with a quizzical air and throwing
down his magazine.
"I've no doubt of that, none at all,"
emphatically answered Kenneth. "Any
fellow of twenty-eight who refuses to
call on girls, declines all invitations
to dances, dinners and parties, who
never changes the color or style of
his necktie, has something wrong
with him, mark my word."
"Her name is Ruth Wilson," began
Robert, as if he were repeating a
well-known lesson. "She was a little
pen-and-ink sketcher and sold some
of her work to our firm; that is how
I flrst became acquainted with her.
But our acquaintance soon grew to
friendship, and then it wasn't many
months before we both knew we were
in love with each other. I wanted to
marry at once, but Ruth insisted
upon waiting a year, as she felt she
had a . future in her artistic career
and was not as. yet willing to give it
up. Patiently I agreed, and at the
end of the allotted time she begged
for six months more. And then another and yet another delay, until one
evening, as we were seated in her
two-by-four hall-room studio on the
third story of a second-class boarding
house, irritated by her seeming preference for her profession when she
again asked for a postponement of
our marriage, I lost my temper and
hurled unkind, angry words at the
girl. " Naturally, she resented my attitude. One word led to another, I
banged the door and dashed like b
madman down the stairs and out oi
the house.   I walked miles and miles.
S   !ff
"By George, Ken, I'm In Love."
not caring where, until, exhausted, I
Anally reached home.    That is   the
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.     -
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 25th Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m.,  Holy Communion
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H. M. Forces on Wednesday at 8-00 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
Dance to the perfect rhythm of the
Edison
Diamond Disc
Phonograph
If you are just learning the
new dances, start right. Get
the rhythm of them firmly fixed
ln your mind through the well-
chosen, well - played records
rendered by Mr. Edison's latest
invention.
If you are already an expert
you will appreciate the splendid interpretation which the
mellow, fully-rounded tone of
this wonderful instrument produces.
No Needles to Change. A Permanent Diamond is the
Reproducing. Point.
Mr.   Edison's  perfect  mechanism  insures uniform pitch
and uniform speed from the
first revolution to the last.
Hear tlie new dance records
which we have just received.
Come in any   time and   hear
as many as you like.
G.A.Fietcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
CUMBERLAND-  HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
/
./ THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
"A JOLLY PICNIC PARTY"
The children's play entitled "A
Jolly Picnic Party," under the
' supervision of Mrs. Thos. E.
Banks, given in Grace Methodist
.Church on Wednesday evening,
was a success beyond all expectations. The church was crowded
to the doors,—standing room at
a premium. The platform was
decorated with trees and palms,
making the scenery suitable to
the play.' The first part of the
programme consisted of vocal and
instrumental solos and a quartette
by local talent. In the second
part of the programme "The
Jolly Picnic Party." in "Woodland Glen," was given by the
Sunday School scholars of the
church. The children played
their part well and gave evidence
of careful training, especially
little Miss Odgers, a child of six
or seven years of age, who told
of the Brownies' visit while
Grandma was asleep and making
good their escape.
The whole play reflects great
credit upon Mrs. Banks |and her
tuition,. The decorations were
under the able'management of T.
E. Banks. The rtceiptsjffor the
evening were a little over $70.
$100 REWARD
One Hundred Dollars]|Re-
ward will be paid jby the City
Council for information leading
tov the arrest and conviction of
the person or personsjmaliciously
breaking and! destroying" plate
glass windows in the city of
Cumberland.
JAMES WARD,
Chief of Police.
City Hall, Cumberland, B.C.,   (
November 1st, 1915,
NOTICE is hereby given^that on 'the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the transfer of the
licence for the sale of liquor in and upon
the premises known as the Union Hotel,
situate at Union, Nelson District, British
Columbia, from John N.McLeod to Walter
Hudson, of British Columbia.
Dated this 15th day ofpctober, 1915.
J. N. McLEOD, Holder of Licence.
WALTER HUDSON, Applicant.
NOTICE is hereby given that, j on$ the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the renewal of the
hotel licence to sell liquors by retail in the
hotel known as the Bevan Hotel situate
at Bevan in the Province of British Columbia. HUGH THORNLEY,
Dated this 15th day of October, 1915.
FIRE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the Lon-
d m & Lancashire Fire Insurance Go., of Liverpool.
Total Assets - -523,788,930.
W.    WILLAEE,
LJOAL
A3 E Nl
last time l ever saw ner. Only Uod
knows how I love that girl!"
"Don't tell me you never went
there again; it's unbelievable!" interrupted Kenneth.
"She, dear little forgiving angel,"
went on Robert, "had written me a
note saying: 'I surrender. Name the
day.* Through the stupidity or carelessness of the maid I never received
it until four weeks later, when I
chanced across it unopened in a book
that was lying on my library table.
"I rushed to her home without delay. Everything on the way seemed
to say, 'Ruth is going to marry me,
Ruth is going to marry me.' I was
fully prepared to tell her what an all-
flred fool and idiot I thought myself
for losing my temper. Bounding up
the stairs, my pulse throbbing, imagine my feelings when the landlady
informed me that Ruth had moved
the day before and had left no address. That is two years ago, and
although I have tried incessantly, I
have been unable to secure the slightest clew to her whereabouts. Naturally, I suppose she thought I received her letter when written and
didn't care to respond."
"It's certainly hard lines, but you'll
find her yet. Brace up, old boy," comforted Kenneth.
A few weeks after this conversation, as Robert entered the ropm, he
found his friend excitedly walking up
and down.
"Bob, Bob," he exclaimed, "I thought
you would never come. I have found
her, I've found Ruth—at least, I have
a clew.
Robert gazed at him, speechless.
"Coming home," continued Kenneth, "I picked up this magazine
from a news stand. I turned to the
story entitled 'Unfinished.' It's almost
word for word the story of Ruth and
yourself. The name signed is doubtless fictitious, for Ruth, and no other,
can have written it. Write to the
publisher, secure her address, and
then your troubles will be over."
Early the next morning, after a
sleepless night. Robert reached   the
publisher's office, where he discovered that the name signed to the
story was the author's real name, and
that she lived in a small suburb in the
outskirts of New York. Jumping on
a train, after two impatient hours ue
reached his destination. A pretty rjirl,
with a twinkling eye and sympathetic
voice, answered the bell. He introduced himself, explained his mission,
and added: ,
"Tell me, please, where I can find
your heroine, for find her I must."
"I'll gladly give you her address,
but flrst 1 wish to explain how I came
to have the story published. Ruth,
after leaving New York in an unhappy
state of mind, came here to visit ancl
rest with me. Poor thing, she was so
distressed that I begged her to tell
me the cause. I never intended to
use the story for material to sell, but
just wrote it up because its dramatic
possibilities appealed to me Last fall
I sprained my arm, and mother, addressing some manuscripts to my publishers, in mistake Inclosed this story.
I felt dreadful at tlie time to think
that it might appear as a breach of
confidence'. But now, if it will be the
means of bringing Ruth and you together ag'.'ir., I •will be the happiest
of girls."-
Robert thanked the girl, boarded
his train, and lost no time in reaching his office and writing a passionate
appeal to Ruth for forgiveness.
Many and weary were the weeks
that followed. Hope and despair alternated in Robert's breast, but ho
answer came.
"It's no use," he remarked one evening to Kenneth. "Ruth has received
my letter long before this, and It is
evident that she no longer cares
enough for me to answer it. I don't—"
The telephone rang, and Pob?rt
(Concluded on page 7 cc). 3.)
a:
Attention!
Every Customer making a CASH
PURCHASE of 50c. from Nov.
13th to Dec. 13th, inclusive, will
receive one chance on an artistic
Reading Lamp
complete with attachment cord
and frosted tungsten globe.
i
Drawing to be held in the Company's office Saturday, Dec. 18th,
at 2 PM.
The number of tickets given will be in direct
proportion to the amount of the purchase.
All other necessary regulations will be left to
the discretion of the Company;   •
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
:K
if
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, (Mis, Edison *& Columbia
Graphopliones
.
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279 Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
COURT OF REVISON
A Court of Revision will be
held in the City Council Chambers on Friday December 10th.,
1915 at seven thirty (7.30 p.m.)
tn correct nnd revise the Voters
List of the C:ty of Cumberland
for the year 1916. The Court of
Revision shall havepovvtrto hear
ancl by a majority vote, determine any application to strike
out the name of any person which
has been improperly placed thereon, or to place on such list the
name of any person improperly
omitted from such list.
Holders of last agreement of
sale, must rrake declaration, and
pay taxes on same, on or before
the 30th. day of November; also
authorized agents of incorporated
companies, wishing to represent
such company at the municipal
election must file their authorization papers on or before the 30th
of November, 1915.
A. McKinnon,
C.M.C.
City Hall, November 17th. 1915
Lady will teach stenography to
a limited number of pupils; low
terms. Communicate with P.O.
Box 388 Cumberland.
BOY SCOUTS
Cumberland Troop No. 1 will
parade at (1.30 p.m. on Friday,
Nov. 16 h, in the Club Room f<r
the following practices:
Knot-tying, Ambulance, Gymnastic Practice, Stave Drill and
Signalling.
Orderly Patrol—Foxes,
Orderly Officer — Assistant
Scoutmaster VV. WI yte.
Boys between the ages of 11
and 18 years are eligible to join
the troop, accompanying a written consent by their parents.
Scouts must be in full uniform.
By order,
A. J. Taylor,
Acting Scoutmaster.
There are vacancies in the
Cubs for boys between the ag9s
of 9 and 11 years; those intend-
i: g to join must have a written
cs nsent from their parents, and
should apply to S.M. A. Bischlager on Thursday evenings at
7 p.m.
as
$25.00 REWARD
Will be paid to anyone giving information leading to the arrest
and conviction of any person or
persons damaging vacant property in the City of Cumberland.
JAMES WARD,
Chief of Police.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
COV-1-M-c...t ,•>,
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.   1915.
READ   UP
Sat. I Fri.
i
P.M.   i P.M.
4.35   ! 7.35
4.10 7.10
Thur.  Wed.   Tue    Mon.
bun.
P.M.      P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. P.M.
4.35     7.35' 4.35 4.35 9.35 3.35
!
4.10     7.10  ; 4.10 4.10 9.10- 3.10
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05
3.05
4.00
7.00
4.00
<
, 7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00
3.00
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3,55
3.55
2.55
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50
2.50
3.45     6.43  : 3.45     6.45     3.45     3.45      8.45    2.45
3.30  : 6.30
STATIONS
3.30     6.30    3.30    3.30      8.30     2.30
Cumberland
Bevan
Puntledge
(f) Lake Trail Read
(f (Courtenay Road
(f)    Minto Road
Royston
Union Bay
READ   DOWN
Sun. Mon.
A.M     P.M.     A.M.
7.00     1.00   ! 10:30
7.25     1.25   : 10:55
i
7.30     1.30   ! 11:00
7.35     1.35   ' 11:05
I
7.40     1.40   ! 11:10
7.45    1.45     11:15
7.50     1.50   i 11:20   2:50
Tues.
P.M.
2,00
2.25
2:30
2.35
2.40
2.45
8.00     2.00   ! 11:35
3,00
Wed,
A.M.
10:30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Thurs
A.M.
7:00
7:25
7:30
7:35
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
Fri.
A.M.
10;30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
Sat.
A.M.
7:00
7:25
7:30
7:35
7:40
11:15    7:45
11:20
11:35
7:50
8:00
An extra train will leavp Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
miiiiwnwi riii     i     tmkn THE   ISLANDfcK.  t. U viKKKI.ANi).  k   ■
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D. D.C.L., President
JOHN AIRD, General Manager. H. V. F. JONES, Asa't General Manager
CAPITAL $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits ot $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. S50
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. a CRAWFORD,
'DEALER 3N!
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
\
BARN B NOW FULLY STOCKED ANDJIMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT;,TOJ.CUSTOMERS:---NoJIOrientate,  Agents,  or  Solicitors
employed.
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Underwear
and Negligee Shirts, Whitewear,
Silk Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc.
Chow Lee & Sons,
CHINATOWN,     West Cumberland
x*.
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
ANO
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. MeKINNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
bieppea to tne pnone. He neura a
soft voice say, "Is this you, Robert?
I just received your letter, returned
to me from England. I ara stopping
with my aunt, Mrs. Davenport, who,
strange to say, lives in an apartment
next to yours. Would you care to j
come over?"'
"Would I care to?" cried Robert.
"Oh, girl, just wait two minutes and
see!"
As Robert bounded down the stairs,
Kenneth said to himself: "I guess the
little authoress won't he able to call
her story 'Unfinished' any more."
(Copyright, 1912, bv W. O. Chapman.)
SPRINGTIME
A .Jightshlrt Council
The most picturesque war council
known to h:story took place during
the battle of Mons. Commander-in-
Chief, Sir John French, General Si
Douglas Haig, and General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, were awakened
with the news that the English forces
were gravely threatened by the Germans. Gathered about their majs in
their nightshirts, they planned tut
new movements for the English and
then went back to their beds.
In the morning, as tht. English
again took up their retreat from Mons,
Sir John French all at once broke
out into a hearty laugh.
"What do you see that's funny?"
demanded Sir Douglas Haig.
"I was only thinking how funny
that nightshirt council would look in
a history booK," replied French.
Soldier's Queer Biscuits
The Indian and Australian can
make their own army biscuits; the
former is a "chupatty,' the latter
"damper.' A chupatty results from
the mixing into a stiff paste by an
Indian of flour, salt and water, and
baking it on a metal dish over .a hot
fire. But the Indian cook seems a
necessary ingredient to make it t^sty
as well as nutritious.
Damper needs flour, baiting powder,
water and wood. A hole in tha
ground is tne oven Fill it with your
wood, and while that -s burning m ke
y>ur dou*'.. then i-vv it on a 'ar
stone, cover it with a tin, and cover
the tin with the h»t wood ashes, a..d
the result will be damper.
"A Lost'Art ™'T
"You say you used to have a-PR>
Ifession, my good man?"
"Oh, yes,   lady, I used to
tacture petticoats."
Nothing Else Forthcoming
"I beg your pardon, sir—"
"Granted; but It's no use begging
ior anything else!"
Uncle Eph. Remarks:
191
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don t you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter  and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind wil) be
permitted on the Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
when folks used t' take a hour off
three times a day reglar t' fill up ther
'waist baskots'—an* bread an' dough-
tuts wasn't 77 per cent, holes."
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3*5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND
0
i
1    Cumberland
DYE WORKS
|                  HJGH-CLASS
[DYERS   AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C. EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
C. H. Mcintosh left for Victoria on Friday.
Geo. Peacock has left for Michel.
P. L. Anderton of Courtenay
was here on business on Monday.
Miss Mary Walker of this city
is now attending to the Telephone
Exchange at Union Bay.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Henderson returned from Victoria on
Saturday.
A. McKelvie was here during
the week representing the Imperial Life Assurance Company.
The Young Ladies Basket Ball
Club have decided to give a dance
in the West Cumberland Band
Hall on New Year's Eve.
J. B. Morgan of Victoria, of the
People's Prohibition Movement
was here on a visiton Wednesday.
P. S. Fagan, paymaster of the
Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd
left for Victoria on Wednesday.
P. S. Fleming of Victoria, provincial relief officer arrived On
Monday and left for the South
on Tuesday.
Mesher Bros, of Nanaimo are
here superintending the construction of the new vaults for
the Canadian Collieries Ltd.
Frank Sawford, superintendent
of the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd. at Union Bay has been
confined to his home at that point
for the past two weeks.
The vicar of Cumberland will
conduct Divine Service for the
soldiers at Union Bay on Sunday
morning at 11 o'clock in the Institutional Church.
Mrs. Len Herd, whose husband
was killed sometime ago at Butte
Montana, is expected to return to
Cumberland on Wednesday next
from Toledo, Washington.
John C. Brown, now Corporal
Brown of the 62nd Battalion of
Imperial National Forces is home
for a few days visit and leaves
to-morrow for Vancouver.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir Ltd. accompanied by
Mrs. Lockard left for Victoria on
Monday ami is expected to return
this evening.
David Stephenson, Provincial
Chief of Police and District
Licence Inspector for this district
accompanied by Mrs. Stephenson
was here on Monday and left on
Tuesday for Nanaimo.
Provincial Constables Hannay
and McDonald raiced an opium
den at Bevan on Friday and arrested seven Chinese. Upon appearing in the Police Court the
Chinese pleaded guilty, two that
were smooking were find $25 each
the remaining five, $5 each.
r
THE   BIG   STORE
Curtain Nets
A consignment of the newest Curtain Nets has just been delivered to
us including some of the very best values procurable.
Lace Curtain Net Striped design, 40 inches wide, very fine
mesh, scolloped edges, only 25c, per yard. Five yards d»l pc
make a beautiful Pair of Curtains for only :.*¥•*• ******
Lace Curtain Net Striped' design, 36 inches wide,   0£
very fine mesh, scolloped edges, a bargain at per yard OOC
Cream Curtain Net   Good design, small pattern,     ofi
40inches wide, scolloped edges, per yard '..,.! **-*DQ
Lace Curtain Net 44 inches wide, plain edge, very A£\t*
dainty design, good quality net, per yard .,.;/ rrUC
I     -        ' :
The Latest in Ladies' Waists
White Marquisette Waists, beautifully embroidered, d» 1  *mj fi
newest collar.   Price each .**. *r ********
Striped Rep Waists, all white, military style, two imitation *n og
pockets, new.collar, very sniart.  Price each *xy**me***iD
White Silk Waists, mapeof heavy Jap silk, military effect, d»n Q(J
convertible collar, splendid style.   Price each $***• W
New White Jap Silk Waist, deep collar, black velvet ribbon d»o C/>
tie, black and white buttons.    This is a /ery dainty waist. *pO*D\J
Smart Dresses
Navy Serge Dress in sailor style, red satin ribbon bow, splendid quality
Serge.   Price $10.50
Green Velvet Dress The very latest style, and a beautifurquality.   Ask
to see this one.
Fancy Work Department
Some of the newest designs and materials, including a good range of
Chenille Ribbon which is one of the latest for this kind of work.
Our Fall stock of Rubbers is now to hand and include Ladies, Gents,
Boys, Girls and Children's.
Leckie's Boots For Boys and Girls.    We guarantee these to'give satisfaction.   Try a pair.
(****tt*-***\
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
.J

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