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The Cumberland Islander Dec 2, 1927

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■
: Weird! Baffling!
; "The Cat and the Canary'
.: Ilo Ilo Now!
Hand Islander
,3*
j Spookiest and Most Thrill-j
; ing Mystery, "Cat and the ■
: Canary," now at the Ilo Ilo. ■
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR.—No. 48
CUMBERLAND.  BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY.   DECEMBER   2.
Frank Opinions Expressed
At Mining Institute Session
Held at Nanaimo Saturday
Thomas Graham, Superintendent of Local Collieries, Advocates
Improved Methods of Mining
SLOAN FAVORS SENDING B.C.    MEN
RESEARCHES
Some   line   theories   regarding   low . jj —
temperature  carbonization   treatment
of coal to obtain by-products In order
to  give   relief  to  the   coal   industry
went by the board at the session of
the British Columbia division of the
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, held al  Nanaimo last weekend.
The  general  opinion   was  that  it
would be time enough for the Britisli
Columbia   coal   interests   to  consider
entering   by-product   Held   after   low
temperature    distillation    had    been
proven successful elsewhere. It was
significant, however, that Hon. William Sloan, Minister of Mines, in a
speech at a banquet which closed tho
annual meeting of the institute, declared himself In favor of a suggestion
advanced by Thomas Graham, general manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, that British
Columbia representatives he sent to
investigate the research that had been
made in this direction elsewhere.
TO    LOOK    INTO
REG. STACEY'S CAR
HIT BY STRAY BULLET
Monday afternoon, Reg. Stacey was
one mad man—and well he might be.
Whilst contracting some business at
the   Colliery  office  Reg.   parked  his
| car in the usual place.   Coming out
J of the office he was astounded to find
| that some careless hunter had put a
I hole  through   the   wind   shield,   the
I bullet travelling on through the rear
) of the car.    It Is a very good thing
! that no one was sitting in the car at
I the time, otherwise serious injury, and
possibly death  would have  resulted.
The police  were  communicated  with
and  an   Investlgstlon  started.
CANADIAN LEGION
HOLD WHIST DRIVE
AND DANCE
A very successful whist drive and
dance was held In the Memorial.Hall
on Saturday evening last under the
auspices of the Canadian Legion, B.
E. S. L. Elglit tables of whist were
played, prize-wluncrs being: Ladies'
1st, Mrs. Balagno; 2nd, Mrs. S. Cameron; men's 1st. Mr. L. H. Finch; 2nd,
Mr. F. Smith.
A basket of candy, donated by Mr.
and Mrs. F. Watson, which was raffled
was won by Mr, George Bates.
Following refreshments, the dance
was held, excellent music being supplied by Mrs. Hudson, piano, Mr. J.
H. Robertson, violin. Mr. Thompson,
saxophone, and Mr. Les. Dando.
drums.
The next whist drive and dance will
be held on Saturday. Dec. 3rd, and a
good time Is assured for all who attend.
P. LEO ANDERTON
HEADS THE NEW
CREDIT BUREAU
Courtenny, B.C., Dec. 2.—A very
enthusiastic meeting of the newly
formed Courtenay Division of tlie
Can'Adlan Credit Bureau Service, was
held in the City Hull in Thursday
evening for tlie purpose of electing
its hoard of directors, chairman and
secretary.
After a short talk ill which lie fully
explained the duties of the olllcers,
Mr. C. Worthlngton, lhe organizer,
proceeded Lo conduct the election,
which was strictly by ballot and resulted as follows: Chairman, Mr. P.
L. Anderton; directors. Messrs. G. T.
Corfleld, .1. H. Macintyre, R. U. Hurford and W. Booth; secretary, Mr. W.
A.   W,  Hames.
Tlic meeting was then tin-own open
for the asking of questions and dls-
I dussion of'matters pertaining to ere-
i dil and some very interesting points
* were brought up-.
> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
School Trustees Hear Interesting
Report Of Recent Convention
At Harrison Hot Springs
LARGE NUMBER ATTEND
TEA AND .SALE OF WORK
I     The   regular   monthly   meeting   of
i theC'umherliiiid      Board  of      School
COAL IMHSTKV IIA 1(11 HIT.
It is no secret that a falling coal
market due to fuel oil competition. Is
the problem that has been confronting the coul operators of British Columbia in recent yenrs, as ft bas been
that of Washington State und other
coal mining centres. As one member
of the Institute put il, "The coal Industry is like a man who doesn't know
where his next meal Is coming from."
Recently there lias been consider
able discussion, especially In Vancouver, of low .temperature carbonization
of coal to extract gas, coal tar and
other by-products as a means of replenishing the depleted revenues of
the operators,
NOT I'ltAf Tl( Ml. RELIEF.
Judging from the discussion at the
meeting at Nanaimo, this channel of
relief is too far from realism to be o:
any practical relief to the harassed Industry.
Prof. Joseph Daniels. College of
Mines, University ot Washington, told
the gathering that, while the technical
phase of low temperature carbonization had been solved, the mechanical
and economic phases were still very
great problems,
"To my knowledge there has been
no commercial application made that
is yet acceptable at least not In the
United States." he declared.
Questioned as to what values might
be obtained In by-products from coal,
thc speaker replied: "Take a piece of
paper, get a pencil and use a little
Imagination, and you can reach any
volume you like. I do It myself some-
limes,"
A Paper on "The Production of
Liquid Fuels from Coal,' prepared by
Prof. Robert H. Clark ol the University of British Columbia, was read by
Prof. Daniels In the former's ahscence.
Commenting on tills paper, Dr. Victor
Dolmage of the geological survey
added another damper to the enthusiasm ot exponents of low-temperature
carbonization when lie snld that Prof.
Clark had told him to Inform the gathering tbat on account of the low price
of petroleum In America, no satisfic-
tory application of oil extraction from
coal was practical at present.
.NEED SCIENTIFIC METHODS.
COAL PRODUCTION
SHOWS DECREASE
DURING OCTOBER
Native Sons' Annual Turkey Whist; Tlie lirst December meeting of the
Drive will be held In thc Gaiety The- W.B.A. will be held on Wednesday,
atre, Courtenay, on Monday, December' December Mth.. instead of Thursday,
lllth.   Keep this date open. I December 8th.
The Vi. II. A. lea and sale of work,
candy and home cooking, which was
held in the Fraternal Hall, on Wednesday afternoon last, proved very
successful.
The work stall, wadded with aprons
of all description, wns a great attraction, while the splendid home-cooking was greatly appreciated by purchasers.
The ladies of the Women's Benefit
Ass. are greatful to all who belped
them by attending their sale, especially to those who do not belong io
the order.
Victoria, Nov. 20.—A decline in production during the month of October
cut the percentage of increase which
has been scored during the present
year in tile output of coal hy the collieries of the province, as compared
with the output In the corresponding
period In 192C. Mild weather was given as tlie cause of the lessened production in the tenth month of the year
However thc figures, as Issued by the
Hon. William Sloan. Minister nf Mines j
show tbat In the first ten months ofj
the year the aggregate output of coal'
was 2,021, 373 long tons, as compared
with 1.8H2.32S long tons In Ihe same
period last year, an increase of 120,
044 long tons or seven per cent.
Vancouver Island collieries are run-
ing .14,188 long tons ahead of last
year, and the Nicola-Prluceton district
shows a gain or 21.121 tons. The East
Kootenay district holds the rate Ill-
crease of lhe earlier months with a
growth for the ten months of 93,723
lnng tons.
Coat production for the month of
October. In Ihe Island district was as
follows:
Canadian Collieries   47,380
Western Fuel Corp  44,755
Other Island Collieries 17,791
Granby Con. Co  13,695
E. Wellington Co    4,0411
Diamond Jubilee Mine         54
Totnl    109,92ii
INTERESTING LANTERN
SHOW.' AT P.T.A. MEETING
BILLIARD LEAGUE
VERY POPULAR
Players Enter on Third Round
of Most Interesting Tournament of C. L. A. A.
The filial blow to the expectations
of the coal Industry In looking for
assistance In this direction wns delivered by Thomas Graham, general
manager of the Canadian railleries
(Dunsmuir) Limited.
"I have been interested to hear that
chemical processes of treating coal
are more or less visionary," he said.
"We have now gotten down to the fact
we must apply more scientific methods to the present phases nf the Industry. We ure not so Interested In what
•wc wll) have In twenty or thirty years
from now, bin what confronts ns nt
present.   Benefnctlon of present coat
Continued on Page Three
The Billiard League being run by
lhe Cumberland Literary nnd Athletic
| Association Is proving to bc the most
popular  tournament  ever  staged  by
j Ihe club.    Harry Jackson, one of the
sponsors  of the league,  ls  very en-
I llitislnstlc over the outcome and pre-
I diets some  Very keen  games  in  the
final rounds.   Sixteen players are In
the league, one and all taking n very
' keen interest In all the games.   The
second round of the league has been
completed and a start on 'the third
round   made.    Tlle  standing  of  thc
players at tbe end ot the second stanza wns as follows: W. Smith. J. Robertson, G. Williams and J. Vaughan,
four points each; T. Carney\D. Martin
S. Hatfield, S.Gough. II   Jackson, T.
Brown, D.  Lockhart and O Frelone,
I Two points each; G. W. Williams, W.
■ McMillan,   S.   Hunt  and   C.   Tobacco
' are at the bottom of the league with I
no points to their credit. I
I    Since the third round started, It has
I been  reported to us tbat C. Tobacco
, sprang  a  surprise  on  young  Smith '
, who heads the table by defeating him
very narrowly.
Lantern .Hay Be Purelm-rd for School
A very Interesting item at the P. T.
A. meeting, held last Monday evening
was the lantern show, "Playing For
Health," given by the Rev. E. O. Robathan. the film being issued by the
National Tuberculosis Association of
America.
Before showing this film, .Mr. Roba-
thnn read part of an address by Miss
Harwood, given at the Women's Institute meeting. Miss Harwood Is
herself a teacher, in active work and
states: "Of tlie most importance is
health, since without health it is im- '■
possible to carry on efficient work
in the class room."
"Next to health, perhaps we could
place cleanliness. I don't think it is
asking too much of any parent to sec
that thc children are clean In the
morning."
The lantern JUm centred around
these subjects.9k depicted the steps
taken by Americans to combat disease
In the schools, thereby assuring goo]
health for Its future citizens. Suggestions of work that might be dune
In class groups were shown on the
screen. In every child Is tlle play
Instinct and the pageants or tableau^ appeal to the Imagination of
all children. To further the Interest
In the health crusade degrees of
Suire, Knight Banneret, and Knight:
Banneret Constant art awarded to i
those who dally follow the rules of
health laid out for them.
At the close of the show, Mr. Apps
remarked that It had been a most
Interesting film, especially so because
Miss Mela Hodge, Provincial Director
of the Junior Red Cross, might In the
near future come to Cumberland to
start that work among thc children.
A very hearty vote of thanks was
tendered to Mr. Robathan.
During the business half of the
meeting. Mr. Robathan gave a satis
factory visitors' report, covering tbe
visits made to lllc scliool by Mrs. B.
Brown and himself in the month of
November, In one room, the lantern
had heen employed in a lesson on
Jap-in and California, nnd the pupils
seemed to take a keen interest in tlie
work when shown in this way. A
lantern, lie thought, would lie a valuable asset lo any school, and lie wondered if tlle P.T.A. would take steps
io purchase one for ihe Cumberland
schools.
After  some  discussion   ilic   matter
was left in tlie hands of a committee,
|and  .Mr.  Wnterlield.  who arc to lind
j Miss Gallivan. Mrs. Banks. Mr. Apps
out tlie feelings of tin- members to-
! wards such a step.
As a tprcseni there is only ^0,66 in
i tlie treasury, the money for the liin-
1 tern would have to he raised in some
i way.
',    As ninny members of the P.T.A. as
possible were asked to visit tlie school
' before the next meeting  iu  January.
A communication from the Provincial   Teachers'   Federal ion   iiad   been
I received,    giving    a   list   of  lectures
j which  would  In- BUltable  for  P.T.A.
I meetings, also concerning the campaign of the Teachers' Federation for
< Home Economics in the schools.
The communication was ordered
filed and tllc list of lectures turned
over to the programme committee,
Tlic p. T. Association is one formed
to further the Interest of the children
by   bringing  parents    and    teachers
j together.   Every parent Bhould-attend
I the meetings.
"Do not expect lhe day and Sunday
! School teacher, the C.G.I.T. leader.
1 lhe Girl Outdo uml Hoy Seoul leader,
[to be responsible, solely, for the wel-
i fare and development of tin- child,
i but let the parents come forward,
with a greater sense of tlieir respon-
: sibility, and join bands With tin- above
f workers, so thai the men nnd women
| of tomorrow will lie better and great*
■ er iu every way than the men and
women  of loday."
"500" DRIVE
The Cumberland Welsh Society wil:
hold a "500" Drive In the Memorial
Hail on Monday, Dec. 5th, at 7:30
p.m. Admission 35c. A travelling
prize will bc given.
BADMINTON
Cumberland Credit Bureau To Be Formed
Chief  Activity  nf  Organisation   WIN
Centre on the Practice of Regit*
lat in it Credit
Mr. Herbert Uoy of Royston motored to Xanalmo Sunday morning, returning home enrly Monday morning.
Mr. and Mra. F. Shenstone left for
. Victoria this morning.
C. Worthlngton, International Credit
Expert, and Field Secretary of the
Canadian Credit Bureau Service, has
been at work in Cumberland for
past week organizing the Cumberland
Credit Bureau In order to render service to local business men nnd citizens*
by protecting them from thc overindulgence and operations of the professional "dead-beat."
The Cumberland Credit Bureau will
be an Institution entirely the product
of the Courtenay business men, under
the control of a local board of dlrec-
; tors and a secretary, to assure the
I success of its future operations. The
chief activity of the organization will
he the standardization of practice regarding credit, thus protecting the
hu.-*ine.4K men and the prompt-paying
customer whose good records will
speak for themselves.
' Honest Customers vs, "Oeitd-RtJlt""
By a  system of credit  record  the
bureau will differentiate between hon
est prompt-pay customers and the habitual dead-beats, 'thus enabling the
merchants who are members of the
Bureau to have available al all times
-I complete community and Provincial
record of each and every Individual
tn whom he Is extending credit. With
the consequent elimination of business
losses from bad accounts, and the necessity to make such losses a charge
on the business, the merchant wfll he
able to give the honest customer a
better value for his money,
.Mr.   Worthlngton     places     on   the
business  men  the  responsibility    ot
upholding the citizenship of the com-j
munity. as the extension of credit to
Irresponslbles bas been aiding   Hnd
abetting   delinquency,   (bus   lowering
the  moral  standard,  and  as   it   is  a
proven fact that fully ninety per cent.
of our  citizens    are    hones*   people,
eacli and  every one uf them  have a .
perfect  right  to demand nf the mer- j
chant   who  Is selling  liim  on  credit,.
that he join the   Courtenay   credit
Bupreau and co-opera lo with the rest
of the merchants for the best Into rests
of tho community.
Associated with Mr. WorthlugtOU Is
.Mr. K, Bridge.
The Dunsmuir Badminton Club, one
of the newly formed clubs of Cumberland, entertained the Cumberland
I'nlted Church Club on Tuesday evening last when some excellent and well
contested games were witnessed. Both
clubs are developing quite a lot of
good player!,, and considering this is
the first year of the Dunsmuir Club,
their players have made rapid strides.
A most enjoyable evening was
spent refresbments being served bait
way through the schedule of games.
Following is the complete list of all
games and scores, names of the Dun-
smuir Club first in each Instance:
'J'.  Little and Mrs. Cope won from
.S.   Mounce and  Mrs.  Brown,  1I-4;B.
Wilcock and Miss M.  Picketti lost to
Nash J. Auchterlone and Miss A. Watson 8-11;  R. Yates and Mrs. Spooner
losl to C. Nash and Miss Wood. 8-11;
J. Rennie and Mrs. Murdock won from
A.  Mann and Miss  Brown,  11-8;   W.
Cope  and   Aliss  L.   Carey   lost   to  G.
Brown and Miss P. Hunden. 4-11; T.
Carey aud  Mfs.s  C.  Carey  won  from
J. C. Brown nud Miss Auchterlone, lilt; .1. Stevenson aud Miss L, Shepherd
won from .). .McLean and .Miss Mann,
11-1;  M. Stewart and .Mrs. Cope losl
to I). McLean and  Miss  B.  Hunden.
1"-]]; W. Bennie and .Miss M. Picketti
won   from   11    Brown   and   Miss   L.
(Irani,   ll-:!;   T.   Carey  and   Miss   L,
Shepherd   won   from   W.   Brown   and
and Mfss A.  Watson,  11-6;   R. Yates
and Mrs Cope won from J. C. Brown
and  Mrs.  Brown.  11-5;  J.  Stevenson
Miss   M.   Picketti   won   from   J.
Mann and .Miss Hood, 11-7; J. Rennie
and Mrs. .Murdoek lost to   J. .McLean
ami   Miss   Brown.   4-11;    B.   Wllcock
and Miss L. Carey lost to ('. .Nash ami
Miss Auchterlone, 8-11;  W. Cope and
Mrs.  Spooner lost   to A.  Walker and
Miss P. Ilundtn,, 6-11; W. Bennie and
T. Little lost to W. Henderson and S.
J. Stevenson and  Miss L. Carey  won
from .1   Auchterlone ami   Mfss Matin,
11-1».
Thc Whippets also entertained the
United church club ibe Following
evening . Below arc ibe individual
scores, with the names of the Whip*
pel**, first  in cadi instance;
Norman Frelone and Alice Watsou
vs Stanley Mounce and Qdtth Hood;
.lack Williams and Vivian Aspecy
vs W W. Browa and Jessie Brown,
I l-o.
William Hutchinson and Jennie
Boffey, vs ,i. c, Brown and Allison
Mann. 10-11,
Wm. Whyte and Blanche Dando vs.
Alex.   Henderson   and   Kile*n   Hunden,
ll-S. .
I David Lockhart and Dellna Frelone
vs, H. Brown and Lily Grant. 11-4
Caleb Dando and Mettle Robertson
vs. L. R, Stevens ami Vivien Auchterlone.  ll-lu.
c. J. Parnham and .Mrs. Wm. Hutchinson vs Qeorge Brown and Mrs.
il. Brown. 11-8,
Les Dando and .Mrs. Bannerman vs.
Jack Auchterlone and Pearl Hundon,!
10-11,
Caleb Dando and Alice Watson vs
Dr. Hick- and Allison Mann. 11-2.
Trustees took place on Thursday
evening lest, Trustees Banks, Mac-
| Xaughton. .McKinnon, Bannerman and
I Henderson being present,
I After the usual routine of business
I was completed, during which tho
j teachers' reports were read, accepted
land the equipping of the Home Economics Room discussed. Mrs. T. B.
Banks, chairman of the Board, gave a
report of tho Trustees' Convention,
which was held at Harrison Hot
Springs in Octoher. The report was
as follows;
"Leaving Vancouver at 1:30 p.m.,
October IC. by car for Harrison Hotel
to attend the Annual Convention of
School Trustees, we travelled along
the Pacific Highway via X'ew Westminster . The day was one of our
most gorgeous typical B.C. autumn
weather, and being the afternoon of
Sunday, thai grand highway was
thronged with cars of all sizes aud description, some pleasure hound, and
others, as I was myself anxious and
eager to be at the opening session of
our Trustee Convent ion.
"I   say  advisedly   ours  for   having
been   privileged   to   attend   on   three
previous occasions, 1 looked forward
to meeting again  persons   willing to
discuss and give help to all interested
In the work of a school trustee.   The
trip down jyas one of great  interest,
passing   through     mostly     rich   and
prosperous farm  lands,  touching the
outskirts    of    Cloverdale,      Clayton,
Langley   Prairie,, Murray vllle,   Alder-
grove. Abbotsford, through  the great
Sumas  Lake  Reclamation, of  which
we have read so much.    This is, indeed,  a   revelation    of    the   riches',
blackest  loam and fertile land to be
found in any part of the country.   The
government have  huge hop  fields In
one  part  of it, and   ihe  many  large
barns or store-bouses  (all built alike
and painted similailyj   for the  harvesting of the hops, and tlie overseers'
houses,  besides the  temporary buildings, for the harvesters, which at that
time were closed, for the harvest  was
over, aud the huge dykes running in
all directions, made the scenery very
i picturesque    and     interesting.      The
I roads in this part of the country are
j not good, having in many pans to he
I built mucli higher than the surrounding  country,  us  in   the   rainy  season
much of the land is under water. But
jin a few years this will he quite overcome.   From ihe Sumas reclamation.
we rode north to t'hilliwack.    That's
; ihe place of my choice all along tlie
i route.   Clean looking aud prosperous,
{possessing a very tine High School of
I seven   divisions,   a   Public   School   of
I nine divisions, and   Manual  Training
' ami Homo   Economics   departments,
'besides    fourteen    or    fifteen    rural
schools in tlie surrounding school district.    The city hall  is an  unusually
i nice   building  and   ihe  ptistofflce  one
any city would be proud of.    Here we
stayed jus* long enough to make these
tew  observation.-' and  have afternoon
[tea and then drove on tn Uosedale, a
charming little place    Here we cms*
the roser on a ferry    This ferry runs
every   hall   hour,   la king   only   about
tlve minutes in  the actual crossing,
and then we go on to Agassis;  bul
more of Agassi/, later.    We arrived at
Harrison   Hotel  at   6  p.m     Brethren,
l have had only one or two   really
luxurious times in my short life, ami
I do not make an over-abundance of
friends,  but   I  had   made  a  friend  of
Miss de Oussammo, the managress at
Vernon   Convention,   witb   the   result
that, on my arrival at  the hotel, she
ran to greet  me. kissing me on both
cheeks in her pretty foreign style, for
die is a Belgian, and. as I had already
written hor for a reservation, she per
Sonally conducted  me  to one of the
nicest rooms iu the hotel.   This only
lasted   for one day.    for  by  Monday
night   the   hotel   wus   lull   and   some
delegates had  to double  up,  so Miss
Margeurite asked me to come to her
apartments.    This   I   gladly  did.  and
found   her    suite    to   be   even   more
luxurious than the one I had vacated.
So   I   was   indeed   fortunate
"Monday morning convention opened with due ceremony.   We were the
guesls of the Kent School Hoard, and
Mr.   C.   Nicbolls,   the   chairman,   and
(Continued on Page SJ PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1987
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1927
comes to us except from the printed page. The
silence of the dead has never been broken. We
may batter our wings against the casements of
the tomb in vain. There is never an answer to
our question: "Whence came you and whither
have you gone?'
The one thing of which we are sure is that
each of us must ultimately find oblivion in that
little green inn called a grave. Let us then look
upon death as a tunnel and not a terminus while
we keep step to life's metronome of sunshine and
shadow
Dean Alford's tombstone is delicately carved
m„„     < I with this eloquent legend:   "The Inn of a Trav-
THE LITTLE GREEN INN j elor on His Way to Jerusalem."   It matters not
THE writer on primitive man and in ancient I whether the end of the journey be a glorified
civilization does not always know precisely Jerusalem or Mecca. We were not consulted when
what he is writing about. He walks, for a we entered upon this brief span of life and we
while, hand in hand with fancy, following where- wjh not be consulted when we leave it. But if we
ever it may lead. All history seems to him as i live right it is the heritage of every man when
but yesterday. And pre-history seems a swaying i the summons comes to obey Bryant and wrap the
mass ot shadowy forms from which he takes or drapery of his couch about him and lie down to
leaves, according to his purpose.    No historian! pleasant dreams.
or antiquarian can tell you the exact day when J	
man for the first time stood erect upon the earth' GOING TO CHURCH
and gazed upon a universe that had been created I pjERHAPS you haven't gone to church for a
n    ,;  »t  *   i , ,     s.     u,      ,     i K   longtime.   Why not try it next Sunday?
Dr. K. AI. Ami, president ot the Canadian i ■ Now that the summer is gone and the lure
School of Pre-history in France, who has just re- j 0f the out-of-doors is not so great we may expect
turned from abroad with 5,000 specimens illus-lm0re people to go to'church on Sunday. Every
trating the evolutions of man's industrial imple- Sunday you are spending a dollar or two for
fent.sjm man has„b,ee" ?.n intelligent creature, gasoline and burning it up on the crowded roads,
ior 450,000 years. We believe that Dr. Ami is Why not take that gasoline money next Sabbath
guessing A matter of 450,000 years is quite a I and drop it into the contribution basket at church,
considerable stretch of time when you consider | You will be surprised to find how much more rest-
that it has been less than 2,000 years since Christ
was upon earth.
Nevertheless, the learned doctor has found tools
while excavating that would indicate that man
was not always engaged in fighting and was,
indeed, very industrious in the glacial ages. He
adds, "His dexterity in manufacture of carving
tools and similar instruments was amazing." All
of which is much more interesting than Henry
Ford's new automobile.
That civilization is very old, no student will
doubt. That this earth is built up of decayed
vegetable matter and dead men's bones we all
must realize. That the present age is but a tick
of the watch when measured by eternity we all
admit. It is well that we have men like Dr. Ami
who will go to the trouble of delving in this
mausoleum, upon which we strut for so brief a
time, and seek to learn from the myriads that
have gone before.
But with all our research, all our excavations,
all our study of picture writings and ancient hieroglyphics we still find the past and the future
wrapped in inscrutable mystery and silence. No
voice from the babble of the years that are gone
ful it is on the soft cushion of a pew in church
than on the back seat of the old automobile. You
will enjoy singing a good old hymn, listening to
the tones of the pipe organ and then the preacher
may say something that will set you to thinking,
You used to go to church when you were a
boy. In fact, we dare say you were brought up
to go to church. Sometimes you drove from the
old home to the village, sometimes if the horses
were tired or over-worked, you walked. The
weather made little difference; if it was cold you
bundled up; if it rained you crouched under a
huge,cotton umbrella. Your shoes were shined
and you took your bath on Saturday night to get
yourself fit and ready for church.
Church-going is a habit. You have gotten out
of that habit. Why not take it up again. An
hour in church on Sunday morning turns your
mind away from the daily routine; it calls your
attention to higher ideals, it emphasizes your
duty to God. It strengthens your character and
wards off temptation, and, best of all, it offers an
opportunity for service. It is a habit learned
early or seldom learned at all. Honestly, weren't
you happier when you went to church?
I        Minto        I
A  KITCHEN  MIDDEN
from   Duncan   last   week,   the   proud
possessor of .-i Gray-Don car.
,, p I    What is a kitchen  midden,  refer-
=tts£3SS£3!3trie'*£3SS£Sia£35aM£3S*'lfe   ences  to  which  have  been  ill  news-
Willlain    Harrigan    arrived    home I paper despatches recently?   It sounds
as if it might possibly be a particularly efficient form of apron or over-
* *   * alls, or possibly even a labor-saving
Mi's. N. E. Lansbrough, who is on   device or electrical fixture.   It is none
her way home to Fairfax, Manitoba, j of these things. A kitchen midden,
from California, where she has spent | says the Natural Resources tntelli-
the last year, is visiting with Mrs.', gence Service of the Department of
J. W. Stalker. They are old Win- j the Interior at Ottawa, is a prehis-
nipeg  friends. ' toric refuse heap, made up chiefly of
* *    * ; shells and  bones, much akin to our
Mr. H. G. Mearns spent the week- j modern garbage dumps.   They are de-
end   with   Mrs.   Mearns   at   Crowton i llghtful hunting grounds for archaeol-
Farin where Mrs. Mearns is spending | oglsts seeking evidence on the living
a  few  weeks  with her parents,   Mr.   customs of other days and no doubt
and Mrs. R. Williamson.
»   *   •
Friends of Mrs. James Monks will
be sorry to hear that she had a bid
attack this week and is confined to
her bed.
.   .   .
The bi-weekly whist drive will not
bc held this coming Saturday as it
clnshes with a popular event in Cumberland, but will come off the following Saturday.
the scientists of another civilization
will be examining with eagerness the
queer shaped bottles, tins and bed
rails of a bygone (1927) Canadian city
garbage dump.
The excavation of tiie kitchen midden being carred on near Seal Cove
in the northern end of Prince Rupert.
B.C., is one of the most interesting
pieces of archaeological work at
tempted in Canada In some years. According to Harlan I. Smith, Dominion
ai Prince Rupert before the time of
Columbus, as is plainly evident from
the fact that a huge red cedar stump
stood on top of thc refuse heap or
kitchen midden, as the debris from
Indian occupation is known. A.preliminary count shows over 325 rings
of annular growth without including
heart rot or closely crowded outer
rings. How long the cedar fell Is not
known but it is evident that the heap
of debris must have accumulated before 'he year 1600. It was probably
many years in the making and perhaps many-ayears elapsed before the
cedar took root.
Quite a number of kitchen middens
have been located along the British
Columbia coast, four of which lie
within as many miles of Prince Rupert while others are found within the
city limits of Vancouver and Victoria.
Thc white man's cities have arisen
on the site of the ancient red man's
habitations. Whereas the European
Immigrant was attracted primarily by
anchorage for his vessels, the Indian
was concerned with his food supply
and made his abode at the mouths of
freshwater streams near ocean beach-
refuse which consists almost entirely
of clam, mussel and other shells, with
here and there a human skeleton.
Typical heaps measure several hundred yards long by five or six feet high;
a few extend for miles, and several
attain a height of more than nine feet.
What enormous quantities of clams
and other shell fish these early inhabitants of Canada must have eaten
and for what centuries has the coast
line been productive of these nutritious foods? Perhaps there is no
other food so easily weaned from
Mother Earth.    The white man took
up the digging where the Indian
left off and the same sands which
provided succor for the aborigines
are still highly productive. It Is Just
recently, however, that the full value
of these shell fish foods has been appreciated and the clams, quahaugs
(hard clams), crabs and shrimps are
esteemed Items of food which are recognized to be rich In protein, vitamines and mineral salts which fortify
Ihe human system against disease.
The Dominion Archaeologist ie doing much to discover the history of
the early dwellers In Canada, their
habits, culture and mode of living.
Not tho least interesting is his Investigations of these old shell heaps,
and he reports that the present work
furnishes the best opportunity for real
exploration by excavation lie has had
since 1914. particularly because the j [
old cedar tree with its annular rings '
gives fairly definite information as to
the antiquity ot these evidences of
coast habitation by the aborigines.
i—>—t—>^?w—>—^—i—i—i— ^—>—>—>—v->— i—i—v->—>—i—i— —.—1—\—i—i—\—i—i—»—i
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Oilice Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
3UI=S5»»S=il^S3W>3MsaW=KSi=^
24 TELEPHONE 100  |
TAXI
Car  leaves   Cumberland  Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets boat at Union Bay.
$8.50
FOR A BRIDGE LAMP AND SHADE COMPLETE
Shades are Pig-Skin Effect Parchment.
Beautifully Colored Decorations.
See our Window Display of Bridge Lamps, with
assorted colors.
Cumberland Electric
Lighting Co., Ltd.
_l — t — (_(_l_l.—l_t_(_(_l_    _( — I — V — (— *. — <— t — *■— (— *.—l-l— I— I— < —
seeac
RICH f.'IKTS WAX POOR
He—"I   got   this   jewelry   from
well-known millionaire."
She—"Who?"
He- "Woolworth."
es where shell fish are abundant.
Archaeologist, there must have been \    The kitchen middens were built up
a considerable settlement of Indians j of refuse from the aboriginal villages,
'
j asawwrsweiMaewweaaeseaw^
IS200.00 In Cash |
Givin Awty
! PIHHT   PHIZK   Ii0.ll I
I SKI IINII   PHI7.K     t40.H0 I
I'i muii piiizk uo.o
FOURTH    PK1ZK  120.001
P1P1II   PHIZK     110.00 I
TEN   PHIZES OF  15.01  tact, |
H«,*>- man* obierta can vou Ind
in thr pielure below thai mmmelue
will,   I ha  letter  II?
To tha peraon who flnda tha
Urgeal number, wa will pay th.
aum of 150.1111 In c.ah and to th.
peraon Undine- the aacond l.rceat
number we will p.y the aum of
140.00 In caah. .nd ao on down Ihe
Hal of pr 1,,-a: provided you comply
with . almple condition, namely:
th.t you aell for ut eight boiea nf
HOME SAI.VK tl 2Sc per hoi.
You need not aend ua .ny money
In advance fur the Satvc, we aie
perfectly willing; to truat you with
it while you are endeavouring to
mak* aalca.
"     ■■'--■••*•"*'/v+a.i
Bind In your Hat of object! at once,
•Ih a raqueat for 8 tiuaca of Home
Bale*. When your replv la received.
th. Salve will b. eent you hy re-
tarn ene.il: together with the name.
and addreaaea of persona who have
been awarded pri/ea to tin- value
of SIX THOUSAND DOI.I.A118 for
aolring   puixlea   and   Belling   aalve.
HONE MFG. CO.     DEPT. G
217 RoncMvallca Ave., Toronto 3.
Something always fresh, dainty and tempting to be
found at MANN'S. All our bakery products are made
of the purest ingredients possible to procure.
Qualify is One of Our Great Aims
Value is another of our mottoes—Service is the other.
When it comes to reliable bakery products we can
deliver the goods. Good wives of the district, please
take note! It is no wtime to order your Christmas
Cakes and Shortbread. See what we have on display
and place your order.   Satisfaction guaranteed.
Mann's Bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Phone 18 Cumberland, B.C.
RILEY'S TRANSFER
COAL     —     GENERAL HAULING     —     WOOD
of all descriptions
David Hunden, Junr.
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
ISP     PROMPT ATTENTION     "^st
SYNOPSIS QF
UNDaGTMNDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land." copies of
which oan be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent,
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ls not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications tor pre-emptions are
to be addressed to tbe Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
Is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and improvements made
to value of (10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land.''
PURCHASE
Applications are received for pur
chase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland.
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land la J6
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land S2.G0 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Ib given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites ou
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment ot
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled and
iand has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 610 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers.
campers and travellers, up to ten
head. f
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Va-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
iagHMq»E»BW]a«i**a=^
Do your Christmas Shopping Early
_l-.l_l—t—l—t—1—t—l—.—t—t—U-1—I—t—t_l_t—l—l—l—i.—I—1_ (—V—I—i_t—I—l—
Coast - Okanagan
Telephone Service
It is now possible to talk to such points aa
Armstrong, Enderby, Kelowna, Penticton, Summerland and Vernon from mainland coast and
Vancouver Island telephones.
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
igttaHcaawrvrirftTffiffiageafcffia^
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES.
, KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WF, DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES J Nlght c""8: 13<X Courtellay
| Office: 159 Cumberland. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 11)27
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDEit, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE
THREE  '
Frank Opinions Expressed at
Mining Institute Session
Held at Nanaimo Saturday
(Continued  from  Page One)
mining methods, not low temperature
carbonization treatment, will give the
. relief."
SAYS  PUBLIC  APATHETIC.
Referring to the remark of E; A.
Haggen that public sentiment should
be aroused in British Columbia to Induce people to buy coal as opposed to
fuel oil, Mr. Graham declared that the
coal   Industry  had  been   trying  for
years   to   awaken   public   sentiment,
I
anil it-had been a difficult task.
"We must come to the conclusion," I
he said, "that when it comes to a
question of dollars and cents and sentiment, dollars and cents count the
more."
Mr. Graham read an extract from a
recent report of the Fuel Research
Board of Great Britain, which Indi
cated that It bad not been established
yet that liquid fuel could be profitably
extracted from coul.   The report stated that lt would likely be many years
yet before that wns possible.    This I
report pointed out that there were 200 |
methods of distillation treatment and
that up to the present the costs of I
the operations were very hljfh. Nelth-'
er had hydrogentatlon of coal been
proven commercially successful.
Christmas Suggestions
Solved
GIFTS FOR EVERY MEMBER OF THE
FAMILY
Gifts for Every Member of the Family
An early visit to look over bur stock awaits
ypu   "SHOP EARLY."
For Fancy Groceries, Dried and Fresh Fruits
Mixed Calidy, Box Chocolates, Cigarettes,
Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, etc.
Also new designs in Tea Sets, Fancy Dishes
and Glassware,'Crockery, etc., Tea Spoons,
Cutlery Sets, Pocket Knives, etc.
Just Arrived:—A shipment of Peak Freen's
famous English' Biscuits*-- "Something
Different."   A trial, will be appreciated.
Matt. Brown's Grocery, Cumberland
caagaHgggig,aMaM_tuui-MU^
PUBLIC NOTICE
THE SCOTTISH LAUNDRY, ALICE STREET,
■     COURTENAY
Sold Head of Deer
,
have completed the installation of their Steam Plant.
It has been erected and designed with a special view
to obtain efficiency and economy. The last two items
will be passed on to their customers in better work at
less cost.
Our Services Include:
PERSONAL LAUNDRY
HOUSEHOLD LINEN
FAMILY SERVICE: by weight, or dozen; flat
work ironed, or dry, ready for ironing.
Hotel, Cafe and Boarding House Linen: Special
rates contracted for.
DRY CLEANING
DYEING
Expert Curtain and Blanket Dressing
Over 30 years' experience in all branches of the
laundry business.
The "SCOTTISH" is the only laundry within a radius
of 60 miles with any Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Equipment.
s*si»->.You can save 25c on the $—plus Better Work.
Visit our plant and we will convince you!
Fdr selling the head of a deer, Wil-
, Ham M. Cowie, of Fanny Bay, was
j fined 310.00 and costs ln the Provlnclal Police Court on Tuesday and tbe
'Japanese to whom he sold it was also
fined a like amount for buying the
head.
P.P. Harrison, M. L A.|
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay           Phone 258
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone  11CR or  24
WE COLLECT TUESDAYS
Phone 150, The Jay Jay Cafe and Candy Store
The Scottish Laundry;,
Dyeing and Cleaning Works
Alice Street, Courtenay        P.O. Box 5.  Phone 120F.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor I
I COURTENAY, B. C. ||
SUGGESTS FKDKKAL ACTION.
"We   welcome   assistance   of   any
kind," said Mr. Oraham.   "I notice In I
Vancouver  there   have  been   sugges-
tions to advi.se the government to es- [
tablish a laboratory to investigate low I
temperature carbonization,    it seems
to me we are starting a little late on
this.    It would he a uase of throwing
away money to go over ground that
has already been covered.   The thing j
to do Is to get  the Federal Govern-1
ment to send one or two representatives to learn what the British Fuel
Research  Board  is  doing.    It  would
also be well for the provincial Government to send men to the laboratory
at Ottawa.    We must  apply business
methods to this situation.    It  would
be inadvisable for British Columbia to
establish a low-temperature distillation plant when such a plant is not ln
successful operation elsewhere."
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
(Continued from page 1
a member of the board for twenty-
five years, who had really been the
one who had Invited the convention
to meet and celebrate with him his
25 years In school board work, gave
the address of welcome. He is a very
dear and unassuming old gentleman.
one who doesn't try to say too much,
but makes you fee! how glad he is to
see you and how deeply in earnest he
is, and it says much for the people of
the Kent municipality to see how
they respect and honor his old age.
for he must he well over eighty years
old.
'We were also welcomed by the
Reeve of Kent and the President of
the Women's Institute. These addresses were replied to by H. Manning of Revelstoke. 1st vice president.
The president, A. L. McWiliiams.
chairman of Vancouver School Board,
then gave his address, followed by
Dean Coleman, the reports of which
will be fully printed in the proceedings of the Convention.
'Monday afternoon was taken up
with reports of credentials committee,
executive committee, report and re-
piles of members to resolutions of
1926 convention; secretary-treasurer's
report and financial statement.
'.Monday evening: From S to 10
p.m., resolutions were taken up and
discussed, and again took up all of
Tuesday morning from 9:30 to noon.
I shall not try to report on these resolutions in an official manner, as the
most important arguments and debates uu mi) resolution are full} re-
ported In our convention report, and
1 should like to suggest to our board
thai on receipt ot the reports we meet
and devo'e at least one whole evening to the reading and discussion ot
these addresses und resolutions, us
much information and help would
surely he gained thereby.
"Among the outstanding resolutions
was No. 1, from 1'eacbland, asking
that women he given appointments as
inspectors. This brought forth many
interesting remarks, some to the effect
that whereas girls were often sent
out to take charge of rural schools in
isolated districts, often having to cope
witli boys aud girls of teen age and
hard to control, there should be many
intelligent women in the province
capable of lilling the position of inspectors. There was the usual criticism of male inspectors and the subject of sentiment was repeatedly referred to. leading one to believe that
seutimutality was not indulged in by
womeu alone. Inspectors present assured the convention a good start had
been   made  in   this direction   by  the
appointment   of   Miss   Mc.... ,
inspector of Home Economics.
"If Resolution N. 'A is passed and
adopted by E. 1>  music will he
an optional subject for those taking
a normal training in high aud U.B.C.
1st yeur course. At present it only
entitles the student to 2nd class certificate.
"The School Law as tt now stands,
provides the teacher may select bible
readings and open with the Lord's
Prayer. Should the law be changed,
it might mean the introducing of
separate schools in our province, a
movement to be deplored, as we are
now the only province in the Dominion  not   having separate schools.
"The Teachers" Superannuation Act
seemed to bring forth the impression
from tbe majority of trustees that this
could well be met by the teachers
theselves.
"The Convention passed a resolution from North Vancouver seeking
amendment to the School Act to obviate the necessity for trustees obtaining the approval of councils before
proceeding1 to appoint a school health
inspector and providing for two or
more adjoining school districts uniting to constitute a school health inspectorial area.
"In many places there is difficulty
in keeping an experienced principal
on account of a suitable residence, so
tlie Convention passed a resolution
asking power from the department of
Education for district municipalities
to build a teacher's residence where
thought advisable.
"A resolution from Mission District
asked that the full salary and travelling expenses of Manual Training
and Home Economics teachers and
the entire expense of these branches
be paid by the department. Several
trustees favored this plan, some trustees claiming they had to pay 8 mills
on the dollar of their taxes io meet
school expenses. .Mr. .Manning, our
1928 president, is much opposed to
Home Economics, though heartily iu
sympath witli Manual Training; also
Mr. Stanley of Burnaby and a great
many criticisms were raised for and
against these departments,   Mr. P	
crossed the room and asked rae to
speak to this resolution, which 1 did;
and, as you know my altitude on these
subjects. I will omit my remarks as
I probably could not recall them.
I also spoke to a resolution on Sick
Pay for teachers, which seems to be
a sore point with North Vancouver,
Revelstoke   and   other   points.
".Mr. Patterson came and upheld my
statements and seemed pleased at my
defence of these subjects, and Miss
Myrtle Patterson, our reporter, came
aud congratulated me on my remarks
and safd favorable comments had been
made at the reporters' table after I
had spoken. I make these statements
in no boasting spirit, but to show
that the Cumberland School Board,
through their representative, took an
active pan in the Convention proceedings.
"1 also was asked to act on the
sub-committee of the Local Branches,
which I declined with thanks.
"Other resolutions of interest were
the resolution from Burnaby condemning the further issuance of McLean's certificates for writing, as it
had been a purely commercialized
matter. Resolutions 29 and 30: lu
view of the fact that thc Board of
School Trustees are held responsible
for the management of schools, the
B. C. S. A. is of the opinion that Instructions issued by the department
of Education and inspectors to principal and teachers should be communicated through the School boards.
Res. 32 aud 33: That in the opinion of the B.C.S.T.A., the summer holidays should lie restricted to two
clear months from the end of tho
third complete week in June, after
(Continued on Page Four)
Cumberland Supply Se^sh'S
Facing the Post Office Cumberland
a a a a ...ii...., «,........ .,,	
*     *  - ' ha''
Seasonable Suggestions: Christmas Helpers %
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 aiid 61
Cumberland, B. C.
I y 1) Tl V 11 II I) lll'll W-Y VV V ^■-imi-ii-n-»t3e«-»3i-n-»m-n-'LJi-
FROM   HALIFAX
To Plymouth-Havre-London
Antonla Dec. 6   AacanU, Dec. 12.
To Belfast.Lherpool.OlaBgow:
Athenla, Dec. 11.
FKOM HT. JOHN
To   Belfast.Lln-rpooMilasgov*
Athenla, Dec. 10.
FROM MF.W YORK
To Queeitslnvrn and Llverpeol:
Andania, Dec. 10   Scythla, Dec. IS.
To Londonderry and Glasgow t
Transylvania, Dec.  10.
To Cherbourg and Southampton t
Berengarla, Dec. 14.
FROM NEW YORK
To Qneenstown and Liverpool: 	
Andania, Dec. 10.    Scythla, Dec. 15.
To Cherbourg and Southtampton:
Berengarla. Dec. 14, Feb. 10, Mar. 2.
•Mauretanla, Dec. 30. Feb. 21, Apl. 11.
To Londonderry and Glasgow:
Transylvania, Dec. 10. Letitla, Dec. 24.
To   Plymoutli-lluvre-London:
Ascanla,   Dec.   10.   Ausonla.   Dec   24.
FROM BOSTON
To Queenstown and Liverpool:
Andania, Dec. 11. Ausonla. Dec. 24.
• Calls at Plymouth, eastbound.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Full Information from local agents, or Company's offices. <I22 Hastings St., W.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Our stock of Raisins, Peaches, Prunes, has
just arrived and are all fresh and this
season's goods. These prices are worthy
of your attention:
Sunmaid Prunes, 21b carton 30c
Market Day Raisins, 4 It) carton 55c
Bleached Raisins, lb   20c
Cooking Figs, very choice, 3 lb carton 35c
Market Day Raisins, special 2tb carton 30c
Puffed Raisins, bulk, lb    15c
Blue Ribbon Pressed Figs, pkt., .......   25c
Choice White Figs, bulk, per lb 10c
Blue Ribbon Peaches, 21b pkt  55c
Bulklb Dates, splendid condition, 2th 25c
Prunes, new pack, 21b 25c
Libby's Mince moat, per lb   25c
Very choice Mince Meat, 2 tb for 35c
Shelled Almonds, (new), per lb 65c
Shelled Walnuts, (new), per tb 55c
Orange and Lemon Peel, (Dundee), tb 35c
t.
Citron Peel, (Dundee), per tb  60c
Glace Cherries, whole, per tb   55c
Ginger Ale, per qt. bottle   55c
Jelly Powders, all flavors, 8 for 25c
Icing Sugar, 2 tb for  25c
Icing Sugar in colors, per tb   18c
Swansdown Pastry Flour, 10 Ib       .. 59c
Wild Rose Pastry Flour, 10 tb 55c
Whole Wheat Flour, Royal Standard, 15c
Whole Wheat Flour, Comox,          60c
Special for Saturday—Cash Only
1001b Sack otatoes    $1.46
201b Granulated Sugar          SI.50
3lb Vancouver Creamery  Butter.
(block),       $1.35
-191b Sack Flour, your choice $2.65
Look for our Christmas Ad. next week    I
a
Novelties in Christmas Toys and Gifts g
 j
Cumberland Supply-The CASH Store     |
S
p    WE DELIVER Phonel55 PROMPT SERVICE    ff PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1827
t'.n*Maa...4aaW*.--^a9iiaaar'.4aaa>nataa.oa*aaa'lt*aWi> V
DINING ROOM
| Our Dining Room offers good food,1
j good  service,   reasonable   charges. I
j King George Hotel j
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
(Continued from  Page Three)
which all departmental examinations
should   he  held.
"On   Tuesday   afternoon   the   delegates left the hotel an the guests of
'tg^tgtgtCtgt^g^tgiC^
the Kent School Board, who entertained us from 2 p.m. to 7:3ft p.m.
We drove to Agassiz, a distance of
. . miles from the hotel to tlie Memorial Hall, where the school children
gave a programme of song.s, drille
and other entertainment which lasted
an hour and was most enjoyable. We
were then taken to the Government
Experimental Farm, where Mr. W. W.
Hicks, superintendent, took us on a
tour uf inspection of pure bred horses,
cow;, pigs, and a variety of poultry,
chickens, ducks, turkeys, etc Tho
grounds and buildings were splendid,
hut the rain came down in torrents,
so we were glad to return to the Hall.
■2JiMiaMjHSjlIMa5E,Mc!J&
Gtmjberland
tn in men-in
Hutiilguurtem
1 Hotel
Kam
Rfisonltilc I
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
IV. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
B'BBMa'i'JBIS'^IMBMaEISJeHfflBJBE/BE
where the Women's Institute had prepared a banquet. This banquet lasted
two hours, und while the delegates
partook of chicken, ham, salads and
every delicacy conceivable, Scotch and
Irish airs were- played by piano and
violin to entertain the guests. At
S p.m. we were again In the Convention Hall where business resumed
until 9:30 p.m.
The hotel manageress then invited
us to a swimming contest and had arranged an aquatic programme for the
amusement of the guests. The swimming building ls very well equipped
with white tiled swimming pool from
3 to S feet ln depth, and about forty
delegates entered into the sports with
great zest and enjoyed the hot sulphur waters. Our neighbors from
Courtenay seemed to en]oy this part
of the programme Immensely and
made quite an effort for the judges of
the male beauty contest to give a decision. Refreshments were later
served in tlle lounge by our hostess,
and trustees who serve year In and
out. without pay. felt  thai  at  these'
conventions their services are Indeed
in a great measure honored and compensated for.
"Wednesday morning was illled up
with reports and resolutions, and in
the afternoon Mis Jean Browne, national director, Junior Red Cross, addressed the trustees. I considered It
the banner address of the convention
and trust It will be published in full
in our report. -
* "'The voting for place' of meeting
was quite exciting. The first vote
showed 75 per cent in favor of again
meeting at Harrison Hotel; although
invitations were Issued from Chllllwack, Penticton, Nanaimo, Duncan,
New Westminster and several other
places. After the large showing for
Harrison a mere woman rose and the
men got the biggest tongue lashing
I ever heard ln puhlic. She accused
them of acting like a lot of men sometimes did, on a morning after the
night before, and told them 'they wero
carried away with sentimentality and
threw back at them many, remarks
which had been made in. regard to
womeu inspectors, only applying them
to their decision In regard to meet at
Harrison.
"There was a lively Convention
room for a few minutes, but the final
vote favored Penticton.
"A banquet followed In the evening,
given by the hotel management, which
brought the Convention proceedings
to a close.
Mr. Joe Harwood brought from Vernon four boxes of Okanagan apples
for the pleasure of the delegates,
which were much appreciated.
Trusting that in future tbe Board
wlll see fit to send more than one
delegate to Convention, and thanking
the Board for the appointment of myself as delegate, and making this vlalt
to Convention possible.
MRS. T. E. BANKS.
Ready for the Holiday
TURKEY
All fresh dressed, dry picked birds.    Every one nice as
can be.    All cleaned out for you.    Order your Poultry
TODAY.    The price is exceptionally low.   Order NOW
and avoid disappointment.
TURKEY AND GEESE
CHICKENS AND DUCKS
The City Meat Market
<&titetijypuivhyfin going to
buy a Jf^stitiefhouse--
"Those new Weattaghouae Sets are great! I was over at Bill's
last night to hear the radio he's been talking so much about.
Oh boy, its some set. There's as much difference between it and
an ordinary set as there ts between this car and my eld bus.
"When you think it over, it's just what you'd expect from
Westinghouse. They were the poineers of both Alternating
Current and Radio so you'd expect them to build the most
advanced models operating on tlie lighting circuit.
"And another thing, Westinghouse have selected the most
competent radio merchants in town as Westinghouse Dealers."
Wt will gladly demonstrate Ihe 1928 Westinghoute models
und explain the many impr-wemnnts that make them hetter.
LANG'S DRUG STORE, Cumberland, B.C.
Distributors for B.C.; E. G. Prior & Co.. Vancouver. B.C.
Westinghouse
PIONEERS   >N  RADIO
Nothing Lik^—
It to Relieve Cold*
^In formula and action, Bucklej't
Mixture; Is different from all
remedUs.   It literally  "acts ■•** ■
flash" In eonuuerfng coughs and
healing the inflamed parts.   Tht ia-
•tant   rtlltf   that   follows   tho  flrst
dost Is multiplied 40 times in a 7*-
e*nt bottle I   "Buckley's" should bs
In sverjr boms.   Your druggist sells
It under a montr-back guarantee.
W. K. Bnckltr. Limited,
.142 Mutual  St.  Torento 1
Acu lib a fkile-
. • alalia tip prove, li
BABY'S OWN
SOAP
9a
The Grand Depiity Auditor will
visit Cumborland F.O.E. 1953, on
Tuesday, December 6th. Alt brothers
nre requested to meet at the Fraternal
Hall at 7:30 p.m. sharp. A cordial
invitation Is given to the Ladies Auxiliary snd their friends to attend the
social after the meeting. -
Corporation of the City of 0nmberland
NOTICE
Municipal Election 1988
A Court of Revision of parties entitled to vote In the Municipal Election of tlie City of Cumberland ln January, 1928. will be held In the Council
Chambers,  on   December,  10th, 192f,
at 7.30 p. m.
46-48
W.  H. Cope
C. M. C.
Union Hotel j
Cumberland, B. C. •
Electrically Heated       j
i• Throughout •
i:  Our Service is the BEST j
j It. YATES, Proprietor j
namedforth
fragrantcreamy
father
Btsi foryou and Baby iooSn    ■  p**01"- W Phone 1» |
■ Ala.,, f.,.| ,„.i.*.MI....M.....
i
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
Hfou are invited to
g^FIRST SHOWING
OF THE NEW CAK
IN OUR. SHOWROOMS ON
Friday, December 9th
The New Car will fulfill the promise
of a singular achievement in light
car manufacture.
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
COURTENAY
I
f
I.
L
lint IKeal Canadian
isN. ____
ion Car-  M
Ss^sa
X3    YEARS       OF       PUBLIC        PREFERENCE
IT
asssfctstsifctt
••atstSK:*. -W3ES»c*>=8as=fefl=S=KSM=^^
5)
We Invite You
to Inspect
our different lines of merchandise, then compare prices
and you will find that we are offering Real Values.
We have opened up this week a line of
Men's 'fan, Brown and Black Oxfords, easy (J»C PA
fitters, in the latest styles, at    «JJtJ.OU
Misses' and Women's Brown Brogue Oxfords in calf,
with a good durable sole, sizes 2 to 7s. d»>| A C
Priced at  .,.  «P**erlv
Boys' School Shoes, at $2.95, $3.45 and $3.95
SANTA CLAUS WILL BE HERE
in a few days with Slippers in leather and Felts, for
Christmas, in Men's, Women's, Misses', Boys' and the
Kiddies.
Gents' Furnishings and Clothing Department
Men's Flannel All-Wool Lumberjacks'       <j» A   p»A
Shawl Collar and two pockets, at  <P~r*9U
Fine Broadcloth Shirts in the latest patterns, at $1.95,
and $2.45.
Sec our Khaki Mixed Tweed Mixture Work flj-fl   AA
Shirt, at  «Pl.UU
Men's Sweaters, in all-wool, V-neck, 2 pockets with
Jersey, waist band. d»Q Qff
Specially priced this week at     -tpOet/v
Men's Work Sox, all-wool, at 8 and 4 pairs for $1.(H>
MAIL ORDER AND VANCOUVER PRICES*.
THE MANUFACTURERS* AGENCY
MacKenzie  &  Partridge
Opposite Post Office, Cumberland, B.C.
ataasaMeatsssweaassi
E. L SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
1 aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note addrets— Opposite the Drug Store. "3B
Friday, December 2, im
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
4
1
*
>
KEEP YOUR CREDIT GOOD!
Don't Be a Credit Castaway!
CREDIT IS MORE THAN A MATTER OF MONEY. IT IS A MATTER OF CHARACTER. GOOD CREDIT IS A PROGRESSIVE ASSET; POOR CREDIT IS A PROGRESSIVE
H4NDICAP. WHAT IS MORE FORLORN THAN THE MAN WITHOUT CREDIT—THE MAN WHO HAS BEEN TRUSTED BY HIS FELLOWS, AND FLUNKED THE TRUST?
BY THE SAME REASONING, WHAT IS MORE BENEFICIAL THAN GOOD CREDIT? THE MAN WITH GOOD GREDIT LOOKS TO THE FUTURE UNAFRAID. OPPORTUNITIES ARE HIS. CREDIT, HIS ADVANTAGE. THE MAN ALERT TO HIS OWN INTERESTS, PAYS UP, AND KEEPS HIS CREDIT GOOD. BUT THE MAN WHO DOES NOT
PAY PROMPTLY SHACKLES HIMSELF—WEAKENS HIS SELF-RESPECT—KILLS HIS BIG CHANCE WHEN HE NEEDS IT MOST.
CREDIT is an acknowledgement of confidence in the
honesty of mankind. In business transactions Credit
is the means by which merchandise or service may be
paid for at a future time. It enables the farmer to
plant and harvest more extensively; it places the
wholesaler in a position to contract for vast stores of
supplies; the retailer to stock in anticipation of his
patrons' demands; the consumer to enjoy TODAY that
which, without credit, would be beyond his immediate
reach. '
CREDIT, WHEN PROPERLY EMPLOYED,
BLESSED PRIVILEGE
Approximately 90S of the business of the entire country is done upon credit—or, in other words, UPON
THE CONFIDENCE IN HUMANITY. No greater
distinction can be acquired than a first-class credit
rating, either for an individual or a concern.
There is absolutely nothing wrong about credit. There
is GREAT WRONG ABOUT MISUSE OF CREDIT.
To purchase without consideration as to ability to
pay ultimately means embarrassment. Unliquidated
debts are barriers to the indhiduals, the home and
business alike.
Credit must be confined to reasonable limitations.
PAY YOUR BILL AS PER YOUR AGREEMENT.
The wholesaler's limits of credit to the retailer arc-
confined invariably to thirty—and not to exceed sixty
—days. In fact, credit in almost all lines, as defined
by wholesaler and manufacturing interests, seldom
exceeds these limits, except by some very special arrangement. Therefore, credit extended by the retailer
to the consumer beyond such limit is unreasonable.
The Credit reputation, zealously maintained, mean:!
not only protection, but comfort as well, in time of
need.
PROMISES ARE NOT BANKABLE
PROFITS
The Canadian Credit Bureau Service has been organized for the promotion of sound credit business. Members, by requiring prompt payment as a condition of
their extending credit, eliminate losses, and can therefore provide you with better service and lower prices
than can non-members.
THE BUREAU HELPS THE
HONEST DEBTOR
The efforts of the Bureau are not directed to harassing the debtor who is sincerely working to pay up his
debts—the Bureau wants to help such debtors. But
it does intend to enforce business-like methods on the
part of careless, indifferent debtors.
Is Your Credit Reputation an Asset to you and
the Cumberland District?
WILL YOUR PAST RECORD AS REGARDS YOUR HABIT OF PAYING YOUR BILLS BEAR INVESTIGATION? WE ARE NOW MAKING A COMPLETE SURVEY OF ALL
OVERDUE ACCOUNTS, AND THE ANALYSIS WILL BE RECORDED IN OUR CUMBERLAND OFFICE FOR THE FUTURE PROTECTION OF OUR MEMBERS. IF VOU HAVE
FAILED TO MEET YOUR OBLIGATIONS AS PROMISED, SEE YOUR CREDITORS AT ONCE, AND ARRANGE TO HAVE YOUR ACCOUNT TAKEN CAKE OF. IN ORDER
THAT YOU MAY ENJOY THE MANY BENEFITS DERIVED FROM BEING REPORTED AS A DESIRABLE CUSTOMER. PAY YOUR BILLS PROMPTLY AND KEEP YOUR
CREDIT GOOD.
CUMBERLAND   DIVISION
CANADIAN   CREDIT   BUREAU   SERVICE
PAY   UP ~ KEEP   YOUR   CREDIT   GOOD! PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR.-No. 48.
ft
THE SMART
Snap Brim
of all the styles that are so popular the Snap Brim Hat
takes the lead. The fellows like that air ol* sophistication that they impart. Choice of fine felts, colors,
fancy bands.   Every hat silk-lined.
SUTHERLAND'S
Preference for ESSEX
(Almost 2 to I
In outselling any other "Six*' at or near the price, almost two
to one, the signal thing Is not merely the overwhelming preference for tlle Essex Super-Six, but the source from which il comes
A great proportion of huyers are owners, former and present, of
big and costly ears.   They turn to Essex because they find:
The smoothness and performance of their costlier cars.
Comfort and riding ease not excelled in any car.
Traffic nihibleness and handling ease unmatched in
larger cars. I
Economy of operation and maintenance exclusive to
Essex.
'engineered to long life, lasting reliability and lowest operation
nud maintenance costs, it represents the geratest value in all
J isex achievement.
[
Buyers of Hssex cars in tne lirst !i months of this
year would fill and overflow tho largest stadium in
the  world.    More than    10-1.000    Super-Sixes  were
bought in tliis period.
]
ESSEX Super-Six
Pidcock & Mckenzie Motors, Ltd.
i'hone  25
Courtenay
•***ir\ tt
4@r
The Most Popular Gift
A box of Candy on the Xmas Tree reflects good tastes
of the donor and good tastes, too, to the recipient. See
our window display and order your Xmas box NOW.
Our selection is the finest in town.   Our lines consist of
GANONG'S — MOIR'S
DAVENPORT — ROBERTSON'S
ROYAL  CANDY
'bfa\**\\\$ara3a\^^
CUMBERLAND   PERSONALS
Miss Florence Sehl. matron of thc
Cumberland General Hospital, left for
Vancouver Saturday morning on a
short business trip.
.Mr. and Mrs. John Furbow, of Summerland. arrived in town Sunday to
spend the winter with Mr. and Mrs.
II. Brown.
.Mr. T. Vincent returned to town on
Friday  last.
Ladies! Xow is your opportunity!
2n per cent., pit all Ladles' Evening
Dresses and Winter Coats, for three
days, until December 6th. McKenzie
&  Partridge.
Miss Haggart. of Union Bay, Is temporarily on the staff of the Cumberland Qeneral Hospital.
Dr. W. Bruce Gordon spent last
week-end in Vancouver.
Moose Carnival Dance, Ho Ilo Hall,
Friday, December Snd.   Lots of Fun!
The feature of thc Cumberland,
Cronies Social on Saturday night will
be the reading of the paper by Mra.
Cameron on certain phases and Incl-
eents In the life of Burns, lantern
slides of the Burns' Country will also
bc Bhown, it  is expected.
.Mouse Carnival Dance, Ilo llo Hall,
Friday. December 2nd.   Lots of Full!
Miss Christine Sutherland spent last
week-end with her parents, Mr, and
Mrs. John  Sutherland.
j The home of Mr, and Mrs. George
Richardson was the scene of a very
successful birthday party held on
Wednesday afternoon, Xov. 30th. with
Leroy Richardson as host. The afternoon was spent by playing games aud
enjoying the dainty refreshments
whicli were prepared and served by
Leroy's sister .Margaret and his
mother, Leroy was the recipient of
many useful and lovely gifts and did
his best to thank his many friends.
Those present were: Masters Sam
and Willie Armstrong. Oswald and
George Wycherly, Allen Mitchell, Bernard McLellan, Jackie Ijennle, Robert,
and Peter Mitchell, and the Misses
Margaret and Georglna Brown. Margaret Armstrong, Hellen Robertson,
Jessie Robertson, Sister Wycherly,
Mrs. T. Armstrong and Mrs. Mae
Brown were also guests.
Mr. T. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, arrived In uCmberlnnd on
Tuesday lasl.
PYTHIAN SISTERS HOLD
SOCIAL EVENING
The Pythian Sisters had a very enjoyable social evening on Wednesday
last at the home of Mrs. John Thomson, about seventy-eight ladies being
presont.
During the flrst part of the evening
mock wedding was staged by the
Pythian Sisters, after which a few
members of the Women's Benefit Society paid them a visit and put on another very humorous wedding In direct opposition. A great deal of merriment was derived from both entertainments; the evening being a greal
success both socially and financially.
a«sssasaas3c>'a»aaui3Uii=i&,>
EAGLES HOLD LAST
WHIST DRIVE OF SERIES
Tlie Fraternal Order of Eagles held
the last of a series of live whist drives
In the Eagles' Home on Tuesday
evening lust. The prize-winners were
Ladles' 1st. Mrs. McKay, Union Bay;
2nd, Mrs. Bogo, Cumberland; gents'
1st, Mr. W. Brown, Cumberland; 2nd,
Mrs. Wm. Hutchinson (substituting).
The live dollar gold piece, which was
offered to Ihe person gaining the highest score for the live drives was won
by Mr. Shilllto. Mr. Shillito has won
two flrst prizes and one second during
the series.
Delectable refreshments were served (luring the evening, which all voted
one of tiie best.
Bevan
.Mr. T, W. Carlisle and
of the K & K Pole Co. ha
sfcrred to Menzles Bay,
there Monday Ins!.
Miss Jnrves  resumed
the school Monday lasl.
recovered from her acch
The Gwllt Lumber Co.
falling timber on each
Uevan-Cttmlierland road
have two donkey engine
blast.
Mr. J. Barton
ve been tran-
nnd left for
lier duties at
having fulyl
ent,
have started
side  of  thu
-ind will soon
I working full
Christmas
Gifts and
Cards
g*J Visit our store for Xmas Gift Suggestions: Leather
m Goods, Ivory Toilet Sets, Fancy Boxed Chocolates,
W Stationery.
m   WATC
W
-at
CH OUR WINDOWS    AND    DISPLAYS FOR
O'l'HEK SUGGESTIONS
Lasting Gifts for all I If ^*^W£«£^P« W^«w«<-«
Our assortment is the largest in the district.
LANG'S
The Rexall Kodak Store
IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S
Courtenay
Phone 26
Cumberland
Phone 23
FRENCH IVORY SETS
We have a nice stock of French jj
Ivory; also many individual jj!
pieces of toilet ware . j'
il
The Lndlcs' Aid of tho Cumberland 17:30 p.m. After the meeting was ad-
1'nited Church held their monthly Mourned dainty refreshments were
meeting at the home of Mrs. Geo. served by Mrs. Richardson nnd MIsb
Richardson   on   Tuesday   evening   nt I Annie Haywood.
WRIST WATCHES       il
for ladles and men. These make, Ij
a beautiful and useful Christ- Jj
mas gift.    Call In and see our «
ll/fo,       A   varied   as-  II
snrtmen-l       ol   fl
'IK*    -
'tf-ug 0 Diamond rings
J with   the  very
Intest    of  set-
Vj  tings.    For an
enduring   gift,
give Diamonds
M. Shiozaki
Jeweller and Watchmaker     il ;
BOOK RESERVATIONS NOW FOR
CANADIAN FARMERS'
Marketing Tour
THROUGH ENGLAND, SCOTLAND
AND DENMARK
$500
Plus low rail fares from    \ urn-m i\r\
starting point to Halifax    j NkSIIll
and return I WOVV
Opportunity for special study of Marketing and
Agriculture in the Old Land.   |v
I
Attractive Sight-Seeing Features Are Included
TOUR LEAVES HALIFAX JANUARY 8,  1928
Cor particulars apply to B. W. BICKI.E. Cumberland, or write
C. P. Earle, District Passenger Agent. Vlctoral, B.C.
\'\ For
ithat
Xmas Turkey
Wilcock & Co. Ltd.
i
•?.ew=t^(-alrs^ia«aiaeKa:s_tesfi
m'
i
MAKE "IT"
MOIR'S IJHOOOLATES
If you're not sure—decide
K now on a gift   of   Moir's
Christmas Chocolates,
Fancy   Boxes   ranging   in
price from 50c up.
jj	
A. HENDERSON
Cumberland, B.C.
*«»KBnnQK
We have secured a fine Selection of Choice
Local Turkeys, Ducks, Geese and Poultry,
ORDER   ONE   NOW!

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