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The Cumberland Islander Jun 17, 1927

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lEiE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which is consolidated the Cumberland News.
t>
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—No. 24.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER
A.S.Jones Chosen
As Referee In
Saturday's Game
The touring Scots will meet with
formidable opposition tomorrow when
they play at Nanaimo tlie pick of Up-
Island soccer stars, as tbe committee
tn charge has selected one of the
strongest aggregations possible to
team together at this time. Ladysmith and Nannimo players make up
the team as follows:
Goal—Orr, (Ladysmith).
Backs—Perry (Nanaimo), Thomson, (Ladysmith).
Half Backs—Knight, McFarlane,
Stobbart,  (All Nannimo).
Forwards — Wilson, Sandland,
Cowle, Davis (Ladysmith), and
Fowler.
Reserves—Routledge. Thompson,
Heeps, Clark, Reserves picked
according to position ordinarily
played.
The game Is scheduled to start at
6 p.m. on the Central Sports Ground,
with Mr. A. S. Jones as referee. Mr.
Jones halls from Union Bay and Is
recognized as the premier referee on
the Island.
The Islander refuses to be prophetic
but other newspapers have freely advanced the opinion that the Scots will
be playing the hardest game of their
tour tomorrow, with even chances for
a win or defeat. A great number of
soccer followers in Cumberland will
take ln the game.
A feature of the dance at Royston
last Saturday evening was the playing
by the orchestra of a catchy fox-trot
written and composed by .Miss Jean
Beasley, of Courtenay. Tliat the
number was populur was evident
from the loud applause and repeated
demands for encores.
MR. JOE TOBACCO
LEADS IN FISHING
COMPETITION
Tarviatlng of the Island Highway
has heen in progress and necessitated
the closing of portions of tlie road
between North Wellingtn and Parksville since June 6th. Traffic was only
slightly impeded as several detours
were called into use. It is expected
that the work will he finished today,
but parties travelling to Nanaimo
tomorrow are advised to pass slowly
over this section.
Courtenay As
A Centre For
Winter Sports
THREE-BASE HITS ARE
FEATURES OF GAME
WON BY CUMBERLAND
COURTENAY, June 15.—The possibilities of Courtenay as the centre
for winter sports were pointed out at
the Board of Trade meeting on Tuesday night. From the snow lields in
the mountains of the Beaufort Range,
tu the summer beaches adjacent to
Courtenay Is only a matter of a few
hours. This was pointed out when it
was announced that the Hon. T. 11.
Pattullo, Minister of Lands, hud
promised to come to the district dur-
By the score of 9   runs   to   6,   the   ■>■« •*,*•■•■'• .'''■•<-", *l ■» expected he will
,,',•,,,      ,   ,, . ,   .    , ,.  spend a lew days in the mountains.
Cumberland baseball team last night I ,(  is ,,„,,„,  that th„ (lay ,„ not ,ar
took the measure of BoVan in a game distant whon the wonderful play-
Ihat certainly provided thrills for the j ground formed hy the beautiful and
spectators.   The game was played at °™r va^ing scenery ol! the mountain
plateau  within  but 5  or 6  miles  of
Bevan. j Courtenay will be made more ttcces-
Cumberland  brought back Into the i slble  for  the  public und tourists  to
fold   such   former   stars   as   "Sacki" | enjoy.
Contl. Ollie Harrison and Ed. Hunden     ,]", 'I'scnssing   the   Board's   annual
' , ,    ,    I picnic wliieh is held in July on  the
und there is no doubt tliat the inclu-j extensive sands of Kye Bay, the
Blon of these players caused the meeting was reminded that no definite
youngsters on lhe-team to settle down ! action had been taken regarding the
ami play the brand of ball they are  Proposed road improvement down to
really capable of. In one Inning Ed,
Hundon came up and nicked Aitken
for a three-bagger, being brought
home by Bannerman's single. Conti
and Have Hunden followed with
singles, loading the bases, and Ollie
Harrison promptly brought them all
homo with a duplicate of Hunden'a
three-base bit, making four runs in
as many minutes.
Fall Fair Plans
Well Advanced
Up to the presont time three local
fishermen have had their "big ones"
duly weighed and recorded at Mumford's Grocery, nnd entered in the
competition being conducted this
summer by the Rod and Gun Club of
Cumberland. At the end ot the season
a prize of $10 will be awarded to the
fisherman catching tbe biggest trout
(by weight) in tbe waters of Comox
Lake.
Mr. Joe Tobacco now holds lirst
place with a line trout weighing 5
pounds aud 5 ounces, while Mr. Sam
Williams follows closely with a nice
one at 6 pounds 3 ounces and two or
three at a slightly lower weight. Rob
Bennle nlso caught a hig fellow which
weighed In at 3 pounds 11 ounces.
DEPARTING RESIDENT IS
FETED BEFORE LEAVING
COURTENAY, June 13.—A number
of tlie directors of tlle Comox Agricultural Association met on Friday evening to further the plans of the Fall
fair and for tlu* Jubilee celebrations,
A letter from MrB. G. L. Swan, of
Denman Island, requesting space at
the 1927 exhibition for a display of
hand-made lace, was received and the
request granted.
Messrs. William Duncan. W. A. Urquhart and R. U. Hurford were appointed a committee to make the
necessary arrangements for a ploughing match to be held next October
The committee formerly appointed,
with Mr. Hurford as chairman, was
empowered to proceed with the conr
slruction of new fences and gales for
the fair grounds to replace the presenl
fence, which lias outlived Its usefulness.
lhe beach. A letter will therefore be
addressed to Mr. W. P. Beavan. ass't.
district engineer, asking for this work
which would benefit so large number,
he commenced as soon as possible? 30
that the road would he ready for this
year's picnic.
Permanent committees for the year
were appointed with the following
personnel, the chairman being the
first named in each case:
Ways antl Means—Win. Eadie, J. N.
McLeod, H. E. Wallis, Ben Hughes.
Puhlic Works—J. W. McKenzie, Jr.,
L. Roberts. W. McPhee.
Transportation—Chas. Simms. C. 11.
Bridges, Theed  Pearse, Joe McPhee.
Agriculture—R. U. Hurford, E. R.
Bewell, W. A. B. Paul, John Pritchard
and Wm. Duncan.
Industrial—G. II. Kirk. E. Thomas,
A. T. G. Smillie. Fred Field and G. R.
Laver.
Reception—A. B. Ball. P. McBryde,
F. C. Brock. Wilcock and M. B. Tribe.
The chairman expressed the wish
that members would make an effort
to increase the membership. Two
new members were proposed and ac
cepted. Mr. H. Bryant heing proposed
by Messrs. Douglas and Eadie, and
Sir.
Mr. F. C. Brock
Cumberland High
Gain Second Place
In Recent Sports
In tlie track meet on June 3rd, our
home High School pupils were runners up to Nanaimo for the honors of
the day. The total points made wero
as follows: Nanaimo 68, Cumberland
52, Courtenny 49. Although, ln tlle
last issue of the Comox Argus, Courtenay High School claimed second
place, they have acknowledged their
mistake and promised to rectify It.
The outstanding athletes for our
school were Nobio Hayashl, flrst In
1110-yd. dash, second in broad jump,
member of 2nd place relay team and
of tug-of-war; Josephine I^reeburn,
flrst in broad Jump, member of First
Aid and 2nd place girls' relay team;
Nina "McKee, Harold Conrod, Edna
Conrod, Victor Marlnelli, Archie Dick
and Tatsuml Iwasa. The relay teams,
both of which gained second place,
were composed of: Girls—Josephine
Freeburn, Mary Gozzauo, Nina McKee
and Edna Conrod; Boys—Nobio Hayashl, Norman Hill, Tatsuml Iwasa and
Harold Conrod.
Much credit is due to the Girls' and
Boys' First Aid teams, who gained
sufficient points to put their school
decisively in second place. By three
successive wins, the boys are now
permanent owners of their cups, while
the girls have brought their trophy
hack from Courtenay.   Teams  were:
Girls—Marjorie Brown, Jean MacNaughton, Annie Beveridge, Nine McKee, Josephine Freeburn.
Boys—Jack McLean, Dick Marpole,
Archie Dick, Andrew Brown, Norman
Frelone.
1 aS"i*-;2Sia»^^»=aJ''<Sa*'r
Next week's afternoon tea in aid
of the Cumberland Tennis Club will
be given by Mrs. MacNaughton and
Miss Burrows on Thursday, at Mrs.
MacNaughton's home, Windermere
Avenue.
Yesterday's fine weather brought
out a fairly large number to tbe tennis
courts. Tea was served during the
ufternoon by Mrs. Cameron and Mrs.
Dick.
CLIFFE TO MEET
BELANGER ONCE MORE
COURTENAY, June 16,-The local
Jubilee boxing carnival programme
has heen completed for presentation
at the Courtonay Stadium, July 2nd.
Charlie Belanger, Winnipeg llglu-
heavywelght, meets Roy Cliffe. local
aspirant for title honors In the feature
event of ten rounds, with Tommy
Fielding, Victoria, and Young Towns-
end, Vancouver, supplying the action
In the seml-windup. These two latter
met In the main event In Victoria two
months ago, and battled to a draw
decision. Eager to settle the question
of supremacy, both accepted Promoter Bert Farrell's purse for a six
round bout. Another Victorian, Ernie Woodley, will be seen In action
against Billy Cox, Vancouver boxer.
Wing Hay. of Port Alberni. Is signed
to face Tommy White, of Cardiff,
Wales, ln one of the other events,
while in Ihe fifth event, Billy Baker
of Seattle is scheduled to meet Kid
Stubbs of Nanaimo. Oil Martin, of
Vancouver, has been selected as
referee of the entire programme, with
the judges yet to be decided upon by
the principals.
FANCY DRESS BALL
IS POSTPONED
The  Children's  Fancy   Dress   Ball,
scheduled  to  be  held  on  June  24th
John SuttmAby thc secretary and j under auspices of the W.B.A., haa, on
account of sickness in the town, been
postponed until early Fall.
ODDFELLOWSHIP IS
IN A FLOURISHING
CONDITION IS CLAiM
Mr. John C. Brown returned Friday
CERTIFICATES FOR
MINE MANAGERS
VICTORIA, June Iii—Results of re-
Discussing the Diamond Jubilee
celebration, Mr. J. H. Macintyre said
tliat the occasion was one tliat only
occurred once in a lifetime and tliat
an effort should be made to assist.
Mr. John Crockett was appointed
chairman of a committee toco-operato
with Messrs. Corfleld Motors, Limited,
with a view to pprticipate in tho
street parade.
The    possibilities    of    holding    a I
monthly  or  bi-monthly  market  was
1 last  from tbe  Grand Lodge sessions'cent examinations for coal mine offi
of Ihe Oddfellows at Nanaimo, where
Ihe   was   elected   to   the   position   of
I Grand Treasurer for the ensuing year.
I The fact thai  this appointment went
I to Mr. Brown is a great honor to the
Cumberland   lodge,   meaning   as   It
does that ln a few years Mr. Brown
will have passeil through other grand
j lodge offices and eventually will he
cials of the Province for granting
second aud third class, and mine surveyors class of competency have just
: been made public by Hon. Wm. Sloan.
Minister of Mines. Examinations were
held under provisions of the Coal
Mines Regulations Act at Nanaimo.
Fernie, Coalmont and Cumberland,
and resulted as follows and the Board
Last Friday evening at the home of
Mrs. K. Brown, New Townsite, a very j
enjoyable   evening   was   spent   by   a
number of neighbors and friends ot
Mrs.   Harry   Farmer,   who   lett   this
week to make her home in Cadomin
Alberta,    After  enjoying  whist   and j
games  and songs,  Mrs.  Farmer was j
presented with a very handsome gift i
from   those   present.     The   evening
came to a close with besl wishes for 1
Mrs. Farmer antl family.
Those In attendance Included Mob-
dames Ben Brown, Bob. Brown, K.
Brown, S. Robinson, Johnson, Pattlnson. Hunden, Ecclestone, J. D. Davia, j
S. Davis, Wrlgley. Devlin, Quinn,
Gear, Stant, Docherty, Murray, Mossey, Jackson, Westfield, Walker, Mil- ■
ler, Somerville, Maxwell and Mi's *
Hunden.
discussed.    It  was  suggested'that  if  come Grand Master for the Province of Examiners has recommended that
the market was'commenced it might 'of British Columbia. certificates be granted 10 the suecess-
soon   develop   into   a   weekly   affair.      oddfellow-ship,  it  was  brought out ful candidates:
The holding of a sheep lair was also  at Nanaim0   •„ |„ „ flourishing con-      Second Class: James Littler. Michel
i'omtwi?^ throughout  the  province   aud B.C.; John Johnston, Fernie; William
through   Mr.   IO.   It.  Bewell,   district j during  the  past  few  years  has  in- Chapman, Corbln;  William W. Frew,
agricultural   representative,  with  the
Intention of geltlng a Pert-heron stallion for the district next Spring.   The
necessity of special attractions for the
Fall fair was pointed out. Dancing
and Instrumental competitions wcre
suggested. It was agreed to try and
arrange for the same round-about aud
side shows which were here a few
years ago. The directors present
were Messrs. Paul. Gunn, England,
Macintyre. Stalker, Pattlnson, Crockett, und the secretary.
EMPLOYEES VOTE
AGAINST PICNIC
FOR JULY 2ND.
creased    in strength   hy   leaps   nnd Nanaimo.
hounds.   It   is perhaps the strongest Third Class: Daniel M. Waddington.
fraternal  order  in  British  Columbia. Michel;  Albert Rear, Michel;   Albert
A lurgo number of local Oddfellows Parsons, Michel; Samuel Ban*. Nanai-
attended the Nanaimo sessions.  Next mo.
year the Grand Lodge (will be held in Mine   Surveyors:    James   Edward.
Chllllwack. Victoria; Frank McKenzie, Corbln.
LEGION TO PARTICIPATE IN
THE JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS
BRICK FACTORY AT
COWICHAN STATION
DUNCAN, June IC — Negotiations I
are pending to acquire property be- j
tween Cowlchan Station and Hlllbank
lor the purpose of erecting an up-to-
date brick factory for the manufacture
of pressed bricks and all high class!
products of that description.
Machinery of the latest type haa
already been purchased and. directly
the necessary arrangements have been !
made, will bc put on the ground. At |
the start the plant will employ fifty
men and this number will later be
increased.
The shale deposits, trom which the
brick products will be made, are reported to compare favorably with
any deposit on the American continent.
As far as can he ascertained, there
will he no celebration In Cumberland
to mark Canada's Diamond Jubilee of
Confederation, and it is therefore
assumed that residents of this city
uill lend their efforts toward making
tbe Courtonay eelehralion one long to'ability
he remembered In this district.
It had been proposed that a cele
hration be held locally on July 2nd
and that tlie employees of the Cana- j
dian Collieries lie asked to hold their
annual picnic on the same day, thereby assuring success to the event, 'the
employees, al a meeting last Sunday,
decided a'gaiust tlie proposition, however, holding that their annual picnic
should be a day apart from any other
celebration. Nothing further has been
done, so we are led to believe tllat
what plans there wore for a celebration here have now been dropped. At
any rute, time Is now too short to
arrange anything specific,
GORILLA MAN CAPTURED
Reports from Winnipeg Indicate
that the "gorilla man" has boetweap-
t tired by police officers.
COURTENAY, June 13.—The
subject of a busluess-llke meeting ol*
the local branch of tlic Canadian
l.cgioi British Einp. Service League,
on Tuesday night was the part thai
(Will be taken in the Diamond Jubilee
celebration here. Bolh General Sir
Percy Luke aud General H. F. Mao-
Donald wrote emphasizing the deslr-
of the Legion tuking n full
part in tho celebration.
Mr. W. A. I). Paul, president of thu
local branch, in agreeing with this
view said thut the meeting should
concentrate on preparations. The
j executive hnd already met onco In
Mills connection, but it was necessary
to get the support of the whole of the
members In order to put on the part
which the occasion deserved. Some
time wus spent iu discussing plans
for tht.1 legion's part in the street parade, including ihe preparation of a
float A committee consisting of
Messrs. Bersey, Wilson, Hughes and
Tarling was appointed to arrange [or
tlie flOUt and Ihe parade committee Is
made up of the following members:
Messrs. Capes and Beavan of Courtenay; Grist of Little niver; W. Farley
ot Headquarters; Fred Hughes of
Merville; Edwin Bayly of Minto; C.
W. Leedham of Comox and N. Thomas
of Koyston.
There Is lo be a Mag party in uniform carrying the colors, and Mr. F.
H. Marshall, of Merville, was appointed sergeant-major of the parade. A
full parade of members is requested
chief 1 for  the  day,     The  meeting  favored
also a memorial service to be held at
the war memorial calm at Sandwick
In the afternoon.
Messrs.   Beavan   and   Capes,   delegates   to   the   provlnclal   convention,
reported  a   very   successful  meeting.
The  financial  report  was  considered
most satisfactory.     The   membership
of the Legion was now 0,240  In the
Province of B. C. and some time of
the convention  was occupied  with  a
discussion of membership and funds.
Other matters considered nt the convention were revaluation of veterans"
lands   as   soldier   settlers,   It   being
thought that this should he based on
the   production   value   of  the   farms.
No decision   was   reached  as   to  the
disposition of thc canteen fund except
that the  relief of necessltlous  cases j
would   be   continued   as   iteretofore j
under recommendation from the local 1
branches.   Interest nn tbe fund now \
amounted to $12.01111 per year, which
would Increase considerably this year. 1
Last year only nine thousand has beetiaj
spent of the twelve thousand dollars
Interest,  but  tllc  trustees  wero now |
Lenhart K. O.'s
Cliffe In Second
Fred Lenhart proved too much for
Roy Cliffe when the two met in a
scheduled 10-round bout at Olympla
last Friday. Cliffe was on the floor
once In the second round and a few
moments later he took one on the chin
that put him on the floor again, this
time for "keeps." He was out for
half an hour.
Roy arrived In Courtenay on Sunday and is now training for his match
with Belanger on July 2nd. He has
issued a call for sparring partners.
The local boy bas put on weight but
Is determined to get down to the
light-heavy limit of 178 pounds before his go with the French-Canadian.
I'nlon Lodge No. 11, I.O.O.F., and
Harmony Rebekah Lodge No. 23, attended divine service at the United
Church on Sunday evening when the
Rev. J. It. Hewitt, himself an Oddfellow, preached an impressive sermon on thc three links of Oddfcllow-
shlp, Friendship, Love and Truth, aa
symbolized In their three-linked emblem.
The united escort of organizations
such as thc I.O.O.F. and Its sister organization, the Rebekahs. stand second only to the Church in its power
to combat evil, hut no man 'can be a
true member of the I.O.O.F. lf he
looks only for tbe material benefit to
be derived from the organization, forgetting his duty to fellowman, embodied In Christ's command, "Love
thy neighbor us thyself."
Postal Department
Issuing Number Of
Historical Stamps
Mr. John C. Brown, postmaster, has
Informed the Islander that as a
feature of Canada's Diamond Jubilee
the Postal Department is issuing six
denominations of Canadian historical
stamps depleting the various phases
and personages in the life of- our
country during its sixty years of confederation. These arc now being
printed anil .Mr. Brown expects to
have them on sule possibly next week,
Aside from their historical Interest,
the stnmps may he used for the same
purposes as ordinary postage stamps.
The denominations and designs arc
as follows:
1 cent stamp, color orange, head of
Sir John A. MacDonald,
2 cent stamp, color green, picture
of Fathers of Confederation.
3 cent stamp, color red, picture ot
Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings.
5 cent stamp, color purple, head of
Sir Wilfred Laurier.
12 cent stamp, color blue, map of
Canada, 1867-1927.
20 cent stamp, (special delivery),
color red, showing live stages of mail
transportation in Canada.
Mr. H. Beadnell of the Britisli
Columbia Fisheries Department, was
lu town Thursday for the purpose of
releasing In Comox Lake a hatch 01'
70,000 cutthroat eggs. Tlie eggs wen:
taken by Mr. Beadnell and Mr. Joe
Reece to the head of the lake an,I
wcre put In tho water In the vicinity"
of Crulcksbanks River.
APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE
HEARD HICKS' RECITAL
Last evening the Gnlety Theatre
management at Courtenay brought iu
Mr. Gideon Hicks, of Victoria, with
bis daughters, Dorothy, a lyric
soprano, and Beatrice as accompanist.
The attendance, though large, was
not what it might have heen when one
considers the quality of a recital such
us Mr. Gideon Hicks is capable of.
Mr. Hicks has not visited Courtenay
for some years hut the reception accorded hlni was very flattering. Ills
voice remains wonderfully full aud
true and hi
Manager J. Adam
Has Great Praise
For Touring Stars
First mail dispatches front the New
Zealand front, where the Canadian
football team have* beon coveting
themselves with great glory, were received this week by tlie Victoria
Times [rom Alderman James Adam,
manager of the line bunch of boya
this count ry seat away last month.
Manager Adam expresses himself
in the highest terms of tho personnel
of the team and was delighted with
the reception given in New Zealand.
When the steamship Niagara, on
which tin* team traveled, was nearlng
New Zealand, .1. c. Coates, Premier'
of the Dominion, senl a wireless t-i
Manager Adam, extending a very
warm welcome to ihe Canadians. Tliis
was the fore-runner of a series of
messages and fund Ions, all witli a
view of making the Canadians feel
right nt home.
In a letter written nfter arriving at
Auckland. Manager Adam hail the following to say:
"Hero we are. New '/.'aland at hist.
after a most  wonderful trip.
'The nighl hi fore we arrived nt
Suva we had a fancy dress hull and
tiie Canadians turned out 100 per
cent. The boys entered into the spirit of lhe affair ia great style and the
winning prizes came our way.
"We reached Suva on May 20 and,
after an early breakfast, were takon
for a long drive .is the guests nf ihe
Football Union. Wc bsw -om,. wonderful scenery and visited several native villages, which were very Interesting.
"Early In the day, bofore ii cm t<»>
hot. we played a game with tbe pi'it
of Suva and won. 6-1. Tlic Suva ollicials allowed tne to piny all the boys,
(Continued on   Page Five)
BASEBALL FANS TO
SEE DOUBLE-HEADER
Baseball fans nf Hu- dlalrlcl will be
treated to two games mi Sunday, tho
2titb of June, when s doubli -header
will   he   played   mi   the   Rei n itli 1
Interpretations were very! Ground here.   Camp -'. Camp 3, Cum-
carefully done. I berland  and Courtonay  will  be the
Miss Dorothy Hicks has a light ' competing teams, though just how
lyric soprano voice which appeared to I they will oppose each other has nol
be pleasing to the audience. In yet been determined. The games wlll
"Sally Roses" and "Thc Second Mln- i be Important in Hint tin. two winning
uet" she sang to the best advantage. 1 teams will bompeto 111  Courtenay mi
Her duet with her father, "Tutta le
feste al tempo," from "Rlgoletto,"
waa especially commendable. The
audience W'as very appreciative and
was favored With additional  songs.
July 2nd
celebratio
as a feature of the Jubilee
delighted with the gift to their coni-
Instruoted to spend the whole amount IPany of a shield about 28 by 3(1 Inches
of Interest and to use part of the with eighteen samples of knots and
capital it necessary. j Bpt*cos,   presented   to   them   by   Mr.
Seerolarv   Capes   reported   that   no 1 ,     ,       ,
reply had been received from the j «*■'■■■<•■■■■ *"'■• wh" ***•» b<"*» »***V*'*B
Courtenay Board of School Trustees at "10 Royston Auto camp with Ins
regarding the raising of the Hag at, father. They very much appreciate
the scliool. but he understood that „„, g|fl .,„,, „u. k|ndly |nterMt lnk„„
arrangements were being mnde 10'
provide for this regulation.
Ticket \o. :il Wins Radio
The drawing held  by  tin- Cumberland   Baseball   Club   waa   completed
! tills   week,   tickcl   No, ::i   being   tho
The Royston Girl Guides were very I lucky one.    It  was held by tl. Cavin,
who thereby comes mi" po -> tston of
a handsome De Forest-Crossely radio.
iln them.
TOURING SCOTS WIN !)-2
The touring Scots soccer team last
night deteatod tb.- Mainland all-stars
at Vancouver by lhe score nf '1 goals
10 2.
Eddie Cantor in "KID BOOTS" Ilo-llo, this week-end PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C,
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
CANADA'S FUEL PROBLEM
At the time of Confederation Canada had no
fuel problem. Every farm had a wood lot and
forests skirted the towns and cities. Wood was
almost the universal fuel and it could be obtained
at very low cost. Wood is now about the least
economical fuel. "King Coal" has usurped the
place of the monarchs of the forest.
Canada possesses one-sixth of the world's
supply of coal, but the areas of production are so
distributed that she is forced to import over half
her annual supply.
The coal industry of Vancouver Island has to
face the competition of cheap oil from California
Mexico and Peru. Alberta needs to extend her
markets so as to absorb the production she is capable of making. New Brunswick faces the problem tit' how best to mine her thin seams; in Nova
Scotia there are problems of markets anil submarine mining.
The greatest problem is connected with our
imports of coal into the coalless area of Central
Canada, and the most urgent phase of this is to
secure a substitute for about 5,000,000 tons of
anthracite imported from the United States, and
to this problem the Fuel Board is giving special
attention. There are several reasons for this,
among the most important being: (I) The certainty of the ultimate exhaustion of the American
anthracite supply; (2) possibility of an embargo
against export; (3) rising prices; (4) the fact
that Canada cannot control supply, price or even
quality of this coal.
The danger of Canada's dependence on the
American anthracite was emphasized by the
strike in the United States coal fields in 1922.
Manufacturing industries were jeopardized and
hardships endured by people generally. A substitute was a necessity for the imported anthracite. Attention was turned to the production of
coke. In 1923 the consumption of coke in the
provinces of Ontario and Quebec was 275,000 tons
and in 1925 this has risen to CC7.000 tons. At
the last session of the Federal Parliament a Bill
was introduced providing a subsidy applicable to
the erection of by-product coking plant. This
measure had a dual purpose—to assist the Canadian mining industry and to relieve the fuel
situation in the industrial areas. If 70 per cent
of Canadian coal is used the manufacturer is
entitled to the full subsidy but if less than 50 per
cent no subsidy is paid.
There would be no fuel problem if our coal
fields were situated near our industrial centres,
but unfortunately they are in the far east and
far west, whereas our great centres of population
and industry are in Ontario and Quebec. To meet
this situation the question is so to adjust freight
rates that the eastern and western coal can reach
central Canada at a price that will enable it to
compete with the United States product.
The coal situation would have been more acute
had it not been for the development of the water
powers. In 1918 the consumption of coal was
4.2 tons per capita; in 192G, only 8.6. During
this period population had increased about 25 per
cent, but the installed turbine water-power 170
per cent. It would require 27,000,000 tons of coal
to do the work done by the 4,556,000 turbine
horse-power installed at the end of 192G.
Coke and "white coal" will go far to solve the
fuel problem and free the Dominion from dependence on the United States mine operators.
THE RISE OF JOURNALISM
Canadian journalism has mirrored the growth
of Confederation during sixty years. It has
caught and reflected the disappointments, the
triumphs, the tragedies and the comedies of the
people of this Dominion. From day to day and
from week to week the press has captured in
printed words the spirit of the drama of these
last six decades. The ringing phrases of yesterday no longer stir the blood oi to-day's generations, but they are recorded in faintly faded print
on the yellowing sheets of old newspapers carefully filed in the vaults of the nation's libraries.
It is to these vaults and to these ageing sheets
that historians turn most frequently when trying
to re-create the pictures of our country's story.
If the daily and weekly press of Confederation
days was meagre in news it made up for any such
shortcomings by a wealth of opinion. They were
sturdy courageous journals glorying in political
combat. Advertising was dull and unattractive
and circulation was circumscribed by the transportation system of the day. But the press took
quickly advantage of the mechanical improvements of the later nineteenth Century. The
rapid transmission of news by telegraph, the improved presses and the cheaper newsprint paper
all contributed to the expansion of the press, 'i he
direct results of good advertising and the rapid
growth of Canadian railroads also contributed to
development.
To-day, instead of daily papers reaching only
a thousand of the people, Canada has a press that
reaches to all the corners of the country. The
papers are served and linked together by the
Canadian Press, which is a co-operatively owned
news service supplying impartial accounts of current events to more than one hundred members
over special wires. The larger papers supplement
this service by despatches from special correspondents giving colour and political interpretation
to suit the paper's policy. With the emphasis in
these days placed upon news rather than upon
opinion the major aspects of journalism have the
affairs of the world at large and despatches from
all the world compete with Canadian affairs on
the front page of the great dailies. There is, to
borrow a recently coined phrase, a "day-to-day-
ness" about the press of to-day that did not exist
fifty years ago.
The weekly press of Canada has enjoyed a
creditable if not spectacular history. These
journals, covering as they do the small towns anil
rural communities have become the intimate
family reading matter of a large portion of Canadian people. A generation ago in both the weekly papers and small daily paper communities
there were valiant battles between rival publications but with the increase in production costs
one of the rivals almost invariably fell by the
wayside and to-day most of the town dailies antl
village weeklies occupy their local fields free from
competition.
There are in Canada to-day 111 daily newspapers, 9 tri-weekly papers, 30 semi-weekly, 35
semi-monthly periodicals, 331 monthly periodicals
and 27 quarterlies, or 1,510 in all. Definite
figures for all these types of publications are
lacking prior to 1892, but in that year there were
96 dailies, 6 tri-weeklies. 22 semi-weeklies, 653
weeklies, 30 semi-monthlies, and 217 monthlies.
NEW FORD CAR WILL COMMAND
WORLD WIDE INTEPEST
H|	
Mr, John  T. Gifford. district sales
manager of the Kord .Motor Company
o! Canada, who is in town loday. conflrmed   the   announcement   that   the
company will produce a new car but
added thai it probably will be November before the new car is available
for Bale.   In the interval, be said, .sale
of  the   Model  T  will   be  continued.
The announcement1 that the new "car
will i"   more expensive to manufacture than the presonl model Bhould
it real  minora as to a price cut.
Further, Mr. Gifford said, the established Ford policy ot confining trade-
in business principally to cars of Its
own make will give owners of present
Ford models a distinct advantage, in
procuring b new model when ii does
Lhe market.   This practice,
aid  i ■ based upon the established
ale value of Konl cars. .Many
are already Belling the new
ear '  Iglii unseen" and orders will bo
In rotation, su thai the owner ol
ii curreul model who gets Ills order In
[I en |oj .i distinct advantage
ho d< llvot j  ol   ili«'   new   car
in * < ar, Mr, Gifford Bald, will
keep the Company'* name to :ii" tore
iu tli< motor world aud will be built
upon lit; ame Quantity basis of hlgli
'in.iliiv .ii low cost. Work on tho
now model was begun .several years
ago, lu- Mild, bill Uie sale ol' tlte model
T contl tued al uch a pace thi i hero
nevt r t mod to be an opportunity to
cei i!i<* new car stnrtod. Even now
tii>' problom of continuing to meet
demands for tho MtTdel T nnd changing over tii,L thousands of machines
in the company'i factory al Ford,
Ontario, which is tbe lar^'st automobile factory in tho British Empire
and the only complete factory in the
llritish ovi rseas territories, is one of
enormous difficulty, it is expected,
however, ilia' the change will lie
effected in very expeditious fashion
in spite of the difficulties entailed.
Detailed Information respecting Uie
now car has not yel been made public,
ibe announcement "i w. it. Campbell,
vice-president ami treasurer of tbo
Ford Motor Compat y <*t Canada, Ltd..
having been confined to tbe fact tbat
ii new ear will be bail; ami that production of ports for the Model T will
lie continued for many yoars. It is
Intlmatod ihat the new car will be one
I to command world wide Interest, it
(will have speed, style, flexibility and
control in traffic but what are the
I details of the mechanical and other
i parts making for these qualities has
not yet been given to the public and
will probably not be announced for
some weeks yet.
"The unusual interest attaching to
tlie announcement of the new Ford."
I Mr. Gifford said, "is attributable to
two things: ihe world-wide popularity
I of the Kord und the Ford policy of
j steadily Incorporating Improvements
in its product without calling attention to them by announcing a new
' model, Of course, one reason why
; Kord did not in the past have any
[radical changes to make waa that
i nineteen years ago tho engineering
genius of Henry Kord evolved an
[automobile that was two decades
I ahead of in time. .Many changes announced in other cars since that time
have been but a process of gradual
adoption of features built into the
Ford of nineteen years ago. Kor In-
I stance, three-polnl suspension is now
almost standard practice. It waa
'originated hy Henry Kord in the
I presenl model Kord ear. The same
applies to the torque tube principle of
transmitting the push from ibe driving wheels to the chassis. .Mr. Ford
developed thai principle many years
ago, and adhered to ii and time proved
he was right"
Mr. James Clarke, of Vancouver, is
in Cumberland on a visit to bis
parents.
-ice _.
'or
Quality and Service
Phone
111
CITY MEAT
MARKET
JOHN INGLIS
Thc Practical White Tailor
COURTENAY, D. C.
i   -1.-* ii    a i**f !|
| DINING ROOM
j Our Dining Room offers good food,)
j good  service,  reasonable  charges.!
King George Hotel
The BEST QUALITY of
FRESH and SMOKED
MEATS
at popular prices
Try our
Cooked Meats for
Cold Lunches
WE SELL ICE
GIVE US A TRIAL
NORMA TALMADGE HAS
COMEDY ROLE IN NEW
FIRST NATIONAL FILM
A new Norma Talmadge is delighting large audiences all over the
country. In fact, the famous motion
picture star is not merely delighting
but diverting spectators, for she has
turned comedienne after so many
years in dramatic roles.
"Kikl," David Belasco's favorite
stage play, has been plcturizetl on a
lavish scale by Joseph M. Sehenck lor
First .National.
Engineered
to Insure
The faith of thousands of tire
users in Firestone Gum-
Dipped Balloons is founded
on exacting service—lon-;
mileage and dependability.
Known as the pioneer of the
Balloon—Firestone has consistently led in its development—using only the best
materials and eugineerin-r
to bring it to the highest
point of reliability. It is
only natural, with such a hig/i
quality product, that Firestone has attracted the beit
tire dealers in the country.
Call your nearest one to-day.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER CO.
OP CANASA LIMITED
Hamilton, Ontario
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
TffgftOM
Firestone Builds tbc Only Gum-Dipped TIret
YOUR DISTRICT AGENT:
HARLING &
LEDINGHAM
Automobile Specialists
Telephone 8 Cumberland
FOU BENT—FurnlsUed House, apply
307 Windermere Ave., between thc
hours of 2 and 4 p.m. ond li and 7
p.m.
FOU SALE—Bed Lounge.
for particulars.
Phone Sin
lt.
Conducted
Tourist third cabin excursion
GLASGOW  &° LIVERPOOL
"S.S. Andania"
from  Montreal July S
Ocean Fare Single $95
Return $170 (plus tax)
Leaving Vancouver July 2nd, personally conducted by "Mr. Frank
Lefeaux of our Vancouver office.
Money orders, drafts aud Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Kull Information from local agents or Company's Offices. 022 Hastings St. W„
Vancouver, B. C.
Miss Talmadge ls surrounded by a
brilliant cast, among them Roirakl
Colman, Gertrude Astor, Marc Mac-
Dcrmott, George K. Arthur, William
Orlamond, Erwin Connelly, Frankie
Darro and Mack Swain.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 60c
Children's hair cut any style 3Bc
P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay           Phone  2il
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone  115R  or  24
(Ejgj^jgjg(3jgjgj2f0I@JEli3f0MSJ3ISJSISJBJSPI.
(^.tiiitberland
jjCommercial
IJHeodquartei
I. Hotel
Hates
Reasonlble [
ACCOMMODATION THE BE8T
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
FOU SALE—Empty Bteel Drums, 50;
gallons, J.'i.ilu apiece. Buy now,
don't wait for tlie lire season. Pidcock & McKenzie Garage, phono 2j.
Courtenay. li. C. 22-24
COWS FOR SALE-Over-stocked v. itii
Purebred Cows, several fresh. Wlll
sell at reasonable prices. Select
what you desire to purchase. For
further Information apply telephone
86L, Cumberland. 21-21.
ANCHOl
ANCHOR DONALDSON ||
CANADIAN SERVICE
FROM MONTREAL
To   I'lymnutli-l lici bourg-London
Ascanla  June 2-1 Alaunia July  1
To    lat'll'llst-LiTa'rpilllM'lil-.l.'IIW
•Auranla  June 2-1 Letitla July  1
FROM NKVV YORK
To Qiiri-ii'.tonii ami Liverpool
Samaria June 2*>     Krancoula July 2
To Cherbourg nnd Sotitliiintptiui
A'jultnnia June 22. July B, Aug.  I
Berengnrla June 20, July 20, Aug. 10
•*.Maure1ania July ll. 27. Aug,  17
To Londonderry nnd Glnngow
Transylvania June 25
C|imeronla July 2
To  I'lTiiauutli-ll'iarp-L-iinl-in
Carmania June 2*i     Tuseanln July (I
FROM BOSTON
To Queeiisloivii und Liverpool
Samaria June 2G        Laconia July 10
* Glasgow and  Liverpool only
** Calls at Plymouth, eastbound
CAMP-FIRE
PERMITS
THIS YEAR IT IS NECESSARY TO HAVE A PERMIT FROM SOME FOREST OFFICER BEFORE ANY
CAMP-FIRE MAY BE SET IN ANY  FOREST  OU
WOODLAND
BE SURE TO GET A PERMIT FOR YOUR CAMP-
FIRE AND FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS
PRINTED ON THE BACK OF IT
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
YOU CAN HELP
-W-M-M--W-M-M-i-l--M-l-1--W-W-l-1—>—1
Johnson's Wax
Electric Floor
Polisher
Beautifies all your Floors and Linoleums
quickly, without stooping, kneeling, or even
soiling your hands.
Price complete, with Johnson's Lamb Wool
Mop for spreading Wax:
$48.50
Rent it or buy it from
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
aBaaaEB3ggCTaggggggg3s8=^^
—l—>—1—1—1—1—1—1—eim—1—1—1—1—1—1--1—1—1—1—1—I—1—1—1—1—1—1—1—1—1—I—>
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "PPEN"
This is a *A-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
**i**»MBi3sa=aa«'*r*wriaca^^ FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
«
Coast to Coast Preparation
for Jubilee Celebration
COMOX VISITORS
Wide  and   Interesting   Divergence of Features Typical
of Many Interests.
All Provinces Keen
To Show Unity Spirit
WhoIe-Souled    Concurrence
Original Objects of
Confederation.
In
OTTAWA, Juno 15.—With lbc Jubilee ot Confederation Utile more than
two weeks away, reports received
by tlie National Committee hero indicate that the arrangements Cor tho
celebration throughout tho Dominion
are well In band everywhere, and tliat
the various localities are vying with
each other in their desire to show to
tlie world tliat, after sixty years,
Canada is a united country in spirit
and iu fact. Not only are the cities
and big centres of population giving
generously of their lime, energy aud
finances to Insure that the anniversary is adequately celebrated but from
the remotest points come reports that
citizens of Canada, young and old,
ore enthusiastically preparing'for the
event. While the National Committee
shortly after its organization, circulated throughout the Dominion a
suggested programme for tho three
days of celebration, starting with July
1st, and ending with lhe third, reports
indicate that there will be a wide and
interesting divergence of features
characteristic of tbe various parts of
the Dominion, and typical of their
respective interests and pursuits.
From Atlantic to Pacific there is evidence or a universal desire for tho
manifestation of Canadian sentiment,
irrespective of varied geographical or
economic conditions. Reports show
that there will be a whole-souled
manifestation of concurrence in tho
original objects of Confederation, and
of satisfaction in the results thereof,
Local programmes will, of necessity
be diversiticd. anil varied in character,
and will include community singing
athletics and sporting competitions,
regattas, pageants, anil llouts. the
planting of maple trees, (he unveiling
of monuments and memorials, ceremonies connected wilh the naming
and dedication of Confederation parks
and squares, folk dames, anil Indian
pow-wows, old home reunions, and
the gathering together of venerable,
and venerated figures, fire works, and
bonfires, children's festivals, etc.
With a view toward ascertaining
the nature of the activities in the
various provinces the N'nfional Committee on Saturday communicated by
wire with the heads of the provincial
organizations, and this afternoon had
received replies from tbe majority.
Hon. P. J. Nash of Charlottetown reports Ihat, in addition to thc big celebration planned for the Capital of the
Island, there will be celebrations at
Summcrside, Tignlsh, Allierlon. Montague. Georgetown, Sourls and other
centres. An interesting feature of Ihe
Charlottetown celebration will be tiie
unveiling of a Confederation tablet,
and thc laying of a wreath In the
Legislative Chambers at 1.80 on tiie
afternoon of Friday. Tlic Lieutenant
Governor will preside over events at
Victoria Park, wlTere messages from
Ills Majesty the King, and others will
be read, and where Percy Pope, son of
one of the Fathers of Contederatlon,
will deliver nn historic address, There
will be yacht racing, aquatic aud
other spoils, community singing, fireworks, bonfires, etc.
J. D. Black, secretary of tlie provincial committee of New Brunswick, reports that "every pupil enrolled in tlie
public schools of thai provl ■ will be
presented witli a Onion Jack to be
carried In Ibe celebration parades,
and retained at thc same time that
thc  children's  Confederation   medals
.are being presented." The government of the province will also erect a
IbrdrTze plaque suitably inscribed, in
(the provincial legislature to honor the
jmemory of the eight. New Brunswick
Leathers of Confederation. The Fred-
ericton celebration will continue during three days, and the official programme ut noon on Dominion Day In
front of the Parliament Buildings will
be carried by loud spakers to those
assembled. There will bc parades of
scliool children, faternal and national
societies and service clubs, lloots.etc,
and the royal salute will be lired at
high noon, while speeches will be delivered by Premier Baxter, A. A.
Dyaart, opposition leader, and others.
In the evening there will be a Mardl
Urns carnival on Parliament Square,
culminating with a firework display
fired from barges on the St. John
River, ln front of the illuminated Legislative buildings. Celebrations of a
similar character will be continued
on Saturday, while on Sunday thero
will be an undenominational service
iu Ihe open air. The report states
that "similar celebrations extemlnlg
over three days will he held at every
incorporated city and town in New
Brunswick, as well as iu many centres
of population which are not incorporated. The provincial committee
has approximately fifty local committees organized and working strenuously, and in communities too small
to have any other kind of celebration
tlie Jubilee of Confederation will be
honored at the formal closing exercises at the public schools on June 30,
tliis ensuring observation in 2,0UU
centres."
John Ilosie, provincial librarian
and archivist at Victoria, B.C., reports
as follows: "Approximately 250 communities are celebrating in a noteworthy manner, as are also many
small schools. Elaborate preparations
are being made in larger centres for
the staging of ceremonies typifying
dominion history from earliest times,
and outstanding dominion and provincial incidents. The local committees
are showing much care, skill, ingenuity and enthusiasm, and the scliool
teachers are specially untied in an
intensive programme of Confederation
history. The committee feels that all
labors will eventuate in memorable
inspirational ceremonies with resultant good to citizenship, and pride in
tlie Dominion."
From Regina comes the report by
Leroy Johnson to the effect that over
201) local points in Saskatchewan havo
organized strong committees for a
proper celebration. In large centres
the occasion will be observed by elaborate programmes on all three days.
A striking feature of tlie activities at
local,points is tlic arrangements being
made for community gatherings, special attention being paid lo giving the
scliool children a prominent part, in
some cases from live to forty scliool
districts will be consolidated at a
central point to take part in (lie celebrations. Present indications are tint
Saskatchewan's seven cities. SO towns
and approximately 200 villages will
celebrate enthusiastically and belit-
tlngly.
Manitoba is preparing for the celebration with great energy and originality. Thc provincial Committee, D.
S. Woods, Its secretary, reports has
sent personal lottes to GOO reeves,
mayors and service clubs, inviting
them to organize. Organizations are
complete in 73 centres. Letters have
also been sent to 2,000 teachers with
suggested programmes Included, aud
beads of churches have been invited
to join. Two minute radio reports of
progress are being sent out dally,
while eighty-live country newspapers
are being supplied with articles of an
educative character.
Alberta Is also in tlie forefront.
Edmonton is to entertain 15,000 children from its public and separate
schools to a hugs children's celebration In Victoria Park on June 30th.
Tlie committee lias conceived the
thought of having thc Edmonton
school child of tlie family with the
longest Canadian ancestry light the
bonfire that will be one of the thousand flames set alight on Jubilee
night. The same city's celebration
also includes tlie placing of wreaths
on tiie grave of Father Lacombe—
noted missionary. From furthesl
north points in this province, aud
from remote points In the Territories
comes the report that celebrations
will be carried out.
It keeps
J/-=*=l\     In-tlie
WMi   Opened
kMw     Tin
Guests registered at the Elk Hotel
recently have been Mr. S. M. Oliver
Mr. A. S. Avill. .Mr. William Erb, Jlr!
and Mrs. C. Tice, .Mr. John  K. Reid.
..Mr. II. J. Scott, .Mr. R. Chester, Mr.
|and Mrs. Horton, Mr. A. G, McLaren,
Mr. Frank Rust, Miss Bainbridge
Smith, Mrs. C. Croucher, Mrs. C. II. G.
Dunn and Mr. J. Dunn, of Victoria;
Jlr. O.A, Bates, of North Vancouver;
Mr. F. A. Rose, Mr. J. Jl. Drainie, Jlr.
D. McKinnon, Mr. and Jlrs. E. A.
Murphy, .Mrs. J. G. Fletcher, .Mr. 11. II.
McCleurhan and .Mr. W. R. S. Eraser,
of Vancouver; Mr. F. B. Rattenbury,
of Victoria; Mr. L. T. Hayner, of
Chicago; Dr. Richardson, of Campbell
River; Mrs. W. A. Richardson, of Net-,
son; Jlrs. William Jl. Eddy, of Santa
Barbara, California; Mr. L. T. Harris,
of Victoria; Jlr. L. Hunt Hogan and
.Mrs. P. Hunt Hogan, of Duncan; Jlr.
E. Jl.  Wilkinson, of Vancouver;   Jlr.1
and Jlrs. liavemeyer and Jliss Gloria j
Havcmeyor, of Qualicum Beach;  Mr.!
Guy  W. Stevens, of Seattle;  General I
Sir Archibald C. JlacDonell, Calgary; i
.Mr. and .Mrs. J. M. Dowsett. Honolulu;
.Mr. William Barr. Paisley. Scotland;
Jlr.  and   .Mrs.   C.   S.   Holnian,   Santa
.Monica,    California;    Dr.    anil    Mrs.
Walton Read and .Master Denis Wal- !
ton   Read,  of  London,  England;   .Mr. |
W.  Haslam, of Powell  River.
J *y **''*"* iL
Never worry about
leaving jagle Brand
in the opened tin. It
keeps perfectly, pure
and sweet, if kept
covered in a cool
place. E2127
.EAGtp/BRANI]):
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
For the Choicest of Meats
try
WILCOCK BROS.
MEAT MARKET
WE HANDLE ONLY THE BEST
Our Cold Meats sliced any thickness you desire on our
NEW DAYTON SLICER
are ideal for the dinner bucket or for lunches.
-: GIVE US A TRIAL :-
FISH LADDER IS
BEING CONSTRUCTED
AUIER.NI, June 14.—To enable fish
to pass above the Stamp River Falls,
a gang of workmen are now camped
at the Falls for the purpose of constructing an  easier access,  to serve
as a fish ladder, alongside the main
waterfall.   This will take the form of!
a gradual ascent, and will not In any ]
way interfere with the natural beauty J
of the scenery. ' I
24 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOli CHARLIE  DALTON
Licensed Taxi Driver
Northampton, Eng.. June 14.—Jerome K. Jerome, noted British author,
died at a local hospital to-day from
cerebral hemorrhage,
SOMETIMES THE
INFORMALITY OF THE
SPOKEN WORD IS
MORE EFFEClTVE
THAN A LETTER.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
DELICIOUS /
DELIGHTFUL//
That's what they all say
who have tried the
famous
PURE
JERSEY
E CREAM
Be sure and ask for it at your favorite
fountain. "THERE IS NONE BETTER"
Manufactured from pure Comox Cream at the
Comox Creamery
Courtenay, B.C.
CANADA'S   THREE   SCORE   YEARS   OF   NATIONHOOD      (Mining)
M*M«|«H*'Si
fsE^MlM
ONE ofthe WORLDS GREATEST
GOLD MINES
MODERN MINING METHODS PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
Ilo-llo Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Eddie Canrpi, Clara Bow, a nd Billie Dove in Elorenz 2ie°:f e!d&
'KidBoota'AFiatiklutllePioduciion AParamouniHctuie
Monday - Tuesday, June 20-21
G QwctmuTit (picture
tSSf I  IASKY
.Menjou. tlie mnn who loves with a smile in his eyes, in a
brilliant society story by .Michael Arlen, iho literary lion of the
hour. Menjou ns a dashing man-about-town in the Arlenesquc
world of Piccadilly night clubs, back-slase and aristocratic
ballrooms. Jilted in love, ho turns gambler, roue and heart
pirate, until he moetH a certain girl. Fascinating entertainment
la assured in this one!
Big Double Attraction
Wednesday - Thursday, June 22-23
Movies
3J35=i5=5SJ=«j355«!=353Mj^^
Attractions for the
Coming Week
KNOW DEFINITION
OF "ACE OF CADS"?
what
"Ace   ot
•with
ton-y;
beats them all   !
!
Do   you   know
Cada" is?
According to .Michael Aden's story
which Luther Reed has made into a
Paramount picture with Adolphe
Menjou in the title role—he is a man
who becomes a villain only because
of his desire to help the woman he
loves.   A bit involved—but listen:
Chappel Maturin, young officer of
the British Guards, loves Eleanour.
She returns his affection until he is
found in questionable company. Unknown to either of them, this discovery has been "framed'' by Basil de
Gramercy, mutual friend of the lovers.
Eleanour breaks their engagement
and Chappel ris discharged from the
regiment. On hearing of Eleanour's
marriage to Basil. Maturin goes to
Paris.
Twenty years later he arrives in
London with tlie light of his one love
still burning. Things have changed.
Basil is dead, having heen killed in
France. Eleanour and her daughter,
Joan, live with Sir Guy de Gramercy.
Basil's father.
Chappel meets Joati and is attracted hy the resemblance to her
mother. She, in turn, falls in love
with this polished man of the world.
Then—in a scene of dramatic strength
and splendor, Eleanour and Sir Guy
beg Maturin to give up all thut they
hold dear, Joan.
And, for tho sake of this woman he
still loves, Chappel becomes a veritable "Ace of Cads'' by—well—see the
picture at the Jlo-Uo on Monday and
Tuesday, June 20-21, Alice Joyce and
Norman Trevor arc featured in support of Menjou. Forest Halsey adapted tlie Arlen story for screen use.
studio property  department.
And—when the automobile arrived,
it proved to be a standard American
make—and the replica of the one
Stahl rode to the studio in himself
every day!
The new picture is a vivid drama
of modern Spain, with Novarro and
Miss Terry in the role of a Spanish
couple in the grip of the menace of
scandal. The cast is notable, including Edward Martlndel, Edward ( ;i;i-
nelly, George K. Arthur, Lillian
Leighton, John Miljan, Otto Hoffmani
and others of note.
Gaiety Theatre
j    This Friday    j
And Saturday  |
NORMA
TALMADGE
in
9>
Wednesday and
Thursday
June 22 - 23
THE ROMANCE OF YOUTH
IN "THE MIDNIGHT KISS"
CHANEY PREFERS TO
DIE TO JAZZ AIR
Picks  "Red  Hot Mamma"  for
Latest Cinema Demise—
Says It Spurs Wits
"Red Hot Mamma!"
That's a strange tune to die to.
But that's the music Lon Chaney
chose for his deatli scene in '"The
Road to Mandalay." his new Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer production playing at
A laugh provoking comedy-drama,
'The Midnight Kiss," will he shown
at tlie Gaiety Theatre on Monday and
Tuesday, June 211-21. In this Fox
Films screen version of John Golden's
successful Broadway stage play,
"Pigs," two of tlie screen's youngest
lovers. Richard Walling and Janet
Gaynor. are the featured players.
They give what is probably one of
the finest interpretations of lovers
who have not yet readied twenty
least of the real old fashioned kind
of lovers who are willing to undertake the responsibility of marriage.
However there is^liore to the picture than this.     Comedy and pal
and  line acting hy  a   well  balanced
cast mark tliis production wliieh was
directed hy Irving Cummings.
"Tho Midnight Kiss," with " lhe
Great K & A Train Robbery," form a
double attraction which will lie shown
at tlie Gaiety on Monday and Tuesday.
June 20-21, and at the Ilo-llo theatre
on Wednesday nnd Thursday, June
22-23.
with
Ronald
COLMAN
t   !
III!
iii!
!       I
i i
i  i
i   i  i
i  !  !
i
Monday and
Tuesday
June 20 - 21
TOM MIX
in
The Great
K&A Train
VtfHERE the human
*" wreckage of the
Seven S etts foregather,
this lioiicrfiil lata of /ore
and intrigue is told.
Lon Chancy in a *.'o!c
surprising even for him!
His thrilling successor to
"Thc Unholy Three" ani
"The Blackbird!"
SEE IT!
TOM MIX DELAYED
BY CURIOUS CROWD
WHILE MAKING FILM
The Royal Gorge of the Arkansas
river was giveir an added attraction
while Tom Mix Iiad Ills company nf
lifty-two at the Hotel Colorado, In
Glenwood Springs, making scenes in
the gorge for "The Great K & A Train j
Robbery." > j
Colorado    newspapers    had    gi 'en   1
wide publicity  to  the*  tact  that   Mix
was on his way and as many Colora-
the  Gaiety  Theatre  next   Wednesday  dans as could get away on vacation
mourn ful
Friday and Saturday June 24-25
afc^&rf&S**-*'*!  ;A/    ,'■•■■::i
■;$•*-*%„ *>A;a!^-**l ■&><
Raqjr*p\SaEii u     *&>*&»
•yfVICTOR SEASTROM Production
With LARS HANSON
a Meva$o(dtwnM<yet pictum.
^^M^S^}qAj^7^^
and Thursday, June 22-23.
No funeral inarches ol
strains of "Asa's Heath*' so common
an inspirer of a screen deatli. heralded
ills passing (for screen purposes only)
from tliis mundane sphere. Jazz
proved the herald of his demise.
"It's all a mistake to use mournful
music to die to." says Chaney. "it
makes you gloomy, and you put on
lugubrious air that spoils your whole
job of dying. If they play something
lively your senses are sharpened and
you pay proper attention to the* business of "kicking tlie bucket,
music is all right for crying
—hut to die properly you've
hnve your wits ahout you."
Chaney plays the sinister "Singapore Joe." Oriental divekeeper. in the
new mystery drama of tlie Orient,
and in the end goes to the land where
it's hoped his forefathers are not.
Tod Browning directed the production
with Lois "Moran as the heroine aud
a cast that Includes Owen Moore, H.
B. Walthall. Kinnlyama Sojin. John
George* and others of note.
Snd
scenes
got   to
had timed their Royal Gorge tours to j
coincide with Mix's arrival.
The crowds, unintentionally and I j
purely from anxiety to see the famous I j
star perforin before Ihe camera, delayed lhe work, making it necessary
for Lew Seller. Ihe director ami Wynn
Mace, his assistant, lo modify their
shooting schedule and move lo more
distant locations, returning later to
complete their work at lhe original
locations.
Similar Interest was found in Canyon City and at Colorado Springs,
where other sequences were made.
"The Greal K & A Train Robbery"
"The Midnight   Kiss"  form 0 dou
programme al the Gaiety theatre
Monday and Tuesday. June 2"-21. n
af the llo-Ilo theatre on Wednesday
and Thursday, June 22-23.
FOREIGN AUTOS
AREN'T FOREIGN
Vaw—n—naaiaa
Foreign automobiles aren't always
as foreign as one would expect. This
Is the startling truth discovered hy
John  m.  Stahl, when lie wanted a
strictly authentic example of Spanish
automobile for "Lovers," his new
Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer .production
starring Ramon N'ovarro witli Alice
Terry, coming In the Gaiety theatre
on Friday and Saturday, June 24-25.
"Get me the kind nf auto lhe King
of Spain rides in,"Jie Instructed the
Bathing Suit Modes Shown in
"Kid Boots" by Eddie Cantor
Clara Bow has worn n one-piece
swimming suit on tlie screen for the
lirst time.   So has  Blllle Dove.
This refreshing sight wns made
possible while filming "Kid Boots."
tho gay play that kept New York in
spasms of laughter lor three years
and which enmes to thc Ilo-llo In liim
form on Friday nnd Saturday, June
17-18, (this week-end).
Eddie Cantor,  creator  of Ilic  til
role on Broadway, iu starred In  the
picture.     In   addition   in  the  Mis-ci
Bow aud Dove, Lawrence Gray ls also
featured.
Cantor wears a bathing niitnt and
his dive from a high platform Into
thc tank from whicli water is being
drained is one nf • tho Paramounl
film's gasping laughs. FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND. B. C.
News of Courtenay and District
INDIAN RELICS FROM
COURTENAY SHIPPED
TO NEW YORK
COURTENAY, June 15.—Courtenay-
Comox Board of Trade matters kept
its members busy until n late hour on
Tuesday night. A pamphlet prepared
by the publicity committee was discussed and live thousand copies are to
be printed Immediately to be followed
by a further like number. Numerous
enquiries have been received from
different points including British Columbia House in London, the National
Automobile Club of San Francisco,
and from the C. P. R.
Secretary C. S. Wood gave a report
of a recent trip to Vancouver and
Powell River when lie had accompanied a party of manufacturers from
Eastern Canada as well as from the
terminal city. The party visited the
Powell River pulp and paper mill,
when Mr. Wood iiad an opportunity
to discuss the advantages or a daily
boat service between tliis point and
Powell River with Mr. Bell-Irving.
Some valuable information was obtained during the trip and good publicity work wns accomplished. Mi*.
Wood said that the numerous eastern
manufacturers witb whom he talked
were not so much interested in the
district from an industrial aspect as
from a point of sport and recreation.
This he attributed to the wide difference in population of the east as compared with the west. Nearly all with
whom he spoke showed a keen interest in the district from a fishing,
bunting or climatic point of view.
Several of them promised to visit here
this summer.
While in Vancouver Mr. Wood conferred with the several heads of departments of the C. P. R„ and as a
result Courtenay will be featured in
C. P. R. advertising throughout the
world, whicli the speaker considered
very excellent advertising.
The matter of affiliating with the
Tyee Club of Campbell River waa
discussed. The secretary of the club
wil] be communicated with, with a
view to having the Tyee Cl»b's fishing
area extended to take in Comox
harbor which is famous for these
large salmon.
Mr. E. L. Macdonald, president, reported having received a visit from
members of the Victoria and Island
publicity bureau with a request for
literature for distribution. He also
reporteaV-that individuals were further
considering the operation of n daily
boat service to Powell River and that
he is hoping to see the service commenced by the first of July.
The Board of Trade's part in the
coming Diamond Jubilee celebration
was gone Into and Mr. Wm. Douglas
was appointed chairman ot a committee to stage the board's part in the
street parade. Tills is to be reminiscent of early settlement days and is
to include a covered wagon and
Indian travois. The hoard will also
be responsible for some of the street
arches and in this connection it was
proposed to acquire two totem poles
which are known to be available in
the district. It was agreed that the
acquisition of these Indian relics
would be a permanent asset and a
valuable advertisement for the town.
During tbe discussion it transpired
that the finest collection of B. C.
Indian relics was In Berlin, Germany,
and that a short time ago two carloads of relics acquired In and around
Courtenay were shipped to New York.
Mr. A. T. G. Smillie will have charge
of the erection of the arches.
NEW VICAR WELCOMED
BY HIS PARISHIONERS
COURTENAY, June 13.—On Friday
night tlie parishioners of St. John's
Courtenay, and St. Andrew's, Sandwick, gathered in the Booth Hall for
the purpose Of extending a welcome
to the Kev. O. L. Bourdillon, recently
here from England. There were over
: a hundred present and a very enjoy-
J able evening was spent. Mr. W. P.
Beavan voiced the sentiments of tiie
gathering in a short address of welcome, to which Mr. Bourdillon made
a suitable reply.
During thc evening tlie Rev. E. 0.
Robathan. ot Cumberland, Mrs. B.
Hughes, Mr. Vincent Bayly and Miss
K. Beasley sang, and Miss Alice Hurford played tlie piano to a violin
obllgato by her brother Frank, and
little Sheila Allard danced gracefully
In costume. Game competitions were
held wilh Mrs. Chris Carwlthen winning the prize for tlie highest number
of points in the series. Mr. Theed
Pearse acted as master of ceremonies
for the evening. Dellghlful refreshment swere served and enjoyed by all
present.
MANAGER J. ADAM
HAS GREAT PRAISE
FOR TOURING STARS
(Continued from Page One)
changing the players at half time so
as to give them all a chance to work
out. The heat was very oppressive
and the going was hard, but tlle hoys
enjoyed the game aud won by five
goals to one. The Suva team played
a fast game, but I could see that the
majority of them were rugby players and used the kick and rush method to gain breaks for their fast runners.   Tlielr goalie was a-dandy.    Wo
were entertained at the hotel by the
Football Union and pulled out at noo.i
for Auckland.
Welcomes Wero Numerous
"Wo arrived at Auckland on May
23, and, while the Niagara was still
in midstream, the soccer officials of
New Zealand came out at 6 a.m. on
the customs launch to extend welcome
to us. We had an official photograph
taken on landing.
"The Auckland Rotary Club met the
boat and after a short drive landed
us at the Albert Hotel. The mayor
and councillors of Auckland gave an
ollicial luncheon and extended a most
hearty welcome to us.
"We had a workout at the new soccer grounds at Blandforth Park, after which we had a look around tho
city und then made ready to leave on
our swlug through the South, arriving back ln Auckland two months later for four games in tliis district.
"We have added another game to
our original schedule. While Hearing
Auckland wo had a wireless message
asking if we would play an exhibition
game at "Flock House," on orphans'
home for boys whose fathers were
lost nt sea during the Great War.
Flock House is ahout fifty miles from
Wanganul by motor and, as It will be
a treat for the orphans, a boost for
soccer, and an additional outing for
us, the team gladly accepted the invitation.
"D. Graham, of Port Arthur, is the
only man on the team who Is not In
lirst-class shape. He has a torn ligament in his knee and it is still giving
him much trouble. The team, however, is fit and in fine physical shape
and I confidently expect that they
will give a good account of themselves. I can only speak in the highest
terms of tlie conduct of tlle boys under my charge and it has been a
pleasure to be associated witli them.
Canada can rest assured that they
will conduct themselves as gentlemen j
both on and off tbe field, and will
bring credit to their country." I
PAGE FIV
ENGAGEMENTS
Mrs. James Stockand wishes to announce the engagement at Nanaimo
on June 14th of her sister Miss Agnes
Hofflielnz, to Mr. John Marsh, only
son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Marsh
of Nanaimo.
Government buildings ln Cumberland will be appropriately decorated
for tiie Jubilee holidays, It was learned yesterday. The Dominion Gov't.
has appropriated a suitable amount
for decorating the Post Office, and
tlie Provincial Government has done
likewise in regard to the Provincial
building ou Third Street.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberlnntl, B. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone 15 Paten 16
NOTICE
THE GRAND PARADE
('(Hindu's Diamond Jubilee Celebration
Comox District
Courtenny, July 1st, Snd und 3rd.
In order to facilitate arrangements
for the successful result of the Parade with which all festivities will begin on the 1st of July, the following
information is published for general
guidance.
The Parade will start at 10 a.m.
The starting point will lie at Warren Avenue (St. John's Church) ou
the Lake Trail Road, from where it
will proceed along the Lake Trail
Road through Union Street direct to
the Ground.
It Is hoped to have the following
various classifications, for each of
which Invitations are extended to all
and sundry to participate:
(a) Floats—Emblematical of Canadian History, Orders, Benevolent Societies, Industries, etc.
No restrictions ns to motile
power.
(b) Decorated Passenger Cars.
(c) Decorated Business Trucks
(with advertising).
(d) Comic Setting in any form.
(e) Decorated Bicycles.
(f) Decorated  Baby Buggies.
(g) Decorated Delivery Wagons—
(boys).
While it is not desired to put any
form of restriction ns to time of entry, the Committee would esteem it
a courtesy If those proposing to put
In entries will communicate the fact
and nature of entry to them, so that
places may be allotted, and information afforded to all entrants as lo
where they should line up.
A $50.00 Cnsh Prize, Trophies and
other prizes are being given.
The Committee will respect any privacy which may be desired prior to |
the day ln regard to entries, hut In |
order to arrange plnces with logical
sequence, It is requested that besides
quoting   the   letter   preceding   each
class above, entrants will afford  in- '
formation as to the nature of the ex- j
hlbit if coming within Class "A."        !
Some   entries   already   In.    Please
send yours early as possible to the
Chairman,   Parade    Committee,   City |
Hall, Courtonay. B.C.
Don't forget delay with the Parade
means delay all through the day.
Make up your mind and start It off t
good.   Keep lt going good all through ,
the days and let us have a good finish,
with much good to remember.
Used Cars
Essex 1926 Coach, done small mileage, just
as pood as new  $850.00
Star 192,1 Coupe, new paint, completely overhauled, tires perfect, a real buy at  S 110.00
Chevrolet 1925 Touring, at a price less than
its value   $525.00
Dodge Touring, 1924 model, bumpers, new
top, etc  $650.00
Ford Delivery   $175.00
Ford Coupe, 1924 model   $425.00
REASONABLE TERMS ARRANGED
PIDCOCK & McKENZIE
('hone 25
I'hone 25
Courtenay
Agents
HUDSONESSEX & DODGE BROS. MOTOR CARS
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to he addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
ls situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained «f rom the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland.
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land ls }5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Ib given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage,
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as bomesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the first year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
IX THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
UF JOHN PETER LEWIS, Deceased,
lute of Campbell Hirer,
British  Columbia.
NOTICE la hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the late John Peter Lewis are
required to send to Robert McCualg
and John Perkins, executors of the
will of the said deceased, at Campbell
Itlver, B.C., their names and addresses
and full particulars of their claims,
properly verified, and the nature of
tho securities (if any) held by them.
AND take notice that after the 30th
day of July 1927, said executors will
proceed to distribute the assets of tlie
said decedent among the persons
entitled thereto, having regard only
to the claims of which they shall then
have bad notice, and the said executors wlll not bc liable for tlle assets
or any part thereof to any person.,
whose claim they shall not then have
received  notice.
Dated at Campbell River, B.C., this
11th day of June, 1927.
JOHN PPRKlN*3)_E![ecutors
ROBERT McCUAlGJ
24-27i
Jasper Park Lodge, Jasper National Park, Now Open
Round Trip Fares
TO EASTERN TOINTS
In Canada and the United States
Also
Edmonton-Calgary
and
The Triangle Tour
VANCOUVER PRINCE RUPERT
Tickets on sale dally to Sept. 30.  Final return limit Oct
Hanadian National* __
"SEE CANADA IN CANADA'S DIAMOND JUBILEE vr.All -iu;.l<
For full particulars  apply
Cumberland E. IV. BICKLE Telephone 'in
Or write C. F. Earle, District Passenger Agent, Victoria.
We have a reputation for Quality.   Purchase your
Bread and Cakes from
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
FOR HEALTH TRY OUR
PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT HEALTH BREAD,
HEALTH ROLLS AND
HEALTH MUFFINS
SATURDAY   SPECIALS
Scotch Soda Scones, Pancakes and Crumpets,
Cream Scones and Syrup Scones
I
|       EL. SAUNDERS
T UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Cptityifta   ji *|*
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note addrets— Opposite the Drug Store.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autog for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
RILEY'S TRANSFER
COAL    —
GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
HOOD
David Hunden, Junr.
E
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
iW     PROMPT ATTENTION     '■.-; 1
E
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the .lay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
i PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 1927.
LADIES' COATS
For one week we wlll offer our complete stock of Ladies' and
Misses' Coats at a REDUCTION OF 20%. You save twenty
cents on every dollar; tiie season is backward, so we are willing
to take our loss now. Secure a snap of a good Coat at a greatly
reduced Price, and have the use of your Coat during the bright
days.
In our stock we have a very smart assortment of the newest
Tweeds and Cloths that the season has produced, and the styles
are right up to the minute.   You can save real dollars by buying
now; only a limited quantity, so be on time.
SUTHERLAND'S
Personal Mention
Miss  Emma   Picketti   has   returned
from  a   long   holiday   with   relatives
and friends in San Francisco,
*    *   *
The Misses   E.   Henderson   and   N.
Cameron, of Cumberland, left yester-
BOARD OF TRADE
SECURES TOTEM POLES
COURTENAY, June 10—Wednesday
afternoon Messrs. E. L. Macdonald.
II. E. Wallis, 1*. L. Anderton, C. S.
Wood and Geo. Pidcock made a trip
to Cape Mudge to investigate the possibility of purchasing some Totem
Poles from the Indians there. Mr,
Pldcock acted as interpreter and they
were   successful    in    obtaining   two
large poles from tbe Chief there by
the name of Chief Chicken Pox or
Old Man Wallis. The old chief made
these himself some fifty years ago.
They will be used for the arch which
lis lo be built for Dominion Day, and
j afterwards placed in somo permanent
! location.
*   *   *
' Miss Ivy Piercy. who has been ill
[in thc Cumberland hospital, is doing
jas well as can be expected.
day morning for Victoria.
* *    *
Douglas Bunbury, a former resident
of Cumberland, was a visitor during
the week.
* *   *
Mrs.   Mumford   and   Mrs.   Robinson
left Saturday last to spend a week's
holiday with friends in Victoria.
* *     4
Miss Edith O'Brien, who is in training at St. Josephs Hospital, Vicloria,
is spending a vacation with her
parentf. .Mr. and Mrs. Chas. O'Brien.
* *   *
.Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Conti, of San
Francisco, arrived in Cumberland last j
Sunday and are tbe guests of Mrs. P.
Bono.
Miaa Harriett Gomm, of Vancouver,
is renewing acquaintances in this
city. She is the guest ot Miss Dellna
Frelone.
* *   #
Jlr. nml  Mrs. J. Emily nnd family
have left Royston Beach and are
residing now on Derwent Ave., Cumberland.
* *   *
Mrs. Marion Stewart returned lo
Cumberland Friday last after a two-
weeks' holiday in Vancouver. Sin*
was the guest of her daughter, Mrs.
F. G. Freeman,
* * *
Miss Margaret Mitchell, of Extension, arrived in Cumberland Sunday
last and is the guest of her sister,
Mrs. C. V. Dando. Miss Mitchell will
make her future home in this city.
* *   *
Mrs. Robert McNeil spent a portion
of last week in Extension. She returned to Cumberland by motor on
Sunday, accompanied by Jlr. McNeil
and Miss M. Mitchell.
* *   *
Mr. Gray. Mr. Wain, Mrs. Conrod.
Mrs. Morgan and Mrs. Davis motored
to Campbell River on Friday lo visit
Mr. II. R. Wnin who is seriously ill
In the hospital there.
| .Miss Muriel Gibbons, of Nannimo, [
will serve In the capacity of relief j
nurse at the Cumberland General j
Hospital for the next two months.!
Miss Gibbons arrived in the city last'
Tuesday  evening  to  commence  hor
| duties.
*   *   *
I    Mrs.   Harry   Farmer left yesterday
; morning for Seattle.
IcAMPBELfRIVER NEWS f
; Mrs. Robt. Atcheson is at present
visiting with friends at Union Bay:
* *   *
; .Mr, Henuing Berg, of San Francisco
\ is at present a guest, at Forbes Landing.
* *   •
Mrs. V. Palmer left Sunday last for
; the city, where she will spend tbe
(summer months.
a      +      *
Mr. T. H. Wilson, of Victoria, was
a guest at tlie "Willows" hotel on
Tuesday  and   Wednesday.
Monday evening last a number of
friends gave a delightful suprise
parly on Mr. and Mrs. Parkins. The
(evening was spent by playing games
and music. At I lie (dose of the evening a dainty tea was served,
* * t
.Mr. It. Berteau, of Vancouver, is at
present  visiting al Campbell Biver.
+ *        ¥
Mr. McDonald entertained a number
of   friends   Tuesday   evening   on   Ins
launch, tlie "Klatawa."
n    *    i>
Tlie Misses Ellin nnd Lillie Timlin
left on Thursday for their vacation.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Thulin nnd
daughter are at present visiting with
Mr. and Mrs. John Anderson, of Lund.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Olson Jiave completed their new home and are now
occupying it.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs, E. Granlund and family have taken now residence at
Campbell Hiver.
* *   *
Mr. 1). Hodsou returned' Monday
from a short  visit lo the city.
* *   •
The Misses Elln and Lillie Thulin
entertained a few friends on Thursday evening lasl. tlie evening being
spent  in dancing and singing.
* *   *
Miss Gwen Smith, of Courtenay, is
a guest of Mr. and Mrs.  II. Pidcock.
* *   *
Mr. Frank Painter, of Vancouver,
Is at present visiting with Air. and
Mrs. E. P. Painter.
.■^■-.:::'&^^^
SUMMER   SALE
It Pays to Deal at
Lang's
Bathing Gaps
Large assortment of styles and colors
Prices range
from
ZuC t„ tpltZt)
Specials in   I-pt. size, Green, special  OCty
V ft fl IIIIM    l"pt' size' Nick,ed' special      $1*18
I A U U U 111    i.qt. size, Green, special   $1.98
itftTTI cQ    1-qt. size, Nickled, special ...  $2.57
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Have you cashed your Discount Bonds
THE   TWO CANADAS
mttr CwMlltutlnil *ct tfusr
THC MAWTIME   PROVINCES
j '-Al""1 «
t^.^aj'-MJ-wt^W"'-**-" .,
fjutmanj
A'
«%\
Used Cars
3 Fords, Self Starters, at    $75.00
2 Fords at   $100.00
1 Ford at   $125.00
1 Ford Sedan at   $275.00
1 Studebaker Touring at.  $490.00
CHEVROLET MODELS FROM 1920 TO 1925
Prices ranging from $50.00 to $550.00
l!>25 Ford Light Delivery   $300.00
I Ford Light Delivery (like new) $2'.i.00
ALL READY TO GO!
All cars ovcr §150.00 guaranteed for thirty days.
All used cars are checked over by our mechanics and put in good running
order before offered for sale.
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone No. (il
"-"•"■* ■SSfltSI 'TXIBS   *I^i»'1«^K,*.,5r'5"".*.'»':*"*' ""' **V<' 'X1W&I&XSRW.^.-SBBc
mrmMai i^»^T^^'^a»Ti'(WTarglyiitta\'W"*7.Ma,w-W'Sf Ba— ■*rr*TMMfrr*g*'*iF"
Expert Workmanship
—Just as Important
in servicing your Ford
as it is in Building it
Expert workmanship, genuine Ford parts, and a flat rate
labor charge are the advantages that this organization
oKers every Ford owner in this community in the servicing of his car.
When your Ford comes into our service department, it
is renewed rather than repaired.
Our mechanics are Ford Trained. They use tools and
machinery made especially for servicing Ford cars and
trucks. When replacements are needed, they put in
new parts that are Identical with those from which your
car was originally assembled in the Ford factory.
To keep your Ford car operating at its original efficiency
and maintain its operating economy, have all your service work done by an authorized Ford dealer.
Corf ield Motors, Ltd. 4?
THE     REAL     CANADIAN     CAR
it^.'-^i tttA-x . !w, r'£*%*, I.'

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