BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Sep 24, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0224648.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224648.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0224648-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0224648-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0224648-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0224648-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0224648-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0224648-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0224648-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0224648.ris

Full Text

Array TS-m CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
id
With which li consolidated the Cumberland Newt.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 39.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA     FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLL ARS PER ANNUM
130,000 Ardent Fight Fans See Tunney Defeat Dempsey
Police Refuse To
Include Pounding
Of Stray Cattle
COURTENAY, Sept. 23—But for
the absence of Aid. Wm. Fielder, who
has not yet sufficiently recovered
from a broken ankle, Monday night's
council was complete. Several communications were received. The B.C.
Telephone Co. authorised the city to
go ahead with the construction ot a
cement side-walk at their premises on
Mill Street. It was decided to call
for one tender for this work and that
of the fifty odd feet of side-walk at the
corner of Union and Isabel streets. A
tender for the latter work from
Messrs. Orr and Bennett is to be returned unopened, accompanied by an
explanation.
Mr. J. K. McKenzie requested the
removal of brush and logs from the
vicinity of his house on Vcltorla St.
Aid. Douglas thought that one day
and a team of horses would do the
work. The clerk of the municipality
of Fernie wrote at some length requesting information regarding the
policing of the city and collecting of
licenses by the Provincial Police.
Fornle was very interested to know
. how this matter was working put,
both financially and efficiently. City
Clerk C. S. Wood was Instructed to
Inform the Fernie officials that so far
the undertaking, which was of an experimental nature, had been satisfactory.
Aid. Pearse remarked that there was
a certain amount of stock running at
large within the city, whereupon
Mayor .McKenzie explained that the
police had refused to include the enforcement of the pound by-law In
their activities. Some discussion on
tho pound ana a pound-keeper followed.
Aid. Douglas, chairman of the Board
of Works, reported for his committee,
showing that the work was proceeding ns usual. Aid. Macdonald also
reported ou the roads within the city
nnd lhe condition of the hard-surfacing done during the summer was discussed.
'ihe matter of the collection of the
Trade licenses by the Provincial
Police was then brought up. Mayor
McKenzie explained that tlle police
were asking ten per cent, as payment
tor this service. The city clerk, ln
answer to a question, said that there
were several delinquents In the matter of business licenses. It was decided to notify all delinquents by mall
forthwith that the licenses must be
paid before next council meeting. A
fire hydrant at the Royal Bank corner
on Union Street, which had been giving some trouble owing to a bent
spindle, Is to be replaced by a new
hydrant owing to the Importance of
tiie location.
In connection with the laying of the
Comox water main, Messrs. R. U.
Hurford und Arthur Smith had uot
been able tu see their way to sign a
right of way for the water pipe across
their properties. An agreement however, drawn up by Mr. Theed Pearse,
and designed so as to be not particularly binding on any of the parties
concerned, bud beeu found acceptable
lo all of them.
The city clerk reported that Mr.
Cecil Smith, who bad been commissioned to follow Brown's River from
Its source through tlle mountains to
tlie point of the city's intake pipe,
had completed the work. Tiie Mayor
snid he wns very pleased lo know
thai Goose Lake was the main supply
for Drown s River, as this assured
the cily of nn enormous supply of
water If the city wus wllllug to do the
small amount of work necessary at
the outlet ot Goose Lake. It was
decided to advertise a notice that the
City Tux Sale will he held nt the city
hall on lhe 30th of September. Before the close of the meeting considerable discussion took place on the matter of employing a man to read the
electric light meters, but it was at
length decided to leave the matter
until Iho next special meeting of the
council.
SOCCER GAME ON
■SUNDAY AT 1:00 P.M.
The first soccer game In the new
B. C. Inter-City league will take place
on the Ilocreation Ground, Cumberland, on Sunday at 1:00 p.m., when
thc Sapperton team wlll oppose the
Canadian Collieries eleven.
The Sappers have signed Sid Bradford, reputed to be the very finest inside forward In the Dominion of Canada. The Collieries team will not be
known until just prior to the game,
but we are given to understand that
a team capable of beating anything ln
the province will be fielded. The
game starts at 1:00 p.m. sharp, with
A. S. Jones, referee.
High School Form
Debating Club
a On Friday, September ^nth, the
matriculation class of the Cumberland
High School held their second debate
of the term: "Resolved that Modern
Press  does  more   harm  than  good."
The speakers for the affirmative i
wcre Minnie Harrigan and Myrtle
Calnan and for the ■ negative, Irene
Bates and Isao Nakano. Although we
are loath to admit It, the affirmative
side won the debate, scoring 14%
points to their opponent's 13%. Each
side spoke very well and presented
their points In such "a manner that we
are quite satisfied that with practise
some of the High School pupils wlll I
develop Into fine speakers if they are i
willing to expend the time and energy, j
At tlie close of the debate there was
on interesting passage of arms between the leaders. Minnie and Irene,
of the affirmative and negative sides
respectively.
On   Tu«sdsy.   Ka-nlemher   21st,   the I
debating club was  formed, with the j
following olllcers:     President.  Helen;
Parnham: vice-president. Irene Bates; ,
secretary, Leland Harrison.   The de- J
bates will be held every Friday after-!
noon throughout the term.   For next
week's debate "Resolved that Cumborland   is   a  more   desirable   place   ln
which to  live  than   Courtenay"  will
be the subject, and  the speakersarc!
Jessie Brown and Helen Parnham for
the affirmative and Leland Harrison
and Sam Davis for the negative.   As
time goes on, the Club hopes to be
able to arrange debaLes between the
three classes In the High School.
Honor Paid To
Baseball Team
POWELL RIVEK. Sept. 21—Last
evening Powell River Assembly No. 38
Native Sons of Canada, held a complimentary smoker in honor of their
baseball team which participated In
the local league this year. Mr. Thos.
McGuigau acted as Master of Ceremonies. Felicitations were extended
to the baseball team and a reply made
by Mr. Alt. Hanson, manager.
Songs, iccitalious. toasts and stories
made up a great programme ond
and limes' Orchestra livened proceedings witli classy music. Refreshments nud smokes were served and
the entertainment terminated at midnight.
CHALLENGER HANDED
UNANIMOUS DECISION
AT END OF 10th ROUND
127,000 ardent fight fans paid something like $1,750,000 to see
Gene Tunney crowned king of the heavyweights, defeating the
title-holder, Jack Dempsey, after a hectic 10 rounds of fighting,
during the greater part of which light rain was falling. Tunney
arrived by aeroplane and entered the ring sporting a blue bath
robe. Dempsey was a decided favorite, odds of 4 to 1 being laid
at the commencement of the fight. In the first round the challenger almost knocked Dempsey out, repeating in the fifth and
ninth. Dempsey opened a cut over Tunney's left eye and both
were noticed to be bleeding a little at the mouth. In the eighth
round Tunney hit Dempsey a terrible punch over the eye, completely closing that optic, the left one, for the last two rounds.
The decision was popular, neither judge hesitating in awarding the former "gob" the verdict. The huge crowd went,wild,
giving the eminent Shakespearian scholar, Gene Tunney, a big
hand.
Monster Badminton Club To Be
Formed At Imperial Pavilion
A most enthusiastic meeting waa
held at the Imperial Pavilion, Royston, on Friday last, when a number
of enthusiastic Badminton players met
to make plans for the coming season,
which usually starts on October 1st.
It was decided by the meeting to form
a club which would be open to anyone
in the district, as there ls ample room
at the Imperial Pavilion, to accommodate a large number of members.
lt was also decided to name the club
"The Imperial Badminton Club," and
Helen Parnham
Elected Head
Of Sports Club
Cumberland High School students
held a very enthusiastic meeting on
Wednesday, to consider means of
raising funds for the athletic association. This organization will be the
parent body of all school athletics
and will apportion, as needed, the
funds required by the different
branches of school sports.
The oflicers elected for the year are
us follows: President, Helen Parnham; secretary-treasurer, Jessie M.
Grant; committee, Archie Dick, Jack
Hill and Barbara Grant.
It was decided to hold a dance in
the Ilo-llo Hall on October 1st. A
hearty vote ot thanks was extended
Mr. Bickle for his generosity In donating the hall and Invitations for tbe
occasion.
the officers to guide their destinies for
the coming season are: Max Blunt,
Courtenay, president; Mrs. F. R. Shenstone, Cumberland, secretary, and
Messrs. J. Vernon-Jones, Cumberland,
H. Idlens, Royston, and F. C. Brock,
Courtenay, with Mrs. S. Watson, Royston, and Mrs. Ben Hughes, Courtenay,
executive committee.
It Is planned to start play on October 8 and five full-size courts will be
kid. A large number of the younger
tennis players of the district have
signified their Intention of Joining the
new club and It Is confidently expected that upwards of one hundred
members will be enrolled by the end
of October.
Anyone desirous of Joining are requested to hand In their names to any
of the above mentioned committee.
Dues for the season have been placed
at $6.00 for both ladies and gentlemen, and In the case ot a married
couple, the fee was placed at $10.00.
The season approximately lasts tor 6
months, and with 2 playing nights
each week, lt wlll be readily seen tbat
the dues of $6.00 are extremely light.
INTERMEDIATES ENTER
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
The Cumberland Intermediate Football Club has sent Its entry to the
management of the Pacific Coast
Soccer League, with the end In view
of entering the up-Island section of
the Second Division League. It is
understood that Courtenay, Qualicum
and Port Alberni will be the three
other teams.
To augment the finances of the local
club lt Is Intended to bold a dance,
probably on Wednesday, October 6th.
Watch for further announcement.
Cue Exhibition At
Athletic Club Is
Well Attended
The billiard room of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association was packed to capacity Sunday
evening last, the occasion being an
exhibition game of English billiards
between Sid Boys and Jack McMillan,
both of Vancouver. Boys, who was 1
finalist ln this year's Dominion championship, went to his points first, defeating McMillan, the 1925 Dominion
champion by 102 points, the final
score reading Boys 600, McMillan 498.
Boys made breaks of 32, 48, 29. 32
(twice), 31, 51, 28, 42, 27. and his final
break ran to 81.
McMillan's breaks included a 3u,
26. 33. 37, 76, 27, 45 and 41. McMillan's break of 75 was a masterpiece,
the 1926 Dominion champion being
given a big hand.
This Is the first exhibition of billiards put on by the management of
the club and unstinted praise has heen
bestowed on them for their foresight
in bringing two of British Columbia's
billiard champions lu lhe district.
STAGE STAR LIKES
ACTING IN MOVIES
FORESTERS' WHIST DRIVE
The Juvenile Foresters, Court Freedom, will hold a Whist Drive and
Social evening in the Fraternal Hall
on Tuesday, September 28th. Whist
commences at 8:15. Everybody welcome.   Admission, 25 cents.
Sir John Martin Harvey, who plays
I the role of Sidney Carton in the film
version of "The Only Way." a stage
play based on the great Dlcken's clas-
| sic "A Tale of Two Cities." says he
enjoyed the work very much.
"It was so new and different. Stage
acting Is one long sustained effort,"
he explained. "This is all done In
little cameos ot work.    I love it."
It was found necessary to make certain alterations in the play for film
purposes.   Sir John made a wry face
| when the alterations were suggested
Look ont!   I Bod Men an hauled
thla iraf.
T.Graham Wins Tennis Trophy
Miss B. Bickle Wins Ladles' Singles
Trophy for Third leu- In
Succession
The steamer "British Monarch" was
at. Powell itlver Monday and Tuesdny,
loading a cargo of paper.
A. O. F. Social
Great Success
W. B. A. SALE OF WORK
The Women's Benefit Association
will bold a Sale of Work and Home
Cooking In the Fraternity Hall jnxi
December 1st.
Warning!   3 Bad Men coming to the
district!
Court  Bevan  9830.  A.O.F. Cumberland, B. C. held Its regular meeting
Wednesday   Inst   with   Chief   Ranger
Bro. Martin In the chair.    Following
the   business part  of  the  evening a I
"get-together*'  social   was  held,  with i
the  Ladles of Court  Cumberland  as!
the Invited guests. After refreshments
were served the programme was open-.
ed with remarks from the chairman, j
Bro. Robb.   Vocal solos were Riven by j
Mr. Gomnr Harding. Bro. Dillon. Bro.
Goodall, Bro. McMillan and Mr. Jones. I
with  musical selections by Bro. and
Sis.  Tweedhope.     Bro. Strachan en-,
tertained with a recitation, followed
by remarks from Bio. Taylor, D.C.R., i
and Bro. Martin, C.R. After a rousing;
community   song   the   evening   wns I
brought to a close with the singing of
"Auld Lang Syne." j
The men's and ladles' singles
tournament tor the championship of
the Cumberland Tennis Club were
brought to completion last week-end,
with T. R. Graham and Miss B. Bickle
carrying off the respective honors.
The tournament was productive of a
line brand of tennis, and the semifinals and finals of last Saturday and
Sunday were well worth watching.
E. Bickle was the other finalist ln the
men's singles, while Miss F. Strachan
opposed Miss Bickle in the finals of
tlie indies' singles. MIbs Bickle has
now won the championship three successive years.
Following are the results complete:
MEN'S SINULES
First round—A. R. Stacey defeated
Jlr. Howlett, 6-0, 6-1; T. R. Oraham
won from T. Graham by default; M.
Graham defeated D. Sutherland, 6-2,
6-3; M. Stewart defeated Dr. Hicks,
6-3. 6-1; P. D. Graham defeated Dr.
MacNaughton. 1-6, 6-2, 6-4; H. Stewart
won from T. H. Mumford by default:
W. H. Cope, bye; E. Bickle, bye.
Second round—T. R. Graham defeated A. R. Stacey, 6-1, 6-3; M. Graham won from M. Stewart by default;
H. Stewart defeated P. D. Graham,
6-4, 6-4; E. Bickle defeated W. H.
Cope, 6-0, 6-1.
Semi-finals—T. R. Graham defeated
M. H. Graham, 6-2, 6-4; E. Bickle defeated H. Stewart, 8-6, 6-4.
Final—T. R. Graham defeated E.
Bickle, 6-0, 6-1.
ladies' Singles
First round—Miss H. Parnham defeated Mrs. Slacey, 6-0, 6-1; MIbs F.
Strachan defeated Miss MacNaughton,
6-2, 6-1; Miss N. Parnham defeated
Mrs. Clinton, 6-1, 6-1; Mrs. Cope won
from Mrs. Finch by default; Miss II.
Dickie, bye.
Second round—Miss H. Parnham,
bye; Miss F. Strachan, bye; Miss M.
Brown defeated Miss N. Parnham, 6-4,
6-4; Miss Bickle defeated MrB. Cope,
6-1, 6-0.
Seml-Ilnals—Miss Strachan defeated
Miss H. Parnham, 6-2, 6-4; Miss B.
Bickle defeated Miss M. Brown. 8-6,
6-1.
Final—Miss Bickle defeated Miss
Strachan, 6-4, 6-3.
but he adapted himself very modestly
to the producer's requirements. "I've
been playing lt that way for twenty-
Beven years," he said, "but you're
right, my boy, alter It.
Sir John, it Is said, regards his part
In "The Only Way' as even belter than
that which the stage version suplles.
His producer, Herbert Wilcox, Bays.
"I think you will find that we have
discovered a supremely great film
actor."
See "The Only Way" at tbe Ilo-llo
Theatre on October 8th and 9th.
EDWARD T. CREECH
RESIDENT OF 10 YEARS
INTERRED WEDNESDAY
Mrs. R. K Cairns
Won Argus Cup
For Third Time
COURTENAY, Sept. 23.—The winners of the special prizes donated for
the Fall Fair, which are both numerous and valuable, Is now complete.
The particulars are as follows:
The three silver cups given this
year to be retained by the winners
were the Royal Bank trophy, for the
highest aggregate In the sheep classes was won by Mr. W. A. Urquhart.
The Canadian Bank of Commerce cup
for the best dairy cow Judged on
points goes to Mr. C. H. Hughes and
the handsome silver cup given by the
Agricultural Association for tbe athlete obtaining the highest number of
points In the day's sports programme
goes to J. Sheasgreen of the Comox
Logging Company. The Comox Argus
cup was won for the third time by
Mrs. R. K. Cairns, of Nanaimo, and
now becomes her property. A special
prize offered by the Ladies Auxiliary
of the Association for girls needlework resulted In a tie between Irene
Smith and Evelyn Owen, and the
special prize for cooking was won by
Olive Anderton. Walter Edwards and
Roy Morrison also tied for a special
prize given by the Columbia Paper
Co. Other silver trophies donated by
tlie Agricultural Association go to R.
U. Hurford for cattle, and Bruce Tower, aso In the catte division. The
cash prizes offered by the Comox
Creamery Association for the best
loaf of whole what bread were won
by Mrs. E. M. Whyte of Alberni. Mrs.
J. Blakely of Merville and Mrs. J. O.
McQulnn of Headquarters. Prizes
given hy Messrs. G. F. & J. Gait Ltd.
of Vancouver, go to Mrs. R. K. Cairns,
Mrs. R. Bridges and Mrs. D. M. Isenor. The Quaker Flour prizes go to
Mrs. J. Blakely and Mrs. J. Cornwell.
Royal Household Flour prize was won
I by Mrs. R. Carter, of Courtenay.   The
' Purity Flour prizes were won by Mrs.
R. Bridges and Mrs. R. K. Cairns, who
tied for first prize, Mrs. J. O. McQulnn
Mrs. E. M. Whyte and MrB. Blakely.
Five Roses Flour prizes go to Mrs. J.
Blakely. Mrs. J. G. McQulnn and Mrs.
E. M. Whyte. Empress tea and coffee prizes were won by Mrs. C. H.
Hughes and Mrs. J. Blakely.   An Ax-
I minster  rug  given   by  the  Edwards
I Lumber Co. Ltd. was won by Mrs. R.
j K Cairns. A prize to the value ot
five dollars offered by thc Courtenay
I Builders goes to Mr. C. H. Hughes.
' Prizes given by the Royal Standard
Feed Co. were won by Dr. F. O. Liddle.   0,   McMonnies  and   Mrs.  Albert
' Kedton. Nabob Baking Powder prize
goes to Mrs. R. K. Cairns.   A prize
' donated by the Barrett Co. of Van-
1 couver wns won by Mr. C. H. Hughes.
1 Mr. It. U. Hurford and Mr. M. S.
Stephens were Ihe winners of prizes
offered by Alex Murray & Co. Ltd.
A special prize of Dahlia stock, which
wns offered by Mr. T. W. Palmer of
thc Valley Field Dahlia Gardens, Victoria, was won by Mr. E. M. Whyte
of Alberni. The race for Ford cars
provided much entertainment and
much amusement. The prizes, to the
value of $45, given by Messrs. Corfleld
Motors of Courtenay, wore won by
Mr. Thos Simms and Mrs. Thos. Hopkins.
UP-ISLAND BOARD
GETS SHARE FROM
ENGLISH TOUR
Senior soccer in British Columbia
will benefit to the extent of $2457 as
a result of the tour of the English
team last summer. Secretary Sam
Davidson mailed separate chepues for
the various bodies and these were
received on Monday as follows:
Pacific Coast League, $600.75; Lower
Island Football Association, $276.75;
Upper Island Football Association,
$317.25; Lower Mainland Football
Association, $648; British Columbia
Football Association, (614.15.
[    COURTENAY.   Sept.   23—The  funeral   of   tbe  late Edward  T. Creech
| took  place at  Ihe  Anglican   Church.
■ Sandwick.   on   Wednesday   afternoon,
' the Rev. J.  W. Flinton  Officiating nl
I the service at Ihe home In Courtenay
j and   at   thc   graveside   at   Sandwick.
j Deceased was a native of Hamilton,
Ontario, being born there on the 28th
, day of July, 1852.   He came lo this
| district forty years ago and took up
I land at Headquarters  which  ls now
I known as the Tyee Farm.   For the
] past number of years  he has made
j Ills home In Courtenay and has been
an invalid for some five yenrs.   Besides the widow he leaves four sons
Messrs.   James.   Henry.   Allien   and
Richard, who are all al home, nnd one
daughter. Mrs. R.  M. Allan, of  Port
Moody, also a sistor. Mrs. It. Ilrldges,
a  well-known   resident   of Sandwick.
Thc funeral, which wns under Ibe
auspices of the Orange Lodge, was In
the hands of Mr. John Sutton, undertaker.   Those bearing the remains of
this pioneer to their last resting place
were Messrs. J. N. McLeod, R. Surgen-
or, J. W. McKenzie Sr., Hugh Clark.
Frank Childs and J. W. McQuillan.
Cumberland W.B.A
Spend Pleasant
Evening
A large number of members and
friends of Cumberland Review of the
W.B.A. motored to Courtenay on Wednesday evening last to attend a shower
given by Mrs. Brynnt nt ber home, In
aid of a bazaar which the Review intend holding In the near future. Many
Courtenay friends nlso attended. The
hostess had planned many novel contests for which she gave valuable
prizes. Whist also was played, and
the clever dancing of little Miss
Handlen. of Courtenay. together with
music nnd radio added to the pleasure
of tho guests. A very merry time
was spent nnd many hnndsome donations received. Dainty refreshments
wcre served.
Winners at whist were, Ladies 1st,
Mrs. Quinn; second. Mrs. Lockhart;
consolation. .Mrs. Bannerman; Gent's
first. Mrs. Herd, consolation. Miss K.
Roherlson (substituting). PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
<*-t™BE8nfi*>
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926,
take us where we want lo go. But when the rich
man in his powerful car crowds us into the ditch
or deliberately splashes us with mud we grow
hot inside and hate him for his arrogance
But wealth permeated by the spirit of simplicity is the ideal condition of life. The rich
man who has faithful employees that he calls by
their first names, the man of means who takes
an interest in the civic welfare of his community
and gives to all worthy causes, who looks upon his
wealth as trust funds to be invested in human
happiness and health is the man who will enjoy
THE FLAPPER    Bid her good-bye, boys, for she
IS PASSE is on her way to the land of
forgotten things. The passing j the'esteem and respect of his fellow citizens,
of the flapper is announced from Paris. Models So when you chance to meet a man at once
for fall and winter now being shown, while not. rich and simple, a man who considers his wealth
entirely ignoring her, markedly thrust her into: as a means of fulfilling his mission in the world,
the background in favor of a more distinctly fern- [ you may count that man a friend. He is a man
inine type. Few flappers of thc original model; from whom you may seek advice, for he has sur-
will be seen the coming season, but it is not likely j mounted obstacles, borne trials and triumphed in
that the flapper will allow herself to be supplant-; temptation. He does not fail to discriminate be-
ed without a struggle by a more girlish type, with : tween the contents of his safety box and the con-
long, curling hair and frills and ruffles, jabots | tents of his head or heart, and he does not es-
and high necks and profusely trimmed hats. | timate his fellow men in dollars and cents. His
Another significant thing in this change that exceptional position, instead of exalting him, will
is coming is the fact that Aliss Tulsa, the 19261 make him humble, for he is very sensible of how
Miss America, is of the old-fashioned type of far he falls short of reaching the level of his duty.
beauty.     Miss   Norma   Smallwood,   who   was'	
crowned i|iieen of American beauties at the an-
nual pageant at Atlantic Git'y lasl week, hails [SMALL TOWN GOSSIP Some people express
from Tulsa, Oklahoma, and she was chosen by dislike of life in the
competent judges from 73 contestants. Miss country towns, on the ground that there is too
Tulsa is described as a typical Western girl, with , much small antl petty gossip. They think people
long black hair that has never known the barber's i show too much curiosity in regard to the affairs
shears. She wears her hair parted in the middle of their neighbors. Such people usually go to
and combed severely down over the ears. She is j the other extreme of moving to some large city,
a'brunette and has none of the manners of the < where they may live for years without any neigh-
flapper or professional beauty.
THE IDEAL
RICH MAN
j bor speaking to them. They may fall sick and no
j one call to inquire or offer to lend a hand. About
Of all the fools that clutter the, that time they begin to wish they were back in
earth, the biggest fool is the the gossiping country, where those curious neigh-
man who boasts of his wealth. I bors would tumble over each other to offer their
We know a man who can talk of nothing else but j services. The trouble with these people is that
his accumulation of money. He is interested in j they are too sensitive or too secretive. They
no other subject. His whole aim and purpose in j ought to realize that the people of a country town
life is to pile up dollars and put them out at j are, or should be, close neighbors to each other,
interest. He has no friends, no intimate associ-' practically members of one big family. It is a
ates, no enjoyment in life but to increase his hold-1 perfectly normal thing for people to be interested
ings and figure his growing income. Of all our
acquaintances he has the least for which to live
and yet he considers himself superior to the rest
of us. He is the victim of vain pride which is
eating his heart and sapping his life.
Some wise old philosopher once said: "Take
care, do not confound what you possess with what
you are." It is, after all, what you are that really
counts. We have heard the clods rattle on a rich
man's coflin and not a tear dim the eyes of those
standing besie the open grave. We have watched
the casket of a comparatively poor man lowered
into the grave while tears streamed down the
faces of those who loved him, It isn't what you
possess, but what you are, that counts.
It is the pride of the rich that galls the poor.
We do not care how much wealth another has,
in the things the community family is doing. If
they go off for a little trip and carefully conceal
their destination, neighbors with sporting blood
and a normal desire for information naturally
speculate on where they are going. If, before
they go, they take pains to hand a simple and
modest little item to the newspaper, the thing is
printed, every one knows it, and there is no reason
for gossip about it. Nothing is so interesting in
the world as human life. You can find the satisfaction of character study just as interesting in
a coal-mining village as in a metropolitan theatre.
The people who have generous and kindly natures
do not come in for criticism. Thos who are cold
and selfish and aloof, or who are egotistical and
unscrupulous, are the ones that suffer. The gossip, perhaps, is helpful to them in correcting
but when the rich man shows contempt for those | these faults
of less fortune he arouses rebellion in their hearts. I It must also be remembered that there is a
We care not how fine an automobile the rich man I great difference between the small gossip of the
may possess, we do not envy him his chauffeur thimble bee and the vicious slander of the kitchen
and his gilded trimmings, i'or our little flivver will I steps which feeds on scandal and jealous lies.
The First Theatre in North America
PHONE 19 CUMBERLAND
arii-tpiSBsgaatatataptrirtieacae^
Arched entranei ti UU t "if
oovuiii'iiiornt.iiij tin. birthplace o/ C
To commemorate the first tlicatri-l
cnl performance on the North
American continent, a simple stone
cairn and tablet haa been placed on
the site of the first French Fort at
Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, the
birthplace of Canadian literature
and Drama.
Here the first American play was
written and acted :{J(I years ago.
Although it waa unlike the kind of
dramatic performances one sees today from comfortable orchestra
stalls, it was from ail historical
accounts, a "pretty good show." It
was called "Neptune's Theatre" and
was staged on the waters of
Annapolis Basin, the actors performing on a movable and precarious stage of canoes, and the actors
themselves, men of opposite extremes in social and intellectual
condition, — some gentl' men of
Prance, and others aboriginals of
Nova Scotia wilds.
The author of this unii'ui* production was Mare Lescarbot, a
French lawyer and poet, who rame
with Poutrincourt tn Port Royal In
IflOri. During his first winter he
was in charge of the Fort durtni;
the absence of Poutrincourt on nn
exploration expedition. If Lescarbot
muat ba credited  with  the distinc
tion of being the author and pro*
ducor of the first North American
piny, ho is also responsible for inaugurating a short hours day for
bis men, and tho first experimental
farm in the country. Moreover he
was one of the most prominent members of the "Order of Good Cheer",
an epicurean organization established by Champlain for the purpose of
sitting a record In the variety and
excellence of food, which members
washed down with a plentiful supply
uf rare old wines. Lescarbot was
us particularly proficient in
"throwing" a good party.
To add a still further "touch of
gayety", as Lescarbot put it, to the
return of Poutrincourt from his
voyage of discovery, Lescarbot composed an original masque called
"Neptune Theatre," which was
enacted in the presence of Poutrincourt aboard ship. After it was
over the merry company went
ashore, entered the "habitation"
nnd home of the "Order" and the
banquet began. Later Lescarbot
returned to France and wrote the
"Histnire de Nouvelle France," and
the Old Fort fell into the hands of
the British.
It Is the most peaceful spot In the
world now. A beautiful bronze
tnhlct, bearing the arms of France
and Navarre at the top and the
inscription:
".S.tr nf the first tort or
'Habitation' of Port UoyaL
Built by the French under D»
Montu nnd Champlain, 1605.
Attacked and partially destroyed by a British force from
Virginia, 1613, Restored and
occupied by Scottish Colonists,
1G2H. Laid waste on their retirement from the country,
1032. Home nf the 'Order of
Good Cheer1, Birthplace of
Canadian Literature and
Drama."
With a simple ceremony the tablet was unveiled recently by tha
Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia
before members of the Histoi'io
Monuments and Sites Board of
Canada, who were responsible for
its erection, nnd prominent archivists from all over thc Dominion.
It Is Just one more Interesting land*
mark at Annapolis Itoyal, surely tha
most romantic centre of Nova Scotia
on the Dominion Atlantic Railway
with its pnt-k and museum, and
beloved of traveflers.
Special Showing this week of the
Newest Exclusive Fall Styles in
Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Fall Coats.
The   Latest    Exclusive   Fall
Models in
Ladies'  and  Misses'   Trimmed
and Ready-to-Wear Hats.
E%3BHHsaaa»nnnHs9=4E3E%
Cumberland Supply Store
I
Rickion'a Old Stand
Dunsmuir Ave.
Read our prices and we are sure you will become one
of our Customers.     No person can afford to throw
away money on High Prices.
THESE PRICES ARE FOR SATURDAY, PAY DAY,
ONLY.
=SSS=a=8=f£aaKHHt3MMT*-M^
Sunkist Orange's, 3 doz. for   .$1.00
Canteloupes, each  15
Mcintosh Reds, per case   2.75
Hot House Tomatoes, 2-lbs. for  25
Outside Grown Tomatoes, per pound  10
Large Lemons, per dozen 32
Potatoes, $1.85 per sack or 12 lbs. for ..*     .25
Vancouver Butter, the best you can buy, 2-lbs.   .85
Canadian Cheese, per pound 28
Horse Shoe Salmon, 2 for 45
Gem Lye, per tin 15
Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. can    .85
Grape Nuts, 2 for  35
Heinz Pork and Beans, flats, 2 for 25
Malt Vinegar, quart bottles 28
Heinz pure-white Pickling Vinegar, bulk, per qt.   .25
Heinz Distilled White Vinegar, per bottle 28
Cow Brand Baking Soda  15
See our new arrivals of Gents and Boys Fall Caps.
Men's Fleeced-lined Underwear, per suit  $2.35
Men's Black Work Pants, 8-oz. Duck, per pair.. 2.25
Men's Blue Work Pants, per pair  2.25
Men's Khaki Pants, to clear at per pair  1.95
Men's Work Suspenders 15c, Dress at  75
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY STORE
Phone 155 Cumberland
*
rJa^T—m i   i w    - ~ r'js vumjc
■ W - ..JtOLia  >V'
Just received a large shipment
of the newest Styles in Ladies'
Silk Charmeen and Flannel
Dresses at popular prices.
asasassesessatasasataestagasasasrc:
|fre$totie
GENUINE FIRESTONE TIRES MAY BE IDENTIFIED BY THE TRADE MAI:K WHICH IS
THE GUARANTEE OF FIRESTONE QUALITY
Sole Agents
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Cumberland
P.P.Harrison, M. L. A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Mala Ofllce
Courtenay           Phone HI
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone  HER or 14
The "OEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 60c
Children's hair cut any ityle 35c
5*53'^?^ *.'L" i. *::; - •' V1: VC'.'-.''
Giving Wings To
Friendship
The long-distance telephone gives wings to friendship. It enables the human voice to be carried along
wires at a speed of thousands of miles per second
without losing any of its cordiality. The special night
rates after 8:30 p.m. are advantageous for social chats.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
ffix?fitt&iTiL&
24 TELEPHONE IM
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets  boat at Union  Bay.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone II.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
26   rooms,   electrically   heat**.
B. TATRS, Manaiar.
DR
W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHOUT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES
(Night calls: 13-1X Courtenay
I Office: 159 Cumberland.
-' FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926.
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
sfriile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
,R(XERY STORE
PAPER TOWN NEWS NOTES j
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Mr. F. H. Hopwood, of tbe Vancou-  FINAL RALLY WAS
  | ver Sun, and Mr. Leonard Frank, the
POWELL RIVER, Sept. 21.—Sunday well-known photographer, were visit-
night the steamer Haurakl left for | ors In the city on Friday and Satur-
New Zealand after having taken on day gathering data and pictures for
a cargo ot approximately 1000 tons of an Illustrated edition of the Sun to
newsprint at the dock of the Powell appear shortly. This special edition
River Company, The same afternoon will deal particularly with Powell
the  American   freighter,  El  Capitan,   River.
came into port antl loaded 800 tons, 	
leaving   on   Monday   night   for   San     Powell  River  was  visited  on   the
Francisco. night of the fourteenth instant by one
PAGE THREE
lit
EXCITING ONE
1 POWELL RIVER, Sept. 14.—Politicians said on Saturday that "lt is
all over but the shouting," but they
were fooled for on Sunday night there
was some noise at least at the final
rally held In the Patricia Theatre in
the interests of the Liberal candidate,
the hecklers that "if I hear another
yap out of you fellows I'll have you
thrown out." From then on tho meeting was more orderly and. having
silenced tlle enemy, Mr, Cowper nud
Mr. McGeer did their stuff.
Today  is  election  day,  day   uf  all
days  when  excitement   runs   wild   in
most communities, among thoso who
I care who governs and the party workers on both sides hnve lel't  nn Bton
PARIS ACROBATS
DIVERT THRONGS
r. aM li mid  I'liiisiiiulr.
Phone  122
Cumberland
Tho Powell River Company has begun construction of ten houses along
the waterfront in the ten hundred
block. Ton other build!. gs iu the
same neighborhood have just been
completed.
JOHN INCUS
The Practical White Tailor
131R        -I'll  NE8—        20K
COURTENAY, It. 0.
Auction Sale
Instructed by Mr. J. E. Spicer we will offer for sale on
MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th, AT 2 P.M.
his desirable residence on Maryport Avenue, Cumberland.     Also   Hot.sehold   Furniture   which   includes
Dominion Piano, four Chesterfield Chairs, Mission Oak
Dining Room Suite, etc.   •
Full particulars in posters or of the Auctioneers.
HARDY AND PEARGE
Real Estate AUCTIONEERS Insurance
Phone 10 Courtenay
 _„       *"  "aaaaaaaaaaaaaj, | U11 III 1110(1     tO     get     tllO    Voters    til    t lie
of the severest electrical storms In Mr. Gerry McGeer. It was funny; In poUs, There Is quite an Irish populn-
several vears. Damage was done to tact " was better thaI* 80me ot -*-e|tlon here and they lived up 10 ex-
property' at the Lake where two rmA vaudeville shows that have pectations. Judged from conver-a-
hour.es belonging to the Powell Lake occasionally visited this town. It|tIona |leanl ,mu overheard thoy voted
Shingle Company and occupied by a came about ln •••ls •*'•*•''' General Mc- ...lgin- lhe government, evidently
number of men who work at the mill I'***J ]ml a meeting advertised for last bellev|llg that -, wou,d be g00(. polk.y
wero demolished. Fortunately no one Sabbath evening. So had Mr. McGeer. for lhe ,,.,„„ t0 at|l.k togotllei. an(I wln
was hurt. Several trees in'the neigh- Tne •'0,'mer ha<1 heI*- a meeting on01. ]ose wllh Gerry cerry's ,„,,.,,
boi hood were splintered. the previous night at Central Hall.   It. majority  wos  close  enough   to   two
was hardly likeiv th.i h. .»-« - , )mmIred (0 ,e, „ g() a, m hm |1](,
General administered a severe beating to him at some uf tiie oilier larger
'polling divisions of the constituency.
It Is all over, lhe town is quiet again,
for even the coterie of politicians who
had played Powell itlver for more
than a month have departed, some
with regrets that go with defeat and
some with the smile nf victory on-
graved  all  ovcr  their  countenances.
.._.,   ....,* ....  ,„™   woj-  io tne  - ""i"' '"" iue a"acK on tne\ There Is onlv one point on which the
head of Toba Inlet where they will  J^^J'S^  but.thelr  barragc i
onr-tul   n   wool.
Ihe hunting season, which opened
a week ago, is being used to good advantage by local nimrods, many of
whom were fortunate in bagging a
large number of birds. Some goats
wore scon In tho mountains but the
shooting of any of these animals has
no: been reported yet. A party from
the state of Washington, beaded by
Mr. P. Carter, of Seattle, visited here
Thursday  last on  their way to the
was hardly likely that he could repeat and get a crowd. Result: the
Liberal meeting was crammed full
long before time was called for beginning hostilities. Many Conservatives had corao to the opposition meeting, and not all with the best intentions. Even the doughty General was
there. His light and left bowers were
there also.
General Macdonald and Frank Pratt
of Vancouver, led the attack on the '
spend a. week.
wus soon silenced. "Throw him out, .
I "sit down," "shut up," and a let more I
I unparliamentary terms were used in |
' the wordy war that took place. Evon [
i the chairman, Mr. George McFall, took
' a hand In the proceedings and told !
community Is unanimous and that Is
that one of the parties Is going to
have support enough to carry on and
give the Dominion what is coming to
it—a  government   that  can   function.
HUNTERS BLAMED FOR
MANY FIRES IN B. C.
Paris has been diverted by a series
of spectacular acrobatic stunts, which
in several cases led to the arrest of
the performers and  In ail Instances
provided entertainment for thousands
of people.   A man with plenty of confidence  in  his Ford  car drove down
the long, steep stairway of the Rue
d'Alsace before the police could Interfere.   A young Englishman  tried to
climb Hie Eiffel Tower on the outside,
and  probably  would  have succeeded
had he been allowed to continue.   A
motion  picture actor did a "human
Hy" act on the front of a seven-storey
building (Paris has no buildings taller
than Mint) In the Boulevard des Itall-
ons.   a  tight-rope  walker  In   Montmartre regaled a crowd by crossing
a stri-et live Btoreys up.
The latest adventurer to bo led
politely to the police statoin by a
small and geutlemanly agent tie police
was a young man named Louis Claus,
who found u practical use for the
lace-like stone projections with which
thirteenth century builders so effect-
ivoly garnished tlie towers of Notre
Dame. The large throng that quickly
gathered in tlie ;;uare before the
cathedral watched Claus slowly make
his way up one side, and down the
oliior side. He then walked along the
roof toward tlie rear of the edifice
nnd tried the thin spire that rises behind lhe two towers of thc facade.
Bui ho changed his mind about scaling that.
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BREAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
^5".
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
7oi*infant
feeding
 ilforxn. and
satisfactory
results
iivariablvjfollow
the use ofi
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk
•The anticipated outbreak of pore
I forest (ires with the opening of the
I shooting season occurred during the
: last week when lifty-scven new fires
j were reported from various districts
|of British Columbia.
j A large proportion of those out-
j breaks, it Is believed by forestry of-
I ficials, was due to the carelessness of
\ hunters who invade tlie woods In for<*e
i when the open season commenced.
| Forestry service heads yesterday
| Issued another appeal to hunters and
' others using the woods to exercise
; extreme caution.
I So far this year British Columbia
has experienced 2,050 forest fires as
against 2.323 last year and 2.025 in
the previous year. The lire season is
nearlng its end now, following wet,
| cool  weather In most  dlsrtlcts.
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND  SERVICE",
"THAT'S WHO I AM"
A low minutes after an alarm of
lire was given lu a hotel, one of the
guests joined the group that were
watching the fire -.ml chaffed them
mi their apparent excitement. "There
was nothing to be excited about," he
Bald. "I took my time about dressing, lighted a cigarette, didn't like the
knot In my necktie, so tied it over
again- that's how cool I was."
"Fine." said one of his friends, "but
why didn't you put on your trousers?"
" Mrs. A. Wheeler
Teacher of the Piano.
PHONE 15
i'nion Hotel Cumberland
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
The Discriminating
Housewife
' Demands Reliable Products
Goods that have merited the confidence of the
purchasing public—
COMOX POTATOES "look for thc tag on the bag.'
COMOX CREAMERY ECC.S.
COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM.
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER.
COMOX WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR.
Comox Creamery
Association
Pure beer is
a beverage
for every
season
lf7**HERE is no season for the enjoyment of
^/ the benefits of pure, hcultliful beer. Not
only in summer, but also in the cooler
months its tonic properties are of the greatest
value in the fortifying of the body ugainst the
strain and tension of modern life.
Used regularly with meals pure beer imparts
not only the nourishment of the grains
from which it is made; it assists valuably
in the assimilation of other foods, uml with
its vitamin content mukes up for the lack
of vitamins /rom whicli modern diet so
often suffers.
Pure beer, such ns is made for thc people of
British Columbia by the Amalgamated Brewories,
is of low alcoholic strength- -only i\%, as called
for by law—only enough to stimulate the bodily
functions nnd rest the nervous system,
Many qualified physicians prescribe pure
beer as a beverage for nursing mothers,
both for its tonic action and on account
of its richness in malt extractives that so
fit the physical needs of nursing mothers.
Every day in the year you uioy have beer, carefully brewed
by the Amalgamated Brewers, .on your table, as ii useful
and zestful part of your meals. Vou may buy it by tho
bottle or by the dozen bottles or by the case, at every
Government Store.
Delivery is free to any part
of the city
These fact* are placed before you by the Amalgamated
Breweries, In which are awoclatcdi Vancouver Breweries, Ltd., Rainier Brewing Co. of Canada, Ltd.,
Silver Spring Brewery, Ltd., WentmlnNti* Brewery,
Ltd.,  and   the  Victoria   Phoenli  Brewing Co.,  Ltd.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
SYNOPSIS OF
MlaMMENK
j I'KE-E.llT'riOJiS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
I Crown luuds may be pre-empted by
| British subjects ovcr 18 years ot age,
i and by aliens on declaring Intention
| to become British subjects, condl-
1 tional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
I land, i.e., currying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to he addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, In which the land applied for
Is situated, nnd ure made on printed
J forms, copies of which can be ob-
I tallied from the Lund Commissioner.
j Pre-emptions must be occupied for
i live years nnd improvements made
' to value of $10 per acre, Including
| clearing and cultivating at least tlve
I acres, before a Crown Grant can be
\ rocelved,
I Fur more detailed information see
| the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
' Land '*
PURCHASE
i Applications ure received for pur-
ohase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first ,-ia- . (arable) lund is $5
por urn-, nnd second-class (grating)
. land $*!.riii per acre. Further Information regarding purebaso or lease
uf Crown lauds In given in Bulletin
No. 10. Laud Series. "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands,"
| Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
' mny be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stum page,
HOMESTEAD LEASES
! Unsutyoyed areas, uot exceeding 20
acres, mny be leased as homesltes,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
i erected In the lirst year, title being
obtained    after    residence    and    Improvement conditions nre fulfilled and
iiinil bus  been surveyed.
LEASES
! Foi- grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
■ may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
I Under tlic Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and (lie range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
io established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits nre available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1916.
I
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store:
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
j   THE PUZZLE CORNER   |
I . *
Puzzle No. 195
Take a neck wear, subtract the letter E, add a digit, subtract part of a
fish, and the resulting letters will
spell TIGER.
MANN'S BAKERY
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
Delicious Appetizing Dainties.
tilso
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/-j-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressurei eauied
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Dimeter.
ipi
tei.ep1ionk be p. 0. drawer 430
1
a
All Your Printing f
FROM  THE TINIEST CARD TO
LARGEST POSTER CAN
BE
HANDLED HY THE JOB
PRINTING     DEPARTMENT     OF
DUNSMUIR AVE.
The Islander
Puzzle No. 196
The word "band" answers the first;
now see if you can guess the others.
Curtail an orchestra and leave a
prohibition.
Curtail a building and leave an obstruction.
Curtail a fissure and leave part of
one's face.
Curtail a vegetable and leave an
Insect.
Curtail a thick schrub and leave a
public vehicle.
Curtail a garment and leave a head
covering.
Puzzle No. 197
While discussing practical ways and
means with his good wife, Farmer
Jones said: "Now, Maria, lf we should
sell off 75 chickens as I propose, our
stock of feed would last Just 20 days
longer, while if we should buy 100
extra fowl, us you suggest, we would
run out of chicken feed IB days sooner." "Well, now, Josian, how many
chickens have we anyhow?"
That's tho problem, how many
chickens have they anyhow?
Puzzle No. 198
The blanks in each of the following
sentences are to be filled by placing
in the first space a word, which decapitated and placed in the second
space will make the sentence entire.
Into the dark   went the
 pirate when he was no longer
of service.
When you   this child he will
run and 	
It will upon his nerves when
he learns the   he must pay.
When the poetical miner found the
rich he sat down and composed
an .   to his golden discovery.
We may be sure that   will
offer to accept the sinecure which
  one could fill.
Though  to take the	
the court compelled it.
Puzzle No. 199
Take a baby animal, add an animal,
add the letter N, subtract a writing
Implement, and the resulting letters
will spell CUBA.
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
In this column next week.
Answers to Last Week's Puzzles
No. 190—Useless, Begone, Nowhere,
Pineapples, Father.
No. 191—WALL plus INK minus
LINK plus* BEE plus TRUSS plus
PEAR minus BEET minus SPEAR
equnls WALRUS.
No. 192—Flute, lute; ledge, edga;
bark, ark, or craft, raft; fox, ox.
No. 193—As it takes one hour longer
to saw the 8-foot logs, we will divide
the labor as follows: Mike saws for
1 minute; splits tor 150 minutes, and
wheels 59 loads In 118 minutes, and
fills 60 barrows tn 30 minutes, making
so far 314 minutes. Dennis saws for
299 minutes, and splits for 15, also
making a total of 314 minutes. There
is one loaded barrow full to be taken
to the house, and as no return of an
empty barrow is called for, Mike has
to pay Dennis $3.14 and wheels his
last load.
No. 194—As there would be just 59
spaces between 60 poles the distance
would be 324 and 24-59 feet.
Through The Telescope
Being a Commentary on Current Topics
THE ELECTION I Mrs.  MacNaughton  has  retired  from
There were all kinds of people who. the Presidency, and Mrs. Clinton has
on the morning after the election, been appointed in her place. The
were going about with a sort of "I newly elected President haa been one
told you so" look on their faces. I of the most active supporters of the
There were also a large number who i Association, and with Mr. Sutherland
had the appearance of 'coming to"! carrying on as Secretary for another
after the knock-out count, and who year there will bc no slackening in
frankly expressed themselves aston- the Interest and work. The P.-T.-A.,
ished at the results. Looking at the to use Its abbreviated name, should
returns through the telescope it is receive the support of, not only every
Interesting to note that the oxtreml- parent, but all those who are Interest-
ties of Canada, that is, Nova Scotia od In Child Welfare. As the name
New Brunswick, and British Colum-; Implies it has as its object the draw-
bla, all elected Conservatives majori-j ing together of parents and teachers
ties, and with Ontario sent back 84 of for the mutual benefit of the scholar,
that party to Ottawa. Quebec, with Subjects are arranged for discussion,
Its solid Liberal front again, proved whicli give food for thought an all
the trump card In Premier King's [ sides. The parents acquire a greater
hand and more than outweighed thc I sympathy for the teacher ln his work,
Conservative majjorlty In Ontario. | and the teachers, by getting to know
The Liberal gains In the latter Pro-; the parents, arc better able to under-
vlnce proved more than Iiad been an- j stand tlie children. Meetings are held
ticipated and went a long way to giv- once a month, nnd those who attend
Ing the pnrty a working mojority. The j will mil find their evenings wasted,
thing to puzzle out Is why did Britisli j •   «   •
EARLY DECISION ON
OPERATION EXPECTED
Columbia, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Ontario elect Conservatives
and the rest ot the provinces elect
Liberals?     Is  it true  also  that  the
Till)  PHr'SN AM) KKI.X'ION
"THE MAN NOBODY KNOWS,"
"Bruce Barton's 'Discovery of Jesus'
is challenge to man  who  walks  hy
Hommlngsen   Properly   on   Malahat,
Wilh Valuable Marble Deposit,
May Be Developed Soon
aHI3iai^3JSM3J3l5l3JBI3JSJBIBIBi3f3l3l!il
■G-Uiijberland
li Mi-Si    Heilom-sli
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MEltKIFIELD, Prop.
] Comtnercia
jUient-quurtcrs
It Is understood that a decision will
bc reached shortly with regard to
operating the Hemmingsen timber
limits ou the Malahat, as Mr. Hemmingsen will shortly conclude, his
contract at Cowichan Lake.
Considerable Interest has been attached to the development of this
property, owing to the discovery ot
a good deposit of high grade marble
there, promising to be greatly in demand in the building and monumental mason's, trades. The proprietors have a branch line constructed from Malahat Station on the
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway, and
one of the proposed routes for the
logging line to serve the limits passes
near where the marble quarry will
be located, If the proposed testing
with diamond drills proves the deposit to be a commercial venture. So
for every test applied has been met
satisfactorily.
ST.\R LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
Liberal gains In Ontario took place I church Door." Rentiers of the Van-
In that part of the province which j couver Province of Sept. 17th will
borders on Quebec? Whatever the have seen these headlines in thick,
conjectures arrived at, the fact re- j black type on the second page of the .
mains that the Liberals are returned j iSBU8l followed by the announcement'
with a majority which will enable that, commencing that day on the
them to carry on as a stable govern- j editorial page there would be pub-
ment. The future will be regarded i ns|1(,|| nruee Barton's new book about
with Interest not only by Canadians i jesus. One of the most remarkable
but by others as well. Locally tho l evidences of the revival of interest in
result was not unexpected, and Jlr. I religion is to see tlie space devoted In
MacDonald can look back on his cam-' t|10 secular papers to this subject.
palgn as well worth the effort. It was Magazines and dally papers no longer
a clean fight from start to finish, and turn away In scorn from discussing
It Is in Mr. Nelll's favor that In nil religion. From the numbers of ar-
his campaigns he has conducted him- j tides that appear it would seem that
self as a fair and clean fighter. Even j religion is something that the people
those who did not vote for him iu this I nrc beginning to demand. Thai the
election will, with his many friends, I province should think Bruce Barton's
wish him Godspeed in this his third |)0ok is worthy of publishing in serial
term as member of the Comox-Alberni tnrm on lis editorial page is evidence
District. enough of this demand.   Over a mll-
*   '   * I Hon  copies  of this  book  have  been
THE PARKNT-TKAt IIK.lt 'sold,   which  again   Is  evidence  ot  a
ASSOCIATION I healthy   desire   to   rend   something
An active, energetic Chairman is the worth while. People are getting tired
backbone of any organization, espec- of shams anil camouflage. The insi'.i-
inlly It his (or as In this case, her) Id trash which one finds on a number
efforts are hacked up by a live wire of bookstalls Is putting up a losing
secretary. The Parent Teachers As- fight, and even tbe publishers of these
soclation has been fortunate in having worthless magazines find that in the
both, and with Mrs. MacNaughton as long run, lf it pays to publish at all,
President and Mr. Sutherland as Sec- It pays tn publish something that le-
retary great progress was made dur-1 freshes and stimulates the mind,
ing the past year. The members of rather than demoralizing it. The
the various committees also nil con- Province will add still further to Its
trlbutcd their share In the varied reputation as a clean, wholesome
programme and Improvements that paper in publishing this story of Jesus
resulted from the Association's actlvl-' as seen through the eyes of a business
ties.   After two years of keen service  man.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone ISO
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
1 aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
Because  a  Ford
Car will save you
money
Any other Car will cost you
40f/o more
ROADSTER - $5B2
SATURDAY SPECIALS
IES ASSORTED
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
SPORT ROADSTER  $690
TOURING  $612
SPORT TOURING  $721
COUPE  $761
TUDOR SEDAN $777
DELIVERED TO YOU—From
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phones 46 and 182 Courtenay, B. C. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
Iff
—cfc
Before you make up your mind to
go to any other form of entertainment
look over the attractions that are
coming to the Ilo-llo and Gaiety
Theatres. It Is the earnest desire of
the management of these two theatres
to give to their patrons tlie "best" in
moving pictures, anil with that end in
view have booked some of the screen's
masterpieces for the coming winter.
Movies
,3»i5»>--*HKSH»WH»MEra5=W
Attractions for the
Coming Week
Attention!
The following times will prevail,
(any change will be duly announced):
Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland, two
shows nightly at 7 and 8:45, with
Saturday matinee at 2:30. Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay, nightly at 8:15;
Saturday at 7 and 9 p.m., with Saturday matinee at 2:30.
Get the habit. Visit the llo-Ilo and
Ca'iety Theatres.
m^&w^w^^wmm^Mm
SM=fl3WW«=Wr*>[WS!=Wtt>**3«=M^
m^-*v***mwwm
Gaiety Theatre
SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
WILLIAM FOX
presents
"THE DANGER GIRL"
MYSTERY PICTURE
Prlscilla Dean, the Star, Ideally Cast
In Production
FLOOD
COMEDY AND NEWS
MONDAY, SEPT. 27TH.
RICHARD DIX
in
WOMAN HANDLED
and Comedy
TUESDAY, SEPT. 28TH.
Priscilla Dean in
The Danger Girl
COMEDY AND SERIAL
The screen's most mysterious pro-
I duotlon ls "The Danger Girl," star-
! ring Priscilla Dean which will be seen
at the Ilo-llo Theatre next Monday
j and at tlie Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay,
! next Tuesday.
I In "The Danger Girl," mystery runs
rampant—the result being that the
spectator Is left in absolute Ignorance
of the secret of the story until the
end of the picture. Tlie story concerns the theft of a collection of very
valuable rubies, worth a million dollars. There are detectives, patrolmen
and "plain clothes" operators. You
wonder at one scene, you marvel at
another, and you roar with laughter
at others while you always question
certain players and their moves.
Tlie plot and its unfolding has been
I worked out finely, swiftly and with
. much humor. Prlscilla Dean is sun-
j ported by John Bowers, Arthur Hoyt,
! Cissy Fitzgerald, Clarence Burton,
j Stanton Heck, William Humphrey,
: Erwln Connelly and Gustave Von
Seylfertltz. Edward Dillon directed
■ the production from a scenario by.
Finis Fox.
Roundup Long-horns With
Flivvers in "Womanhandled"
OLD OUTLAW HAUNTS
REVEALED IN FILM EPIC
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, SEPT. 29 & 30
Kentucky Pride
A Great Racing Story with an All Star Cast
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCT. 1 & 2
If
"Oh!
What a Nurse/
Directed by Charles C/tuckfteisner
Rounding up Ave thousand head of
j long-horn cattle with automobiles was
1 the unusual feat  performed  by the
Richard Dix company, while on loca-
; tion   near   Houston,   Texas,   filming
western scenes for "Womanhandled,"
[ Dlx's newest starring vehicle which
,' Is due nt tlie Gaiety Theatre, Courte-
1 nay, next .Monday and at the Ilo-llo
Theatre, Cumberland, next Tuesday.
Using twenty flivvers stripped to the
chassis, Dix, with the aid of a squad
of cliuulTcurs, completely rounded up
the cattle In almost half the time required  by a  similar sized troop of
cowboys.
i So successful did tho venture prove
tliat*" the owner uf the cattle Immediately placed an order for five automobiles to bc used for handling the
long-horns.
! Leading players In the cast of this
big picture Include Esther Ralston,
.Margaret .Morris and Edmund Reese.
THRILLS OF RACECOURSE
IN "KENTUCKY PRIDE'
A unique story, entertainingly told
l.y a thoroughbred, two thrilling horse
races, a superb cast—both equine and
human—unite to give powerful appeal to the William Fox romnnce of
the   turf,   "Kentucky   Pride."    This
novel attraction which gives Intimate
glimpses of such world-famous race
horses as .Man o'   War.   Fair  Play,
Negofol, Morvloh and others will he
| presented at the Gaiety Theatre next
Wednesday and Thursday, September
j 29 and 30, with J. Farrel MacDonald,
: Henry  W.  Walthall,  Gertrude  Astor
j and other well-known nrtlstes In the
principal roles.
As  told  by herself,   the  appealing
story of "Kentucky Pride" concerns
the thrilling, adventurous, tragic and
triumphant   career   of   a   thorough
I bred   filly.   She   reveals   with   heart-
| touching pathos the sorrows of her
I defeat when, with  the responsibility
of   her   master's   daughter's   future
vested In her. she falls and breaks o
(leg In a sensational and thrilling Hn-
, Isli lo a whirlwind race.   How years
later her own  daughter  effaces her
j disgrace anil restores shattered fortunes Is depicted in a tremendous and
| thrilling climax—another  breath-tak-
! Ing and nerve-tingling horse race.
Jackson Hole, located between the
towering range of Teton mountains
and the Grand Shoshones, mysterious
and secluded rendezvous for many of
the old-time bandits, served as the
background for many of the gigantic
scenes In "3 Bad Men," Fox Films
epic of the opening of the vast Indian
lands for settlement.
"Robbers' Roost," "Dead Man's
Bar," "Death Canyon," "Snake River"
and "Suicide Lake," all celebrated
locations because of their black deeds
are used as scenic backgrounds for
the reproduction of many scenes in j
the picture.
Director John Ford and a large cast
of principal players, including George
O'Brien, Olive Borden, Tom Santschi,
J. Farrel MacDonald and other well
known stars, as well as thousands of
supernumeraries were camped in
Jackson Hole for months making the
picture, which appears at the Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, October 21-22 and 23.
ONE OF THE FUNNIEST
"Oh! What a Nurse!," the new Syd
Chaplin picture which comes to the
Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, on Friday
and Saturday, Oct. 1 and 2, is said to
be one of the funniest pictures ever
screened. Critics In other cities have
used up all the adjectives they-ve got
In trying to say that this picture will
get every laugh you've got. They all
agree It Is funnier than "Charley's
Aunt" or "The Man on the Box," the
pictures that lifted Syd Chaplin to tlie
top as a screen comedian.
The new picture was written by
Robert E. Sherwood, editor of "Life"
and Bertram Bloch. It concerns the
mad adventures of a newspaper reporter, who, forced Into the garments i
of a bootleg queen, runs into an
astounding aeries of misadventures
aboard a lugger. j
In "Oh!  What a Nurse!" Chaplin
outshines his recent success in "The
Man on the Box" and securely sub-1
stantiates himself as the greatest fe-1
male   impersonator   that   stage    or •
screen has ever known.
Beginning as a young news reporter on a San Francisco dally, Jerry
(Syd Chaplin) ls assigned to fill the j
place of Dolly Whimple of the "Ad- I
vice to the Lovelorn" column, during i
her vacation.     This   assignment   in-
volves  him   In  a  wealth  of  highly
humorous  and  unusually unenviable
situations, drags him through the back
door  into politics  and  high  bootleg
finance, and reveals him in feminine
disguise to the girl, played hy Patsy
Ruth Miller, whom fate has exposed
to his interest.
NOTE—This picture will be shown |
In Courtenay only.
"JOHNSTOWN FLOOD"
SHOWING AT GAIETY
The costliest thrill picture ever produced Is offered to the public in the
Mix Film, "The Johnstown Flood,"
a dramatic record of the historic disaster of 1899 that destroyed ten millions worth of property and cost
twelve thousand human lives In and
near the city of Johnstown, Pennsyl-1
vanla. The picture Is at the Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay, Friday and Saturday of this week. Its cast, under
the direction of Irving Cummings, Includes George O'Brien, Florence Gilbert, Paul Nicholson, Anders Randolf,
Waiter Perry, Janet Gaynor and severs! more favorites.
Warning!
< i dlslrlet!
II Dad Men coming to the
"Too Much Money," with Anna Q.
Nilsson and Lewis Stone in the featured roleB, and Art Acord In "Sky
High Corral," will form a double
attraction at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Wednesday and Thursday, September
29th and 30th.
Ilo-llo   Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Bill Hart in Tumbleweeds
alto
§£■■„ WILLIAM FOXpmenu
'^A\v     A DRAMATIC
.^ \.%       FANTASY
brmm      BASEDOW
^ mm
alPH* C rtlNM
MONDAY, SEPT. 27TH.
PRISCILLA DEAN
*teA,tasMftfGilf
'*9i'*V -V"       ,f   ■-**■<
1
waan StfiUBtniNC
mooumoN
J0NN BOWBtS
mmm «•»■» m
•—Tut MlDT
muTm
mmt%
TUESDAY, SEIT. 28TH.
Rd. Dix in Woman Handled
and Comedy
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, SEPT. 29 & 30
ANNA Q. NILSSON in
TOO MUCH MONEY
And a Western—"SKY HIGH CORRAL"
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCT. 1 & 2
fJack Pickford in Hill Billy <<,»jmvwt*j**>t*m'
PAGE SIX
THK CUMBERLAND ISLANDiR, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1926.
New Fall Coats
We have received by Express a shipment of New Fall
Coats comprising some of the latest styles.
Heavy Blanket Cloth Coats with fur collar, and lined
throughout, a really good warm coat  $22.50
Velour Fall Coats in new shades, fine quality velour,
good fur trimming, assorted sizes.   $25.00 to $27.50
Needlepoint Coats in Brown and Black, very smart and
good style.   Call and see these.
SPECIAL SNAP IN GIRLS' WATERPROOF CAPES
About 15 Girls' Waterproof Capes in assorted colorings
to fit girls from 5 to 8 years.   Clearing price....$1.95
NEW VELVET HATS
A very large showing of the new styles in Ladies Fall
Hats
Men's New Fall Coats
We are specialising in a line of smart up-to-the-minute
Coats  for  Men,  in  various  styles, made of reliable
Tweed.   Every Coat will give you the utmost for your
money.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
NOTICE
HORTICULTURE  & AGRICULTURE
A public meeting will be held at
Crowton Farm, Minto, Saturday 25th,
at one o'clock In the afternoon, when
Prof. White, of Victoria, and Pro.
Boving, University of B. C, will give
demonstrations on Fruit Tree planting
and best varieties suitable for this
district; also raising fresh vegetables.
SITUATIONS VACAMT
ALL OVER CANADA WE WANT
responsible District Managers and
Salesmen. Make detailed application; give references; and state
salary expected. Sorema Limited,
Winnipeg, Man. 39-41
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of our dear sister
and   neices,   Mrs.  John   Hunter  and
children, who lost their lives at South
Wellington, September 20th, 1925.
"Sleep on, Dear Ones, and take thy
rest,
For God hath called when He thought
best.
Our Iosb Is great; but thine Is gain,
In  Heaven  we hope  to meet again.
A Bllent thought, a secret tear,
Will keep your memory forever dear."
Inserted by her loving sisters.
LOST —Post Offlce Key on silver
chain. Finder please return to Mrs.
W. Beveridge Sr. or to Islander, lt.
HOUSE FOR SALE-Containlng Six
Rooms, out-bulldings tnd Oarage,
near Band Hall, West Cumberland.
Also Gerard Helntzman Piano for
sale.   Cheap for cash.   Apply J. E.
Boffey, Cumberland.
lt
FOR SALE—Five Passenger Chevrolet
I Automobile; a Snap for cash, $200.
[ Also Household Furniture. Apply
to John McWhlrter, Camp. 38-9
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food
good service,  reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
FOR SALE—AUTUMN FLOWERS, Including Chrysanthemums, Alton.
Carnations, Roses, etc. Apply Mrs.
R. R. McQulllam, Union Ba; Road,
Courtenay.   Phone 20.
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and nud cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.    t.f.n.
CHEVROLET TOURING    $175
FORD TOURING  - ... $250
MAXWELL TOURING  ?475
STAR TOURING .  ?450
CHEVROLET TOURING   $425
FORD TOURING * $100
Pay as you go on our
EASY PAYMENT PLAN
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
Courtenay,
Phone 61
Personal Mention
Mr. Henry Watson, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Watson, of West Cumberland, haa returned to his studies
at the University of B. C.
• •   •
Look outl S Bad Men are headed
this way.
• •  •
Mr. and Mrs. D. R. MacDonald are
spending a short holiday in Victoria.
...
Look out! 8 Bad Hen are headed
this way.
• •  «
Mrs. F. G. Freeman, accompanied by
her sons, Donald and Teddy, arrived
from Vancouver Saturday last and
will spend an extended vacation in
Cumberland, the guest of her mother,
Mrs. Marlon Stewart.
Herea^ndTK
ere
More than 500,000 people will have
visited Ste. Anne de Beaupre this
year when the season ends. It is
already an increase over last year
when 304,322 persons visited this
famous shrine. During the week
ending August 22nd, 43,900 pilgrims
visited Ste. Annes.
Halifax,—Considerable quantities
of swordfish are being shipped from
Nova Scotia to the Boston market
at the present time. This commodity
has found a good market in Boston
and shipments to that city average
around ten to fifteen thousand
pounds a day during the shipping
season.
September is becoming a popular
month for marriages judging by tha
number of honeymoon couples leaving from Windsor Street Station,
Montreal, recently. On Labor Day
no less than 50 couples boarded tho
Canadian Pacific trains at this depot. The record established for on*
day, however, was some years ago
in June when 70 couples left Windsor Station one morning.
The new North Channel below
Quebec will be opened to navigation
on June 1 next and continue during
the high water season, according to
a recent announcement of the Marine Department. The new channel
extends in a straight line from St.
Jean, Isle of Orleans, to near the
north shore. The work has been
underway for the past ten years.
The minimum depth of water at
high tide will be 35 feet When all
the work is done there will be the
same minimum at low tide.
Mrs. Gordon Cavin is spending a
short holiday In Vancouver.
•   •   •
Miss M. Michell, who has been holidaying in England for the past three
months, returned to Cumberland during the week.
AUTUMN FLOWERS
MAY BE PROCURED NOW
Mrs. R. R. McQulllam, of the Union
Bay Road, Courtenay, ha smade a
specialty of Autumn Flowers and has
for sale Chrysanthemums, Asters,
Roses, Carnations, etc. Intending
purchasers will do well to get In
touch immediately with Mrs. McQulllam by phoning 20 Courtenay.
There was deep romance fifty years
ago ln the Kentucky mountains Just
the same as there Is a jazz-age love
on the boulevards of the great cities
today. Jack Pickford will prove lt to
you In his new picture success, "The
Hill Billy," coming to the Ilo-llo
Theatre next Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 1st and 2nd.
Warning!
district!
8 Bad Men coming to the
Keep your skin smooth and white with
LANG'S CREAM
OF LILIES
An excellent aid for chapped hands and sunburn.
per bottle     CA«     P*-* bottle
at the place of manufacture.
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Mrs. G. W. Clinton
Elected Head Of
P.-T. Association
The resumption of school classes
finds the Parent Teacher Association
preparing once again for the new
term's activities, and lf the attendance
at the annual meeting laat Monday is
any criterion then the Association ls
starting another successful season
such as lt enjoyed last year.
At the opening of the meeting, Mr.
John Sutherland and Mr. R. J. Selte
were requested to act respectively as
chairman and secretary pro tern, after
which the election of oflicers was proceeded with. The following names
were the choice of the meeting for the
ensuing session:—
Hon. Presidents, Messrs. Shenstone
and Apps; President, Mrs. Clinton,
1st vice president, Rev. Hewitt, 2nd,
vice president, Miss Gallivan; secretary, J. Sutherland; treasurer, Mr. O.
Apps. Convenors of committees are
Mrs. D. McLean, membership; Mrs. J.
Lockner, social; Mr. Hardy, llbraryl
Dr. Htcka, programme; Mr. Murray,
grounds; Mr. Selfe, press correspondent.
Reports of Committees
Miss Hood, on behalf of Mrs. Apps,
read the report of the Social Committee, showing the number ot utensils In use at present, as well as giving Information re the necessary additions required to make the working
of this committee as easy as possible.
Dr. MacNaugton, on behalf of tbe
Programme and Educational Committee, read his report, which gave a
synopsis of the topics for the various
meetings, showing how they had endeavored to give the meetings a selection of subjects that were of practical
Interest to both parents and teachers.
A full report of the condition of tha
grounds as well as the Schools was
given by Mr. J. Brown, and Miss P.
Partridge, on behalf of the Library
Committee, reported the work done
during the past year.
The treasurer's report showed total
receipts $108.57 and total disbursements $74.22, leaving a balance of
$34.35. Bills payable will amount to
$8.26, so that the actual cash on hand
will be $36.10.
Best   Prices
ever of f ered in
the  Comox
District
From Sept. 25th at 9 a.m. to Oct. 2nd at 10 p.m.
CHEVROLET TOURING, 1920 Model, runs and performs d» 4 O EA
Al, Used Car Sale price  qrtO.aUV
OVERLAND 4 TOURING, all overhauled, good tires, *ȣ79 ^il
battery, etc., Used Car Sale price  «P ' "w"
OVERLAND 90 TOURING, new tire, battery, top etc. {Pi A A AA
good, mechanically perfect   Used Car Sale price  «p±**±VeVU
CHEVROLET DELIVERY, 1923 model, closed body, tjrt A A A A
good tires, mechanically good.   Used Car Sale price  «PJ.a/e7el/v
DODGE TOURING, all good tires, runs perfectly, d»1 AO AA
Used Car Sale price  iffX*70a*J*J
CHEVROLET TOURING, 1921 model, just like new (POI O CA
throughout.   Used Car Sale price   tPAilOeUvF
FORD LIGHT DELIVERY, starter, new heavy-duty (COOQ ftft
Cord Tires, completely overhauled.   Sale price   iyaa\aa)Oa\M*J
FORD TOURING, new Top and Back, Tires good, shock CJOOO AA
absorbers, good paint, mechanically perfect.   Sale price *p£iOO»*J*J
FORD SEDAN, 1923 Model, Low Pressure Cord Tires, Paint and Upholstery perfect, running gear 100 per cent, Atwater Kent (|»0JQ KA
ignition, Battery good.   Used Car Sale price   •JJ»J4tOet»Vr
CHEVROLET TOURING, 1924 model, new Top and Back, Tires good, and
motor completely overhauled, paint as good as new,        XfcQQG ftft
Used Car Sale price  - tJtOUOaXfV
DODGE TOURING, 1922 model, 5 new 32 x 4.Cords,      &A Ot AA v
Battery overhauled, Top, Curtains, Motor, etc. perfect.. ♦JJ'iUU.W
OVERLAND 4 TOURING, 1924 model, full balloon tires, fl» 4 JC AA
paint, top, curtains, upholstery, motor, etc. Al   iPfxtle W
TERMS     ARRANGED
PIDCOCK and McKENZIE
Phone 25
HUDSON-ESSEX
COURTENAY
DODGE
Phone 25
STAR

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0224648/manifest

Comment

Related Items