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The Cumberland Islander Dec 9, 1927

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Array ■ At the Ilo Ilo this week
•       end, "The Chinese
■ Parrot"
Cumberland Islander
*   mr.ifa
Coining Soon! j
"Tarzan and The Golden :
Lion" I
tfi
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland Hews.
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—NO. 49
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1927
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Fine New Billiard
Parlor Opened
Team from Cumberland Defeat
Pick of Courtenay in Interesting   Games   Which   Mark
Opening of New Parlors
To celebrate tho opening of Mr.
Bert Farroll's new billiard parlors at
Murtenay a match had been arranged
and took place on Friday evening last
a good gallery being present. The
new parlor la up-to-date In every respect and Is a distinct asset to the
new business section developing at
the corner of Union and Judson
streets. Mr. Farrell has spared no
expense on* the Interior fittings, a very
comfortable and home-like appearance resulting.
In the special match games between
Cumberland and Courtenay, the latter boya were outclassed ,the miners
scoring a total of 1064 points as
Against 951 hy the Courtenay players.
Following Is the complete list of
games antl players, Cumberland being mentioned flrst In each Instance:
Jackson, 150 points, vs. Jackson, 96
points; Baird, 121 points vs. Cameron,
150 points: Robertson, snr., 150 points
va. Sutton, 74 points; Carney, 64
points vs. Sutherland 150 points;
Rond, 129 points, vs. Spencer, 150
points; Hatfield, 150 points, vs. Scott,
142 point.-; Robertson jnr., 150 points,
ys. McKay, 56 points; Smith, 150
points, vs. Mannering, 133 points.
MEN'S CLUB HOLD
BRIDGE DRIVE
The Cumebrland Men's Club held
a very enjoyable bridge drive on Friday evening last In the Anglican
Church Hall, ten tables of bridge being played, Prize-winners were:
Ladles' 1st, Mrs. Q. K. MacNaughton;
consolation, Miss Q. McFadyen; men's
1st, Mr. T. H. Mumford; consolation,
Mr. E. Robinson. During the evening the members of the club served
dainty refreshments.
LICENSE APPLICATIONS
DO NOT HAVE TO BE
MAILED TO VICTORIA
Summer Home
Burns At Lake
Fire   of   Undetermined   Origin
Destroys Home and Two
Pleasure Boats
Many automobile owners In Cumberland and district who have recently received forms of application from
B.C. Police Headquarters ln Victoria,
appear to be under the Impression
that lt Is compulsory to mail their
applications and the necessary fees
to Victoria. This is not the case. A
large number of motor license plates
have been received at the court house,
Cumberland, and these will be ready
for distribution to car owners in the
course of a few days. It Is Important,
however, that applicants do not alter
received by them from Victoria. If
In any way the forms of application
there ls anything wrong with the
particulars given on the forms received from Victoria, the discrepancies
should be noted on a separate piece
ot paper and attached to the form
received which will be mailed to Victoria by the local Issuing ofllce. The
main thing to bc remembered ls that
it Is NOT compulsory for applications
to be mailed direct to Victoria In
order to secure plates, and another
Important point Is that no alteration]
must be made.
Fire totally destroyed thc summer
residence of.Mr. Joe Horbury at Puntledge Lake Saturday morning last
about 3 o'clock. The fire had gathered such headway before being
noticed that it was impossible to save
either the building or contents. In
uddltlou to the house and contents,
two pleasure boats were also destroyed. "One of the boats." said
Mr. Horbury, "had been in use for
twenty-one years on the lake and had
probably been up and down the lake
thousands ot times." Mr. Horbury Is
an ardent admirer of the popular
lake. It Is expected that he wll)
build both a house and boat before
next summer rolls around.
NEW SUMMER CAMP
ON DENMAN ISLAND
The Cumberland branch of the Canadian Legion held an enjoyable
whist drive antl dance last Saturday
evening. In the G.W.V.A. Hall. Prizewinners lo the whist drive were:
Ladies '1st, Mrs. \V. Hudson; 2nd,
Mirs. Balagno: gents' 1st, Mr. Finch;
2nd, Mr. Faber. Mrs. Hudson very
kindly donated her prize to the association to be drawn for at a later
date. Excellent music for tho dance
wis supplied by Mrs, Hudson, Mr. J.
H. Robertson, Mr. H. Thomson and
Mr.  Les.   Dando.
LIVE COUGAR CAUGHT
AT CAMPBELL RIVER
EXHIBITED AT VICTORIA
Work Starts on Site For the Erection
oi Twenty Small Cottages
Four hundred and eighty acres at
Henry Bay, on the north end of Denman Island and opposite Union Bay
wharf, wlll eh developed as a tourist
resort with a number of small cottages to be erected for tourists.
Thc development will be undertaken by Messrs. Ashworth and Bond,
Mr. Ashworth being In England at the
present time raising money to finance
'.he project. Work has already commenced on the preparation of sites tor
twenty-one two, three and four-room
cottages, which it Ib hoped to have
ready for next season's tourist business. The cottages are only the flrst
unit of a complete scheme which calls
.'or the erection of many more. Tennli
courts, bowling greens and a golf
course are Included In the plans.
One would hardly think that a, person would take cougar cub to Victor-
la to exhibit it—full-grown ones have
been caught on the Main street there
within recent times, but that is what
Mr. E. R. Lee did recently. Speaking
of the event, a Victoria paper says:
Making a total of thirty-two cougars so far this year killed and captured by himself and two cougar
hounds, Mr. E. It. Lee arrived ln the
city yesterday with a three-months-
old live cougar cub caught near
Campbell River. The animal Is at
present domiciled at the Westholme
Hotel pending a decision as to Its
fate,
Cecil "Cougar" Smith, of Comox,
also has been successful ln his quest
tor mountain lions, shooting a seven-
foot one yesterday afternoon on Red
Flag mountain in Metchosln district.
Tlfteen purebred sheep have been
slaughtered during the past two
weeks between Rocky Point and tho
Kangaroo Road by cougars, and It
was at the urgent request of the Metchosln Sheep Raisers' Association
that Mr. Smith was sent down from
Comox by the Provincial Canio Board
for the second time this mouth.
WELSH SOCIETY
HOLD "500" DRIVE
On Monday evening last the Cumberland Welsh Society held a "600"
Irlve in the War Veterans' Hall, eleven tables being In play.
Ladles' prizes were won by: 1st,
Mrs. Parkinson; 2nd, Miss Charlotte
Carey; consolation, Mrs. A. Walker.
'Icnts hy: 1st, Mr. Irvin Morgan; 2nd,
Mr. Jack Stevenson; consolation, Mr.
Rudy  Tomcn.
Travelling prizes were won by Mrs.
\V   Davis and Mr. James Quinn.
This drive was the last for this
year. Thu "e:;t will bc held in January, on a date to be announced later.
Eminent Canadian Tells Of
Work Accomplished By
The League Of Nations
Sir Herbert Ames, Financial Director of the Secretariat Of the
League, Heard in Notable Address; Describes Canada's Place
in Great Machine "To Consolidate Peace."
For over an hour and a half, at the Canadian Club dinner .held
at the Union Hotel, Cumberland, on Tuesday evening last, when a
pin would have been heard if dropped, Sir Herbert Ames, K.B.,
LL.D., told of the work of the League of Nations. Fifty-odd
members of the club were in attendance and as the distinguished
guest unfolded the doings, the aims and objects of the league,
his listeners were held enthralled.
In Introducing Sir Herbert, Mr.
Theed Pearse, the president of the
club, said that the honored guest had
held the position of treasurer to the
Secretariat ot thc League of Nations
for seven years. During this tour he
had spoken sixty-four times in six
weeks since leaving Winnipeg and the
club should be very grateful to bim
for coming so far out of his way to
address them.
On rising to speak, Sir Herebrt said
that lt was quite as much a pleasure
to him to have the opportunity of
meeting them as it was to them to
hear what he had to say.
No one was more surprised than he
when he wns asked to fill the office
he had filled for seven years, that of
treasurer of financial director to the
Secretariat of the League of Nations.
He hnd just completed sixteen years
as representative in the federal par-
liamnt for a Montreal constituency
and he and his wife were away in
New Brunswick enjoying a quiet vacation when he received a request
trom his former political leader, Sir
Robert Borden, that he accept the
position. It was a hard matter to
decide but finally 'the glamor of lt
became moro than they could stand"
and he accepted the position. Then
wheu his term of office had expired
In July 1926, he was asked to remain
as one of Canada's delegates to the
League nt the assembly In September
1926.   '
"When I went to Europe In 1919,"
said Sir Herbert, "I found that Europe
was In a disorganized and unhappy
state. The old map of Europe was
made over. States had been torn
apart, and some of them had grown
nationalistic and had adopted policies
of isolation. Uncertainty prevailed
and there was a general feeling of
fear of everybody.
" When I left it In 1926, lt was a
different Europe. There had grown
up a spirit much more friendly on the
part of the nations towards each
other. Fear had died down, mistrust
had beon removed, and vengeance bad
gone out of Bight. Two great nations,
France and Germany, had made a reconciliation, and there had come into
effect a piece of machinery, the
League of Nations, which had been
perfected to such an extent that settlement of International disputes had
heen made possible, and friendly cooperation among the states of Europe
had been attained.
'I do not, however, claim that conditions  ln  Europe have yet reached
CITY COUNCIL IN
SHORT SESSION
the stage ot perfection, nor that the
Improvements made are all due to
the League of Natlona. But I do
maintain that the League has played
a notable and conspicuous part ln
bringing about the changing conditions there."
The speaker described the Treaty
of Lomarno as "marking a wonderful
milestone ln the progress  of world
peace."   The nations which were parties to that treaty were seven In number, namely, France, Germany, Poland,   Czechoslovakia,   Great   Britain,
Belgium and  Italy.    Tbe Treaty  of
Locarno  contained   three  classes  of
! provisions.   Firstly, the said nations
I agreed to maintain the status quo—
they   would  not  resort to  force  to
i change provisions of existing treaties;
| secondly, every question of any kind
I whatever that arose between Germany
and France, they agreed would be submitted  to  arbitration;   and  thirdly,
that the powerful states guaranteed
the permanence of the agreement.
One Condition
Sir Herebrt declared there was one
cos's:.Rn  ln the treaty, and If that
i was not fulfilled the treaty would not
go into effect.    That condition was
that   Germany   be   taken   Into   the
League of Nations.    It Germany was
not taken ln, then the treaty would
be as waste paper.
The Council of the League of Nations contained fourteen members,
and tour of these members, Great
Britain, Italy, France and Japan, had
permanent seats and were known as
the great powers. Germany, holding
that she was a great power, sought a
premanent seat with the other four.
Other nations felt that if Germany-
was entitled to a permanent seat, they
were also. These nations, however,
one by one agreed to drop their
claims, but Brazil held out and said
that If she did not have a permanent
seat she would not let Germany Into
the League a (unanimous affirmative
vote being necessary).
A deadlock took place, and Instead
of Brazil getting a permanent seat
the delegates went back home without settling the Issue. However, at
the next Assembly meeting Brazil
failed to send delegates and thus the
Council of the League was able to
recommend that Germany be taken In.
The vote was taken on September 8,
1926, and Germany was unanimously
accepted.
t.ermnny Is Received
The speaker said that Germany was
(Continued on Page Seven)
POTATO GROWERS
WIN CUP
Word was received last night that
the District Cup haa been again won
by the Comox District at the Provincial Potato Show. The eight Individual exhibitors who made up this
exhibit were Messrs. H. R. Cox, R. M.
Halliday, W. A. Urquhart, C. E. Yock-
ney, Don Butler, E. Butler, Arthur
Smith and H. Morrison. No other
particulars of the ahow have been received. In addition to the District
Exhibit, there were fourteen other
exhibitors from tbe district.
FINDING OF FIRST B.C.
COAL WAGE PROBE TO
AFFECT WORK OF SECOND
Ottawa, Dec. 6.—Action concerning
the appointment, of a third member
of the Board of Conciliation, established to mediate in the dispute between the Canadian Collieries, ot
Vancouver Island, and their underground workers. Is still, under consideration by the Minister of Labor.
Two members, Joseph Hitchen, of
Nanaimo, and W. Fleet Robertson, of
Vancouver, were appointed some days
ago, and the Minister haa been requested to name a chairman.    .
Mr. Hitchen was a member ot the
Board representing the men ln the
'iispute between the employees of the
Western Fuel Co. and the operators.
This Board has now concluded Its
work, and it ls understood that since
the demands of the miners of the Canadian Collieries are similar to those
of the Western Fuel Co. workmen,
thc findings of that Board may have
some effect on the second one. The
point at Issue was a request from the
men for a restoration of a bonus of
90 cents per day which, In June, 1925,
was reduced to 30 cents.
MOOSE CARNIVAL
IS HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL
Novelty reigned supreme at the
Carnival held In the Ilo Ilo Hall laat
Friday evening by the Loyal Order ot
Moose.
The hall was decorated with many
colored streamers and numerous balloons, ticklers, paper caps, and nolse-
maklng devices, all lending a festive
air to thc occasion.
The lucky ticket for the standard
reading lamp was held by Mr. Johnston of Headquarters, while the handsome cousol set was won by Mr. Malcolm Stewart.
The Chevrolet car, which prize was
set up by the War Veterans 'Association, was won by Mr. Edmonds.
Splendid music was supplied by the
Byng Boys' Orchestra.
A short meeting of the City Council
was held on Monday evening last,
those present being Aldermen Parnham, .Mumford, Ledlngham, Henderson and Williams, His Worship the
Mayor   presiding.
Bills and accounts amounting to
{1K2.H5 were referred to the Finance
Committee. If correct to be paid.
On behalf of the Finance Committee
Alderman Parnham reported the following bank balances:
General account. $2448.32; School
account, 16848.00) Savings account.
1284.64,
Thc matter of Ihe reduction of tho
cost of electricity was discussed by
thc council, lt being finally decided
to leave this In the hands ot
.he Light Committee, who are to Interview the Lighting Co.
Campbell River Expects
Large Newsprint Mill
NEW PROJECT IS CALCULATED  TO  TURN  OUT  OVER
1,000 TONS PER DAY
MR. PRYDE'S OLD
HOME DESTROYED
Residents of this city were no
doubt pleased to notice on Wednesday
afternoon that the Cumberland Fire
Brigade destroyed the shell of Mr.
I'ryde's house on Derwent Avenue,
which was partially destroyed by tin-
some time ago. Several persons ln
that part of the city have several
times asked to have the shell removed
as It was dangerous to anyone walking nearby.
Cumberland Cronies
Burns'ClubjBecoming
Very Popular One
Record Attendance at Fortnight
ly Social Held in Anglican
Hall Saturday Last
Congratulations are Ina order to the
local Burns' Club tor the very excellent social held at tbe Anglican Hall
on Saturday last. Tbe feature of the
evening waB the showing of some very
fine slides depicting the birth-place
of tbe poet, Robert Burns. As the
slides were flashed on the screen, Mr.
Robert Strachan briefly described
them. His descriptions of "Tarn O'-
Shanter," "Afton Water," the Birthplace of Burns, the farm tbe poet
undertook and to which be took Jean
Armour, and tbe many monuments
erected in different parts of the
world, were very attentively listened
to.
An ambitious programme of vocal
and instrumental selections had been
arranged, the following well known
local artists contributing to the enjoyment of all  present;
'Bonny Mary of Argyle," and "Comin' Through the Rye," by Mrs. J. Ledlngham; "Hame O' Mine," and "The
Flower O' Dumblaue,' by Mr. R.
Goodall; "Angus McDonald" and "Ol
To Me a Pint O' Wine," by Mra. F.
Baird; "Bonny Jean," and "Ye Banks
and Braes," by Miss Edith Hood, Instrumental selections Included trombone solos "Drink to Only witb Thine
Eyes.' and "Blue Bells O' Scotland,"
by Mr. Les Moody; violin selections,
"Dark Lochnagar," and "Roses ot
(Continued on Page Seven)
Lights Went Out;
Bevan's Chance
Draw Resulted   in  Meeting of
Cumberland Athletic Club
Team and Bevan in Crib
League
The Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association cribbage team Journeyed to Bevan ou Wednesday evening to engage the hoys from the mill
town ln a return game In the District
Crlbbage league. A most interesting
series of games was played, but at
a very critical period of the night's
play, thc lights went out. This explained one of the Cumberland players, enabled tbe Bevanltes to make a
draw of it. as when the scores were
totalled, It was found to be eighteen
all. Genial Ralph Gibson Is being
blamed tor manipulating the lights
so conveniently for his team, but
whether he is to blame or not, the
locals certainly were on edge for a
time. However, the evening terminated with all having had a very good
time. The Bevanltes entertained In
right royal style, bounteous refreshments being served on the conclusion
of crib. After the games and refreshments, indoor football, a new game
Introduced In this district last winter, was indulged In. Bevan running
out easy winners.
Tbe Financial Post, which puhllca-
j tlon ls generally pretty sure of the
j ground on which lt stands, contains
an Item to the effect that plans are
! well under way tor the construction
of the largest newsprint mill In the
world at Campbell River, with a dally
I capacity of 1,000 tons. It Is aald that
j construction will begin In the spring
and that the s-inie Interests behind
j tlie Pacific Mills at Ocean Falls, ore
behind the new project.   The new mill
will overshadow the largest mill In
! Canada to-day, that of tho Canadian
I International Paper Company at
j Three Rivers,  with  a  production  of
700 tons per day. British Columbia
| Newsprint mills are  reported  to  be
working at capacity. A large proportion of the output la Bold to Australia
and New Zealand.
The class ot lumber used by these
mills ln the production ot newsprint
differs from that used In the East.
Logs, thirty to forty feet long, six and
eight feet In diameter, are converted
Into pulp. Before reaching the ground
wood mills or the chipping machines,
these logs are cut Into blocks some
two feet square and three feet long,
so that to a casual visitor to the mills
tt would appear that boxea, rather
than the pulpwood sticks, used ln tho
Eastern mills, were being manufactured Into pulp.
A PROMISE MORE
THAN KEPT
When the publishers of the Family
Herald ami Weekly Star of Montreal
two years ago announced thnt the
owner of the paper wished them to
reduce the subscription price from
two dollars to one dollar a year, they
promised that not a single feature of
the paper would lie eliminated, but
new features would be added, and the
paper made more valuable than ever.
' It Is frankly admitted by their million
; readers that their promise has been
'more than fulfilled, and today the
Family Herald and Weekly Star at
one dollar a year Is the marvel of the
newspaper world. No home iu Canad-i
would regret this Investment. Just
htlnk of n great big 72-page publication at less than two cents per week,
and every page ot It alone worth the
money .No wonder the Family Herald
and Weekly Star has over a million
readers.   It deserves   them   all, and
ANGLICAN W. A. HOLD
XMAS TEA AND
SALE OK WORK
Despite tbe inclement weather on
Wednesday afternoon last, quite a
large crowd turned out to the tea and
Hale of work held by the members of
thc Anglican W.A. In the Church Hall.
Many tempting delicacies weie on
display nt the home-cooking and
candy stalls, while the splendid fancy
work antl sewing brought ready purchasers
The greatest attraction of the afternoon was the very realistic snowman who was standing in one corner
ot the room handing presents to an
eager crowd  of children.
The W.A. Is grateful to those who
patronized their sale and helped to
make It no successful
more, too.
A RECORD CATCH
Constable W. V. Fenton made a record catch at his crow trap on the
Campbell Flats on Wednesday, making a total haul or S6. This brings
his total so far up to 351. Constable
Fenton haB received many Inquiries
from other points as to the construction ot the trap, one Inquirer going
so far as to offer to pay for a set of
plans PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLjVND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,  DECEMBER 9.  1927
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD VV. BICKLE
FRIDAY,   DECEMBER  9,  1927
WASTED TIME
.,|F nobody comes in and they
'  I    they spend the evening playing solitaire,"
said a man speaking of a young married
couple who lived in an adjoining apartment.
How many hours, precious hours, are wasted
If you will try using some of these wasted moments and put them to practical use your mental
equipment will increase by leaps and bounds.
For instance, there are books you have been
wanting to read for a long time—years perhaps.
But somehow you have never been able to get to
it. You have put it off. Something has always
seemed to interfere. Just try getting away from
that solitaire game or the radio for a few evenings
and giving the time to that book.
Watch your wasted hours. Conserve them.
They can be turned into gold.
I
HOME TOWN ENTHUSIASTS
SOME people are natural enthusiasts for anything that
promises to benefit the community.   While the av-'
crage man Ib plugging for ills own success, and
may not have much time for public causes, yet this ele-
playing solitaire?    How  many hours,  priceless  ment of enthusiasts keeps interest in a broader range of
hours, are spent idly beside the radio, listening activity,   it you want them to serve ou some committee
to jazz orchestras ?   How many hours are fritter-! they will probably reply that they are on a dozen of them
ed away by groups playing bridge, night after j n0w, but they will be so full of desire to promote a good
night?   Now, don't call US an old crab.   We know j cauae thot they will take hold of that additlnoal burden. :
people must have amusement, and that all work ■ if people have nny project that they want to put over for
and no play makes Jack a dull boy.    We know I tho good of the community, those folks are never too busy
that a game of bridge with a few friends is a; t0 meet with them.   The community should extend its
healthy antl worthwhile recreation.    We are not j warmest thanks to these folks.   We do not have to name I
talking of such cases.    We are talking of the , them here In our town, as we all know a good number of '
young people who night after night gad about or | them.   And usually they succeed well in tlieir own busi-
play solitaire. , ness too.    There Is a principle of reciprocity by which
It is perfectly amazing what you can accom-   when people give generously, they also get pretty freely,
plish with a few well-directed   hours each week.  —Cranbrook Courier.
CUMBERLAND DRAWS
WITH NANAIMO
The Cumberland High School basketball teams paid a visit to .N'anaimo last Friday to play against Nanaimo High School. The Boys' game
ended In a draw with points 20-20,;
while the Nanaimo Girls managed to
obtain tlve more points than the
home team, although the game was
really very close, with half-time score
standing  at 4-4.
Members of the team were as follows: Olrls: Edna Conrod, Capt.;
Katherine Brown. Emma Picketti.
Muriel Partridge, Beatrice Cavellero.
Josephine  Freeburn.
Boys: Harold Conrod Capt.; Victor Marlnelli, Jack Hill, Norman Hill,
Archie Dick, Andrew Brown. .Norman
Frelone. Ceorge Brown.
The teams remained in .N'anaimo
until Saturday, returning to Cumber-
laud that day.
Members of the teams feel very
eraieful to Mr. Wm. McLellan, snr.,
Mr. M. Brown, Mr. Blackmore and
Mr. Victor .Marlnelli, who kindly lent
their cars for the occasion.
ANNUAL MEETING
CUMBERLAND LITERARY
& ATHLETIC ASSOC'N
ment of Publlc Health. It Ib hoped
that by testing tbe fitness of prospective Immigrants before they sail, the
possibility of their rejection on arrival in Canada will be practically eliminated.
Dr. Hames, of Toronto, and a brother of Mr. W. A. W. Hames, editor of
I the Courtenay Free Press, was a
member of the party.
Rod and Gun antl Canadian Silver
Fox .News Is published monthly by W.
J. Taylor. Limited. Woodstock, Ont.
Gifts for Every Member of the Family
An early visit to look over our stock awaits
you   'SHOP EARLY."
For Fancy Groceries, Dried and Fresh Fruits
Mixed Candy, Box Chocolates, Cigarettes,
Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, etc.
Also new designs in Tea Sets, Fancy Dishes
and Glassware, Crockery, etc., Tea Spoons,
Cutlery Sets, Pocket Knives, etc.
Just Afl'ived:—A shipment of Peak Freen's
famous English Biscuits — "Something
Different."   A trial will be appreciated.
I'hone 38
DECEMBER ROD AND GUN
AND SILVER FOX NEWS
Here For Holiday Season
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Cliffe returned
to Sandwick on Tuesday evening,
where they will visit with Roy's parents over the holiday Besson.
MATT   BROWN'S   GROCERY
wuao*3SflS»S-«S,*J«WWM>3aBBBia'-
The annual meeting of the Cumberland Literary nnd Athletic Association
will be held In thc Athletic Hull un
Sunday. December 18th. at 7 p.m.
Election of officers. 49-50
CANADIAN DOCTORS
ARRIVE IN LONDON
Twenty doctors from Canada arrived ln London for the inspection of
potential migrants from that side of
the Atlantic to the Dominion under
new pre-einbarkatioii medical examination scheme which lias been placed
In operation by the Canadian Depart-
Featuring several splendid stories
of outdoor life as well as numerous
Interesting articles on sporting subjects, the December Issue of Rod and
Gun aud Canadian Sliver Fox News
Canadian sporting magazine, has just j
been published. Among the well told
stories of hunting trips Ib an especially good one of a trip ln the Rocky
Mountains after big born sheep and j
goat by George H. Charts.
In addition to the full list of other
articles, the tegular departments on
guns und ammunition by C. S. Landls,
Fishing Notes, edited by G. P. Sladen,
Outdoor Talk by W. C. Motley, Kennel Notes by C. G. Hopton and Dr.
L. E. L. Taylor, and Along the Trap
Line, by M. U. Bates, all contain most
useful information with regard to
tlielr special fields.
Canadian Silver Fox News section
also contains valuable material with
regard tu the growing Industry and
Informative articles.
vdffmmn
cjaHWcs**.
2*1 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
Car  leaves  Cumberland  Hotel
ut 9:00 a.m. every'Sunday and
meets boat at Union Bay.
sagaaaiaiapiaswcasaaBBWB
A Distinctive
Remembrance
The smartest thing in tht* world of gifts is a gift of
Jewellery from Shlozikis,
For "Her" or "Him" thu sweetest thought is one
expressed In some line piece of artistic craftmanship.
HERE VOir WILL KIND  THE   JEWELLERY OF
YOUR DESIRE.
MANTLE CLOCKS
We have a splendid assortment
of Mantle Clocks, with or with-
       out chimes, the ideal gift for
Z-tthZ  Mother or Dad.
BREAST CHAINS
If he already has a watch, what
better gift is there than a Breast
Chain.   We have a variety of designs in green and white gold that is bound to please.
LASTING GIFTS FOR ALL
M. SHIOZAKI
Watchmaker and Jeweller
l*>aMMilAli^%^Mi*^^
carry a full line of Auto Accessories.
AUTO REPAIRS A SPECIALTY
Get your anti-freeze today and save trouble!
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Phone 8 Cumberland
Give Something
ELECTRICAL
Of course you'll want your Christmas gifts to be
pleasant reminders for the whole year. There is one
sure way—
GIVE SOMETHING ELECTRICAL!
For every member of the family there is an electrical gift that is ideal. For the boy, a flashlight, train
set. For the girl, curling tongs, boudoir lanvp; and for
the mother, a percolator, toaster, iron, egg beater, or
one of the larger electrical labor savers. Dad'll like
a heater, or a desk lamp.
Visit our Store and see our Gifts!
Cumberland Electric
Lighting Co., Ltd.
nt-«=3=!t=frissesw=ss=caaesasa»!=^^
a-aaH'JB&QKHjwrtBwaaBaiaaHaaHa :
I
Ready for the Holiday
TURKEY
All fresh dressed, dry picked birds.   Every one nice as
can Le.   All cleaned out for you.   Order your Poultry
TODAY.   The price is exceptionally low.   Order NOW
and avoid disappointment.
TURKEY AND GEESE
CHICKENS AND DUCKS
The City Meat Market
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/o-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
■^eatswwtatswBwsataeMesswae^^
Phone 18 Cumberland, B.C.
Christmas Cakes
Choice selection of Specially
ORNAMENTED XMAS FRUIT CAKES
also
Cherry, Sultana, Madeira, Genoa, Iced or Plain, and
You miss a treat if you don't eat
OUR OLD-FASHIONED SCOTCH BUN AND
SHORTBREAD
Get some—Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Mann's Bakery tf
FhlDAY. DBCBMBEH 9, 1027
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
KEEP YOUR CREDIT GOOD!
THE HOLD-UP MAN WHO ROBS HIMSELF
How foolish the above picture is--Yet it is typical of the average "DEAD-BEAT" who does
not pay his bills. He robs himself of the greatest asset he could have—-A prompt-pay credit
reputation among his fellow citizens of Cumberland.
LIKE THE HOLD-UP MAN WHO PAYS NO TAXES—THE "DEAD-
BEAT" CARES NOTHING OF THE QUESTION OF MAINTENANCE
OF OUR SCHOOLS OR THE EDUCATION OF OUR CHILDREN. OUR
SPIRITUAL NEEDS ARE THE LEAST OF HIS CONCERN. OUR
STREETS, HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES AND THE THINGS
THAT MAKE LIFE IN CUMBERLAND POSSIBLE AND A PLEASURE
ARE NO CONCERN OF HIS.
THE "DEAD-BEAT AND THE HOLD-UP MAN ARE ALIKE IN
SOME WAYS. THEY ARE NOT INTERESTED IN THE WELFARE
OF THIS COMMUNITY FROM ANY ANGLE	
A
Throw the light of publicity on the habitual
in either case the community is better off.
are helping build up Community Spirit.
BUT THERE IS A BODY OF MEN WHO ARE INTERESTED IN
THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE AND IN ITS EVERY DETAIL. THESE
MEN ARE YOUR LOCAL MERCHANTS. WHO ARE WORKING WITH
US TO PROTECT THE CASH CUSTOMER AND THE PEOPLE WHO
PAY THEIR BILLS PROMPTLY. FROM THE "SLOW PAY" AND
HABITUAL "DEAD BEAT." THE HONEST MERCHANT KNOWS
THAT TO LET SPECIAL PRIVILEGE PEOPLE RUN ACCOUNTS LONG
PAST DUE IS ONLY IMPOSING AN INJUSTICE ANI) TAX ON THE
PEOPLE WHO PAY HIM PROMPTLY. THE HONEST PEOPLE ARE
PATRONIZING THE MERCHANTS WHO ARE WORKING WITH US.
OUR MEMBERS ARE PROUD OF THIS GREAT WORK AND ANY
HONEST CITIZEN CAN (ALL AT OUR LOCAL OFFICE AND GET
ADVICE.
"DEAD-BEAT."   He will either pay or get out—-
The honest  citizens who pay their bills promptly
Courtenay - Cumberland Division
CANADIAN   CREDIT   BUREAU   SERVICE
Pay Up and Keep Your Credit G
• Illl PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FMDAY, DECEMBEn 9, 1927
The New Ford
Corfleld Motors Ltd., local Ford
dealer, has Issued Invitations to tile
first showing of the new car iu his
■Couffhs and Colds '■
APlcasantSlp-InstantRclid
There U ftn effective wmy to pleaa-
•ntJy relieve that dUtreeiine OoUgh.
tiuckUy'i Mixture ii delightful and
"friendly". Yet It acts like a Hash in
clearing the throat and cheat. One
do** stops cough in?—and there an> -tit
doses in a 78-cent bottle 1 All druBKiitte
sell tt under a money-back ifuaraiit-oe.
W. K. Bnckler, Limited,
142  Uutnal  St.. Toronto 2
\ 142  M
IE
JUfiNJPtt
Acti like n /ia»h-
s single sip proves It,
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office ('or. of Dunsmuir Ave,
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  U.C.
Union Hotel
Cnmberlnnd, 11. C.
Electrically Heated
Throughout
Our Service is the BEST
It. l'ATES, Proprietor
Phone 1'j Phone 15
show rooms on Friday, December Jth.
'The people of this district, says Mr.
Corticld. "are in for a real surprise.
This new car Is a very conclusive bit
nt evidence that tlie Ford Motor Company  has  anticipated  thc needs and
desires of  Canada's  motorists  for a
long way Into the future as they did
when the Model T waa Introduced In
(iiiions.  speed,  riding comfort,  road-
j 1! 08.   In performance under all con-
', Ihlllty, case of control, flexibility, and
; thc  other points on  wliieh ear3 are
l judged, the new car performs astonishingly, even when compared to expensive cara.    The details  which  to
de e hnve been looked upon as "big
; --nr"  features have been included by
| thc Ford  Motor oCmpany of Canana
lo  the New  Car," said Mr. Coriield,
"yet the Ford genius for precision In
quantity   production,,  unequalled  In
the world, have placed the car within
the roach of every purse.
BABY'S
OWN
SOAP
INTERNATIONAL CAST IN
TARZAN AND
GOLDEN LION"
Despite the fact that "Tarzan and
the Golden Lion" Is aa African story,
the cast of the picture has an almost
international air. James Pierce, the
225-pound athletic who plays the role
of Tarzan, is American, but Liu Yu-
Ching, the eight foot giant who has
the part of Cadji, the high priest of
the' mysterious Palace ot Diamonds,
aud ii probably the tallest man in the
world, is a name of Peking, China.
Boris Karloff, the treacherous Ow-
aza of the story, ls a Russian by birth
und D'Arcy Corrigan hails from the
■Emerald isle .as does Edna Murphy,
who has the feminine lead. Major t\
J. Franklin, the noted big-game hunter and soldier of fortune, who supervised the technical details of the him,
is an Englishman, while J. P. Mc-
Gowan, tlie director, was born in
Australia.
Although the hundreds of colored
people wiio were used in the big moo
scenes arc of course of African descent, the only real '•natives' of that
country who appear in the picture are
the two magnificent lions.
"Tarzan and ihe Golden Lion'
comes to the Gaiety, Friday antl Saturday, December 9 and 10, nnd to the
Ilo llo, Wednesday, and Thursday,
December 7 and 8.
test out i& uforM. uk
l    AUmtUa-tMVmH*. Urn. *«lr**l .■■MM
STRONG DRAMATIC
SITUATIONS IN NEW
CIRCUS PICTURE
1 A great picture and a great cast.
', That has been the honest, enthusiastic
: verdict of everyone who has seen K.
i 1). Q.'s big Gold Bond special, "Digger
' Than liarnum's," which ia cuming to
! the Gaiety Theatre next Wednesday
and Thursday, December 7 and 8.
The theme of the story is impressive
ln Its simplicity; the pride of the old
acrobat In his profession aud his
family name, and his sorrow when
his sou, whom he has trained to follow in his footsteps, through a misunderstanding appears to bc a coward. How young Robert redeems himself makes one of the most dramatic
episodes ever shown on the screen,
and one that makes the film tbe outstanding picture of the year.
Ualph Lewis, as the father, has one
of thc biggest roles ln his screen career, with, abundant opportunity for
the emotion and pathos of which he
is so eminently capable. Viola Dana
plays the dainty Juanita dalles, who
shires performing honors oa the hlgh-
wlrc before the appiauuing crowns,
while George 0 Hara does remarkable
ivork as the son. Ralph Ince not only
directed the picture with all the genius of which he is master, but also
takes the part of Ravellc, the rival
(or both Juanita s affections and Uo
old acrobat's position as the leading
attraction of the circus. Backed with
.ill the resources of the big F. B. 0.
organization, "Bigger Than Barnum s"
presents undoubtedly the most authentic and interesting portrayal ever
made of the life behind tho outward
glitter and display of "The Biggest
.lliow on Earth.'
Fall Pruning
Of Shrubs
Written specially for the Courtenay
Free   Press,   and   published     in   tho
Cumberland   Islander  by   request.
By JOHN HUTCHISON, F.R.H.S.
Guilty Of Rushing
Bathing Season
the occupants of a couple of tug-j
Lied up at the Comox wharf thought
they had mistaken the seasons when
hey Baw a swimmer indulging in a
dip around tbe piles under the
■hart   0; investigating they disco*/-
v'd ihat the captain of the locol
iqx Logging tug had missed his
. oLing on the slip thereby unexpectedly rushing the swimming season.
NEW CAR
Introducing a Fine*Car in
the Light Car Field
This entirely new car surpasses the accepted
standards of light car accomplishment; sweeps
aside all boundaries of price class; establishes a
new standard of acceleration, speed, power and
smoothness that heretofore has marked only
expensive cars as fine cars.
Motor
Make and Model Ford "A".
Four Cylinders—Bore iVa";
•troke 4V4."
Unit Construction
Pump ind Thermo-Syphon
Cooling
Pump, Gravity tnd Splosh
Lubrication
Single Coil Distributor Ignition
Sliding Gear (3 speed) Transmission
Multiple 9 Plate Dry Disc
Clutch
Dynamically Balanced Crankshaft
High and Low Speed Jet Carburetor (hot-spot manifold)
Aluminum Pistons
Oil Indicator
2 Blade Aeroplane type Fan
Bakelized Fabric Timing Gear
Carbon Chrome Nickel Alloy
Valves
N.A.GC. Rating 24.03 H.P.—
Actual Developed IIP. 40
at2200R.P.M.
Chassis
4 Wheel Brakes—Mechanical,.
Internal Expanding Type,
with Automatic Brake
Equalizer
Springs — Transverse Semi-
Elliptic
Drive—Torque Tube Gears-
Spiral Bevel
Rear Axle -V* Floating
Full Crown 1-Piece lenders
Gravity Feed Fuel Tank
Ignition Wires Enclosed in
RoBabU Steel Tubing
Steering  Gear   (irreversible)
—Worm and Sector Type
Acorn Design, Nickel Plated
Headlights
5 One-Piece Steel Spoked
Wheels
nVi" Steering Wheel
Alemite-Zerk Chassis Lubrication
Body and Chassis insulated to
prevent noise
Wheel-base 10314 inches
Turning Radius 17 feet
Tire Size—30x4.5
Road Clearance!**1/-,"
Equipments
Automatic Windshield Wiper
(closed cars)
Rear View Mirror
Speedometer
Dash Light
Gasoline Gauge
Ammeter
Motor Driven Horn
Starter
Combination Tail and Stop
Light
Sun Visor
One-Piece Windshield
Thief-Proof Ignition Lock
Foot Accelerator
4 Hydraulic Shock Absorbers
Wide Range of Color Options
"Pttformanou
-60 Miles Per Hour
40 Miles Per Hoar in Second
Gear
Acceleration—3 to 23 M.P.1I.
in 8V4 Seconds
30 Miles Per Gallon (
Consumption
CORFIELD MOTORS, LIMITED
YEARS
PUBLIC        PREFERENCE   If
P35NIVS
With aome flowering shrubs, as, for
instance, the lilacs and forsythias, it
is best to prune tlie branches when
the (lowers Eade, it' tlie best results
are to be obtained. There are others,
however, such as the riiiladclphus,
which are host pruned at tho close of
lhe flowering season, but this matter
is often left until thc general clearing
up of tlie shrub border in late fall or
early  winter.
Mnny of the berried trees and
shrubs should he given attention now
particularly lf tbe fruits havo fallen
or havo been eaten by tlie birds.
.dany still carry their fruit and are
still attractive features iu tlie garden aud cannot therefore lie dealt
.vith just now.
Most berried shrubs flower on the
growths, or from spurs on growths,
of the previous year. Therefore any
pruning and thinning of thc shoots
must be done with a great deal of
:are, ia order to preserve all the
. est young wood. Taking the Berberries, which are so attractive when
covered with their berries, tho ata
mu3t bc to thin the shoots by cutting
out a few of thc oldest branches back
to the main stem. To shorten the
jranches would only mar lhe beauty
of the long, slender growths ill fruit
out would cause a still more tangled
nass of short twigB. Most of the
berberrie will also be much improved
lay the removal of thin, weak branches crowding  the centre of the bushes.
The Philadelp-bus, or mock orange,
s a good example of deciduous shrubs
hich flower freely on the young
growths of thc previous year. First
if all, if It has not already been done.
;ut out the old flowering wood on
■.hich there are no useful young
-.hoots. Then cut out useless crowded
cviga, and then shorten very long
growths, whicli in time would spoil
lie shape of tho shrub.
.Many gnrdenors pay very little at-
eiition to tlielr shrubs. This is a
nistake, because no class of plants
•■ive a better return for a little good
treatment,   it is well to dig in some
'inre around them, from time to
time, aud the winter is an excellent
-ion. to undertake this work, Bone
nienl ls a good nnd safe fertilizer to
,i-e if real farmyard manure cannot
be bad.
Wistarias should have a final spur-
pruning ahout this time. The spur-
pruning of these Is very like tbe spur-
i/.'uning of fruit trees, the shortening
of the shoots to within three or four
eyes of the old wood causes tbe tor-
.Tvt'ilo.i of flower budH.
The pruning of the ipyracanthas
and the coioncasters must bc done
with some Judgment. All that can
really be done when the branches art-
clear of fruit is to shorten the long
branches. Should hard pruning be
necessary in order to keep the shrub
viiliin hounds lt should he done hi
the psi-ing, just when tlle new growth
is about to commence, as It means
losing the dowers and fruit for one
.-eason. Willi really evergreen specimens this I.' worth while, because
ihese plant" readily send <jut new
j.o.u'i from very old wood.
It Is as wel. ;o do this work ns
early In winter ... possible, as pruning Induces root notion anil the consequent growth of the plain.
The following vlll give some Idee
of how shrubs ahould lie pruned at
this time of thc- yoar:
Aucuba: Shorten long growths
back to side shoots.
Herberts (deciduous): Thin bushes
hy cutting out old branches entirely,
hack to main stems and remove weak
twigs.
Blgnoula: Shorten long ' trailing
branches on walls back to within two
or three eyes of the old wood unleBs
there Is more space to be covered
and plenty of young wood to cover lt.
Buddleia: Cut back the new strong
growths of the past summer to within
one foot to eigiiteen inches of the old
wood and remove weak twigs.
Dlervllla: Cut out old flower
branches and remove weak twigs, retaining tbe best and strongest of the
new   growth.
Ilex (Holley); Shorten any long
shoots tliat detract from the shapeliness of the tree.
Jasmine (while): Shorten long
trailing growths on walls or fences.
Nail  In  strong young shoots.
Lavender: Trim off all old flow«r
shoots aiid rough ends with shears,
l'lilladelphus (mock orange): Remove old flowering wood and weak
twigs. Shorten long strong growths
which would spoil the shape of the
bushes.
Pyrnnthn: Shorten long branches
when free of fruit on walls and
fences. Put off hard pruning until
spring.
Spirea (Spring flowering varlct-
les): If these were not pruned in
early summer .cut nut a few of tho
oldest branches, some down to the
ground, to keep tlic hushes free aud
open in growth.
Wisteria: Spur hack all young
growths not required for extension
to within three or tour eyes of the
old  wood.
MR. JOHN KING
PASSES  AWAY
".lesident of District For Quarter
of a Century
Tlie deatli occurred nt the Cumber-
aiid Qeneral Hospital on Thursday
ivenlng of Mr. John King. The de-
-eased was in his seventy-fourth year
| md has been a resident of the district
'or ibo past twenty-live years, making
I its Imme on the Courtenay-Curaber-
land Itoad. Lett to mourn his loss
are a daughter. Mrs. Hadden. and a
ion, .Mr. Elijah King, both of Courtenay.
Mr. King was born in Derbyshire,
England,  in   1650,    and  was a  coal
miner over there.   So when he carao
out to Canada UV year* ago It waa
natural  Ior  blm  to  work  his  way
: icross lo tile cualllelds of Vancouver
1 Island.   He lirst got a job at N'anaimo,
, nil then moved mi to the I'nion mines
I *t  Cumberland.    He lirst worked hi
j *.*.). l aud afterwards iu Xo. 4, where
| io got hurt.    After ho was hurt ho
j  Hired to the littlo place he has on
j .lie Clttnborl'in'l Itoad. where he has
' :eeu ever since.
j lib was buried at St. Andrew's
'nltoil I'hurcb nl Sandwick, the pall-
i oarers being his old friends and
| (Olghbors, Messfii. wm. Duncan, H.
I lark. R. England, ll. Morrison, T.
Smith and W. J. Mu'uillaii.
RadioIsAUstinAGft
..Of all the Christmas gifts none will meet with
greater enthusiasm than a Westinghouse radio set. It
is a gift that the entire family will enjoy, for day after
day your home will be flooded with countless hour* of
enjoyment.
In the complete line of Westinghouse Radio Set*
and Radiolas you will find a model to suit your requirements, locality and your pockel'ook.
For example the Model 57—a battery operated
set many times a* selective a* the average set Otherwise known as "the greatest value in radio". Contain*
every improvement found in a set at twice the price.
One dial control. Wide tonal range. Operates on the
newly perfected UX-201-B radiotron which cuts operating costs in half. The price, without accessories, ia
only $78,001 Come in to-day and judge this model
for yourself.
LANG'S DRUG STORE
IT PAYS TO DE.il AT UNA'S CIMBKHLAMI
Distributors for B.C.; E. 0. Prior & Co., Vancouver, B.C.
Westinghouse
BATTERYLESS AND BATTERY
RADIO and RADIOLAS FRIDAY,  DECEMBER !),  102?
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
#
The Making
Of Honey
; Specially Written for Farm, Orchard
and Garden, by G. M. Swan, and
republished by request.
In commencing these articles It was
our intention io confine our efforts to
- completing n general survey of the
marketing conditions of thc farm In-
| dustry iu tlie province, and then to
suggest a line of action that we believe necessary for its betterment.
Editorial and oilier articles In the
last Issue dealing with the honey
isituatlon would, however, appear to
'demand attention, hut before commenting on tills matter let us make
•one point clear:
The fundamental economic principles necessary to he observed In put-
Ing together a commodity contract
.pool co-operntlvo marketing association are tbe same, Irrespective of what
Offmruodlty Is to be marketed through
it. In other words, the technical
structure ot all pool organizations Is
-substantially tho same.
Thc marketing problems confronting the respective pool organisations
naturally differ. These inherences nre
largely duo to Ihe varying degrees of
perishability between different commodities, Highly perishable commodities, such as soft fresli fruits, present
a problem In routing for quick delivery while staples, such as wheat, are
concerned chiefly with lhe storage
Problem. Potatoes and other vegetables have tlielr problems in a combination of both the foregoing.
Tbe solution of these problems ls
the special care of the sales staffs
which function under the directorate
of the particular pool to which they
belong. The members of these staffs
are engaged on account of their
technical knowledge.
Not being bee-keepers—at least not
yet—anything we may say in this
connection may be taken as applying
lo any other commodity as well as
honey.
Helping  Ktei-jImiiIj   Bill  Himself
The late Hon. II. C. Wallace, secretary of agriculture In tho Harding
Administration, was an outstanding
loader In agricultural progress, and
"IfiPSISOF ~
UNDACTAHENDMENTS
I'ltL-F.IIl'TlONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Prpwn lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 yeurs of age
SUd by aliens on declaring intention
to become Britisli subjects, condl
tional upon residence, occupation
pnd Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Pllll Information cum Mining regu
lutious regarding Pre-emptions In
given in Bulletin No. 1, Lund Series
"J(ow to Pre-empt Land." copies oi
wnicli uau ba obtaine(| free of chargi
by addressing tbe Department of
Uuda, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-
ernmont Agent,
. Records will be grunted covering
only   land  suitable  for   agricultural
f'iurposos, and which Is nut timber-
and, I.e., Carrying over 6,000 board
eet per acre west of the Coast Hang
•gi) s^i'jl feet per acre east or thai
.IUll««,
Applications for pre-eniptloiiB are
to be addressed to Hit- Laud Commissioner of the Laud Recording Division, in whicli the land applied foi
|s situated, and are made on printed
fitrius, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied foi
flvr yeom mul improvements made
to value of fill per acre. Including
Clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before Crown Giant cau bs
waived.
For more dutulled intormatlon see
tbe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Lund."
I'lltCHASK
Applications are received for put
chase of vacant aud unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland
tor agricultural purposes; minimum
price of tli si-class (arable) land la }5
por ncre, und second-class (grazing;
land $2.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purobase or loasr
(If Crown lands Is given in Biilletlu
No. 10, Latid Meilps, "Purehnso and
Lease of Crown Lands,"
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
Umber land, uot exceeding 40 acres
may be pgrchusod or leased, the conditions Including payment ol
stituipuge.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding ill
acres, muy be loused us bomesites,
conditional upon u dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtained i»fler resilience and Improvement conditions are fullitlcd and
land has heen surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding IHO aei-03
may lie leased by one person or u
company.
AltAZINA
L'pder tlfo Glazing Act the Province Is divided lino grazing districts
and tho rungo administered under a
Orazlng Commissioner, Annual
grazing permits arc Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being givon
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations fur range
management. Free or purtlally froa,
permits nre available for settlors,
campers  aud travellers,  up  to ten
probably -dw e* much as any man of
bis time to propagate the pool marketing idea In tlie United .-states. In
one of his speeches ou ttie subject of
"The farmer is the only large pro-
marketing, he said:
ducer who produces without Informing himself carefully as to future demand; who sells at the price ihe buyer Is willing to pay; who does not
condition his products carefully for
market; who dumps them in large
harvesting, and who, therefore, pays
quantities on tbe market soon after
high charges of ail sorts to other people to do for him what he ought to
ilo for himself."
If we accept the articles contained
in tiie last Issue as representing tllc
honey situation, we will bc Inclined to
agree that Mr. Wallace's statement Is
a fair presentation of lhe existing
state of affairs.
Aside from concurring in tbe generally accepted fact that out methods of
distribution are wrong. Mr. Aruut
does not provide any material ror discussion apart from tlie work we have
already undertaken, namely, to try to
And the right one.
The article hy Mrs. Greenwood,
however, tempts us lo step out a Utile
ahead or ourselves, as lt definitely
acknowledges the necessity of ono of
thc chief functions performed by all
properly formed and properly directed
pool marketing organizations, viz., advertising.
Tlie following, be it understood, is
not a criticism of Mrs. Greenwood's
article, nor la It q comparison made
for comparison's sake only. On the
contrary, wc aro but taking advantage
of the opportunity provided hy Mrs.
Greenwood to llustrnte by comparison the clear, definite comprehensive
character of Sapiro'a Vernon speech,
which, In itself, must remain as the
most Important contribution ever
made to the farm marketing problems
of the province, snd which, as a textbook, we believe should be in tlie
bands of every farmer lu British Columbia.
Mrs. Greenwood's article shows a
clear grasp of a very Important phase
of the iho question, und it is an encouraging feature to And such Initiative behind the desire for better conditions on the farm. We could stand
a lot more of the same work from a
lot more poople.
Tlckner Edwards, that might be loaned to good advantage to many who
could not be Induced to adopt a hive
as a means of learning more ahout
honey. Tiie book Is of high literary
merit, and of such engrossing interest
that It carries one along In spite of
ull apathy to the mere details of bee-
mansiilp.        a
There are other books by the same
author almost eually as good.
Let us remember, however, that
while advertising can promote our interests, it cannot of itself protect
them,, mid thut an advertising campaign Is an expensive business tbat
can only justify Itself by returning i
profit to those who foot the"l)lll.
There Is also a good deal of technical knowledge necessary to profitable advertising, more particularly
■vhon curried on in connection witli
•omnioility-wlde organizations ,that
should be as wide" in tlielr scope as
Ihe market Is In extent.
Hard Time Dance
At Sayward
Sayward, Doc. 3.—Tho Agricultural
Fair Board's Hard-Time Dance on
Saturday night. Nov. 26th, was n huge
success, and a very substantial sum of
money realized and turned over to
the treasurer. Great Interest centred
around the guessing contest, a cash
prize being offered by the management to the person guessing the correct time or nearest to correct time
that the mail boat would tie up at
the wharf the same afternoon or
night, one guess going with each
ticket. When the official time was
brought lu by special courier .alt
signed, sealed and delivered, it was
found that Mrs. Turner of Victoria,
and Mr. James Connors, had tied,
and the prize was divided between
them.
During the course of the evening
Mr. James Edward, our local comedian, sang some old lime songs In tils'
usual delightful manner. Supper was
served at ton o'clock, followed by.
dancing.
Headquarters
Mrs. Fraser, of Inverness, Scotland,
who for the past six months, lias been
visiting ber daughters In the States,
is now with her son, Mr, J. C. Fraser.
Mrs. R. S. Patrick und her two sons
from Portland, Ore., visited here last
| week.
Mr. Joe Parkin,'who has been farm-
Ing at Comox, Is homo with bis par-
lents.
>    Mr. Alvln Parkin has returned from
! Port Neville.
I    Mr. John Anderson, who bas been
! working at Cowlchan Lake since early
I summer, Is spending a  holiday  with
lhls sister, Mrs. Murtsell.
' Mr. and Mrs. Dalby havo gone to
Vancouver to attend the golden wedding celebrations of Mrs. Dalby's
parents.
Comox
The ranking In the Comox school
for the month of November wns as
follows: Grade II—1st, Connie
Holmes; Grade III—1st, Bertram
Smith; Grade IV—1st, Rachel Hull,
2nd,   Lance  Rossiter;   Grade  V—1st,
Pip Osier, 2nd, Bertha Daniels; Grade
VI—1st, Kathleen Gills, 2nd, Eleanor
Ball; Grade VII—1st, Douglas Fair-
aim, 2nd, David Guthrie; Grade VIII
—1st, Beatrice McOann, 2nd. Margaret
Knight.
aWHaggsagtaeta*.
■P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Do Your Xmas
Shopping Early
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Ofllce
Courtenay           Phone  208
Local OOlce
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone   HSR  or  24
"^l****«M]=ajEM»»EWHHMESHHS^^
E
11
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
{I       Phones I and 61
Tl
Cumberland, B. C.
DINING ROOM
j Our Dining Room otters good food,)
j good  service,  reasonable charges, j
[KingGeorge Hotel]
Qli n) berland
gCiiminercttil
""IHeiulil wirier*
"fj 111* w I DuuontUe H
:| ACCOMMODATION THE BEST ll
j-/ Rooms Steam United 7
I        IV. JIEHIIIFIELD, Prop.       11
• iiaaisisisiaHBifflEralBHSiaiBEiBisiaE^
Extension of Markets
In her article, Mrs. Greenwood distinguishes between advertising honey
end educating the publlc to tho value
and uses of honey, while Saplro deals
with the whole situation under the
heading of "The Extension nf Markets,"  fie says I
"Tbe third point, tbe third step In
the 'merchandising' of your commodity, ls tlie extension of your markets.
You can extend, your markets In
three ways; 1st, by time. 2nd, by
place.   3rd, by intensification of use."
Suplro (hen proceeds to enlarge
upon this subject by explaining how
this Is done.
Ily time; Through -storage and a
systematic feeding of tlic market all
the year around Instead nf throwing
the crop on the market all at one time,
creating a surfeit, and then lotting
the market go hungry for the balance
of the year,
Ry place: Through Jiidlclons advertising and salesmanship in Introducing your commodity into places
where nothing of Its quality and uses
are  known.
Ry Intensification of use; By developing or searching out new and different ways of using your commodity
and introducing them to your consuming puhlic.
Saplro tells us that by following
this policy producers havo In BOtue
cases Increased their markets as much
as tinu per cept,
We agree with Mrs. Greenwood
about the almost abysmal ignorance
of Uie general public ns tn honey
knowledge, nnd must plead guilty to
tho same thing oursolf. until quite recently when by n fortunate circumstance a wonderful book on the subject came to our lunula
The extension of markets along the
lines suggested above would seem to
lend Itself to the present honey situation to a remarkable extent If Intelligently directed.
Somewhere bidden away In our pot
piles of confusion with which we surround ourselves of nights is a detailed
account of the advertising activities
of the California Orange Growers'
Co-Opcraflve, that Ideal of all produc
ers' marketing organizations. Based
on vital statistics, It Is a marvel ot
scientific salesmanship carried to a
high degree.
lt might bc taken almost Intact and
applied to tho honey producers' marketing problems, only substituting the
varied uses qf honey ln sickness and
health for tiie claims tho orange
growers make for their product fn
the same circumstances.
Among tho literature Is a hook,
, "Tbo Lore of the Honey Bee,"   by
*'i«'=*Me3;Me(t3t=MW=:'-:>r!i*3
u,
We Invite You I
to Inspect      |
our different lines of merchandise, then compare prices jy
nnd you will find that wa are offering Real Values. j-J
We have opeiied up this week a line of S
Men's Tan, Brown and Black Oxfords, easy fljr r A k
fitters, in the latest styles, at    ■tpD.Ol/ g
Misses' and Women's Brown Brogue Oxfords in calf, 1]
with a gootl durable sole, sizes 2 to 7s, d» A   A C H
Priced «t   $4.40 \
Boys' School Shoes, at $2.95, $3.45 and $3.95 |
SANTA CLAUS WILL BE HEBE \
In a few days with Slippers in leather and Felts, for g
Christmas, in Men's, Women's, Misses', Boys' and the (f
Kiddies, ;;
Gents' Furnishings and Clothing Department •{
Men's Flannel All-Wool Lumberjacks'       d» .fl   fLC\ H
Shawl Collar and two pockets, -at  *4>zi.t)l/ g
Fine Broatkloth Shirts in the latest patterns, at $1.95, J
and $2.16.                                                               . fi
See our Khaki Mixed Tweed Mixture Work fl»i   AA \
Shirt, at  tPJL.UU 3
Men's Sweaters, in all-wool, V-neck, % pockets with I
Jersey, waist band,                                d»Q AC 9
Specially priced this week at    tpO»*/0 H
Men's Work Sox, all-wool, at 3 and 4 pairs for $1.0f il
MAIL ORDER AND VANCOUVER PRICES j]
.THE MANUFACTURERS' AGENCY J
MacKenzie  &  Partridge I
Opposite- Post Office, Cumberland, B.C. j
_^_ n
•ss3Ss»ea»t;tss2»K'=wrsrieM=aewe,3ei»e
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS.
WINDOWS, DOOHi, .
SHINGLES,
KILN  DltlBD FLOORINGS.
AND   FURNISHINGS
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES I Nlt'lu calls: 1S4X Courtenay
I Office:  IBS Cumberland.
BOOK RESERVATIONS NOW FOR
CANADIAN FARMERS'
Marketing Tour
THROUGH ENGLAND, SCOTLAND
AND DENMARK
$500
Plus low rail fares from   j a^^/v
starting point to Halifax      jkoOU
and return
Opportunity for special study of Marketing and
Agriculture in the Old Land.
Attractive Sight-Seeing Features Are Included
TOUR LEAVES HALIFAX JANUARY 8, 1928
For particulars apply to E. W. BICKLE, Cumberland, or writ"
C. F. Earls, Dlatrlct Passenger Agent. Vlctoral, B.C.
■"Ml
n National Railways
-,~i*nw*****:,*******r.'-*iweea****n****M^
aK^HUB^-Ju--:JjJi-*J-ysa^-M&&j-^--i'.i-.'.*-ii.
RILEY'S TRANSFER     |
COAL    -    GENERAL HAULING     —     WOOD       |
of all descriptions
il
David Hunden, Junr.       i-i
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive       ff
i"■?:.'"■•     PROMPT ATTENTION     --53 il
awr^wwssH'rMe^ttwweeMwww
E. L. SAUNDERS ji
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER. J
It pays lo have your shoes repaired as thoy wear ,
j.                 longer alter repairing than when new. ■
{!       I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship ami ||
Jl                                         Service at— i
I!                     THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS 2
E       Note address—                   Opposite the Drug Store. {]
ijB>i»i=ii-i«sw.M*.^^^^
Coast • Okanagan
Telephone Service
' It is now possible to talk  to  such  points as
} Armstrong, Enderby, Kelowna, Penticton, Sum
merland and Vernon from mainland coast and
f Vancouver Island telephones.
} ,       B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY !{
^•a^M-'-MpniaR-MMaaMi*"^
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
1; At Reasonable Prices.
fi       Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
I receive prompt attention. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,   DECEMBER 9,  182f
^-iWiSHieMaBlMiilE/aiSraiaraiSIBIii^^
Cumberland
1*1
i
@5
*»■
m
d
a
i
Potatoes, sack, $1.45
Supply
The Cash Store
Dunsmuir Avenue
Facing the Pott Office - Cumberland
Also the New Season Naval
Oranges, Jap Oranges, Apples
Bananas, Grape Fruit, Onions
Cabbages, etc.
■■''raaBis'i'^
Complete Stock of Dolls
Toys, Mechanical Trains
Magic Lanterns, etc.
Do your Xmas Shopping Early, save last minute disappointments.   Our Stock
is replete with the finest Merchandise for Christmas and Holiday needs.
Our Prices are right.    Toys for the Kiddies, come and choose early.
Christmas Toys and Gifts
Toy Trumpets, each 100
Tin Whistles, each   100
Toy Watches, 15 and   250
School Paints, per tin   150
SKIPPING ROPES
Each 	
MA-MA DOLLS .DRESSED,
Bonnet, Stockings, Shoes
$1.00
MAGIC LANTERN
with six slides ....
$1.15
10c
Kaladoscope, each   100
Dust Pan and Broom   150
Musical Grinder   200
Mechanical Toys, Assorted   20c
Double Garage, with Two Cars  300
ASSORTED GAMES
Each  	
25c
Mixed Nuts, with Shell
per lb., 35c.
Children's   Gift   Handkerchiefs   in   box
19c and   250
Ladies' Gift Handkerchiefs, 3 in t-jx 590
Ladies' Gift Handkerchiefs, 3 in a box
Colored 39c, 59c and 75c
Ladies' Fancy Handkerchief 5c, 10c,' 150
$2.75
VELVET HAND PAINTED
CUSHION COVER  ,....
*-fWgWSWWf*W-f*-"I*S
Men's Suspenders, in box, from 500
Men's Garters, in box, from 350
Men's Garters and Suspenders in box 900
Men's Garters, Armbands and Suspenders
in box $1.00
Men's Caps, from 95a**?
AN   EXCELLENT   CHRISTMAS   GIFT
rob roy mufflers    djn 9c
Each     •yu.tUO
Men'.**, Kerchief, 10c, 15c, 25c and .... 350
Men's Fancy Socks, 65e and   750
Men's Fancy Tics, from  750
Drawing Slates   400
Nested Blocks   350
Mechanical Toys, Assorted 300
China Toys  ,  550
Shooting Game  550
Mechanical Trains on Track, each      650
Ten Pins, each   75,0
Mechanical Train Outfit   $1.25
Cat and Dog on Wheels   $1.50
Doll in Basket   $1.15
Toy Hand Bags   50c
Box Tools     $1.00
Dressed Doll, Assorted   60c
Character Baby. Lace Trimmings, Dress
Real Hair   $1.35
Kelt Dolls, Dressed, unbreakable head and
arms      $1.15
Novelty   Dolls,   made   of   felt,   assorted
colors   25*r
^-CHPCW-f-*---*?^
Heinz Sweet Mixed Pickles
Heinz Sweet Gherkins	
Heinz Chow Chow 	
Heinz Sweet Mustard Pickles
Blue   Bird   Chocolates,   in
each 	
Fancy
'itb   Boxes
each
Fancy
large
Boxes
250
Assorted  Chocolate  Creams
  350
Boxes    McMorack's    Chocolates.
$100
Fancy Boxes Chocolates, %Xb 50o
LARGE ASSORTMENT P_
CHOCOLATE BARS   Ot
Assorted Jelly Beans, per tb   300
Jelly Layers, per lb  40c .
Classic Gums, per tb 350
Mixed Candies, per tb 350
Assorted Chocolates, per tb   40c
GROCERIES
450
450
400
450
Libby's Sweet Mixed Pickles, 35c and 450
Happy Vale Chow Chow, large bot. 600
Happy Vale Sweet Mustard Pickle, large
  600
Happy Vale Sour Mixed Pickles, large
    550
Happy Vale Sweet Mixed Pickles, large
  600
C. &B. Sweet Onion Pickles, large .... 850
C. & B. Chow Chow, large 750
C. & B. Walnuts   600
Heinz Malt Vinegar, 32 oz 450
C. & B. Malt Vinegar, quarts 400
Heinz Stuffed Olives, per bottle 550
Libby's Stuffed Olives, per bottle .... 350
Glace Cherries, per lb  550
Citron Peel (Dundee), per tb 600
Orange and Lemon Peel, per tb 350
Cumberland Supply
the  CASH Store
Phone 155 Cumberland
_' ijraramjgEHaiSISiSEEi3)BEiaHSISIiWaEIS^ 	
-"^cwmpripff
GROCERIES
Shelled Walnuts (new), per lb 55<£
Shelled Almonds (new), per tb 650
Sunmaid Prunes, 2 lb carton 300
Market Day Raisins, 4 tb carton 55£
Bleached Raisins, per tb 200
Cooking Fig.s 3 tb carton 350
Market Day Raisins, 2 Ib carton 300
Puffed Raisins, bulk, per lb 150
Blue Ribbon Figs, per pkg., pressed 250
Choice White Figs, bulk, per Ib 100
Libby's Mince Meat, per lb  250
Very Choice Mince Meat, 2 lb for...... 350
Icing Sugar, 2 lb for .-...* 250
Icing Sugar, in Colours, per Ib   180
Snow Flake Pastry Flour, 10 tb 590
Wild Rose Pastry Flour, 10 lb .....  550
Crisco ls 29c, 3s 850
Shaker Salt, 2 pkg. for   250
White Star Baking Powder, 12 oz 250
Magic Baking Powder, 12 oz 33c, 2V4s 950
Royal baking Powder, 12oz 550
Cow Brand Baking Soda, Ms 150
Almond Paste*, per lb   600
C. & B. Herb.:, in glass, full strengh parsly
thyme, mixed herbs, per bottle 250
Braid's Best Tea, Blue Label, per lb 800
White Star Tea, per tb   650
Nabob Tea, per Ib   750
Malkin's Best Tea, per lb   800
Ridgway's 5 O'clock Tea, per tb 950
Blue Ribbon Tea, per tb 700
Nabob Coffee, per tb   700
Blue Ribbon Coffee, per tb 700
C. & B. Coffee, per lb 650
Fresh Ground Coffee, per tb 550
CHRISTMAS CAKES
AND PUDDINGS
XMAS CAKE, 2i/2 lb $1.50
XMAS PUDDING in bowl .*  750
XMAS PUDDING in bowl $1.25
XMAS SHORTBREAD, in boxes 600
XMAS CAKES, (cherry, wrapped in holly
paper) 2 tb $1.00
XMAS CAKES, Silver Luxury Cake,
2 lb $1.00
XMAS CAKES, dark fruit, 2 tb 950
LUXURY CAKE, lib  350
«««€«*«^«^p««««*€«ep««e««p«
All above cakes are made by Robertson's
Bakeries, Vancouver, B.C.
HBIBIi!l5iaiBIB(iiJ|i#S
-Bit i
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 19*27
CUMB'LAND CRONIES—Cont.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
Picardy," by Mr. James Walker, who
also later In the evening played as a
solo, "Auld Robin  Gray."
two trim little kilty lassies and a
laddie, tlie Misses S. Small and Mary
Morrison and Master Morrison gave
several Scotch dances, following them
with an exhibition of the Charleston.
On the conclusion of the musical
programme, Mr. J. L. Brown briefly
addressed the audience and on behalf
of the committee thanked all for their
presence there that evening. To the
artistes who so graciously gave of
their services, and to the Rev. E. 0.
Robathan for kindly operating the
picture machine thanks were also
extended. It was also i sported that since the first social some
seventeen new members had been enrolled, and a cordial Invitation was
extended to one and all to join the
Cumberland Cronies' Burns' Club,
whether a Scotchman or not.
Following the serving of refreshments, the Byng Boys' Orchestra,
composed of M°:-srs. R. Goodall, S.
Robertson, Bert McLdllan, R. T.
Brown, Jimmy Walker and Les
Moody, provided the music for the!
dance which continued until midnight. \
At a good meeting   of the Burns'
Cronies' Club held   in   the Athletic
Hall   on  Sunday   evening    arrange- i
ments were made for another social I
and dance to be held on December ■
It was regularly moved and seconded
that the poet's birthday, January 25th,'
be celebrated by the Club with a
-anquet and dance and preliminary
plans were made for tlilB event,
•lesdames Cameron, Johnston, Derbyshire, and Clark were appointed a
lUb-committee to act with the executive in making the necessary arrangements.
17th, in  the Anglican  Church  Hall.
CANADIAN CLUB—(Cont.)
MAKE "IT"
MOIR'S CHOOOLATES
If you're not sure—decide
now on a gift of Moir's
Christmas Chocolates.
Fancy  Boxes  ranging  in
price from 50c up.
A. HENDERSON
Cumberland, B.C.
aqpaoqaiaawsBagaaagB
Inducted Into the League on September 10, 1926. which was the twelfth
anniversary of the Battle of the
Marne. 'the bloodiest battle of the
war." He described the ceremonies
attending Germany's reception Into
the League, and quoted extracts from
speeches made by Foreign Minister
Stresemann, of Germany, and former
Premier Foreign Minister Brland, of
France.
At the conclusion of his dramatic
description of the addresses by
StreHemauii and Briand, the speaker-
told of Sir George Foster's attempt
to raise a cheer. Sir George leaned
over to liim and said, 'Don't you think
we ought to give him a wave?" to
which Sir Herert replied, "It Isn't
done over here." Nothing daunted,
Sir George, rose to his feet and waved
his handkerchief with a "Hip, Hip,
Hurrah!" One or two faint hurrahs
were heard from the gallery and Sir
Oeorge tried again, with a little better result but on the third attempt
the roof was fairly raised off the
building. It was a blessed relief to
a tense moment.
"Was tlie reconciliation between
Stresemann and Brland really genuine? was a question that had been
asked. As far as these two men were
conperned, It was. They had become
personal friends, and each appreciated the problems of tbe other. Stresemann and Brland wcre doing more for
world peace than any other two men,
Sir Herbert aserted.
Sir Herbert said that lhe best kind
of good will prevailed between Stresemann and Brland, and that during
the last yoar, every two or three
months, events had occurred which
showed that they both were endeavoring to humanize treaties,
tirentest Thing In History
The speaker told IiIb audience that
he had Just heard that M. Paul Bon-
cour, the French delegate to tho disarmament parley, had suggested a
Locarno pact for all Europe. If this
became a fact, It would be the greatest thing ln all history. He himself
would like to see a Locarno pact for
all the English speaking races. It
was In this way tbat the League was
establishing a sense of security, for
lt was only nfter a sense of security
had been established that there could
be any hope of real disarmament.
"When we have such an agreement
between the nations of Europe, and
between the English-speaking nations
by which they will agree to settle
their differences and disputes in a
peaceful manner, we will be a long
way towards a perpetual guarantee of
peace," Sir Herbert declared. ,
In concluding, Sir Herbert said that
Canada entered the League of Nations
without tho expectation of material
advantage or reward. Canada had
done what she could ln the work of
the League, and in doing so she was
actuated by the highest of altruistic
motives. Canada saw In the League
a piece of machinery through which
she could do her bit to consolidate
peace. i
At the close of bis address, Sir
Herbert was given a wonderful ovation. The president said he would
refrain from asking any person to
move n vote of thanks as they would
all want to do so but on behalf of
the club hc tendered their hearty
thanks to the speaker. I
ljesff«sasasas=a3fiSESS3sa5=weaea
Ronnie Gray ls home from Duncan
and residing with his sister, Mrs. I
Davis.
Friends of Mrs. Monks will be glad
to know that she Is much improved
in health.
Mrs. Wm. Davis, Mrs. Morgan and j
.Mrs. Calnan with Ronnie Gray motor- ■
ed to Nanaimo on Saturday on business In connection with the Christ-1
mas entertainment at the school. The;
children are busy preparing a programme to present at that time.       j
Mr. Davis ls slowly recovering from j
his accident in the mine a few weeks |
ago, but'time Is the only healer In
his case, so he has got to keep quiet
a few more days yet.
Quinton White suffered a very
painful accident in Grant's Camp,
where he was assisting ln splicing a
rope, some of the bones in the back
of his hand being fractured.
Thero will be another of the biweekly whist drives In the school thlH
Saturday night.
Through the good offices of Mr.
A. W. Neill, the member for Comox-
Alberni, tlie residents of Departure
Bay, as far south as Piper's Lagoon,
have been granted a rural delivery.
Tlie new route begins with the Wellington Road, down to Departure Bay,
and thence on to Piper's Lagoon and
back by* Farmers' Road.
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Senior Canadian Girls In Training will serve afternoon tea ln the
United Church Hal), on Wednesday,
December 14th, from 3 to 6. Candy
stall, and Gift stall.
Awsome!
Romantic!
f
ONLY THE PARROT
COULD SOLVE THE
MYSTERY
f
A    PRICELESS    NECKLACE   AND   THE   FATE
OF A MILLIONAIRE AT
THE MERCY OF A—
PARROT.
At the IL© IL© THEATRE
Monday and
Tuesday
December 12 and 13
An Amazing
Aggregation
of Artists
Ralph Lewis
I
/Pv      V    *^V
s*'1   **     ■   \,5fc,
m        JLJ
Viola Dana,   George O'Hara,   Ralph Ince
Wednesday-Thursday, December 14-15
EDGAR RICE  BURROUGHS   MIGHTY   JUNGLE   STORY!
A   FEARLESS   HERO   AT   GRIPS   WITH   THE   GOD   OF   THE
STUPENDOUS   PALACE   OF   DIAMONDS!
Nerve-tingling action in the most amazing background ever shown
in a picture! An age-old palace in the heart of Afrira! A beautiful girl
offered as sacrifice! A snarling Lion God held in leash by a gigantic
priest! One second more and the gigantic cat would claim its prey ! A
swift-hurled spear—a crashing smashing figure to the fore—TARZAN
TO THE RESCUE !
CHILDREN, 25c ADULTS, 50c
SPECIAL MATINEE THURSDAY AFTERNOON AT 3:15 P. M.
CHILDREN, 15c ADULTS. 35c
Friday and Saturday, December 16-17
"The Great
Mail Robbery"
Mail Bandits! Marines! Adventure! PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY.  DECEMBER 9.  1927
What to
Give
---that is the
question
? ?
We can materially assist you in the selection of suitable gifts for the whole family for the Christmas
Season.
FOR MEN—
Forsyth Shirts are most acceptable. You can have
such a variety at a price to suit your purse.
Broadcloth Shirts give lasting service.
GLOVES—
A man appreciates a nice cosy pair of gloves these
days.   We have them.
SCARVES—
For the young man who wants to be up to the
minute, give him one of our new scarves.
TIES—
The Miracle Tie, an all-wool lined crease-resisting
tie, in such a variety of new colors, we feel we
can meet the tastes of all in the selection we
have.   For this tie the price is $1.50.
HANDKERCHIEFS—
Men's Handkerchiefs are most useful, as well as
a choice gift. Our new range contains a large
assortment.
We have two large counters loaded with suggestive gifts suitable for men and boys. Call and
inspect.
LADIES* GIFTS—
In acceptable and suitable gifts for Ladies, we
have an array of goods that will give you delight
and pleasure to make a selection.
HANDKERCHIEFS—
One whole counter with an array of oozes of
Handkerchiefs that will make selection less difficult.
UMBRELLAS—
Our Christmas stock of Umbrellas comprise an
assortment from which it should be easy to choose
one. The price is according to quality, and we
have them from $2.95 up to $10.50 for the all-silk
special which we have on view.
SILK UNDERWEAR—
Year after year this kind of gift is being more
appreciated, as it is something that most ladies
delight to have. See our special Non-ravel Garments, guaranteed to give you satisfaction. Vests,
$2.25; Bloomers, $2.75. Art Silk Vests in a number of good shades, 98c each. Art Silk Bloomers,
a real good quality, peach, pink and white, $1.75.
DRESSING GOWNS—
Ladies' Dressing Gowns in a good variety of
colors, smartly done, trimmed with silk collars.
Prices $6.50 to $7.95.
LADIES' SILK HOSE—
We are carrying a good line of "Holeproof Silk
Hose" in a number of the best shades, done up in
separate boxes, $1.95 pair. Ladies' full fashioned
Silk Hose, full length silk. Price $1.50.
LADIES' HOSE—
A splendid range of colors in a really dependable
quality, price $1.25 each pair, in a fancy box.
SCARVES—
We have a wonderful selection of new Scarves in
new colorings, made of Georgette and Crepe-de-
Chine, as well as Silk, and the prices are from
$1.50 to $195.
Wc have about 18 very smart Aprons done in
Cretonne, with contrasting colors.   Price $1.00.
BEADED BAGS—
We have one line of the latest in Beaded Bags, a
really pretty bag, and makes a handsome gift.
Price $3.95.
CHILDREN'S GIFTS—
Come in and let us help you to make your selecting
easier, as we have a special table with suitable
gifts for the children.
SPECIAL—
We have just received a shipment of smart two-
piece suits in some of the best colors, knitted,
splendid combination of colors, price $9.75. If
you want to give the young lady something nice,
see these!
For Christmas Gifts
visit
SUTHERLAND'S
3uj=53uB3BSwsaMi=BaHHias3saaHjajaHsasaiaj:
| Cumberland Personals
WJ*ac55a=5Hsas:S=g M&B&S&^9&a\¥S9-^^
Miss Edith Horbury, of the teaching
staff of the South Wellington public
school, wa? a visitor to Cumberland
last week-end.
Mr. G. J. and John Richardson motored to N'anaimo on Saturday last,
returning on Sunday.
Mr. George Tait, who was a resident
of Cumberland a few years ago ,but
who returned to England with his
berland this week-end, where he will
parents, ls expected to arrive In Cum-
reslde in future.
Miss Hazel Maynes of Duncan arrived In town Saturday last to spend
the week-end with the Rev. and Mrs.
Hewitt.
The Canary Club Orchestra aro
playing for the Firemen's Dance at
Headquarters, Saturday, Dec. 10th.
The first meeting of the Bridge Club
after officers have been elected was
held at the home nf Mrs. A. It. Nunns
this  afternoon.
Officers elected at lhe last meeting
were: president, Mrs. Dick; secretary,
Mrs. Cope.
New members this year are: Mrs.
Conway, Mrs. Murray, Mrs. Eadle,
Miss Burrows and Miss Sehl. Tho
club meets every second week, on alternate Thursday evenings and Friday afternoons.
Word has been received here of the
marriage of Miss Lillian June Bor-
reson, of Long Beach, and Mr. Douglas McLean Forsyth, tn Lob Angeles,
on November 14th. After a honeymoon trip to t'-itsilina. Mr. and Mrs.
Forsyth will reside in Glendale, where
Mr. Forsyth Is connected with a legal
firm.
The bridegroom Is the elder son of
the late Rev. S. M. Forsyth. B.D., and
Mrs. A. C. Wier Darch, of Long Beach,
and a grandson ot Mr. and Mrs. J. J.
Wier, of Cumberland.
Mrs. L. R. Stevens and little grandson Kenneth Bourne lett for Vancouver Monday, where they will join Mrs.
Bourne, who has recently returned
from an extended holiday in the East.
The regular December meeting of
the Women's Auxiliary to Holy Trinity Church was held at the home of
Mrs. J. Cameron on Monday evening.
Mr. T. E. Jones and Mr. Mills, auditors for the Provincial Government,
arrived from Victoria this week, and
are at the Government Office here.
Mr. John Conway returned on Monday from-Alert Bay after a uslneos
trip of a few days.
Mr. Thomas Graham went to Nanaimo on Tuesday on a business trip,
Mrs. Sherman Byrd of Vancouver
is in town visiting her mother; Mrs.
M. Stewart.
Mrs. Fraser Watson and Mrs. Ralph
Gibson of Bevan motored to Nanaimo
on Tuesday, returning on the same
evening.
Mrs. M. Watson entertained a few
friends  last Wednesday  evening.
The Rev. antl Mrs. Hewitt and child
returned from Victoria Saturday last
after spending a few days in that city.
W^ French
k Ivory
a most acceptable
gift
WEDDINGS
n
Will the party who took wrong umbrella from Anglican Hall on Wednesday afternoon kindly return to
Mann's Bakery and get own In exchange.
CUNAR
A ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
Copp - iiogg
A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. George's Manse, Courtenay,
ion Thursday morning, December 8th,
when Agnes Alexander, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mra. A. Hogg, Sandwick, was united In holy matrimony
to James Henry, third son nf Mr, and
Mrs. William Henry Copp, late of
Barnstaple, England, and now of
Sandwick.
I The bride was most becomingly at-
j tired ln pale blue crepe-de-chlne and
' carried a bouquet of while carna-
i tions. Miss Christine Hogg ncted .im
I bride's maid and was dressed In orchid georgette. Mr. Harry Simms
supported the groom. The wedding
ceremony was performed by the Rev.
IW. A. Alexander. The happy young
j couple left at once by motor Cor Victoria and upon their return will make
their home at Sandwick.
Toilet Sets, from   $15.00 to $30.00
Buffers, from  „  90c to $1.75
"a   Card Sets, from   $1.75 to $6.00
i     Photo Frames, from   90c to $2.50
t
j    Nail Files, Button Hooks, etc $1.50 and 60c
'   Scissors, Ivory handles  $1.25
.   Shoe Horns   50c
and many other pieces.
s    Perfume Atomisers, Xmas   Cards,   Seals,   Stickers,
j Fancy Xmas Holly, Paper, etc.
i     LANG'S
j
j The Rexall Kodak Store
J IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S
3    Cumberland Courtenay
a Phono 21! Phone 26
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS
FROM   HAMFAX
To Plymiiutb-Hnvre-Londou
Antonla Dec. 6   Ascanla, Dec. 12.
To Bfilfast-Mrerpool-GlnsgoiTi
Athenla, Dec. 11.
FROM ST. JOHN
To  Belfast-Llverpool-Glasgow
Athenla, Dec. 10.
FROM NEW YORK
To Queenstonn nnd Liverpool:
Andania. Dec. 10   Scythla, Dec. 16.
To Londonderry and Glasgow)
Transylvania, Dec. 10.
To Cherbourg nnd Southampton i
Berengarla, Dec. 14.
FROM NEW  YORK
To Queen»town ami Liverpool: 	
Andania, Dec. 10.    Scythia, Dec. 15.
To Cherbourg and Southt'impton:
Berengarla, Dec. 14, Feb. 10, Mar. 1.
•Mauretitnia. Dec. 30. Feb. 21, Apl. 11.
Aqultania, Jan. 6, 27, Mar. 23.
To Londonderry and Glasgow:
Transylvania. Dec. 10. Letitia, Dec. 24.
To  I'ljinouth-llnvro-Lmiclon*
Ascanla,  Dec.   10.   Ausonla,  Dec 24.
FROM  BOSTON
To Queenslnwii nnd Liverpool:
Andania, Dec. 11.    Caronla. Feb. 19.
♦ Calls at Plymouth, eastbound.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates.   Full information   from  loc:il  :igents, or Company's olllces.  C22  Hastings St., W.
Vancouver. II.C.
■soaaauaais--.-^^^acwra""**. j
Thc Royal Confectionery
SCOTTISH LAUNDRY
and Dyeing and Cleaning
Works, Courtenay
Reduced Rates .on Xmas
Orders
Leave Parcels and Messages at
Jay Jay Candy Store. Phone ISO
Tempting Bakery Delights
THOSE "Melt in thc .Mouth" Xmas Cakes and Pies of
ours certainly make a popular dessert for your Christmas or any other dinner. Young or old can't resist
tlieir tempting freshness.
MAR©eeHI*S
Phone 11
Cumberland, B.C.
Xmas Turkey
Wilcock & Co. Ltd.
DAVENPORT  CANDY
The Gift of All
What a vast difference a gift of
Candy makes on Christmas
morning. especially il It's
Davenport   home-made   Candy.
THE ONLY PLACE TO GET IT
THE ROYAL
Confectionery
We have secured a fine Selection of Choice
Local Turkeys, Ducks, Geese and Poultry.
ORDER   ONE   NOW!

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