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The Cumberland Islander Sep 11, 1925

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
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With wklck Is eouolidated the CuMberUnd News.
FORTY-FOURTH Y    .R—No. 37.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA     FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Cumberland And Saint
Andrews Yet Undefeated
In Coast Soccer League
OPENING TILT  2 GOAL  DRAW
THE STORY OF "THE
TEN COMMANDMENTS"
Egypt. The days of thc glory ol
tbe Pharaohs. Such majesty ami
power and corrosive magnillcence as
exist only ln those periods of history
when one small class lives upon ami
ls heedless of the blood and tears or
tens of thousands of people held in
subjection.
The Children of Israel In bondage.
Bereft of hope they toil in the desert,
building walls and temples and pyramids. Faithful to their God despite the vindictive oppression of a
ruler and a people who worship graven Images, they Dually see hope when
.Moses is raised up to plead for their
liberation from slavery.
An old man In flowing robes gains
audience with Barneses, but his plc-is
lor justice do not avail, and as a last
resort he pronounces—the curse ot
the death of the llrst-born. The old
man Is Moses, but his curse provokes
only laughter, and Pharaoh's young
son lashes the prophet from the steps
of tbe throne.
Is not Pharaoh's son hinii-elC of the
race of gods?
Are not his golden sandals beaten
trom the crowns of conquered kings?
But in the night Ihe angels of the
Most High visit the plague upon
Egypt, and when, the next morning.
Pharaoh holds his first-horn dead in
i.is arms, and hears the walling of the
mothers and fathers of his land, he
orders the liberation of the Jews.
Moses leads the Children of Israel
forth from the gates of the city of
their captivity. By the thousands
they stream forth—men and women
and children. Most of them are afoot,
but here and there one rides an ass
or a camel, and some of the aged and
Infirm are in litters. With them they
take their goods and chattels, their
cattle and their sheep and their goat?
They are a liberated people on tlie
march—a nation exalted with hope of
the Promised Land and witli the
knowledge that the word of their
prophets has come true.
I Then Pharaoh suiters a change of
heart, and orders his war chariots lo
l! start In pursuit of the Jews. The
Children of Israel are at the Red Sea
and those who are wavering in their
faith revile Moses, the leader. Death
or captivity seem inevitable, bul
Moses prays, aud then Ihe Lord sends
a pillar of Ore to stop the charge of
the Egyptians and at the same lim*
divides the waters of the sea so that
His Chosen People pass In safety and
dry-shod to the other shore.
The war chariots start in pursuit
but the waters close over their heads.
The exaltation of the prophet soon
passes, for he finds that during his
absence his people have set up a golden calf and worshipped it. Even his
sister, Miriam, has heen guilty of
abominations. Then Moses, tiie lawgiver, descends from the mountain
and crashes his tablets of stune into
the scene of idolatrous worship ami
licentious revelry. The golden calf
is destroyed and turned to dust.
As the dust settles figures emerge
slowly from a misty background. Departed is the picturesque splendor of
the days when history was written In
atone; vanished the majesty of tlie
background of Sinai and the lightning
which was the sign of the wrath of
3od.
A primly dressed mother sits at u
.able in a modern room. She Is reading from the Bible to her two sous.
It is San Francisco; the time is today
or a just-passed yesterday.
One son, Dan. Is bored and cynical.
The other son. John, Is tolerant and
more than half impressed; at any
•ate, he Is deferential to his mother.
"That's bunk," says Dan. He Intl-
nates that the Ten Commandment'
say have been all right for Ihe dead
ines, but that the world has changed.
The deeply religious mother, a Scotch-
American woman who believes In the
etter and falls to catch the spirit of
ellglon, Is affronted. Hugging her
llble to her breast, she turns her son
•ut of her home because he says he
.oes not believe In Ood. Dan npoln-
•lies to his mother, but refuses In
.pologite to Ood because he does not
•lleve In Ood.
The mother Is relentless.     She is
anted by her good son that she Is
.sing the cross for a scourge, hut will
■ot relent. Later she does lei Dan
eturn, but the next Sunday she starts
o leave home, Bible under her arm.
ecause this sceptical son and his
weetbeart ure dancing on the Lord':
mr.
The upshot ot it Is that Dun nnd
lary, both unbelievers, leave Ibe
ouse. They wlll defy the command,
lent! together, they say, and Dan's
artlng taunt to John Is to the effect
uat he, Dan, wlll break the laws of
-loses and wax  rich  and  have  tho
orld at his feet, whereas the stay-
t-home boy, If he lives up .to the
-n Commandments will finish juu
here he began—as a carpenter.
Now it so happens that the good
in also loves Mary, and In bitter-
ess of spirit he says: "I guess that's
il I'm good for—to be a carpenter,"
His mother, her Bible In her arms,
verhears his words and repllc:
Many line men have been carpenter.*,
ohn."
'The Ten Commandments" will be
lown at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
lomlay, Tuesday and Wednesday and
t the Gaiety Theatre. Courtenay, tho
.Rowing three days, Sept. 17, 18 and
9,
An equal division ot the two points
at stake was all that Cumberland and
St. Andrew's, of Vancouver, could
garner from their opening tilt tn tbe
Pacific Coast Soccer League played
on the Recreation Ground here Sunday last. Monaghan's long and lucky
shot, Graham's scored penalty shot,
and then a really good goal each put
the teams on an even basis. The.
left the field satisfied; to make a two
goal draw out of such a game was
enough tor either team.
Captain Conti lost the toss and
Fowler kicked off for Cumberland
with the brilliant afternoon sun
squarely In his own and team-mate's
eyes. This did not bother the loosely-jointed center-forward for within
three minutes he took his first pot
shot at the visitor's goal and although
the ball sailed harmlessly over the
croBO-bar It gave promise of things
that were to come. For fifteen minutes the sphere was anybody's for the
taking so Monaghan took it. Receiving the rebound from his throw-in
the red-headed Cumberland right-
half took a long drop-kick which
travelled heedlessly of anything else
straight toward the waiting Saint-,'
goalie, passed through his out-stretch
ed arms, and landed ln the net with a
thud that sounded like sweet music
to Cumberland ears.
Their delight was short-lived, however, for with about five minutes to go
Sacki handled the ball within the 18-
yard area and referee Jones promptly
blew his whistle. The penalty was
plainly an accident, pure and simple,
and Jones knew It as well as Sacki.
yet the whistle had gone. When
Oeorge Graham slipped the ball past
Wulker lie not only evened the score
but took the heart out of Contl as
well, and from that point on the brilliant Cumberland center-half was
little better than a passenger. Before the half ended the local team had
a fine chance to put themselves one
up again when Jones awarded a penalty against Edmonds, who charged
MacDonald. Hltchen's shot was a
miserable failure, missing the goal by
ynrdB.
The second half was almost a repetition of the first—it was as far as
goals are concerned—but both teams
were feeling tbe fast pace and had to
slow up considerably. Fowler beat
all opposition only to see his shot
saved by the goalie, who had to fall
on Ills ear to do II. Little Sandy
Houston, the Saints' inside right, miss
ed a good chance when he lifted the
iuill over thc bar with only the goalie
to bent. Oraham and Turner theu
took n hand ln things and it was a
treat to watch them In action. Only
pure luck on Cumberland's part keot
them from scoring in the first thirty
minutes. The famous old dame must
have tired of silting around for as
soon as she departed Graham slipped
in one of the shots for which he Is
famed. Walker had no chance whatever to save. Shortly afterward
('.nihilin scored again but Jones claimed Turner had handled the ball and
accordingly refused to give credit for
the goal. With the score two goals
to one In favor of the visitors, and
with only three minutes to go, many
of the fans left their seats in the
stands, thinking that It was all over.
Bul Hitchens and "Gloomy" Fowler
decreed otherwise and so was it. Fowler took a beautiful pass from th.?
elongated left wing, fooled around
with II for a few seconds as if trying
lo get the goalie's goat, and then
slammed the ball Into the net with
a kick from a most difficult angle.
The score was evened and the game
was over. Promptly arose Fowler's
own song—"Gloomy Aint so Goofy
After All"—and he aint.
BRIGHT AND CLEAN
ROOMS GREETED
SCHOOL PUPILS
When pupils of the Cumberland
Public School went back to their
"dally grind" on Tuesday last, after
u holiday of nearly eleven weeks,
many of them failed to recognize their
former rlass-rooms, thinking that
they had accidentally dropped into
ihe wrong school. Praise for thc
wonderful change Is due entirely to
the caretaker, Mr. Wm. McLellan, sr.,
and his staff of workmen who have
assiduously been plying the hammer
nnd paint brush nearly every day
since school closed.
Every room in the old school has
been retouched In lighter colors than
was formerly the case, giving an effect entirely pleasing to both teacher
and pupil. Mr. McLellan lays no
claim to being a professional grainer
yet his work of this kind is a wqrk
of art and a credit to any professions!
painter and interior decorator.
In two or three cases entirely new
floors have been laid down and all
itbers received a coating of floor oil.
Ml In all, thc school Is a model of
cleanliness, nnd will compare very
favorably In thin respect with any in
the Province—a decided credit to the
City of Cumberland.
BADMINTON CLUB
TO MEET MONDAY
The Annual Meeting ot the Cumberland Badminton Club will be held in
the Anglican Hall on Monday evening, Sept. 14th at 8 o'clock sharp, for
the purpose of re-organizing for the
coming season. A cordial invitation
is extended to all Interested.
HUNTERS, ATTENTION!
The following Is a correction in the
Game Regulations published In the Islander last week;
DUCKH (except Wood and Elder
ducks), Wilson snipe coots, black-
breasted and golden plover, greater
and lesser yellowlegs—Western district, in that portion thereof situate
and lying to the south of tbe fifty-second parallel of latitude, open season
from October 15, 1926 to January 31,
1925, both dates Inclusive.
ENDEAVOR TO FORM
DISTRICT BADMINTON
CLUB AT ROYSTON
A great effort is being made to form
a huge district Badminton Club with
headquarters at Royston. The Imperial Pavilion is being put into shape
for both Badminton and Tennis and it
is confidently expected that the promoters of the district Badminton Club
will meet with a great deal of success
as the popular indoor winter game
ls increasing In popularity year b
year. It looks as though Badminton
was iu for a season of success during
the coming winter as both clubs In
Cumberland and Comox are beginning
to get ready for the season to start
on October 1st. It is more than like
ly that a club will also be formed a1
Courtenay and there Is some talk of
a club at Headqparters.
Three Straight Wins
For Cumberland Ladies
LOCAL LADIES' TEAM CARRIES OFF HONORS FOR THIRD
YEAR IN SUCCESSION IN FIRST AID COMPETITION
HELD BY ASSOCIATION
Cumberland teams made a most
excellent showing at the ninth annual
Held day of the Vancouver Island
Mine Safety and First-Aid Association
held Monday last on the Central
Sports Ground, Nanaimo. To the
Cumberland ladles' team went the
honors of the day when they captured
the Vancouver Island Cup in the first
aid competition, making the third successive year that they have accomplished this feat. The team ls composed of Mrs. Mary Hudson (capt.I.
Mrs. Margaret Farmer, Mrs. Llls Potter, Mrs. Bertha Davis and Mrs. Elizabeth Shearer.
The Coulson Cup was captured by
Cumberland No. 2 team compoeed of
W. Beveridge, (capt.), A. Williams, J.
D. Davis, A. Watson and W. Devoy;
and the one-man event also fell to
Cumberland, both first and second
prizes. All the Individual prizes as
well as both cups, are on view in the
Jay-Jay Lunch Room, Dunsmuir Ave.
The winners of the various events
were ns follows;
Mine Rescue Competition—1st, Coal
Creek team, Capt. Corfleld, 98%; 2nd.
Ladysmith, Capt. Geo. Carson, Wfc.
First Aid Competition, Department
of .Mines Cup—1st, Cassidy, Capt. Mc-
Lachlan; 2nd, Ladysmith, Capt. Get..
Carson. A notable feature of the
Ladysmith team ls that the team is
composed of Capt. Carson and bis four
sons,
Coulson Cup—1st, Cumberland No.
2,   Capt.   Beveridge;   2nd,   Nanaimo
Capt. Simpson.
Ladles, Vancouver Island Cup—lsl.
Cumberland, dipt. Mrs. Hudson, last
year's cup holders; 2nd, N'anaimo.
Capt. Mrs, Turner.
Juvenile Competition, V. I, Cup-
1st, Nanaimo, Capt. L. Wharton; 2nd.
Nanaimo, Capt. Geo. Barton.
Two-Man Event—1st, Nanaimo, C.
Wharton. W. Wharton and Geo. Coitle
2nd, Nanaimo, L. Saaman, J. Kay and
J. Scott.
One-Man Event—1st. Cumberland.
W. Beveridge and II. Waterfleld; 2nd,
Cumberland, R. Reid and John Robertson.
The judges of the First Aid competitions were Dr. Sutherland, of Vancouver; Dr. Maxwell, of Ladysmith.
Dr. Hall anil Dr. Ingham of Nanaimo.
Dr. Hicks of Cumberland and Mrs.
| Wilson of Vancouver.
The judges of the Mine Rescue competition were Mine Inspector J. Dixon
of Victoria and II. B, Mlnrd, Fernie,
SLOAN WANTED
TO FISH FOR FISH—
NOT VOTES, HE SAID
Billy Sloan, of Victoria and Nanaimo, and Alan Neil, of Alberni, blew
into town last Friday afternoon. In
the ordinary course of things this
double event would not cause a flurry.
But there Is an election campaign under way and though the wise birds
who frequent Main Street did nut see
these two parliamentary passengers
together they just naturally opined
that there must be something in the
wind. Billy is known as the astutest
politician strategist of all time. He
was once holder of the seat In the Dominion House now occupied by Alan.
No, not exactly the same seat but a
Beat put there for the same purpose.
So, knowing that Billy and Alan had
gone to separate political schools together, sagacity row Just naturally
came to the conclusion that the synchronizing visits wcre prearranged.
True, Alan's mission was political,
but nothing was farther from Billy's
mind—be came to fish, not for votes
but for Tyee Salmon In Comox Bay.
Why should he monkey with Alan's
campaign for Ihe latter disclaims affiliation with the Liberal forces and
Ib in the present political war as an
Independent, backed by Ihe same organization that elected him In 1921,
who assert that their candidate's record Is such that he deserves to be
continued in olllce. On the other
hand Meighen Men declare that the
stage wns all set for Alan to announce
his passing to the ranks of the Liberal party and Ihat their Intention lo
run a candidate was the only thing
that spilled the beans.
Who their candidate will be has not
yet been announced but the majority of one thousand gained by Mr.
Neil in the last election will be hard
to overcome and no unbiased person
would care to say that his popularity
has suffered since he was sent to Ottawa as representative of Comox-AI-
bernl constituency. Larry Hanna.
who accompanied Alan on his recent
jaunt to Cumberland says that over in
the Alberni quarter every other new
arrival is christened either Alan or
Neil. It's great to be popular with
the women folks—for they, too, have
votes.
SCHOOL LAW SHOWS
TRUSTEE'S ACTION
WAS NOT IRREGULAR
Readers of the Cumberland Islander will remember the controversy that
was brought out in these columns n
few weeks ago over the fact that tlie
Chairman of the School Board had
seconded a motion at one of the
board's past meetings. It was claim.
ed, both by the Islander and by some
of the trustees, as well as private citizens, that this action was decidediv
irregular and nol in accordance with
the School Law.
Mrs. T. Banks, the chairman In
question, was not clear on the point
herself but made It her business lo
find out if she were wrong or not.
Accordingly at Tuesday's meeting of
the board she had thc secretary read
a passage from thc law which cleared
the matter up for good and all. According to this passage, the chairman
has the same privileges as any other
member of the board, and therefore
can second a motion if he or she so
desires, providing she vacates the
chair. Mrs. Banks also pointed nut
that she has no casting vote, and in
the event of a tie the motion shall be
lost.
Patronize the Cumberland United
Football Club's Dances to be held
every Saturday night in the Ilo-llo
Hall, commencing this Saturday, September the 12th. Popular prices,
Gents SOc. Ladles 10c.
WAS THE ALMIGHTY
POWER INTERVENING
FOR JOHN LEE?
Following Is what the Medicine Hal
Dally News (AlbertaI has to say about
Ihe film production of "The Man They
Could Not Hung." which will be shown
at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Monday,
Sept. 21 and the following evening a!
Ihe Gaiety Theatre. Courtenay:
"In spite of the Bullry evening and
great counter attractions Die Monarch
theatre was packed lo the doors lust
evening to witness the flrBt local performance of the Life Story of John
Lee, "The Man They Could N'jt Hang."
The show had been well advertised by
Its long nnd successful run In Toronto
and Montreal nnd local opinion was in
no way disappointed.
"Starting with a very good comedy
"The Luck of the Foolish." the next
Item disclosed Miss Doreen Thompson
in high class vaudeville numbers, her
singing of "Off to lhe Greenwood,'
belnp a rare treat. Miss Thompson
was In excellent voice nnd added a
dance which brought down tho house.
Later she impersonated John Lee's
mother in the Operatic, scenic prologue to the main feature, singing
with a sympathy and trueness of ton,*
i which brought tears lo many eyes In
the audience,
I "The picture Itself was Introduced
jby W. Leonard Howe, an Kngllsh actor, specially brought to Canada for
this tour, In a speech teeming with
Impromptu humor; later In the cven-
I Ing Mr, Howe gave a tnste of Ills
| quality in more serious scenes and
! thrilled us several times with vivid
! descriptions of Lee's wonderful es-
' capes.
Huge Crowd Attend Fall
Fair At Courtenay; Fine
Display Of Farm Produce
KEEN CONTEST AT SPORTS
COURTENAY. Sept. 10.—Something
more than success in the ordinary
sense, is In evidence for the Comox
Fall Fulr when the farmers und loggers of the district are able to Join
hands on Fair Duy and meet together
In one big party with all the other
residents of the valley. And a very
big party It waB too, for the lurgest
gathering ever seen on the Agricultural grounds was In attendance on
Wednesday.
There Is a cause for every effect—
a reason why—and there Is a reason
why this year's Comox Fall Fairi
apart from the Logger's Picnic, was
so successful. The executive of the
Comox Agricultural and Industrial
Association, and special committees
and the superintendency of the Comox
Logging Co., are to be congratulated
In putting ovcr. the best fair In the
district that has eyet been held.
To compare the exhibition with that
of last year which came two weeks
later, may perhaps be interesting.
Generally speaking the entries
throughout were more numerous In
ull classes. This was most notic-
ulilc in the poultry and domestic-
science sections; but the lack of adequate accommodation for the splendid poultry that was brought in was
felt. Apart from the four hundred
employees ot the Logging Company,
the attendance on the fair grounds
this year was rather better than last.
Betler arrangements for the exhibits
Inside the hail were noticeable than
in previous years, this was made possible by a decision to display the Held
crop classes outside the hall under
canvas. Entries In this section which
includes the potato classes, were very
numerous. The spuds being particularly good. Rather more entries wero
made In both the cattle and horse sec.
tions, but buildings to accommodate
thc animals, many of which were very
line specimens, are sorely needed to
encourage still more farmers and
bleeders  to  bring  in   their  animals.
Thc sports program was followed
with keen Interest. The events staged in the stadium were witnessed by
a crowded "house", and the fair
grounds owing to the presence of a
good number of trade exhibitions and
concession men presented a scene of
lively vivacity. it has been suggested by some that the Fall Fair and
the Logger's Picnic be an annual
event. This might well be done, ut
least, until logging operations become too distant from the scene of
the agricultural exhibition. In the
meantime, however, It is good to see
agriculturists shaking hands with
other Industrialists of tho district.
A list of prize- winners in the different classes wlll be found on Page
Five.
TOURNAMENT IS
NEAR COMPLETION
ON LOCAL COURTS
The early days of next week should
see the completion and final settlement, for 1925 ut least, of the tennis
tournament that has been progress-
lug for some time on the local courts
fur the men's singles championship of
the city. Heck Stewart reached the
finals on Wednesday afternoon when
Jic defeated C. C. Graham, and will
meet the winner of M. Graham vb. T.
Graham jr., the remaining semi-finalists. Miss B. Bickle, winner of the
ladles' singles trophy last year, duplicated her feat yesterday when she
eliminated Miss G. Oliver 6-1, 6-3, In
the final match, thereby gaining possession of this year's silver cup. This
Is the third straight year Miss Bickle
has won this tournament.
Following are the various  rounds
of Ihe men's tournament:
First Round
Vaughan  and   Shenstone  both  defaulted; J. Idlens defeated G. K. MacNaughton, 6-3, 6-2; T. R. S. Graham
defeated G. Curwen, 6-0, 6-0.
Second Round
Idlens won by default of Vaughan
and Shenstone; T. R. S. Graham defeated E, Bickle. 6-3, 6-2; D. Partridge
and E. II. Hicks both defaulted; M.
Graham defeated J. James; P. D. Graham defaulted (o C. C. Graham; T.
Graham sr.. defaulted to H. Stewart;
Stacey defeated W. H. Cope.
Third Rniind
T. R. S. Graham defeated J. Idlens,
6-3, 6-4; M. Graham won be default
of Partridge and Hicks; C. C. Graham
won by default of Wllcock and Mumford; H. Stewart defeated Stacey, 6-1,
6-0.
Scml-Flnnls
H. Stewart defeated C. C. Graham.
6-3. 6-3; M. Graham meets T. R. S.
Graham early next week.
CHINAMAN TOOK
THE CHICKENS AND
THE MONEY TOO
ROAD THROUGH
COMOX PASS IS
DIRE NECESSITY
Tlic distance between Cumberland
and Alberni is seventy miles NOW.
The distance between Cumberland i
and Alberni will some day lie twentv-
two miles,     WHY NOT NOW?
To eliminate fifty   miles   of   travel
between the cast and west qoasts will
entail the construction of twenty-two !
miles of road through  Comox  Pass, j
Hiking  parties   who have  been  over!
the trail say that the road is not an '
impossibility and tell tn picture and j
words a wonderful story of the beau-
tlful scenery encountered,     Members j
of the VU'c-Kegal party who visited |
Cumberland  a  few   weeks  ago  were
charmed with tho magnificence of the ;
country.
A few years ago when the famed
Mala lint DrlVQ was projected there
were antagonists of the propositi who
declared It to be a child of imaglna-
iion and that the money to he expended would he wasted. Can any one
he found today who will say (hat the j
money put into the construction of
that road Is out of proportion to the
benefits that have been derived there-
from?
A short time ago nn ollicial of one I
of the Automobile clubs, after a tour '
of the completed portion of the Trans.
Provincial Highway asserted that he
and others had had an awful nerve
to ask for the building of the road,!
but that  when finished It will be Of |
Inestimable value to the province.
In asking for the construction of the
Cunihcrlaud-Alherni road the people
of the mid-Island zone are seeking
thc completion of the last link ln tbe
Island Highway, a link that when
forged will mean a very great deal
to Alberni. Cumberland, Courtenay
and the Comox Valley. It will prove
to he as important in the development
of these communities as the Malahat
Drive has heen to Victoria nnd tho
district between that city and Duncan.
The words of the Automobile Club
ollicial after his tour of the Trans-
I'rovincial Highway tell us that he, at
least, did not know what he had asked
for. We are not asking for something we know nothing ahout. Be
cause of the knowledge of the route
gained from experience on the trail,
It did not take much nerve to nsk for
the road through Comox Pnss. It
Is tho most important piece of public
work left undone on Vancouver Island.
A lady in the Comox District noted
for her business acumen, meeting a
Chinaman nt n neighboring farm Inquired If thc Chinaman were buying
chickens. He said that he was; she
then asked him to come over and give
her n price on a few old hens. Arriving at her home she found two very
old friends had arrived on a surprise
visit, by motor from Vancouver.
The Chinaman decided to take three
hens and surprised her again by offering a dollar each. He tendered
her a $5.00 bill for which she gave
$2.00 change nnd hurried In to meet
her guests.
It waa not until evening that she
had time to dwell upon the transaction, when she discovered she had
also returned the $5.00 to the Chinaman along with the $2.00 change there
by paying him $2.00 to carry away
three perfectly good fat hens.
The Chinaman is still smiling.
IN SMILING SEAS
Following Is nn excerpt from the
Victoria Daily Times of a recent Issue:
A grandfather, and proud of lt, Is
Capt. C. I. Harris, genial master of
the It.C. Pilots' Association of this
city. Ilright and early on (he morning of September l a utile barque was
launched on the greatest ocean of the
world, the Ken of I.lfc Bequlta Marie
Harris, Infant daughter of Mr. and
.Mrs. Jack Harris, of King's Road, this
city, made Capt. C, I. Harris n grandfather and a happy one. "This makes
the fourth generation," Capt. Harris
told his son. ns he congrntulnted him
warmly on the happy event. The
good wishes of the port will be extended to HcqiiMa Marie Harris, wishing for her a pleasant pnssagc on the
Sea of Life, with fair winds nnd flue
harbors throughout the years to come.
Mrs. Jack Harris is (he youngest
daughter of Mr. nnd Mrs. James
Boyd of Cumberland.
FLIERS ARE RESCUED
A radio hrnntlcast was received late
last evening (rom KFJK, a 20 watt
stall™ III Portland, tn the effect Uml
tlle live United Slates fliers, lost In
the Paotflc, have been rescued They
were found lirtccn miles off the const
of Hawaii.
CONSERVATIVES TO
SELECT CANDIDATE
A convention of Conservatives Is
announced for two o'clock nt Courtenay on Friday afternoon. September
ISth. Thc purpose of the convention
Is to nominate a candidate to oppose
Mr. A. \V. Nell for the I'nmox-Albcrnl
sent In Uie Dominion House. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1825
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 1925
WIPING In these days of many divorces we
THE wonder what has become of the good
DISHES old-fashioned home life. It seems so
easy to have a happy home and the
rules so simple that we wonder why so many
homes are broken up.
It doesn't hurt a husband to wipe the dishes
for his wife when they are just starting out and
she has a baby to care for and the housework to
do. It's different from his downtown work and
should be a pleasure to him, knowing how much
appreciation such a small task would be.
If you ever hear the dishes rattling in the
kitchen, and put down your pipe and go and help
with them, the brightness of the smile you will
get should rest you more than lying on the couch
while your wife does the job.
Try it some evening.
as ever it was. But it has come to pass that
youth is quite likely to hear more of suggestive
and erotic pruriency from the public platforms oc-
| cupied by a class of "moral" reformers than it is
! likely to see on the screen of the much-condemned movies.
These gentry should be made to understand
that they are talking about and to our wives, sisters, mothers and sweethearts, whom we hold to
be true and good and altogether worthy, as they
are, without references to how they dress.
The evil is not in the girls and women of today, but in the minds and on the tongues of those
whose perverted vision shuts out from their view
the innate virtue, innocence and bidding goodness
of all womanhood.
WHERE      "The home life has given way to
THE hotel life, and real love has been
EVIL LIES replaced by free love. We want
men who can look, not at a woman's
legs, but in her eyes. "
So rants another of the Reformers' Brotherhood, and we wonder how long decent," normal,
God-fearing men and women will continue to
stand for this pruriency of vision and declamation on the part of professional moral regenerators.
The minister who thinks with his brain instead of his mouth, whose heart is filled with conscious appreciation of life's goodness, whose soul
is clean, who understands and sympathizes with
humanity's infirmities, its struggles, dreams,
hopes and aspirations, has neither time nor inclination to stain the purity of Faith's heaven-
ordained mission by making woman's legs the
subject of his uplifting efforts.
The youth of today is just as sane and pure',
GO Many people take a summer vacation by
AWAY going on a sight-seeing tour to some in-
...teresting section of the country. Let
no one think he is going to get any vacation rest
out of it. He will probably return much more
weary than when he started. Yet anyone who
takes such a trip usually feels that his labor is
well repaid. He is cheered for many days by
the memories of beautiful country or fine cities
he has seen. He has met interesting people,
talked upon new subjects, and got different points
of view. He returns a broader citizen. He begins to realize that his own town and section do
not hold all the wisdom and virtue, and that people with somewhat different inheritance have
their points of view which have some degree of
I wisdom. Also he gets ideas of civic advantages.
■ He learns how different towns have solved their
! community problems and have put through pro-
jgressive measures. He begins to see how his
| home town might take some advance step, solve
old problems, and build new institutions. Most
men get ideas helpful to business by travelling.
They are inspired with the swing of the giant
stride of progress in other communities, they
have more faith in their own ability to do big
things. They have a definite idea in many details as to how other people and other sections
have achieved success. So the returned tourist
may talk so fast about what he has seen that his
neighbors weary of his conversation. He may
have a flat pocketbook, but his head is bulging
with ideas. Anyway he is the possessor of an
experience worth all it cost. But whatever the
glories he has seen, he almost invariably comes
back with the feeling that the good old home town
is the best place yet.
Ask For and See
•a
That You Get
Comox Whole
Wheat Flour
At All Grocers
Comox Creamery Association
m
SOCIAL SEASON
OPENS AT GRANTHAM
COURTENAY, Sept. 10.—Thc social
season opened at Grantham on Wednesday night with a whist drive followed by a dance. Thc successful
card players were ladles, llrsl. Mis?
Crockett, second, Mrs. Carey, consolation, Mrs. Swan. There were
lem* than three Bcntlemen player.-, lo
UNION   HOTEL
COXBBHLAld, i. C.
Comfort  and   HoomIIIm  iwtIm.
16  room,  alMtrlMlaT   h«*M4.
Biotllint onliln-t—
Tor rmmtloni f hea* li.
>. IAVU, Mutf«.
TAXI
TAXI	
Safety and Comfort
Day or Night
CAR   SERVICE
24 TELEPHONE 1110
Cumberland Hotel
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at  8:00   o'clock   every   Sunday
mornin*!;   and   meets   boat   at
Union Bay.
TIM ItlMi PARTIES CATERED
TO  AT REASONABLE   RATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
TAXI
TAXI
tic for lirst honors and on cutting tho
curds the award went to Mr. E. Grant.
Mr. John Crockett won second prizo
and the consolation prize was secured
by Arthur Grant. An enjoyable
dance followed to excellent music
which was provided by Messrs J. Carthew. S. Venables and N. Smith.
fc'"t
Shoe Polish
On your shots
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beat Quality
: REEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
L *,
I HOTELS AND CAMPS T
I | SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
*- ■ *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
| W. P. Symom   •  •    Proprietor
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have y<">ur shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give tht best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
V. C. T. Co. Ltd.
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE
Commencing Wednesday, August 12th, the company freight  boat  will  leave  Vancouver  each
Wednesday at 1:00 p.m.
DELIVERING COURTENAY FRIDAYS
Way Points—Baynes Sound, Thursdays
VANCOUVER-COURTENAY TRANSPORTATION
Phone 144 COMPANY Phone 144
Chas. Simms, Agent
Public subscription is invited
for 0 nevO issue of
$75,000,000
DOMINION OF CANADA
Fifteen-Year 4V2% Bonds
Dated September 1st, 1925. Due September Ut, 1940.
Principal payable at the offlce of the Receiver-General, at Ottawa, or
that of the Assistant Receivers-General at Halifax, St. John,
Charlottetown, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipej, Regina,Calgary
or Victoria.   Semi-annual interest (March 1st and Sep-
tember 1st) pa-gable at any branch in Canada of any
chartered Bank.
Denominations: $100, $500, $1,000'.
All bonds may be registered as to principal only,and bonds in denominations
of $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000 and $100,000 may be fully
registered.
These bonds are authorized under Acts of the Dominion of Canada, and both
principal and interest are a charge upon the consolidated revenue fund. They
are secured by the full credit, faith, and taxing power of the Dominion of Canada.
War Loan 5% Bonds maturing December 1st,' 1925, will be accepted at par
and accrued interest in settlement for the new bonds at the purchase price.
This offering is made subject to prior sale and advance in
price, and the right is reserved to allot a less amount of
bonds than applied for.
These bonds are offered for delivery, in interim form, when,
as and if issued and delivered to us.
PRICE: 97V4 and accrued interest, yielding over 4.75%
Orders may be telephoned or telegraphed {collect) lo any of the undersigned, or may be submitted through your usual bond dealer, stock
exchange broker, or through any bank in Canada.
Bank of Montreal
Royal Bank of Canada
Canadian Bank of Commerce
Dominion Securities Corporation,
Limited
A. E. Ames & Company, Limited
The National City Company,
Limited
Wood, Gundy & Company
Septamtxr ''th, 1925. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1925
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
1^
At the   Ilo-llo Theatre,  Cumberland, Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday; September 14th, 15th and 16th
I 3ke Greatest dramatic Spectacle of ail Vie Ages*
A COWBOY ABROAD
BY TOM .MIX
A record of the most notable reception ever accorded by
Europe to a private citizen
ReIeasotl   for   Publication   In   The   Cumberland   Islander
To see Europe, or a great part of
It, in nineteen days Is no joke. ffe
travelled light and fast. We couldn't
If we were to make thc rounds we
planned, miss a train If It struck our
fancy to remain one place longer than
another. We were moving hy the
clock.
Our train mude good time to New-
Haven, which we reached about noon
There we boarded the little steamer
which crosses the Channel. We hnd
i splendid trip. Three hours later
we pulled Into the picturesque port of
Dieppe, which Is entered through a
long, narrow ami of the channel and
which resembled a canal more than
anthlng else. There, amid the scur*
rylng of dock workers, we debarked
We were In France.
A jabbering from a hundred tongues
reads not a word of English, yet he
makes up an English newspaper.
They told me he senses a misspelled
word In a headline and seldom lets
an error creep In. I told him they
might well send him to America.
The joke didn't go so well with the
boys, hut II must have got over with
the French printer, for he rushed out
and brought me In a glass of beer. I
told him I didn't drink. He must
have thought of me as a headline, for
he Immediately conveyed the Idea I
was an error. He drank the beer
himself,
Paris was gray and lonesome when
ive departed from the hotel for Brussels. We had left Thomaslna behind
with her nurse to await our return,
as we would hate to travel quickly to
he   hack   In   Paris   by   Ihe   thirtieth.
7om.CM.ix and. Mrs.Mix in Jbn.ste.r'darri
AT THE MATINEE AT COURTENAY ON  SAT., SEPT. 19 THE PRICES WILL BE
ADULTS 50C CHILDREN 25<>
At the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, Thursday, Friday
Saturday, September 17th, 18th and 19th
and
SEALED Tenders addressed to tbe
undersigned, and endorsed "Tender
for wharf, Blubber Bay. B.C., will he
received until IS o'clock noon (daylight saving), Friday, September IH,
IKS, for the construction of a wharf.
at Blubber Bay, Texada Island, Comox-Alberni District, B.C.
Plans and forms of contract can be
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at this Department, at
the olllces of the District Engineers,
Post Office Building, New Westml.i
ster, B.C., Post Olllce Building. Vlo»
toria, B.C., also Post Olllces. Vancouver, B.C., and Blubber Bay, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department nnd In accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Mln-
Ister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
of the amount of the tender. Bonds
of the Dominion of Canada or bonda
of th* Canadian National Railway
Company will also be accepts!) as security, or bonds and a cheque if required to make up an odd amount.
NOTE—Blue prints can be ohtiiine 1
at this Department by depositing an
accepted cheque for the sum of $10.00
payable lo the order of the Minister
of Public Works, which will he returned if Ihe intending bidder submit
a regular bid.
By Order,
3.  E.  O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa. August 24, 1925. 30-37.
e
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for Repairs to Wlinrf, Clayoquot.
B.C.," will be received until 12 o'clock
noon (daylight saving), Tuesday, N<--i-
lenilier ii, HtlM, for the repairs lo
wharf and npproach, at Clayoquot,
Comox-Alberni District, B.C.
Plans and forms of contract can be
seen and specification and forms of
lender obtained at this Department, at
the olllce of the District Engineer.
Posl Ofllce Huilding, Victoria. B.C.. also at the Post tMllees, Vancouver. B.C..
Alherni, B.C., Port Alberni, B.C., and
Clayoquot, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and In accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
hy an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to Ihe order of the Minister of Puhlic Works, equal to 10 per
cent of the amount of the tender.
Bonds of the Dominion of Canada or
bonds of the Canadian National Railway Company will ulso he accepted as
security, or bonds and a cheque if required lo make up an odd amount.
NOTE—Blue prints can he obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted cheque for the sum of $10.00,
payable to the order of the Minister
of Public Works, which will be relumed If the intending bidder submit
a regular hid.
By Order.
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa,'August 27. 1925. 30-37.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN  DRIED  FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS
WB DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
mouthing words entirely unintelligible to me hit upon my Anglo-
Saxon cur. I felt very grateful for
the welcome, but entirely Inadequate.
'Bon jours, messieurs," I finally
managed to ejaculate. It seemed to
tickle them, and althoughMhey understood it, my accent must havn
sounded as amusing to them as theh
accent in speaking English was amusing to me at home. I decided that
after that I had better stick entirely
to my English.
The officials were very considerate
about examining our luggage and it
was only a few moments after our
packet had docket thnt we were in
the train for Paris and moving away.
Little hy little, we reached open
country and continued on our way.
I was happy our train wasn't setting
any records for speed. Tlie country
was too beautiful to he taken at a
glance. Suddenly from the farm lands
and the grazing fields, we passed into
a countryside entirely different. The
ground was not smooth and rolling.
hut uneven and punctured with rises
and swells. We crept through Normandy for several hours, and then
came into Rouen, that lovely city situated on the Seine, over which river
we crossed slowly on a long bridge.
The end of our ride was fast approaching. We began to prepare to
enter Paris. The shock I experienced then wns felt the more because It
was entirely unexpected. A crowd
of men and women swaged toward
me, shouting a welcome In their musical tongue. In a moment .Mrs. Mix
was deluged under a shower of flowers and Thomaslna was not forgotten
either. The reception at the station
had taken so much longer than expected that I bad hardly enough time
to dress for Ihe dinner that was being given to tbe "Presse Cinematographic," at which I was the guosi of
honor.
I concluded my lirst night in Paris
with a visit to tbe European edition
offlce of the Chicago Tribune and New
York Daily News. There I met the
most minimi man in the newpaper
world.     He is   a   Frenchman   who
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
[Night calls: 134X Courtenay
I Office: 159 Cumberland
Within an hour we were well out of
i'arls and within two hours on the
jnttlefields.
I can'l begin to describe to you the
fullness of the scene which unfolded
before us. nor the reflections they
stirred. The marks of that moat
lesperate struggle the world has ever
(iiowu were evident at every foot, al-
, hough hard working countrymen had
been working for more than five year3
■o remove the signs of combat. They
had succeeded to a great extent. Sections that had been barren No .Man's
Land were fast giving way to prosperous, closely worked fields. But
greal holes in'the eurth told an unforgettable story, and the roadways were
lined with bundles of harbod wire,
salvage from entanglements. Only
courage and determination, tbe happy
legacies of the French, had made it
possible to recover an arid wasteland.
At a place between Chateau Thierry
and Rheims we came suddenly upon
the scene of three soldier graveyards
—first French, then German, (hen Am.
erican. if the War had escaped us
so directly, here was the most powcr-
i'til reminder that we must not forget.
The little white crosses caused n worshipful respect to sweep through us
all. There were no words to be
spoken. We uncovered, bowed our
heads and I think each one of us said
la little prayer. 1 know 1 did.
i We li;nl luncheon in Rheims and remained there about two hours, going
through tlie famous old cathedral,
now slowly being rebuilt nfter having
j been all hut demolished hy the shells
(of continuous cannonading. Here :*i
| Rheims tlie aftermath of the war was
most evident. While work was going
I on in determined fashion to construct
another city; thi- ruin had been so
(complete it was slow business. Here
j the ruins provoked a most ghastly
I retrospect, hut one couldn't help hut
feel proud of our comrade nation  iu
| arms  for  its  unquenchable spirit.
In another five years all signs of
the war probably  will  be removed—
I
.....   .....   ,.,,.......,..    	
all except those great latticed grave-
I yards  with   their tiny  white  crosses
I and their unforgettable story.
I (Continued on  Page Kourl
aWfB
jQatr \.~"sa^szS^sss\\saa\\i
w
W *^r "A aaaa^
If <;   ■
If %'B
Wi   *'"Ai
*    ^9^-R^itifl                              aWWnt"*
9dm !Mix and 'MrsMi arriving in Berlin, PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1926
From Rheims—I must mention thnt
the city hall there was as thoroughly
scarred as the Cathedral and Is under repair—we set off. again through
the battlefields, for Mons, Belgium,
where we were to board the train for
Brussels. Mons Is where the first
great battle ot the war was fought.
But before we reached there there
was another battle, this one with
Belgium customs officials, who, because our chauffeurs happened to take
a by road at the border, figured we
were trying to dodge them.
My French wasn't very fluent that
day and 1 had to leave the explaining
to someone else. But finally we were
permitted to go on. Our drivers,
however, were held by the officials for
their error, and we climbed into taxis
to continue on the short distance from
the border to Mons.
The train ride from Mons to Brussels Is only a little more than an
hour and wc arrived there at (1 o'clock
In the evening, twelve hours afler
leaving Paris.
Towards its close, our tour was becoming a succession of one night
stands and quick jumps. The morning of April 25 at 6:30 we were away
from Brussels, regretful we could not
stay longer to come to know It more
thoroughly. Twenty-four hours later we were in Berlin, nfter having visited two other cities and extended
greetings ln several others. My
troupe waB working well and fast. It
had the clrcuB beat all hollow.
About 9 o'clock our train crossed
the Belgian border into Holland at
Dordrecht and we had our passports
stamped. A few moments later we
were in the station in Schiedam, Hot-
land, where a tremendous delegation
was waiting to wave a greeting. As
the train drew to a stop, a gentleman
and his young son pressed their way
to my window and handed me a package, which I list as one of the prize
gifts of the trip.
Schiedam is the home of famous
Holland gin, and the package I received was a quart bottle of the stuff
200 years old. They call It Bots,
perhaps because It is guaranteed to
bowl you over. Although, as I have
said often enough I don't drink, this
was not a present to be returned with
thanks. Instead I accepted It with
tears in my eyes, and with it a parchment scroll on which the gentleman's
small son, in English, had written a
poem dealing with Bols and with me.
I have that parchment framed and
hanging in my den now. Whether
the Bols Is a matter for me to know
and the prohibition authorities to find
out.
After Schiedam our next stop was
Rotterdam, where 1 left the train for
about twenty minutes. 1 gathered
from the demonstration, that Rotterdam was rather happy to see me. A
wild, cheering throng, sprinkled here
and there with young men dressed up
in the most flamboyant cowboy outfits, greeted mc as I stepped from my
compartment. Across the width of
the platform, and swung high on
poles, wus a huge sign, proclaiming
quaintly In red letters: "Welcome Be
Tom Mix To Holland.'' Thc little
twist in English was a pleasant tonic,
for it showed my friends had really
extended themselves to make me feel
happy to be there.     I was.
A two minute stop at thc Hague
and more flowers; the same thing at
Haarlem, where our cameraman, a
Bronx lad, became so excited he want
ed to catch the subway home. And
then—Amsterdam!
But I shall pass briefly over iny live-
hour stay in Amsterdam, even though
it was the maddest of all receptions.
At the station lt was only after a battle that we reached the hotel. Then
we set out to make a tour of the cily.
Our drive covered ten miles. Over
the whole distance, lining each side
of the streets, were waiting throngs
As we passed canals, or drove along
roads running parallel to them, head"
suddenly appeared through portholes,
the canal boats stopping aud swinging
idly in the water while their occupants peered out. There wcre strings
of regret pulling at my heart as the
train pulled out of Amsterdam. It
had been so generous, nnd 1 hail Been
only enough of It to make me eager
to see more.
Holland Is worth a great deal of
anyone's lime.     Of course, I perhaps
A Cowboy Abroad
(Continued From Page Three)
,i prejudiced because of the welcome  »*»■"• •■• ^amonui
LllJl „,„ „, »v»rv -.ton of the train. \ I*1***1* ** B-**-°P*--* ot
urn ]
tanla a week later, because his stall
already was built on that boat. But
soon, 1 realized, we both would be
again in California. I caught, in my
afforded me at every stop of the train. 1 J"""1* a.gltaPse of the sunshine which
But also it Is as picturesque as guide ■» Iff"" *° ■»*•* State, and 1 hung-
books ever painted. My glimpses of! f'«> ""* ■'• The ranch was as alive
the country from the train told me ] » "5* memory us if I actually was
that.      But  1 must get on  with my:l"<;!e* . ,,    ,
After Amsterdam and a night I    N°  °*le. ever  successfully  has  de-
story,
on the train—In tiny compartments,
with running water in each room—we
reached Berlin early In the morning,
lt was election day, and as we pulled
Into the capital of the German Empire
the opposing Hags of the Republicans
and the Monarchists were seen hanging from windows of every home. It
was the day the German people unexpectedly chose Hindenburg or President over Marx, the Republican candidate.
After a splendid breakfast—cereals,
ham and eggs, fruit, and coffee, not
forgetting the cold meats which Oermans seem to prefer, often for breakfast we left tllc llessen for tlle Adlon
Hotel In I'ntor Den Linden. The
drive carried us through n most Interesting cily.
The three days 111 Berlin passed all
too quickly. Thero were receptions
and such tilings; there wero people lo
meet; there wns a tour of the cily,
where 1 was greeted at every designated corner with a wildly enthusiastic crowd. At these places. I must
add, I was honored with bugle calls |
customarily sounded only when some '
great war lord was being feted.
But. through all this rush and despite the kindest efforts to make me
enjoy the trip. I was becoming homesick. If ever anyone wanted to return to the I'nlted States it was Tom
Alix. And vet 1 couldn't place my finger definitely on the cause. Throughout the trip everyone had been so
kind, il seemed shameful to me to
have an acute anguish to return. But 1
1 did have It—had had it, In fact, for |
several days. Besides, we had left
Thomaslna' in Paris, alld no small
part of my heartache was directed toward seeing her again.
"First   Thomaslna.   then   home," .1
murmured to myself   all   too   many
times, and then regretted it as being a
poor way to show my appreciation of
Europe's   kindness.      Yet  when,  tho ■
afternoon of April 29, 1 waved a fare- j
well to Berlin and the train steamed j
out for Paris. I  must confess I was
happy .
Paris—and then home!
My story is about done.   From Ber-
lin there were 22 hours in the train. I
Paris—two hectic days there getting
adjusted   and   dreaming   of  my   own |
land. The train from Cherborough and
lhe Care St. Lazare—Cherbourg and j
again  the   jade   green   sea—Anxious
hours waiting for the tender to put
out  for  the  Mauretanla,   which   lay
steaming in the harbor, indolent yet |
Impatient.
The six days to New York passed as ,
If in a daze. Europe resounded be- ;
hind me. I spent the time alternately playing with Thomaslna and dream
ing of the world I had left and the
world I was about to see again. As
in a mirage, I saw once more my ow*i
ranch at Mixville. I began to llilrs,
to get again before a camera—the
lure gets you, you know.
1 had only the regret that Tony was
not with me. Although I had seen
him in Paris when I returned—seen
him an hour after the train had pulled In—it seemed years instead of
weeks since I had ridden liim.
Tony was lo follow on tlle Acqul-
scribed the emotion which surges
through an American when he returns to his land and first sees New-
York harbor, its building, and the
Statue of Liberty. I won't even attempt it. But it led me to a last
gesture, for, beyond the roofs of New
York, I could see the open plains of
my own wild and open west.
I went Into our stateroom and opened one of the carefully packed trunks.
"What ure you doing?" asked Mrs.
Mix.
"Packing away my European polish." I answered. "I'm home, thank
Ood."
(The End)
NOTE -Headers of Tom Mix's Story
Abroad and lovers of his pictures,
will be pleased to learn that tbey may
again view liim on the screen in "The
Last of The Dunnes," which will be
shown in Courtenay next Monday.
Tuesday and Wednesday and at Cumberland the following three days, Sept.
17, 18 and 19.
WATER NOTICE
inversion and Use
TAKE NOTICE that John William
Smith and James Broughton Smith,
whose address Is Sandwick, Comox
District, B.C., will apply for a licence
to take and use 500 gallons per day of
water out of an unnamed spring which
overflows and drains into Ranch No.
137 and Is situate on Lot 202, Comox
District. The water will be diverted
at the spring and will be used for
domestic purposes upon the land described ns Lot 20°, Comox DlBtrict.
This notice was posted on the ground
on the 28th day of August, 1925. A
copy of this notice aud an application
pursuant thereto and to the "Water
Act' will be filed In the offlce of the
Water Recorder at Nanaimo, B.C., and
with the Comptroller of Water Rights,
Parliament BuildlngB, Victoria, B.C,
within thirty days after the first appearance of this notice in a local
newspaper. The date of the first
publication of this notice ls August
28th, 1925.
John William Smith,
James Broughton  Smith.
Applicants.
By P. P. Harrison, Agent.
Cumberland, B.C.
35-38. Barrister, etc.
For Quick
Hot Water
Fill an BMP K—altd Tea
Kettle. Bet it on tht ■tore,
No Kettle wlll boil water
quicker. That menu convenience, time saved, too.
All 8MP Enameled utensils
are very fast coming to the
boil and in their job of cooking. Not only quicker to
cook with, but easier, more
quickly cleaned after. Th*
best any way yon look at it
Think this orer.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite llo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any St., le SOc
Children's hair cut any style 35c
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B.C.
I
Enameled
Tea Kettles
Save Fuel
SOLI) BY MATT BROWN'S
GROCERY, CUMBERLAND.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEHUIKIEU),   PioprMoi
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue. Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON ]
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR I
NOTARY PUBLIC 1
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C. I
■  ill'
IslanderOffice for Private Greeting Xmas Cards
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
ILO-ILO THEATRE
EXCEPTIONAL ATTRACTION
-ONE NIGHT ONLY-
MONDAY, SEPTEMBEP. 21—AT 8:15 P.M.
World Tour — Direction — Hugh. D. Wilson
(President and Jviry Coolidge receive {My. and CWirs.J'omMijc
The Most Astounding
Case in Criminal
Annals.
The Life Story
Of John Lee
Absolutely True in
Every Detail
Laughs, Thrills, Tears
yet    not    one    gruesome
moment   in   the   picture.
Specially Imported
Scenic   Musical   Prologue
MISS IIOHKEN
THOMPSON
English Dramatic Soprano
as Mrs. Lee.
W. LEONARDS HOWE
formerly with Doug. Pair-
banks,   wlll   graphically
describe   Lee's   wonderful
escapes.
ENTIRE MUSICAL PROGRAM CARRIED HY COMPANY
Complete company nml production direct from Its extended runs
in Toronto, Montreal and tho Orphcuni, Vancouver, B.C.
Press and Public Enthusiastic About This Super-Film
"Opened for n week but re-1
nialned a second week, which
indicate*)  how  much   interest
was aroused."—Mail and Em- ]
plre, Toronto.
"The story lends Itself rend-
ily to picturization, Is rellev-1
ed with many touches ot hu-
mor, and a happy ending."— 1
The Globe, Toronto.
"Absorbing picture."—Dally
Star, Montreal.
"Keeps the audience spellbound, nnd packs the Theatre,
both matinees and nights."—
London (Out.) Free Press.
"Tolls Its wonderful story In
a quiet, easy way."—Ottawa
Journal.
ADMISSION-
ADULTS 75*r> — CHILDREN 35*p
(Including Tax) FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
&
PAGE FIVE
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
HUGE   CROWD
ATTEND FAIR
(Continued From Page One)
Cattle
Registered Jerseys—Bull, 3 yrs. and
over, Frank Child 1; Bull, senior, 1%
yrs. and under 2, G. S. Hornby 1;
Bull, junior, 1 yr. aud under 1VL-. It.
U. Hurford 1, Bruce Towler 2; Bull
calf, senior, 6 mos. and over, R. U.
Hurford 1, R. M, Halliday 2; Championship bull, senior, Frank Child;
Championship bull, junior, R. U. Hurford; Cow In calf or milk, W. A. Ur
quhart 1, Hugh G. Russell 2; Heifer,
2 yrs. and under 3, R. U. Hurford 1,
C. H. Hughes 2; Heifer, senior, 114
yrs. and under 2, C. H. Hughes 1;
Heifer calf, junior, under 6 mos. Ted
Williamson 1; Champion Female, senior, W. A. Urquhart; Champion Female, junior, Ted Williamson; Cow, In
calf, dry, G. S. Hornby 1; Best Dairy
cow, to be judged on points, W. A.
Urquhart 1.
Dairy Grade—Heifer, 2 yrs. old and
under 3, Roy Morrison 1, Rev. J. W.
Flinton 2; Heifer, senior, 1% yrs. nnd
under 2, C. H. Hughes 1. D. S. Piper
1; Heifer, junior. 1 yr. nnd under l1/..
W. R. Cooke 1. C. H. Hughes 2; Helt-
er calf, senior, G mos and over, C. II.
Hughes 1, C. H. Hughes 2; Helfei
calf, Junior, under 6 mos. W. A. Urquhart  1, C.  II.  Hughes  2;   Cow  II. j
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
When you are in need of a
Plumbing A Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 167
Cumberland
Your   needs   will  receive  lmmtdiatt
attention.
m
BEETLES   1
Moucntfa(4K|
Spiinklt In ehicktn bouMt tad oo coiekoao
pod (owl, to KILL LICE 1
-calf, dry, W. A. Urquhart 1; Best
Dairy cow, any pure breed or graded,
to be judged by points, Silver Cup, W.
A. Urquhart; Dairy cows judging
competition, competition open, R. M.
Halliday 1, R. U. Hurford 2.
Horses
Heuvv Draught Horses—Mare, with
foal at foot, W. A. Urquhart 2; Colt
or Filly, sucking, W. A. Urquhart 1.
Agricultural Class or Light Draught
—Mare with foal at foot, J. Casanave
2; Mare or Gelding, 3 yrs. and upwards, C. H. Hughes 1, R. M. Halliday
2; Colt or Filly, 2 yrs, J. Casanave 1;
Colt or Filly, sucking, J. Casanave I;
Agricultural Team, C. H. Hughes 1,
J. Casanave 2.
General Purpose—Mare, with foal
at foot, J, Casanave 1, D. S. Piper 2;
Mare or Gelding, 3 yrs old and upwards, Frank Chllds 1, Bert Carey 2;
Colt or Filly. 2 yrs old, J. CaBanave 2;
Colt or Filly, 1 yr, J. Casanave 2; Colt
or Filly, sucking, J. Casanave 1, D.
8. Piper 2; General Purpose team. J.
Crockett 1, James Crockett 2.
Shwp
Oxfords—Ram, aged, Idlens Bros. 1.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Ofllce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHANE - TYPEWRITING — BOOK KEEPING
BUSINESS METHODS *
New Location Opposite Corfleld's Garage.
R. U. Hurford 2; Ram, shearling, Idlens Bros. 1, W. A. Urquhart 2; Ewe,
2 shears and over, W. A. Urquhart 1,
Idlens Bros. 2; Ewe, shearling, Idlens Bros. 1; Ewe, lamb, Idlens Bros.
1; Champion ram, Ribbon, Idlens Bros
Pen, consisting of 1 Ewe, 2 shears and
over, 1 Ewe, shearling. 1 Ewe lamb,
Idlens Bros. 1.
Fat Sheep, any pure breed or grade
—One Ewe, any age. W. A. Urquhart
1; Idlens Bros. 2; Ono Wether lamb,
idlens Bros. 1.
Graded Sheep—Ewe, 2 shears and
over, W. A. Urquhart 1. Idlens Bros.
2; Ewe. shearling, idlens Bros. 1, W.
A. Urquhart 2; Ewe Lamb, Idlens
Bros. 1.
Glints
Toggenburg Doe, 2 yr«. and over,
Mrs. Mobley 1; .Nubian Doo, 2 yrs. am)
over, Mrs. Mobley 1; Best Kid over 3
mos. Mrs. Herbert Smith I. Irene
Sinllb 2.
Swine
Yorkshires—Boar,   1   yr.   and   upwards, John Crockett 1; Hoar, under
1 yr., Ted Williamson l.
Graded I'igs—Sow, 1 yr. and up
wards, ('. II. Hughes 1. John Crockett
2; Sow. with litter nol less than s.
Silver Trophies, C. II. Hughes 1, J.
Crockett 2; Host Bacon Hog, weigh:
160 to 260 lbs., C. H. Hughes I. ('.
II. Hughes 2.
I Dry
Plymouth Kock—Cock. J. W. Stalker 1; Hen. J. W. Stalker 1, M. S.
Stephens 2; Cockerel, II. S. Stephen.-,
1, M. S. Stephens 2; Pullet, M. S.
Stephens 1, R. M. Halliday 2.
Ithode Island Red—Cock, George
Chappell 1; Cockerel, Elizabeth Uall
1; Pullett, Elizabeth Ball 2.
White Leghorn—Cock. W. J. Gunn
1 and 2; Hen, J. Limpton 1, J. W.
Stalker 2; Cockerel, W. J. Gunn 1. J.
Limpton 2; Pullet, J. W. Stalker 1,
W. J. Gunn 2.
White Wyandotte—Cock. W. J. Andrews 1, W. A. B. Paul 2; Hen. W. A.
B. Paul 1, W. J. Andrews 2; Cockerel.
W. J. Andrews 1 nnd 2; Pullet. W. J.
Andrews 1, Ted Williamson 2.
Championship Ribbons—P. II. Hen.
J. W. Stalker, P. R. Cockerel. M. S.
Stephens; W. W. Cockerel, W. J. Andrews, W. W. Pullet, W. J. Andrews;
W. L. Hen, J. Limpton. W. L. Cock
W. J. Gunn.
Geese—Best goose and gander, any
variety, John Crockett 2.
Dairy Products
Creamery butter, 51) lbs. or over In
1-lb. squares, Comox Creamery 1;
Plate of 3 1-lb. squares. Mrs. M. McPhee 1, Mrs. W. Hardy 2; Hulf-gal.
cream, in 1 qt. and 2 pt. standard milk
bottles, capped, R. U. Hurford 1, C.
II.  Hughes  2;   Cottage  Cheese.   Mrs
* B U iTd I N G ""     !"
MATERIAL  OF  ANY  DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
Buy McBryde's Bread
 Purest and Best
And Patronize our ICE CREAM PARLOR—
The Coolest Spot There is in Town.
OUR SODA FOUNTAIN
must please.     If for any reason you are not pleased
with a drink at our fountain do us the favor to ask
the dispenser to serve you with a second drink.     It
will be done without cost.
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND ICE CREAM PARLOR
COURTENAY, B.C.
ODR MOTTO IS s—-
Fair to our Patrons; Fair to our Employees; Fair to
ourselves.
Dry Cleaning
Did you ever stop to figure that when you send a
suit or dress to the cleaners, you pay for the cleaning,
not barely removing the spots or patches of dirt ?
This practice might improve the appearance of
your suit, but does not get to the real injurious particles of dirt and grease imbedded in the material.
In our method your clothes are washed in pure,
clear gas until every spot of grease and dirt is removed, then they are turned over to experienced hands,
shaped and pressed on one of the latest steam garment
pressers.
Try Us Once, We Guarantee Satisfaction
The White Laundry & Dry
Cleaning Company, Ltd.
TELEPHONE 157 COURTENAY
Our delivery calls in Cumberland Mondays and Fridays
or leave parcels at Spooner's Barber Shop.
Herbert Smith 1; Fancy Cheese, Wlnnifred Wortnington 1; Doz. hen's eggs
brown ('. II. Hughes 1. L. Pearce 2;
Doz. lien's eggs, while. Secondo Gal-
iafrio 1. J. N. Stalker 2; 10-lbs, honey
lu lb. sections, T. Waslllefl 1; Two
frames of honey. T. Wasilleff 1; 20-
Ihs. honey lu 1-lb. jars, T. WasilielT 1;
I Display ol' honey in comb ami ex-
jtratcd. T. WasilielT 1; Dressed fowls,
\V. J. Andrews 1.
Garden Vegetables
Onions—Yellow.   Mrs.   It.   R.   .McQuillan 1, George Butchers 2; White.
George Butchers 2;  Red. M. Burnett
1, S. J. Sldgwlck 2;  Sliver Skin, for
pickling, George Butchers 1; Shallots,
D. M. Iscnor 1. S. J. Sldgwlck 2; Beets
—Long.  Mrs.  Cecil  Smith   2;   Globe.
Mrs. Herebert Smith 1, I). M. Isenor
2; Carrots—Long, D. M. Isenor 2; Intermediate, II. Morrison 1, George Edwards  2;   Shorthorn.   Mrs.   Herbert
Smith 1. Mrs, Cecil Smith 2; Parsnips.
G. Edwards  1.  W. A.  W.  Hames  2;
Table corn. G. Edwards 1. G. Butchers
2; Table turnips, S. J. Sldgwlck 1, M.
Morrison   2;    Cabbage—Pointed,    II.
Morrison 1, G. Butchers 2; Round, M.
S. Stephens 1. G. Butchers 2; Flat, G.
Butchers  2;   Savoy.  G.   Butchers   1;
Red,  H. Morrison 1;  Cauliflower,  H.
.Morrison 1; Scotch Kale, II. Morrison
1; Cos Lettuce. G. Butchers 2; Squash
—Hubbard, Mrs. H. Smith 1, H. Morrison 2; Abyssinian, D. M. Isenor 1;
Largest, any  variety, J.  Morrison  1,
I). 51.  Isenor 2;  Vegetable Marrow-
White or yellow, Mrs. II. Smith 1, Mrs.
It.  H.  .McQuillan  2;   Pumpkin.  M.  S.
Stephens 1, G. Bell 2;  Citron. D. M.
Isenor I, W. J. Andrews 2;  Cucumbers—Long, Mrs. R. R. McQuillan 2;
Ridge W. A. W. Hames 1, Mrs. R. R.
.McQuillan 2; Tomatoes—Red. Mrs. R.
It. McQuillan 1, Secondo Galiafrlo 2;
Yellow,    L. W. Leedham 2;    Pens-
Green,   J.   Cooper   2;   Beans—Green
Car Owners
When in trouble with your
Battery System, Ignition or
Lighting System, bring it to us
where it will receive expert attention by those who specialize
in this work.
The Battery Shop
Cumberland, B.C.
WALKER & STRACHAN
KIIKK — Butteries Tented — FREE
wax. Mrs. R. R. McQuillan 1, Mrs. H.
Smith 2; Yellow wax, G. Edwards 1,
Mrs. R. R. McQuillan 2; Scarlet runners, J. Cooper 1, Alice Hurford 2;
Celery, H. Morrison 1, Mrs. R. R. McQuillan 2; Leeks, Mrs. R. R. McQuillan 2; Collection of seasoning herbs
Mrs. ('. H. Hughes 1; Best collection
Garden Vegetables, D. M. Isenor 1, G.
Edwards 2.
Field Produce
Potatoes—Dlst. exhibit of commercial potatoes. 4 varieties, weight 10 lbs,
each, 2 varieties to consist of Green
Mountain and Burbunk, Dyke District
1, Little Hiver District 2; Green
Mountain W. L. liodgkins 1, D. M. Isenor 2, II. It. Clark 3; Burhnnks, W. L.
liodgkins 1. Butler Bros. 2, G. Butchers 3; Netted Gem, E. A. Hannah 1.
Butler Bros. 2, Mrs. C. Phelps 3;
Early St. George. Butler Bros. 1, S. J.
Sldgwlck 2, W. R. Perrcy 3; Any other
variety, early, W. R. Perrcy 1, H. R.
Clark 2. Butler Bros. 3; Any other
variety, lute. G. Butchers 1; Sheaf—
Wheat. Mrs. W. B. Harris 1. Pritchard
Bros. 2; Barley, S. J. Slddwlck 2;
Oats, S. J. Sldgwlck 2; Field Beans,
D. M. Isenor 2; Turnips—White, M. S.
Stephens 1; Swede, II. Morrison 1,
Mrs. W. S. Hodgklns 2; Aberdeen. C.
R. Worthlngton 1, J. W. Stalker 2;
Mangolds—Globe, H. Morrison 1, G.
L. Hornby 2; Long, H. Morrison 1,
G. L. Hornby 2; Sugar, H. Morrison
1, D. M. Isenor 2; Carrots—White, Intermediate. H. MorriBon 1; Red, H.
Morrison 1; Pumpkins, Roy Morrison 1, W. J. Andrews 2; Kale, J. Limpton 1, J. W. Stalker 2; Ensilage Corn,
0. L. Hornby 1. C. H. Hughes 2; Sunflowers, Capt. E. Lloyd 1, W. A. Urquhart 2.
Fruits
Fall Apples—Gravenstelns, J. A.
Carthew 1, R. D. Hurford 2; Wealthy,
C. R. Worthlngton 1, Pritchard Bros.
2; Mcintosh, J. A. Carthew 1; Alexander. Secondo Galiafrlo 1. J. Crockett
2;   Blenheim Orange, Mrs. J. Knight
1, J. A. Carthew 2; Any other variety,
named, J. A. Carthew  1.  M. Bell-Ir-,
ving 2.
Winter Apples—King of Tompkins.
M. Bell-Irving 1, Mrs. W. L. Hodgkln
2; Rlbston Pippin, W. R. Perrey 2;
Norther Spy, J. Crockett 1; Grimes
Golden, C. W. Leedham 1, Pritchard
Bros. 2; Wagner, Pritchard Bros, 1;
Cox's Orange Pippin, W. R. Perrey 1;
Snow, R. M. Halliday 1; Rhode Island
Greenings. J. A. Carthew 1. J. Crockett 2; Baldwin, Mrs. J. Knight 1, J.
A. Carthew 2; 20-oz. Pippin. R. M.
Halliday 2; Yellow Bellefleur, Pritchard Bros 1, Mrs. J. Knight 2; Golden
Russett, M. Bell-Irving 1; Winter
! Banana, Pritchard Bros. 2; Any other .
' winter variety, named, M. Bell-Irving
1; J. A. Carthew 2; Collection Ave
, varieties, named. J. Carthew 1; Larg-
| est apple in the show. Ruth Carto.
I Pears—Bartlett, C. It. Worthlngton
' 1. George Butchers 2; Clapps Favor-
i Ite. J. A. Carthew 1; Flemish Beauty.
Ii. M. Halliday 2; Louise Bonne de
' Jersey. Pritchard Bros. 1; Clalrgeou,
C. H. Adey 1; Beurre d'Anjou, C. R.
; Worthlngton 1; Any other variety,
i named. W. R. Perrey 1. It. M, Halll-
i day 2.
;    Further results wlll he announced
next week.
m
i
Auction Sales
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
September 16th and 17th
HIGHLY ATTRACTIVE AND INTERESTING AUCTION FOR MRS BRUCE, OF BELVOIR VILLA, CUMBERLAND. THERE WILL BE OFFERED FOR
SALE, HOUSE AND GROUNDS, VALUABLE
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND GRAND COLLECTION OF CUT GLASS, CHINA AND SILVERWARE. CATALOGUE CONTAINING FULL LIST
OF ARTICLES FOR SALE MAY BE HAD FROM
THE AUCTIONEER.
Wednesday, September 23 at 2:00 p.m. For Mr. Ibbot-
son, Sale of Young Dairy Stock.     See Posters.
Hardy and Pearce
AUCTIONEERS, COURTENAY, B.C.
Offlce Phone 10 House Phone 79F
NOTICE
ROYSTON IMPERIAL PAVILION
For The Winter Months Will Only Hold
SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES
Every Two Weeks Until Further Notice.
NEXT DANCE
Saturday, Sept 19
The Pavilion is now being double boarded to make thu
building warm and comfortable for the winter.
HEATING ARRANGEMENTS ARE ALSO BEING
INSTALLED
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE IU
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
We are preparing Badminton and Indoor Tennis Courts
for use either day or night.
Used Car Specials
FORD SEDAN (UKOK A A
1923 Model   •pD6D.\)\J
S-rET "EUVE"V$400.00
FORD TOUKING C07K (\i\
Late Model $4 i U.\)\)
CHEVROLET TOURING    |P£AA AA
(Superior)  «PDUU.UU
FORD TOURING (PI Pft A A
Sale Price   tpltHMJU
EASY TERMS ARRANGED
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone 61 Agents For Phone fil
MrLaughlin-Buick and  Chevrolet Cars. PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1926
liaigiaiEIBISIEHS^
The Importance
of Good
Appearance
Clothes never pass unobserved—consciously or
unconsciously people judge you by them.
It's mighty important—this matter of your personal appearance—and it's always a matter of satisfaction to know that your clothes are distinctive—that
they are made of good materials, in the correct style
and well made—and after all they're the cheapest
clothes in the end—they wear longer.
We'd like to show you all of the newest styles and
fabrics for this season—come in and see them—you're
more than welcome.
SUTHERLAND'S
Personal Mention
MIbs Beatrice Mitchell returned on
Wednesday to her home in Vancouver
after a short holiday in Cumberland
with her mother. Mrs. D. Mitchell.
Mr. Thomas Oraham. general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(D). Ltd., was a visitor to Nanaimo
Monday last, returning the following
evening.
Cyril Michell left for Nanaimo Monday last to resume his position on the
teaching staff of the Harewood Public School.
Patronize tlie Cumberland United
Football Club's Dances to be held
every Saturday night in the Ilo-llo
Hall, commencing this Saturday, September the 12th. Popular prices,
Gents 50c. Ladies 10c.
Harold E. Murray returned to Cumberland Monday evening to resume his
duties as assistant priclpal of the
Public School here. Mr. Murray
spent the vacation at Vancouver,
where he attended summer school.
Mrs. R. H. Robertson returned home
during the week from n short holiday
spent in Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Apps returned to Cumberland Friday last
from Mission City, where they spent
the summer vacation. Mr. Apps, who
Ib principal of the local Public School
also attended summer school for
teachers in Vancouver,
Patronize the Cumberland United
Football Club's Dances to be held
every Saturday night In the Ilo-llo
Hall, commencing this Saturday. September the 12th. Popular prices,
Gents 5Hc. Ladles 10c.
Miss Mary Picketti, ot the Cumberland Electric Lighting Co., returned
Tuesday evening from a two weeks'
vacation spent in Vancouver and Seattle.
Mr. and Mrs. James T. Brown left
Tuesday morning for Seattle, where
they will make their future home.
Visiting Mrs. John Bruce at Belvoir
Villa during the week were Mrs. Macfarlane and daughter, of Nanaimo, Mr.
and Mrs. Matear, of Vancouver and
Mr. and Mrs. A. Wilkinson, of Vancouver.
Rev. George B. Kinney, former pastor of Grace Methodist Church here,
has been transferred from Ocean
Falls to Procter. B.C.
FRIENDS TENDER
SHOWER TO BRIDE
Mrs. William Wheeler, nee Miss
Jane Cameron, of Bevan, was the recipient of many beautiful and useful
gifts on Wednesday, September 2nd,
when almost thirty of her friends
tendered ber a miscellaneous shower
at the home of .Miss Elizabeth Henderson, Maryp* I Avenue. Mr. and
Mrs. Wheeler were married the following Monday and will make their
tuture home in Nanaimo.
The evening was enjoyably spent In
singing and music, and delectable refreshments were served by Miss Head
erson. Those present were: Mrs. .1.
Robertson. Mrs. C. Hitchens, Mrs. R.
Robertson, Mrs. J. Damonte. Mrs. S.
Gough, Mrs. It. James, Mrs. D. Stevenson. Mrs. J. Monaghan, Mrs. A.
Henderson, Mrs. D. Piket, Mrs. J.
Bond. Mrs. Bryant, of Courtenay. Mrs.
Wm. Henderson sr., and the Misses
Jessie Stevenson, Hazel Mounce. Hannah Lockhart, A. Baird. I. Henderson.
T. Damonte, J. Boffey. V. Aspesia, I).
Frelone. N. Cameron, J. Cameron. A.
Haywood, E. Horbury, H. Gomm. ami
E. Henderson.
Morton H. Graham and Thomas
Graham, jr., are spending a week's
vacation in Victoria and Vancouver,
having- left Cumberland Tuesday
morning last.
Pierce Graham, who spent the summer vacation in Cumberland with hia|
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham, left for Victoria Monday last to |
resume his studies.
llllilAllllllilliAIAAAAAilllllllllillliiil'^Ai;:. I'iltfllllAililliii! Iliiil'
Widening The Field
Doubtless at the present time you use the telephone for the purpose of having social conversations
with friends in yi ,ar community. With the same ease
you can add to y<ur telephone calling list those friends
who reside man;, miles away, for the long-distance
telephone is well suited to friendly talk-trips.
re
I
Eureka Electric
Vacuum Cleaners
IMPORTANT   NOTICE
Up to and including September 30th, 1925 complete set of attachments supplied
FREE
H       BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY m
with each cleaner.     Value $10.00 for
$65.00
$65.00
cash less 2 per cent.
Monthly Payments Can Be Arranged.
We would suggest to you—we would do more and
urge—that you do not delay ordering before end of
September 1925. We have set aside a certain number of machines to go out with free attachments—
when these are gone it is all off.
BUY NOW—SAVE $10.00 AND BE HAPPY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
MANN'S BAKERY
Appetizing Fruit Pies for Summer Time
Apple .Pineapple, Raisin and Apricot
Our Famed Sc. tch Oat Cakes and Girdle Scones
Sure to Please.
WUEK END SPECIALS
Delicious Custard I, Lemon Pies and the Real English
Bath Buns. Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls.
No id No Recommending
Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order.
MANN'S CUMBERLAND, B.C.
All Orders Delivered Phone IS
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
BUTTER HORNS
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Lemon, Apple and Raisin Pies
Alto a large assortment of Small Fancy Cakei
Cookie*, Fruit, Cherry and Sultana Cake
Marocchi Bros.
The Canadian National Railways
with its Universal Connections,
can Book Steamship Passages to
all Parts of the World
THROUOH TICKETS ISSUED
OVER ALL
TRANSATLANTIC
TRANSPACIFIC
ALASKA, WEST INDIES
MEDITERRANEAN
ROUND THE WORLD
STEAMSHIP LINES
PREPAID  PASSAGES  ARRANGED   FOU   IF
YOU   DESIRE   TO   HIUNO  RELATIVES   Oil
FRIENDS FROM ABROAD
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Full Particulars may be obtained and Complete Arrangements made through E. W. Bickle, Agent,
Cumberland, B.C.    Telephone 35
CANAliiAlKriONAL RAIJMYS
SPECIAL FOR
This WEEK-END
PATENT CIGAR, CIGARETTE AND PIPE
LIGHTERS
 HANDY VEST POCKET SIZE	
INDISPENSABLE TO HUNTERS
Specially Priced For This Week-end Only
25
c.
SUPPLY LIMITED—GET YOURS NOW
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS To DEAL At LANG'S"
WANTS SALARY INCREASE]
F. It. Shenstone, principal of the
Cumberland High School, had a communication before the School Board
on Tuesday evening, respectfully asking the trustees for an Increase In his
salary. The principal acheived splendid results last term and in view of
tills fact he thought he was entitled to
an increase.
The board has tlie request under
consideration.
WANTED—Work hy lhe day or week.
Scrubbing. Ilouse-cle.inlng. Apply
Mrs. Burghiner, Cumberland.      37.
54 Ib
JPacka^e
KEEP YOUR EYES
C LI A N   C It A R AN D  HIA L1 HT
Union Stage
Co., Ltd.
Stages leave from the
CUMBERLAND HOTEL AND
WAVERLY HOTEL
for Nanaimo and all way points
at 8:00 and 9:15 a.m. daily.
TRAVEL BY STAGE
T. D. Coldkutt,
Manager.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Merrifield, accompanied by Mrs. Thos. .Merrifield of
N'anaimo anil Mrs. J. Mercer of Ocean
Falls, who have been guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Merrifield for a few
days, returned to Naualmo today.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDAGTAMENDHENTS
PKK-E.UPT10.NS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding I're-eniptlons Is
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ls not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Laud Recording Division, in which Ihe land applied tor
Is situated, and nre made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre. Including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can he
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes: minimum
price of first-class 'arable) land ls *}o
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment rf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the lirst year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based m
numbers ranged, priority being given
lo established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations tor range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
SVtakes
ahuslykiddy'
FREE BABY BOOKS
Write to the Borden Co., Ltd., Vancouver for two Baby Welfare Books.
/ Witt Call
at your house in time to take you to
the train or boat.
Car   For  Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHONE 25 OK 22- ASK FOR
Geo.  Mason

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