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The Cumberland Islander Sep 17, 1926

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Array v'°"
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
a** With ulileli la riinnnllilntl.il  the riimlierl.-iml News.
^
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 38.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA    FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.*    <5^^Sg^r> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLL   ARS PER ANNUM
NEILL AGAIN  CHOSEN   FOR  COMOX-ALBERNI
■jWS***"**HHM*E3jSHHMMS=3HMW
Interesting Gathering Of
Parents, Teachers, Scholars
BILLIARD EXPERTS TO
PLAY EXHIBITION GAME
AT ATHLETIC CLUB
The evening of Friday, September
10th, was tlle occasion of a very interesting gathering In tho Anglican Hall
when the pupils gradual ing trom the
Entrance and Matriculation classes in
the Cumberland Schools received their
certificates. The meeting was held
under the auspices of the Cumberland
Parent Teachers Association and was
so well attended by pupils, teachers
and parents that the hall was (Hied to
Its capacity.
•Tlle proceedings began with the
singing of "0 Canada" In which all
joined heartily and the meeting was
then called to order by tlle Chairman,
Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton. Perhaps
the principal event of the evening was
the presentation of the Canadian Collieries Gold Medal by Mr. Thomas
Graham to Miss Margaret Robinson,
who won the highest total of marks
In the matriculation class. In a brief
address, Mr. Graham wished the recipient of the medal every success ln her
WILL TAKE STEPS TO
CONSERVE COURTENAY'S
DOMESTIC WATER SUPPLY
COURTENAY. Sept. 10— At this
week's meeting of the city council,
which was delayed on account of the
holiday, the business was transacted
witli dispatch. Messrs. Orr and Bennett were awarded tlle contract for
tlle installation of the new fifteen ton
Gurney weigh scales at a total cost
of $1,800. The contractor's tender
was $550. Another tender by George
Brethour exceeded this sum  hy $50.
The matter of non-payment of certain trade licences was left in the
hands of Mayor McKenzie who will
take it up with the Provincial Police
for the purpose of collecting the arrears.
Chairman of the Works Committee,
Alderman Douglas, ln a rcpoit stated
tliat a certain amount of grading was
being done on Victoria Street and that
other streets were being cleared up.
The city fathers intend to take in
hand the conservation of the city's
water supply and will erect a dam
at Goose Lake. Before tlie work Is
actually started, however. Brown's
River wlll be followed from its source
in the mountains down to the point
where the city intake pipe main is installed in tlie river in order to make
absolutely sure of the river's source.
Amongst the correspondence was a
letter from H. L. Taylor. Provincial
Inspector, advising the Council that
he had inspected the overhead pole
lines of the city which had been found
In good condition. The letter, which
asked for technical Information, was
referred to the Light Committee.
There was also a letter from Mr. P.
P. Harrison In connection with nn
agreement between the Comox Water
Company. Following a former request of Mr. T. Booth for the construction of a cement sidewalk at the
corner of Union and Isabel Streets.
It was decided that tlle work to the
extent of some llfty feet should bc
taken III hand. It Is understood thnt
the property owner at this point will
contribute to lhe cost of the sidewalk.
MISS BESSIE JOLLY
BECOMES BRIDE OF MR.
NORMAN PRITCHARD
COURTENAY, Sept. 13.-OU Friday
evening at the manse, Mr. Norman
Pritchard and Bessie M.i eldest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Jolly
of the Lake Trail, Courtenay. were
united In matrimony. The ceremony
wns performed by the Rev. Mr. Alexander, pastor of St. George's United
Church. Miss Isohel Henderson was
bridesmaid and Mr. Charles Rive
supported the groom. A small group
of friends were present to wish thc
happy couple Godspeed. The bride
was dressed In blue silk nnd carried
a bouquet of pink roses trimmed with
maiden-hair ferns. While their future home ls being built. Mr. nnd Mrs.
Pritchard ranch. Comox. The bridal
Norman Pritchard will reside nt the
march was played by Mr. Stewart
Smith. After the ceremony the bridal
car made its way through Courtenay
to Comox.
journey down the river of higher education and out over the sea of life.
The certificates to the pupils successful In the matriculation examination were presented by Mr. John C.
Brown, chairman of thc School Board,
who bade them good-bye from the
Cumberland School. The valedictory
address of the class was given by
Margaret Robinson, and, if composed
by the pupils themselves, bears witness of the high standard of English
grammar and composition prevailing
in the High School.
In an address to the meeting, Mr.
G. Apps, principal of the Public
School, stressed the fact that such
measure of success as had been
attained by the School was duo to cooperation on the part of four classes
of Individuals, i.e., the pupils, the
teachers, the parents and the Board
of School Trustees. He spoke warmly of the support given the teaching
staff by the School Board as evinced
by their interest In the school library,
instalment of new playground equipment and Improvements made In the
school grounds.
The presentation of tlie certificates
to the pupils passing the Entrance
examination was made by the secretary of the School Board. Mr. Alex.
MacKinnon. Mr. MacKinnon stated
that he was confining his address to
the Public School because tie had been
threatened with physical violence ii
he said anything about the High
School, which was to be dealt with
in the address of Mr. J. C. Brown. I!
Is far easier to fill the offlce of School
Trustee uow than it once was, said
the speaker. Money is more plentiful and it is now possible to provide
things for the School that the Scliool
at one time had to do without.
The new Parent Teachers Gold
Medal awarded to the pupil winning
the highest score of marks in the
Entrance examination went to Stephen
Jackson. It Is. necessary to make a
percentage of 70 of the total marks
in order to be in the running for this
medal. The medal was presented by
Mr. John Sutherland, who paid tribute
to Stephen's accomplishment.
The valedictory address of the
Entrance class entering High Scliool
was read by Norman Frelone.
The awards to thc drill team, who
triumphed' In the Interscholastic sport
day at Qualicum 'lust summer were
made by Mr. Jackson. Miss Vivian
Aspesi. who trained the team, took
charge of the sliver cup awarded for
the event.
A haudsome plant had been purchased by the Parent-Teachers
Association to be given to the class
which had the largest representation
by parents at the monthly meetings
of the Parent-Teachers Association,
This was won by Mr. Murray's clnss
and was presented by Mrs. T. Banks
to Barbara Grant as class representative
Mr. Shenstone, In a short address.
showed the disadvantage under which
the Cumberland High School labored
when competing with other schools
for the Government scholarships and
medals. The present system of division into districts militated against the
smaller schools. A system in which
the schools would be divided into size
classes would, 111 his opinion, he mote
fair. The same advantage to tlle bigger schools was also apparent in tlie
annual Inter-school sports bin In this
case there ls, al present, no solution
advanced to tlle problem.
At the conclusion of the business of
the evening It was announced by Mr.
If. E. Murray that a local business
man had volunteered to give two cups
to the School for athletic proficiency,
tb be competed for on a score basis
over a period of time every summer,
the purpose being to encourage a continued interest and activity in sports
In the school instead of a spasmodic
one as obtains today .when just before
Sports Day the athletic talent of tiie
School awakens from Its winter hibernation to n strenuous but short
existence. This appears to be an excellent Idea nnd has an attraction
coming as It does through Mr. Murray
who sowed thc seed from which grew
tlie annual Inter-school sports and
also the hockey movement which
made such good progress last year,
thanks to the excellent coaching of
Miss Sehl.
British Columbia's two foremost
billiard experts, Jack MacMillan and
Sid Boys, will play an exhibition game
of (J00 points at the Athletic Club on
Sunday evening, September 19th, commencing ut 7:30. An exhibition of
trick shots will also bc given by these
two experts.
It has been definitely announced by
the Board of Management that owing
to the limited accommodation at the
Club, admission will be granted to
members only.
BADMINTON TO
COMMENCE EARLY
IN OCTOBER
Badminton enthusiasts are meeting
tills Friday evening in the Imperial
Pavilion. Royston, at 8 o'clock sharp
for the purpose of organizing for the
coming season, which commences the
Hrst of October, A special appeal is
being made to the younger element
of the district to join up with the big
club, which it is expected will be
formed at Royston, and a cordial invitation is extended to all Interested
In the popular Winter indoor game
to be present at the organization
meeting at Royston  this evening.
Conservative Candidate
Defeated By 1,295 Votes
•sawwai3tasJ6asatiea!atasssssseseseswr<M
Standing Of Parties—All
Seats Accounted For
TOPvONTO,  Sept.   16.—Last  night -the  Canadian
Press reported  the parties by provinces as follows,
with all seats accounted for:
Province L. C.       P.
Prince Edward Island     3 10
Nova Scotia       2 12     0
New Brunswick       4 7     0
Quebec     60 4     0
Ontario       25 53     2
Manitoba      4 0     4
Saskatchewan     17 0     2
Alberta         3 10
British Columbia       1 12     0
Yukon         0 10
P.L. U.F.A. Lab.
0       0       0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
0
0
Total
  119   91     8   11    11     3     2
Total   245
With The Mayor And Aldermen
One absentee was noted around the
Council board at the regular meeting
last Monday evening, Aid. Ledlngham
being unable to attend. A communication from the Cumberland Literary
and Athletic Association asked for a
monetary donation to assist in securing trophies for the members of the
Canadian Collieries Football team,
bul although the Council members
were in sympathy with the movement
(hey felt in duty bound to refuse the
request us it Is only recently that an
organization working for a more
worthy cause had also to be refused
assistance. In any case, the Municipal Aci does not allow for bequests
of this nature.
City Clerk W. H. Cope applied for
and was granted leave of absence for
one day. Saturday September 25th,
and in consequence the City Hall will
be closed on that date.
Alderman Potter noted the various
Improvements Ills department had
heen making to the Streets and roads
of the city. Fourth Street from the
Islander coiner to Allan Avenue, and
Allan Avenue itself, are being covered
with u thick coating of ashes and
some much-needed repair work has
also been done on Windermere Ave.,
near Second  Street.
Aid. Parnham outlined lbc activities
of die Fire iicpartmenl. stating that
the chemical truck had been called to
two llrec In the past week, both on
the Koyston itoiiil. about two miles
from Cumborland. Tlu- truck was
called too late in he of nay assistance
at   tin*  lirst.  Iml   valuable  work  bad
been, done in raving out-buildings in
the vicinity of the second blaze.
Bills and accounts for the past two
weeks totalled $499.70.
-==
The   meeting   concluded   with   tlle I
serving of refreshments.
It was a good meeting and well {
attended. As Mr. Sutherland Observed
In his speech the attendance at these
meotlngs Is greater every year and
next year it will take larger quarters I
to house the meeting as every available scut was full. Between the presentations, musical numbers were
rendered by pupils of tlle Scliool nnd
Mr. Jackson, making a pleasant
break In the proceedings.
The   Cumberland    Parent-Teachers
Association is now a body over one
hundred strong.   Its rapid growth In '
(he past two years Is due more than
anything else to the energy and en-1
thuslosm of Its president, Mrs. G. K.
MacNaughton.   Under her presidency
a  hearty  co-operation  lias  evidenced
Itself between  teachers, parentB and'
trustees.
CAREY TRIUMPHS IN
VIVID, COLORFUL FILM
Harry Carey, coming to the llo-Ilo
Theatre next Monday In "The Prairie |
Pirate," has one of tlie best roles thai
Hunt Stromberg has ever assigned
him. From a peaceful young rancher
he is transformed overnight into the
mysterious, terrifying scourge of the
border, seeking and searching for the
murderer of his sister. As "The Yel-1
low Seal" he becomes a romantio figure, Intent on finding tlie guilty man,
taking up the task that the law had
failed to acomplish. Bis life takes a
different turn when be meets Teresa
Esteban, daughter of the owner of the
biggest ranclio of the country, played
by Trilby Clark. The task of saving
her and her father from the very man
who killed his sister makes a thrilling
and vivid story fascinating and interest-holding to the very finish.
Spanish and Mexican fiestas add
slill more color and life lo the picture, tlie scenes of which are said to
lie the most picturesque ever photographed for a western picture. Costumes   were   given   special   attention.
Hundreds uf genuine mantillas anil
Spanish shawls were collected hy Mr.
Stromberg'a technical staff for the use
ol' tho actors. So many native Mexicans and Spaniards were used In the
huge gambling ball scene that live
Interpreters were needed to explain
to each corner of the crowd the orders of the director, Edmund Mortimer, who does not speak Spanish.
Stromberg has assembled a great
east to support Carey the star, und
.Miss Clark the leading lady, headed by
Robert Edenson of the Cecil D. DeMille stock company, who plays tin-
part of Don Estcban, master of the
llancho. Lloyd Whltlook plays tho
part of the owner of the gambling
bull who accumulates notes from Don
Estehan, gradually gaining i'or himself (he ownership of the Rancho and
leaving (he Don and Teresa, but for
(he fast work of the Yellow Seal,
homeless and penniless. Fred Kohler,
who will he remembered for his work
in "The Iron Horse'' portrays the
bandit and Jean Dumas, formerly an
Edison and Triangle star, returns to
pictures In "The Prairie Pirate" In
the part of thc sister.
For the third successive time Alan
Webster Neill, of Port Alberni, will
represent the constituency of Comox-
Allierul in the House of Commons at
Ottawa. Mr. Neill was returned lasl
Tuesday with a majority of 1295, Just
slightly more than half, of what he
received in last years election against
T. D .Coldicutt. Mr. MacDonald, the
Conservative candidate opposing Mr.
.N'elll this year, put up a hard fight to
wrest the seat from tlle Independent,
and although unsuccessful, Is nevertheless to be congratulated.
Tiie general consensus of opinion
was that Mr. Neill would be returned
once more, bul even his most enthusiastic supporters hardly expected that
lie would carry Mr. MacDonald's home
town, Cumberland, with a majority of
189.
Following are the results as near
as can be ascertained at this early
date:
Neill   Mac- Armt-
Donald shaw
Estevan     14 1        1
Ahouhset     31       12       2
Toflno     27      25       2
L'cluelet     34      17      2
Nootka      9       15     ....
Bamfleld     56       12       3
Pachena     S     	
l't.   Alberni    425     188     15
Alherni    287     131       4
Parksville    66     163       3
Nanoose   72      32      2
Bowser   6).      29     ....
Horn Lake   19      22     ....
.Menzies  Bay   26      23       3
Sechart    21        7     ....
Sidney Inlet   14      12     ....
Uchucklesat   29     20    ....
Itoysloii    26      49
Seymour Narrows  .... 45       18       1
Englewood   45      15      2
Bold Point   12        2     ....
Union  Bay  107      63      8
Headquarters   54       24
Merville   31       67     ....
Fanny Bay   45      31
Comox     71     112     ....
Central Lake   44      21       1
Hainliridge     54      24       2
Courtenay  409     345     ....
Cumberland   451    262    13
Wellington   137      64     ....
Lantzville     72        2       2
Port  Alice     77       44       2
Consolidated Copper..   6      10      4
Quatslno    54      22       2
Honniiigs     19        1
Cape Scott   12 2     ....
Kyuquot     27,     15
Snlse Bay   23        5
Seaford     12        2
Ileohee Channel   21      33     ....
San   .Mateo    23 5       1
Camp Eight   25        9       4
Port  Hardy    11      50       2
Shushartl    16      14    ....
Whaletown    29        9     17
Manson's Landing .... 15      25
Squirrel  Cove    17 7      17
Horlot Bay   HI      29     ....
Quathiaski cove   54     68      I
Oyster River   35        2       I
Campbell   River     52       52       6
Rock   Bay    32       27       7
[Sayward  Valley    34      21     16
Camp Four   II      In      5
Minto           1"      41       3
Bevan   32      38      4
Lazo    54      I"
Qrantham 2ti     44      i
Qualicum Beach 96     5?      I
Hllllers in     21    IB
i'ii',mhs 32       72
Errington 32      72
Klldonan       39     SO
LENGTHY TRIP IS IN
STORE FOR FIRE CHIEF
Alderman C. .1. Parnham,  who  Is
also chief of tlie local Volunteer Fire
Department, hns a lengthy and Interest ina trip III store for him If he so
desires. At Monday's meeting of tlle
City Council a communication was on
hand from B. W. Stewart, chief of lhe
Vicloria Fire Department, setting
forth dial (he annual convention of
Pacific Const Fire Chiefs would b-
held this year in Fresno, Calif., October II. 12 and 13. and asking the
council to send a delegate if at all
possible. As tlie convention this year
will deal in n large measure with
Volunteer Brigades it was felt by all
members of the council that Cumberland should' he represented, and In
consequence Chief Parnham was given
authority to make the trip.   Alderman
STOLEN—One S3.oo Padlock ln first
I    class condition, belonging to door of
Islander garage.   If tho thief will
kindly   call   at  tills  olllce  llo  may
secure Hie key ulso, as ono Is value-
!    less without the other. lt
NATIVE DAUGHTER OF
B. C. LAID TO REST
Mrs. Elizabeth Walter, wife of Mr.
J. Walter, of Union Bay, passed to bet-
reward on Friday, September 10th, at
1 the Cumberland General Hospital, interment taking place at (he Cumberland Cemetery on Sunday, Sept. 12th,
Rev. E. o. Robathan officiating,   The
deceased lady, who died on her birth-
1 day,   was   65   years  old,   being   bom
' September   Kith.   1861.    She   was   a
native daughter ol' B. c. her father,
i Mr. J. Thompson at  the time of her
birth 65 years ago, was janitor at the
Nanaimo  Post. Office .     Two sisters,
! .Mrs. Bruno Maliado. formerly of this
city, and Mrs. Bell, of Victoria, survive, also her husband and numerous
relatives in tliis district.
I    She ran the journey of her life In
I 65 years,    lt is a path marked witli
I deeds of kindness and cheer. Flowers,
I not thorns, sunshine, uot shadow, did
I she scatter everywhere.     With these
she  was  lavish.   Truth  was  the inspiration of her life and by kindness
she exemplified Its great worth.
j    The funeral,  wliieh  took  place on
Sunday last, was very largoly attend-
; ed.   The following, all friends of the
family, acted as pall bearers: Messrs.
William   McLean,   Martin   Davidson,
Ronald Delancy, Bert Geary, Thomas
1 Armstrong George Richardson.
Many beautiful floral tributes were
, received   and   are   hereby   gratefully
acknowledged by (he family:
Pillow, the Family, Cumberland anil
Union Bay; Wreath", Mr. and Mrs.
Geary; Spray, Blllia and Tommy, her
grandchildren, Seattle; Spray, Mr. and
Mrs. Midrich; Spray, Mrs. George
Galger; Spray, Mrs. Bell; Spray, Mr.
Sam Thompson. Nanaiiuo; Spray, Mrs.
Robertson ami family, Cumberland;
Sprays. .Mr. nml Airs. Tom Bennett,
Mr. and Mrs. Irvine, .Mr. and Mrs.
Stant. Cumberland; Mr, and Mrs.
King. Union Bay; Jack, Frank and
Charlie Bradley, grandsons, Union
Bay; Lillian Bradley, granddaughter,
Union Bay; .Mr. and .Mrs. P. Hold,
Union Bay; A. Shllllto, Union Bay;
Thelma and Olive Walters, grandchildren, Union Hay; Mr. and Mrs. E.
Mugford and family, Vancouver; .Mr.
and Mrs. Dave Walker, Cumberland;
Mr. and Mrs. G. Davis. Union Bay;
Ruth and Berhice Bates, granddaugh-,
|ters; Mr. and Mrs. II. Glover. Mr. and
' Mrs. E. Anderson. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, Union Bay; Mrs. Bruce, Cumberland; Mrs. Hudson, i'nion Buy.
DEBATED
lit.-Hon.   ARTHDR   MEIQ tEN
Leader  of  the  Conservative  Party.
Parnham, in thanking the Council for
its generosity, stated that In all probability he would he able lo attend the
convention. He thoughl (he opportunity was one not to he thrown aside
as much valuable Information would
he gained nnd later put (o use hero.
In view of this fact, (be small amount
of money necessary to cover (he expenses of (he trip would bc negligible,
The Mayor and Aldermen thought. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
THE THINGS LEFT OUT After years of experience publishing
a newspaper we have reached the conclusion that
it isn't the things we put into the paper that
cause us trouble, it is the things we leave out.
We may write columns of nice things about our
readers and we seldom get a word of thanks or
appreciation, but let us omit to mention some
item that seems of importance to a subscriber
and we hear from it immediately. This is the
cause of the lines in the brow of the editor and his
staff. The little neglects, the little unintentional
slights are the things that lose friends for the
newspaper. And the hard part about it is that
these offences are never intentional. A good editor will never keep an item of news out of the
paper, even if it will benefit his bitterest enemy.
The trouble lies in the detail that goes to make
up an issue of the paper. We have just so much
space and so much time in which to fill that space.
Just so many lines can be set on the linotype per
hour, and sometimes the machine bucks or the
electric current is off. There may be a hundred
good items on the copy hook, but the clock reaches
the zero hour and we will have to stop setting
matter and rush the paper to press if we are going to catch the mail. Your item may be one of
the hundred that is left on the hook, but you feel
quite sure that for some reason the editor or his
reporter has slighted you and you develop a sore
spot toward the newspaper. Everybody is apt
at times to feel that his job is worse than the
other fellow's. But the thing that makes it hard
to conduct a newspaper is the fact that you are
powerless to go on after a certain moment. In
other trades and professions what cannot' be
accomplished today may be finished tomorrow.
Not so with the newspaper. Each issue is a finished piece of work so far as that issue is concerned. If the item you are looking for is not
in the paper, it simply isn't there and next week
will be too late. A dozen trials and tribulations
of the printers may have caused the omission.
There is nothing to do. You are disappointed
and the old paper isn't worth anything, anyhow.
All the nice things the editor may have said in
the past; all the favors he may have done you are
lost sight of and forgotten in this particular
failure.    And so the tired editor can say with
Margaret Sangster:
"It isn't so much what we do, dear,
As what we have left undone,
That gives us the* bit of a heartache
At the setting of the sun."
THE GHOST OF FEAR Someone once said:
"Caution makes you
careful, but fear cooks your goose." That guy
said a mouthful.
Caution is a good thing, but fear is the most
fearful thing that can come to a man when he
wants to go ahead. Nothing will be, nothing can
be, accomplished when you are afraid. Fear
binds a man's brain and attaches a ton or two to
his hands.   It also weighs down his heart.
Did you ever lie awake at night because you
feared disease or debt? Don't you know that
every time you let fear get into your heart,
things look like failure and begin to go bad?
The ghost of fear almost always comes from
a run-down physical or mental condition. You
are tired, nervous, worn and weary and then old
Fear camps at your bedside and you cannot sleep.
When you are right in brain and body, nothing
can make you afraid. When you are wrong or
sick, a shadow makes you shake like an aspen
leaf.
Banish your fear by right living. Use caution
to avoid the pitfalls. Be temperate in all things.
Live within your income and the ghost of fear
will not trouble you.
IT IS TO LAUGH The eternal hunt for something new among the rest-'
less smart set of Paris has brought out a novelty j
to goad the flagging appetites of the dyspeptic.!
Ambitious hostesses are abandoning the silver'
candlesticks and soft glow of candles on their dining room tables in favor of glass table tops,
through which comes the only illumination in the
room. Frosted electric light bulbs are hidden
under the ground glass table top. A dull glow
comes through the delicate tracery of fine doilies.
Usually there are three sets of electric lights hidden in the table, enabling the hostess to get either
a discreet soft light, a medium, or hard, strong
glare. The new tables and illumination may
prove only a passing fad, if counter lighting isn't
adopted to soften the features of the persons sitting around the board. Light from below is extremely disadvantageous for guests with double
or triple chins. Bacon and eggs or even a broiled
steak with onions are not improved by an illuminated table top and most of us still prefer the
homely foods to snails and goose livers. It must
be pretty tough to have to mince at French pastry
over a green light reflected through the table top.
We would rather have a slice of mother's pumpkin pie served right off the top of the old kitchen
table.
PHONE 19 CUMBERLAND
•^**T-,,r**'r'*r*t-'r,<r**^^
Through The Telescope
Being a Commentary on Current Topics
HISTOHIl   INCIDENTS  OCCUR O.N
SAME DAY
Foundation Stone of >'ew Cathedral
Laid
There was nothing to mar the
beautiful ceremony of the laying of
the Foundation Stone of the new
Cathedral In Victoria last Wednesday
afternoon. The weather was perfecl.
and It is estimated that a crowd of at
least 5,000 people gathered to witness
this historic event when the Bishop of
London declared the stones "well and
truly laid." The service was a very
impressive one, the significance of
which ls possibly not. as yet, fully
grasped. History was made In the
Island Diocese of Columbia on September 9th.
The Bishop of Spokane in his
speech at the Royal Victoria Theatre
remarked that "the Cathedral stands
as a monument to God, and God knows
God needs monuments in these days
when things have stood still spiritually but gone forward materially."
The Bishop of London also emphasized thc fact that tbe Cathedral stood
as a witness to the Empire of Christ,
as well as a witness to the ties of
kindred amongst British people. It is
Interesting to note the numbers of
cathedrals thai are now In course of
construction throughout the world.
Liverpool links with Victoria as New
York does with Seattle, whilst elsewhere these "silent" witnesses proclaim their message to a materialistic
age. The Cathedral stands as a protest to too much materialism, and as
an evidence that there are those who
still believe In a Kingdom founded on
Love and Goodwill.
Cennany, France and the
League of Nations
In the Vancouver Province of Sept.
10th in which was reported tlic laying
of the foundation stone of Victoria's
new cathedral, there was also the
press report ot what, we hope, was
another "stone being well and truly
laid." Seen through the telescope at
this distance It appears that history
was being made in Geneva on Sept.
9th as well as in Victoria. Germany
has once more been received into the
Council of Nations on an equal footing with other Great Powers, and the
occasion  was  one of jubilation  and
thankfulness. Dr. Stresseman for
Germany, and M. Brland for France,
shook hands and committed themselves to perpetual peace and solemnly engaged the honor of their countries never to draw sword again but
to settle their disputes by arbitration
or compromise. If this pact can be
kept, much will be done to break
down and remove the suspicions and
distrust which have kept Europe so
long uneasy. The idealistic principles
of faith in one another which Christ
laid down have yet to be fully tried,
and at last it seems, a step has been
taken In the right direction. Geneva
and Victoria, unknown to each other,
had much in common on Sept. 9th. In
the Old Land there is the effort being
made to bring back "the stone which
the builders of centuries have so long
rejected" and which if "well and truly
laid" will be the foundation of lasting
world peace. In the New Land wc I
see In process of building a cathedral
Which on completion will stand as
man's witness to his belief in God.
Both in the old and tlle new lands,
even if on different lines, there is the j
re-ullirmatlon that the Christ way id I
the only  way.
Miss K. Richardson
begs to announce that she has again
commenced business as a
LADIES' HAIRDRESSER
at her residence, corner of
Maryport Ave. and Third Street
where she will be pleased to welcome
old and new patrons.
Ladies Visited in Own Homes
PHONE 7
Special Showing this week of the
Newest Exclusive Fall Styles in
Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Fall Coats.
The   Latest    Exclusive   Fall
Models in
Ladies'  and   Misses'   Trimmed
and Ready-to-Wear Hats.
ESHsssssaMsartHsasss*****': -.■*-*. - *.
Announcement was made from the
headquarters of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Montreal recently
of the retirement of W. B. Lanlgan,
general freight traffic manager
from the services of the Company
which he has served for forty-two
continuous years. Mr. Lanigan is
regarded as one of the outstanding
authorities on rail rates, and, although relieved from active official
duties ,-it. his own request, he will be
retained in the eomnany's service in
order that his special knowledge and
long experience in traffic matters
may bc available in connection with
enquiries before the Board of Railway Commissioners.
Promptness in First Aid handling
by C.P.R. in the case of a man whose
leg was completely severed while
he was at work unloading the S.S.
"Montroyal" at Quebec recently undoubtedly saved the man's life, according to the surgeon of thc "Montroyal." The First Aid rendered by
Sergeant Murphy and Constable
Kelly, of the Canadian Pacific Railway, was reported to have been the
means of saving the injured man's
life.
Tlle Bishop ol' London
The Bishop of London is a man of
outstanding charm and personality.
"The Telescope" Iiad it close range
view of lllm as well as a short Interview, lu feature he is somewhat
severe, with a chin that allows great
strength of character and lips that
speak of determination. But the
severity is quickly banished by the
humorous twinkle in his eyes as he
greets this person or that, and by the
wonderful smile which lights up his
face. His energy Is unbounded and
many a younger man would hnve tired
under the strain and activity of last
Thursday. His visit to Canada coincides with the visit of many other
puhlic men of note from Great Britain
and will not only strengthen tlle ties
that bind us to the Motherland but
will remind our legislators more and
more of the need of poulatlng Canada
with good British stock.
A Canadian owned Ayrshire cow,
"Nellie Osborne of Elmshade the
16th," owned by W. C. Wylie, of
Howick, has displaced thc American
owned Ayrshire for thc world's record milk and butter production for
this breed. In a 306-day. official
test she produced 21,241 pounds of
milk and 909 pounds of butterfat.
The previous record production for
the same number of days was 18,266
pounds of milk and 739 of butterfat.
EMIGRATION PLANS
The Empire Settlement scheme has
all the brains and energy of the
Church of England behind it. So impressed was the Imperial Government
wilh lis soundness and sense that it
promised to give towards It pound for
every pound spent. The Church of
England is lllc biggest organization
which exists in England and numbers
some 14,000 parishes. Information
regarding the Dominions will be given
out by the Clergy in charge of these
parishes, and Intending settlers will
bc helped In their decisions. On this
side an active committee is at work
and in touch with the authorities in
England. They meet and care for the
settler on his arrival, and in many
cases his career is followed by the
Church. Many have been tlle letters
received which have expressed their
gratitude for the help and advice
given. Letters also have been received In which the writers have pointed
out the difficulties that have confronted them. One of tiie things needed to
make the scheme a success Is the
human touch. This has, it is believed,
been lacking on many occasion when
a settler arrives at his destlaation.
i^AjNA
Just received a large shipment
of the newest Styles in Ladies'
Silk Charmeen and Flannel
Dresses at popular prices.
Immigration to Canada for the
first two months of the fiscal year
amounted to 36,113, according to an
official statement issued by the Department of Immigration and Colonization. This is an increase of 11,-
791 over the same two months a
year ago. Immigration for May,
which is the latest month included
in the statement, was 18,620 this
year, as compared with 13,338 last
year. British immigration has increased from 6,559 in May, 1925, to
,980 in May, 1926. For the same
months immigration from the United
States has increased from 1,757 to
2,003 and from other countries 5,022
to 8,571.
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food
good  service,  reasonable  charges
King George Hotel
P.P.Harrison, M.LA.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Ofiice
Courtenay             Phone  258
Local  Ofllce
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone  115H  or  21
The "GEM"
Barber Siiop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style SOc
Children's hair cut any style 35o
HAVE YOU
ever been caught a long way from homo without
A TIRE REPAIR OUTFIT
or a i
TIRE   PUMP?
I'crlians   if's   a
SPARK PLUG, BULB OR FAN BELT!
There's no need for it—we sell them all.
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
SPECIALISTS IN AUTO REPAIRS
Phone ti Cumberland, B. C.
Here and Tkcrs
It is anticipated Ihat tbe wool c'ip
In Southern Alberta will reach the
2,000,000 pound mark this year. Of
this a million and a quarter pounds
will be handled through tli" Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers'
Association. The fleeces this year
are stated to be unusually large.
Canada, in proportion to population, has more golf courses than tho
United States. With its -10-1 courses
there is no need for the summer
tourists to miss their game. Ontario
leads with 100; Quebec, 70; Alberta,
60; Saskatchewan, 53; Manitoba, 51 i
British Columbia, 39; Nova Scotia,
17; New Brunswick, 11; Prince Edward Island, 3.
The recent appointment of the Ht.
Hon. Reginald McKenna, former
Chancellor of the Exchequer of tha
British Qpvernment, and IC. It. Peacock, a director of the famous Bank
of Baring Brothers, to tbe directorate of the Canadian Pacific Hnil-
tvay, has caused very favorable
comment in Canadian and English
financial circles.
The annual across-Cnnada educational tour carried out under the
auspices of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, terminated recently nt Toronto and Professor Sinclair Laird,
Dean of Macdonald College, who was
in charge of the party of over 100
teachers, students and professional
men, stated that their entire trip
had been an unqualified success.
Over 3,000 tickets wcre sold recently for tho annual picnic and outing of the Angus Shops in Montreal
to Ste. Rose, which proved the most
successful ever held. Prominent
officials who took part in tlie day's
outing were: Mr. Grant Hall, vice-
president of the Canadian Pacific
Railway; John Burns, works manager at thc Angus shops; J. I). Mulr,
assistant works manager, ond \V.
Peterson, shop engineer. *
Rickson's Old Stand
[QMXLl'MVWi&WMJiM
Giving Wings To
Friendship
The long-distance telephone gives wings to friendship. It enables the human voice to be carried along
wires at a speed of thousands of miles per second
without losing any of its cordiality. The special night
rates after 8:30 p.m. are advantageous for social chats.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Cumberland Supply Store
Dunsmuir Ave.
Pe»d our prices and we are sure you will become one
of our Customers.     No person can afford to throw
away money on High Prices.
THESE PRICES ARE FOR SATURDAY, PAY DAY,
ONLY.
Sunkist Oranges, 3 doz. for $1.00
Canteloupes, each  15
Mcintosh Reds, per case   2.75
Hot House Tomatoes, 2-lbs. for  25
Outside Grown Tomatoes, per pound  10
Large Lemons, per dozen  32
Potatoes, $1.85 per sack or 12 lbs. for  25
Vancouver Butter, the best you can buy, 2-lbs.   ,85
Canadian Cheese, per pound 28
Horse Shoe Salmon, 2 for 45
Gem Lye, per tin    .15
Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. can 85
Grape Nuts, 2 for  35
Heinz Pork and Beans, flats, 2 for    ,25
Malt Vinegar, quart bottles  28
Heinz pure-white Pickling Vinegar, bulk, per qt.   .25
Heinz Distilled White Vinegar, per bottle 28
Cow Brand Baking Soda  15
See our new arrivals of Gents and Boys Fall Caps.
Men's Eleeced-lined Underwear, per suit  $2.35
Men's Black Work Pants, 8-oz. Duck, per pair.. 2.25
Men's Blue Work Pants, per pair  2.25
Men's Khaki Pants, to clear at per pair  1,95
Men's Work Suspenders 45c, Dress at  75
Me:cMMr3«WMt3S**fM*--flSHJ3jas3^
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY STORE
Phone 155 Cumberland FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
NOTHING TO CONCEAL
AS TO ITS AGE AND
METHOD OF MATURING
*»
Whisky
READ ITS LABEL. READ THE
GOVERNMENT STAMP. ASK HOW
LONG IT HAS REMAINED IN CASK.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thu
Liquor Contiol Board or by tlv Government of B.C.
MANN'S BAKERY
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
Delicious Appetizing Dainties.
also
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
*
1
—
i
Lumber
I
In every sorts of building materials,
i
MOULDINGS,
4
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
\
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
•
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
| Night calls: 134X Courtenay
PHONES |0ffl0B, 169 Cuml)eriand,
.    .
SUMMER TOURIST
Tickets
STILL ON SALE
Daily until September 18, 1926
Final return limit, October 31, 1926
Attractive Fares
TO EASTERN POINTS
LIBERAL STOPOVERS OPTIONAL ROUTES
in connection with
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
Dally from Vancouver 9:50 P, M.
GOLF WEEK AT JASPER, SEPTEMBER 11 TO 18
Kull Particulars anil Reservations from
MR. E. VV. BICKLE
Cumberland, li. 0,
Telephone It.'
Entrance And Matric Pupil j
Issue Valedictory Addresses
At P. T.A. Gathering
Last Friday evening, in the Anglican Church Hall, the graduating pupils of the Entrance and Matriculation classes received
their certificates. During the evening the valedictory addresses
of the Entrance class and Matric class were read by Norman
Frelone and Margaret Robinson respectively, and were of such
high order that the Islander is pleased to reproduce them i'or the
benefit of those who were unable to attend last Friday. A full
account of the proceedings at the gathering will be found on the
first page of this issue.
.UUtl'AIil'T ROBINSON'S ADDRESS
Madam President,
Ladies and Gentlemen: —
Another cycle of High School work
has been completed, another hand of
students have reached the goal of
their High School career. Many of us
nre about to leave home for the first
time to seek a higher education, while
others are ahout to begin their life's
work. In giving this valedictory, it
would be well to cost a backward
glance over the time spent In High.
During the three years there have
been many changes. Miss Partridge
and Mr. Hamilton successfully started
us on our new work. At this time
we wcre twenty-nine In number, but
eacli year we lost several of our
school-fellows until only ten remained
—one boy surviving tlle ordeal.
Mr. Hamilton left after the lirst
year, being replaced by our present
principal, Mr. Shenstone. To these
teachers we owe our success, not only
in Intellectual but also ln physical
development. Through their efforts
the trustees granted money to enlarge
our scanty library. Grass hockey
was Introduced i'or the first time and
we extend our sincere thanks to Miss
Sehl for coaching us in this new
game. Lei us hope tho present scholars will bc as keen and derive as
much enjoyment from it as we did.
"Basketball and football also, were enthusiastically taken up by the students. When we wero in Second Year,
Field Day was started. Every Junu
3 the pupils from ilie different schools
assemble for a combined sports Day.
The first year we were lucky enough
to win the Colonist Cup and five or
six smaller ones. Last year we lost
several of these owing lo the absence
of our best* sports girl, .Miss Priscilla
Cloutler. However, those who did
compete deserve much praise for their
splendid work. |
The- School Grounds have been
leveled and enlnrgcd. two tennis
courts being built on the extension.
To raise funds for tennis equipment
a. D.ince was held in the Ilo-llo. At
this Social the large sum of ninety-six i
dollars was collected.
During the last two years tlie chemical apparatus has been greatly added
lo and this year the students will have
the benefit of performing their own
experiments at their own benches.
Debates and talks were an Important item of our work. These not only
helped our speaking hut also our
studies as tbey were all on the different subjects.
Now tlie time has come for us to
say good-bye. The three years spent
here havo proved most satisfactory to
all. Wherever our lot Is cast, nothing
cm blot from our minds the happy
days at C. H. S.
To our teachers. Miss Partridge and
Mr. Shenstone, we return our sincere
gratitude for their efforts on our behalf. Should any measure of success
intend uur labors iu after life It will
he largely due to the benefits derived
from their Instruction. We tender
our grateful thanks to the School
Board and the P.T.A. for their kind
help; also to Mr. W. McLellan, for
whatever the students did, Mr. MoLel-|
NOit'l.iN FRELONE'S AI'I'liKSS
Madam President, Ladles and
Gentlemen  and  Fellow-Students:—
I am very pleased to have the honor
of giving this valedictory address for
tlie very successful Entrance Class
Which lias jusi graduated. Wo owe
very much to the teachers, .Miss Gallivan, Mr. Murray and Mr. Apps, who,
I am sure, did their utmost to help us
conclude the year's work with success,
Kathleen Emily, by winning tlie gold
medal for her essay on Fire Prevention, has kept up the reputation of the
previous Entrance Class by repeating
what Claudia Harrison did, and we
hope that tiie present Entrance Class
will keep up this reputation by repeating what Kathleen has done. Doth
these essays were included in tlle
first Entrance Class Annual which
was organized during the Inst term.
Practically everyone in tlie class contributed towards tlle Annual, whicli
was printed by some of the pupils on
the new Mimeograph.
Wc arc all very thankful to the
P.T.A. who showed their interest in
us by awarding a gold medal to the
leading pupil, Stephen Jackson. We
hope Ihat next year's candidate will
be successful in carrying off the
Governor General's medal as well.
The line selection of books added
to the School Library provided many
pleasant hours of reading, also the
tennis court which provided many
hours of outdoor recreation. Both
these additions we owe to tiie generosity of tlle Trustees.
Though we didn't have much chance
in   tlie   recent   June   3rd   sports,   on
account of the extraordinary size of
the N'anaimo  boys,  still  we wish  to
thank those who helped us, especially I
Mrs. Hudson and Mr. Beveridge who |
helped with the First Aid; Mr. Jackson for the Drill; Mr. Henderson fori
the   Tug-of-War.   and   Mr,   McLellan :
who was ever willing to help in any-!
tiling which was for the good of tbe
scliool.   Probably   we  saved   difficult
periods through the kindness of Mr.;
Edwards, who conducted the singing
on May 24th, and for this we wisli io
thank him heartily.
It seems, now that we are in High !
School, that we are at tlle beginning
of a new phase of life.   Still, we wlll!
be able to glance back again to our
happy Public Scliool days.   We only I
hope Hint the future holds as much in
slore for us as the past and that the
following classes will realize tliat we j
are always  willing lo help  tiicni at j
any time, knowing tliat we wcre once.
Entrance pupils also.
lun was always willing to lend a help-
Ing hand.
OUR High School course ii ended, j
Its  doors  are closed to  I'S  forever.'
To the students who remain wo would
say: "Guard jealously what Is entrust- j
ed to your care.   The School is doing
its 1iest for you; give It your whole-1
hearted support In return."   Wc shall i
miss your company more than all else j
on   leaving  High.   The  thought   thai
all ties aro now to be severed (ills us I
witli sadness.
I have fulfilled my task. The class;
of '26 makes its departure.  Wo all
long to remain, but must bow to Ibe
nevltable.   To one nnd all. farewell.
!   THE PUZZLE CORNER   I
Puzzle No. 190
Place a word In the first place and
repeat it iu tiie second, although it
may have a different meaning:
The landlady says it Is   to
give her hoarders a hint that tbey
must   butter.
He said lie wished to cent to
help pay his rent, but the scent of his
breath was so strong that we told him
to 	
The kidnapped boy who could 	
lie found lias returned and is	
asking for tlie reward.
1 planted   In the garden, hut
they never materialized; but why	
.... were plentiful.
Utile Miss Spratt would eat no
   would  eat no  lean.
it
Puzzle No. 191 |
^Take a piece of masonry, add a j
dark liquid, subtract part of a chain, i
add an Insect, add an architectural
lealuio, adii a fruU, subtract a vege- |
table subtract a weapon and tbe res-1
ulting  letters  will  spell WALRUS,     j
 o	
Puzzle No. 192
Behead  a  musical   instrument and
leave a musical instrument.
Behead a margin and leave a mar- '
gin.
Behead a vessel and leave a vessel.
Behead an animal and leave an ani- {
mal.
 o	
Puzzle No. 193
Here is a cute problem ln simple i
arithmetic whicli will interest every- j
24 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOK CHARLIE  DALTON
£   far   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
*   'it 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets   boat at  Union  Bay.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Excellent ouliiue—
Por reservations Pheae 11.
Comfort  and  Homelike  Mrvlee.
in   rooms,  electrically  beat.*
B. YATKA, Manager.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
. OHice Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
body.   It appears that Mike had just
sawed,  split   and   boused  a  cord  of
wood and as the same led to a spirited controversy, the minute data involved is 'here given.   It took .Mike four
hours to saw tlie  wood, 3  hours to
split it, half a minute to fill a wheelbarrow, and 2 hours to wheel 60 loads
to the house.   He was just preparing
I to tackle the last cord, when Dennis
[came along witii an axe and saw, so
■ Mike hired him at 60 cents an hour
to help on tlie job.
Now, as you all  know,  a cord  of
{ wood consists of a pile of logs 4 feet
j high by  I wide by 8 long; the logs
were to be sawed into 16-inch lengths
! and just here Is where the pretty point
1 comes in.   The lirst cord, which Mike
completed alone, consisted of 4-foot
i logs, but in the second one tlie logs
1 were 8 teet long, as they run the long
, way of the pile instead of across it.
and hero Is where the trouble begins.
I How much  money did Mike have to
pay Dennis?
 o ■
Puzzle No. 191
Do you remember how as a child
you used to count the telegraph poles
as you went by? Now here's a little
problem which you can work out In
a practical way next time you go by
a line of telegraph poles in a car.
We were returning the oilier day from
an automobile trip when we came to
a short signal line of ;i% miles of telegraph poles. With tlic aid of a stopwatch we discovered tliat the average
poles passed per minute multiplied
by tlie 3% miles would give the number of miles per hour that the car
was going. Now you see from these
facts you should lie able to tell Just
how far apart were the poles..
Additional puzzles, as  well as the
answers to tlie foregoing, will appear
f in this column next week,
Answers to I.iisl   Week's Puzzles
No. 185—Gregory gagged garrulous
George.
No. 186-Nineveh, Paris, Palmyra,
.Spuria, Thebes. Naples. Andover, Dover, Athens, Verona, Romo.
No. 187—STAR plus TREE plus
SI,ING minus TREES equals STARLING.
No. 188—As the train goes two
bridge lengths less one foot, while
the cow goes half a bridge length less
five feet, and would go three bridge
lengths, less three inches, while the
cow went half a bridge length plus
four feet, nine inches, we see that the
train would go five bridge lengths,
less fifteen Inches, while tlle cow went
one bridge length, less three inches.
So the train goes just live times as
fast as the cow. and 2 bridge lengths
less one foot is equal to two and a
half bridge lengths, less 25 feet.
Hence half a bridge length Is 24 feet
and tlie whole length Is 48 feet.
No. 189—Tear, Horse, Broom.
Strand. Crow. Shore, Gray.
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush tor picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, .'!0 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KELT' "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/u-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
<UMUEULAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
Pure beer
proved pure
by test
HE Amalgamated Breweries of British
Columbia are determined llinl I lie beer tbey
make fur tlic people nf British Columbia
shall be pure and wholesome. Xo care is spared,
either in Ilic selection of materials or in Ilio
processes of brewing, Hint will guarantee pure
beer,
Each of tin* five companies associated in the
Amalgamated Breweries maintains laboratories
where continuous analyses are made, as n clicck
on Hu- methods of brewing nml mi Un* finished
product. 'Ilic Government also, through tlic
Lir'imr Control Board and in the interests of the
people,
"The Radio Detective"
egularly examines for quality ull the beer
so!.I in British Columbia. Hut thut is not enough.
A further check is provided for the Amalgamated
Breweries by absolutely independent tests made
frequently by reputable public analysts upon
request, and by means of these reports the beers
of the various breweries are compared for purity
and general quality.
A report lias just been made by the well known
linn of Macdonald & Macdonald, inspecting and
testing engineers of Vancouver nnd Victoria, on
beer made by the Amalgamated Breweries. This
report indicates I In* high quality of the beers sold
to lhe people of British Columbia.
For instance, alter noting that in the
beer tested the original extract in beer
wort was high—14.21 per cent.—that
alcohol wus 4.37 per cent., that "extract" in the beer was 5.88 per cent.,
and that there was a complete absence
of foreign substances, tlle report goes
on to state:
" beer is of excellent
qtia^'iy, as the above analysis
plainly shows."
Tie- Amalgamated Breweries are sensible of lhe obligation
placed upon them In provide the best and purest beer
fur llii- people of llritish Columbia. Whether you purchase
beer by tin- gists* in licensed premises under Government
supervision or by I la a - Imltle ill Government stores you
receive a healthful ami beneficial beverage.
Tho members of iho Amalgamated Brewers arc: Vancouver
Breweries Ltd., Rainier Brewing Co. of ('unutla Lid.,
Westminster Brewery Ltd., Stiver Spring Brewery Ltd.,
and tho Victoria PhoLnls Brewing Co, Ltd., where ihe heer
supplied lo lhe peeple of British Columbia is made.
I
.'J
CHAPTER XXX
«iio.Mt-:w
"Vario!" Kennedy repeated hi;'
liame. "I gathered ;^s much from
some negatives I discovered hidden
away in a chest al. the Binnacle Inn.
I lirst suspected you on tlie night of
tlie Radio Robbery, when your tool,
Rae, singled you oul Cor special atten-
elon and made an ostentatious robbery
of you. You're clever, Vario. It was
your alibi, so to speak, as brains of
tho thing."
Sullenly Vario stood as we pinioned
bis arms. He was waiting for Kennedy lo mass up the evidence.
"Vou UBed your position al XYXZ
lo interfere witb radio-casting." con
linucd Craig. "And I don't forge
your little wave-meier. You were always on the watch. You're clever
hut It takes o Radio Detective io catch
;i Radio Crook!'!
Easton on his part had been piecing
things together, lie could not resist
an extra twist to Vario's arm as he
thought oi' how he must have enticed
Ruth along with the oilier young
people hi play ii sporty game of
chance, lirst dances at lhe fast road-
houses in the country, then games of
hazard, nexl betting on the races, until he bad them in a financial tangle
where they must do anything at his
bidding, or of his clever emissaries to
save their skins.
"Walter." decided Craig, "you and
Easton   look   after   this   gentleman.
I Don't, forgel that he is tricky,   i want
j to look around." •
He stalled in on a thorough search
, of the cabin. There was still something for which he was looking that
he  had   not   yet   I'ound.    Yet   he   had
'ransacked everything visible, it seemed, For a moment he stood thoughtfully.   The chronomeler was striking
| a number of bells.
"Ah!" It seemed to have given
Craig an idea.
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Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
^i&tt*^^
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m
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE   PRICES
The select quality of our
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smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Car. 511)  and   Dlllishllllr.
Phone 122 Cumberland
Tie .stalked over to the chronometer
Itself. Theh at last he found a secret
spring. The instant he pressed it the
chronometer was moved forward as
if on a little track. Back of it in a
sort of wall safe reposed a little casket, a strong  box,
With ;i quiet smile of satisfaction
Kennedy lifted out the casket and
curried it over to the table in lhe cabin. "None of that!" We twisted
Vario back as he made an involuntary
start.
A low exclamation escaped Kennedy
as he pried the lid of the casket open.
"Talk about Kid and .Morgan and
Blackboard! They were piker pirates
compared witli you!"
Wo strained our oyes, almost Incredulous, as Kennedy lifted one by
one the contents of the caskel out
nnd laid them cm ihe table for our
appraisal.
Thero wero the Adams pearls, the
emeralds his sister bad worn, the
Gerard diamond necklace, LOaston's
ring, jewels worth ninny hundreds of
thousands of dollars, the products of
countless robberies of country housed,
"I don't see those studs that were
taken from you. Vario," remarked
Craig sarcastically. "No wonder you
were nol much worried over robbing
yourself."
Our eyes  were fairly bulging.
Kennedy produced P pair of band-
i cliffs from his pocket and snapped the
bracelets on Vario's wrists,
i "It's getting d;n'k."_ suddenly ex-
el aimed Easton. "I never did any
night flying in the Sea Seoul. Do you
think we ought to take a chance?"
"And leave these prizes here? Craig
wiili the casket of recovered jewels
in der ono arm, waved the other lirst
nt the villainous crew, then at the
trim, fast, and powerful Scooter. "No.
1 think we have this crew where wo
wanl (hem. If you gentlemen will ba
so kind as to head into the nearest
| port, you will avoid a greal deal of
trouble."
Kennedy assumed the job as skip-
;■■ r while Easton devoted his attention to the hydroaeroplane trailing
behind us.   Each of us with a gat in
irh hand, I perched myself al the
lilghi il point of Ui" cabin roof where
wo could sweep tbe deck, and tha
■ v. w Ln ailence worked the Scooter
into port where we lodged Varlo and
the real of them in jail. leaving Uu
vessel in charge of tlie authorlites,
li was late when we arrived iu pin
and one of the lirst things Kennedy
did was to send Dick, wilh Ken and
myself to find a telephone.
"Tell your mother first thai you are
safe. Dick," he directed, then to Ken,
"You had better call up your mother
loo, tell her you aie nil right, ami
thai they may look for us the lirst
I thing in ihe morning at Eagles' Nest."
Then we fed I hose hungry boys and
turned them into tlie luxurious quarters of ihe Scooter for. a good rest.
There was no one kite that morning
I when  we tumbled out of ibe berths,
Every one uf us was on the qui vive.
We had determined to make a quick
job of it, take both boys tn the Sea
Scout and land them aa soon as possible back at their Scout camp.
Tlie day dawned clear and cool, not
too inch wind. Easton made a splendid take-off, and we droned flying
down the Sound shore, passing head-
laud after headland on our triumphant flight back to Rockledge.
"Mother! There, tbey are! See
that speck?" It was Ruth, peering
ont over the Sound.
"They're waiting for us!" Ken's
sharp eyes discerned tbe group as we
had passed the last headland.
' Though it was only n matter of a
few minutes, it seemed an intolerably
long time before those ou the shore
ran out surf bouts lo ferry us in to
them. Never shall I forgel the greeting that Mrs. Gerurd gave her boy as
i she ran out and flung her arms about
I/ick even before the boat had been
beached.
i     Vira was just behind her, aud Cor-
,1)110 Adams was almost iis glad as her
friend when she took Ken by tbe
arms. She was proud'of her boy and
tbe part he had played.
1 "Craig, how can I ever thank you?"
It was Mrs. Gerard, happy tears in
hor eyes as she realized that this was
Dick himself brought back to her nnfe
and no dream.
As for Ken and Dick, they had their
bands full, between their mothers and
the other boys iu the troop who were
; already preparing a wonderful Scout
breakfast for the wayfarers of the air.
■ Everybody wns talking at once, lt
seemed that in our absence Cauliflower Pete, seeing Hank in jail with
' him. and  realizing that tbe game of
his   release   was   up,   had   squealed.
; They bad not only taken Mr. Crook.
! the too clever attorney,  but bad lo-
■ cated Ibe remnants of the gnug who
! had abandoned tbe Gray Racer.   I felt
ii  wao going io go hard with Vario
as these men all fairly tumbled over
themselves to gain Immunity by tell-
Ing all and  turning state's evidence.
i    Kennedy did not answer to tbe congratulations of Mrs. Gerurd and lhe
| rest of tbe people nt first.   Onty, finally, be said iu a quiet voice, waving
'his hand out to where tbe Sea Scout
proudly  rode at anchor,  "Thank tbe
1 Scouts—and, most of all.  the Scout -
i master!    Without them I could have
1 done nothing.   Everything will come
Mint   all   riglu-ns   long   as    we    have
j young people like them lo grow up to
| lake our places."
i He turned to congratulate Easton.
But Easton was paying no attention
;u> anything except Ruth. Vira and
I Glenn were the same.
j Kennedy fumbled in his pocket for
la moment, then pulled out the roll
(of negatives he had seized in the
idlest at tbe Binnacle. He took a look
at it. aside. II showed tbe groups of
| Ruth and Vira and Glean, with Rae
land Jack Curtis and Vario on board
the Scooter.
Then he turned and saw me looking,
smiled, mlled it up, then with a wide
sweep of his arm threw the roll far
out into the water.
"Thflt'a evidence we don't need!
They've learned their lesson. Let's
give them a cHauce!"
THE END.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANOACTAMENDMENTS
PltK-EJIPTlONS
Vacant. unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over IS years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, condi-
i tional upon residence, occupation,
| and improvement for agricultural
1 purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
; given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
| "tiow to Pre-empt Land,' copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
jby addressing tlle Department of
j Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Gov-
i eminent Agent.
I Hccords will be granted covering
| only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, aud which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
jand 8,000 feet per acre east of.that
Range,
I    Applications  tor  pre-emptions  are
to   be  addressed   to  the  Laud  Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, In which tiie land applied for
ils situated, und are made on printed
' forms,  copios of  which  can  be obtained  from the1 Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must he occupied for
live   years  and  improvements  made
to value of $10 per acre,  Including
clearing aud cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
j For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
rritniASE
! Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of llrst-class (arable) land is $5
per acre, and second class (grazing)
land  $2.50 per acre.   Further Infor-
i ni.-itlou regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lauds 111 given iu UulletYi
| No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
j    Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
j timber land, not exceeding. 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the cou-
iliLions Including payment of
Btumpage.
110.UKSTE.tl)  LEASES
; Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ill the lirst year, title being
' obtained alter residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding G40 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
('HAZING
I Under the Grazing Act Uie Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
' grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
lo established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
All Your Printing
I-'IIOM  THE TINIEST CARD TO
LARGEST POSTER CAN'
in-:
HANDLED BY THK JOB
PRINTING     DEPARTMENT    OF
^Islander i
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
1  (:mqberland
I Co-nt-rcln    II i\\c>\
fSHeaalquarter*  \\\ wwi
Halts
ll.iistinahit- 0
ACCOMMODATION THE 11KST
Idioms Steam  Ileulcil
Wa MKIlltlFIELl), Prop.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
■ •'w.-^Hiwr^r. » i •r^im.m
DUNSMUIR AVE. CUMBERLAND
WPfiZ.C'LS&i?*/;^..'^.,'*.',.*..'*'. '^'..*-'. v. .*..**. A^.''i'..■i*,,v,,•i.'.•,'*iv;*I';€i^■'•i
/^'•T-';*.?-"-f-:'-'t-^
E. L. SAUNDERS I
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
t pays tn have your shoes repaired as they wear ^
longer after n pairing than when new. S
|g     I aim hi give the best in Material, Workmanship ami |gj
Service at— ?=•
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS M
-V|      Note address— Opposite the Drug Store, p
■llllillli
eg;
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Poller at thc Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
a**a ~^g" ja:,.^„.Tff .... .,  .  ;T.«.   .„,» , ^'x       -^jsrzav.Ti:^. _.:.:.   -
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL. Proprietor
Autos for Hive.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, R. C.
ss
EE
aaEiffi'aiwfiiaMSHaiBw jBEEF* VEAL, MUTTON AND
 I PORK
GAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS I
SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
* '- *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   -   ■   Proprietor
H ROYAL    ICE     CREAM
Jjj| ~"~—————-————
; Support Your Town!
M Buy our Ice Cream—the only Ice Cream made in the
M city.   We use only the purest pasteurized cream in
jl the manufacture of our product.   A trial will convince
H you that
If ROYAL ICE CREAM
'§> is simply delicious.
•58
I
The ROYAL CANDY
PI10NI3 25
Walter Hudson Jr., Prop.
CUMBERLAND, B. C. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND. B. C.
PAGE FIVE
[fr
List Of Winners
At F?Ji Fair
-.Continued flora Last Week)
Floral
Antirrhinums—E. M. Whyte 1, A.
Tyrell 2; Asters, M. S. Stephen 1, Mrs.
Herbert Smith 2; Collection of Asters,
A. Tyrell 1, M. S. Stephens 2; Carnations, A. Stewart 2; Cosmos, E. M.
Whyte 1, Mrs. Herbert Smith 2; Dahlias, cactus or hybrid, Mrs. H. Smith 1,
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
1.11R —PHONES— 29R
COURTENAY, Tt. C.
Sf£$ttARLES
Th®
MILK
thai %»
always steady
for &mxr
StC 23-26
I RWBimH
E. M. Whyte 2; Dahlias, decorative,
Mrs. Herbert Smith 1, E. M. Whyte 2;
Dahlias, show, M. S. Stephens 1, Mrs.
Herbert Smith 2; Dahlias, peony, Mrs.
Herbert Smith 1; Collection Dahlias,
|E. M. Whyte 1; Best display Dahlias.
E. M. Whyte 1, A. Stewart 2; Olarloln
priraulus, E. M. Whyte 1, A. Stewart
2; African Marigold, Mrs. H. Smith 1,
C. W. Ludham 2; French Marigold.
E. M, Whyte 1; Nasturtium, Mrs. II.
Smith 1; Single Petunia, Mrs. P. Mclntyre 1; Pansles, E. M. Whyte 1. Mrs.
Herbert Smith 2; Phlox, dnmiondi.
E. M. Whyte 1; Roses, E. M. Whyte 1;
Sweet Peas, Mrs. Herbert Smith 1, A.
Tyrell 2; Stocks, Mrs. H. Smith 1;
Salpiglossis, Mrs. Herbert Smith;
Zinnias, M. S. Stephens 1, E. M. Whyte
2; Collection Annuals, E. Jl. Whyte 1,
T. Stewart 2; Collection Perennials,
E. M. Whyte 1. T. Stewart 2; Hanging
Basket. Mrs. R. K. Cairns; Collection
Pot Plants, Mrs. R. K. Cairns 1; Decorated Table, Mrs. Herbert Smith 1.
Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2.
Domestic Science
Cooking—Collection of jellies. Mrs.
E. M, Whyte 1, Mrs. C. If. Adey 2;
Canned Raspberries, Mrs. J. It. Sldgwlck 1. Mrs. F. Kerton 2; Canned
Loganberries, Mrs. J. K. Sldgwlck 1,
Edith Sldgwlck 2; Canned Strawberries, Mrs. Ahe Orr 2; Canned Cherries
Jlrs. G. J, Turner 1, Mrs. W. J. Andrews 2; Canned Plums. Mrs. C. II.
Hughes 2; Canned Peaches, Jlrs. C.
H. Hushes 1, Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2;
Canned Pears, Jlrs. R. K, Cairns 1,
Jlrs. E. M. Whyte 2; Collection Canned Fruits. Mrs. R. K. Cairns 1, Jlrs.
C. H. Adey 2; Canned Salmon, Jlrs.
C. J. Turner 1. Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2;
Canned Chicken, Jlrs. C. H. Hughes 1.
Jlrs. R. K. Cairns 2; Loganberry jam,
Mrs. C. H. Aden. 1, Mrs. W. J. Andrews
2; Strawberry jam, Mrs. R. K; Cairns
2; Raspberry jam, Mrs. F. W. Tull 1.
Mrs. C. H. Hughes 2; Collection o!
jam, Mrs. R. K. Cairns 1. Jlrs. ('. H,
Adey 2; Orange Marmalade, .Mrs. W.
J. Andrews 1, Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2;
Raspberry Vinegar, Mrs. C. Hughes 1,
Mrs. R. K. Cairns and .Mrs. G. J. Turner 2; Mixed Pickles, sweel: .Mrs. f.
H. Hughes 1, Jlrs. R. K. Cairns and
Mrs. G. J. Turner 2; Jlixed Pickles.
sour, Mrs. J. L. Turner 1, Jlrs. C. II.
Hughes 2; Pickled Onions, .Mrs. ('. II
Hughes 1, Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2; Pickled
Beets Mrs. C. H. Hughes 1, Jlrs. 0.
»
 K'
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BHEAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
Jl. Whyte 2; Canned Peas, Jlrs. C. II.
Hughes 1. Jlrs. R. K. Cairns 2; Canned Deans. .Mrs. C. H. Hughes 1, Jlrs.
L. G. Edwards 2; Canned Corn, Jlrs.
C. H. Hughes 1, Jlrs. R. K. Cairns 2;
: Canned Tomatoes, Mrs. C. H. Hughes
11,. Jlrs. G. .1. Turner ami .Mrs. R. K.
Cairns 2;  Loaf White Bread, home-made. Mrs. It. Carter 1, Jlrs. J. Blake-
I ly  2;   Quaker  Flour   Dread.  Jlrs.  J.
Blakely 1. .Mrs. Cornwell 2;  Wliole-
: Wheat   Dread,   Jlrs.   E.   M.   Whyte   1,
* Jlrs. .1. Blakely 2, Jlrs. J. G. McQulnn
3;   .Milk   Rolls,   Jlrs.   J.   Blakely   1;
Fruil   Cake,  Mrs.  R.  K.  Cairns  and
| Jlrs. It. Ilrldges 1. Jlrs. G. J. Turner
i2; (linger Bread, .Mrs. E. Jl. Whyte 1,
i -Mrs. L. G. Edwards 2; Cookies, .Mrs.
J. G. McQulnn  1.  .Mrs. J. Blakely 2;
linking Powder Biscuits, Jlrs. J. Blak-
I ely 1. Jlrs. R. K. Cairns 2; Doughnuts.
Mrs. J. Blakely 1, .Mrs. E. Jl. Whyte 2;
I Layer Cake. .Mrs. R. K. Cairns 1, Mrs.
It.  Ilrldges  ■>,  Jlrs.  I).  Jl.   Isenor 3;
| Apple I'le. .Mrs. J. G. McQulnn 1, Mrs.
|R. I*. Hurford 2;  Lemon Pie, Jlrs. J.
IBlakely I. .Mrs. It. K. Cairns 2.
|    Neodlework—Yoke, .Mrs. J. Jl. Williamson   1;   Dollies,   Jlrs.  E.   Illitch-
lielil 1; Mis. Kenneth Grieve 2; Ladies
Wool Dross, Jllss Wlnnifred Ball 1;
Chllds  Wool  Dress; Jlrs. E. Muir  1;
ciiiiiis    Wool   Socks.   Jlrs.   Herbert
Smith   t;   Daily's   Wool  Jacket.  Jlrs.
Herbert   Smith;   White  center-piece,
Jlrs. I-I. Bllchfleld 1. .Mrs. Ii. Cairns 2;
Centerpiece  colors.   .Mrs.   it.  Cairns;
Pair Pillow Slips, Jlrs. It. K. Cuirns;
Sideboard Scarf. Jlrs. E. Uliclificld 1.
.Mrs. It. IC. Cairns 2; Pair doilies emh..
Jlrs. H. Hllclilleld 1. .Mrs. It. K. Cairns
2; Tray cloth emh.. .Mrs. E. Bllchfleld
1. Jlrs. R. K. Cairns 2; Teh Cloth, Jlrs.
E,  Bllchfleld  1,  .Mrs. T.  IC.   Bunks  2.
,    Applique work, .Mrs. R. K. Cairns 2;
Luncheon Set. Jlrs.  Kenneth Grieve;
[ Chain stitch emb., Jlrs. R. Cairns 1.
; Jlrs. (i. J. Turner 2; Cross stitch emb.,
Jlrs. It. K, Cairns 1. Jlrs. G. J. Turner 2; .Monogram on table linen, Jlrs.
It. k*. Cairns 1. .Marjorie Hopkins 2;
: Monogram on handkerchief, Jlrs. R. K.
Cairns   I. .Mrs.   P.   Hellan   2;   Guest
(towel emb., .Mrs. E. Bllchfleld 1, Jlrs.
R. K. Cairns 2; Set of ladles Undies,
Jlrs.  R.  K.  Cuirns;   Child's  summer
dress, Jlrs. 11. K. Cairns 1, Jlrs. G. L.
[Cairns 2;  Chililss  winter dross, Jlrs.
R.  K. Cairns;  Fancy apron.  .Mrs.  It.
K. Cuirns 1, .Miss Ina Smith 2;Hand-
made nlghl  dress, Jlrs. It. K. Cairns
I. .Mrs. G. J. Turner 2; Hand-made
slip. Jlrs. R. K. Cairns; Kitchen Apron. Jlrs. It. K. Cairns 1. Jlrs. Robt.
Bridges 2; Buttonholes, Jlrs. E. Bllch-
fleld 1. Jlrs. It. K. Cairns 2; Darned
stockings, Jlrs. E. Bllchfleld 1, Jlrs. It.
K. Cairns 2; Pillow Slips Crochet
edge, .Mrs, R. K. Cnlrns; Articles
made from flour sacks. Jlrs. R. K.
Calms 1. Jlrs. Herbert Smith 2; Bedspread emb., Jlrs, It. K. Cairns 1, Jlrs.
II. IC Cairns 2; Tatting, Jlrs. R. K.
Cairns; Buffet set emb., .Mrs. Cairns;
.Irlisllc Work
Hand-made Toy, Rodney Beavan;
Waler colour, George C. Edwards;
Collection Photographs, A. D. Gregson 1. Frank Plggott 2; Pen and Ink
drawing. .Marjorie Leedham 1, Geo. C.
Edwards 2; Sample home spun cloth.
Jlrs. G. Thomas.
Children's Classes
Heifer cull*, senior. Frank Everett; J
Heifer cull*, junior, R. Pringle 1, John
Avenl 2; Ewe or wether lamb. Claud
Smith 1. Sidney Smith 2; While Wyandotte pullett, Roy .Morrison 1 and 2;
While    Wyandotte   Cockerel,    Frank
Adey 1. Frank Hurford 2; While Leghorn   Pullet-,   Graeme   JlcJIonnlcs   1,
Dorothy   Smith   2;   While   Leghorn
Cockerel.   Phillip   Le   JIare;    Rhode
Island Red Pullet, .Margery.Kerton 1, |
Glndys Kerton 2;  Rhode  Islund Rid ■
Cockerel, Gladys Kerton  l. Margery J
Kerton 2; Writing by child under 11.
Phyllis Capes 1. Leonard Avent 2;
Writing by child under 15, Evelyn
Owen 1, John Avent 2; Painting hy
child under 15, John Avent 2; Collection of B, C. wood and foliage. Jack
Gregson I, Phillip Le JIare 2; Collection of Ilowers mounted ami pressed.
Pearl Lupton 1, John Avent 2; Collection local photographs, Jack Gregson; Collection insects, Jnck Gregson.
Vegetables A- l-lowers
Largest Pumpkin, Kathleen On- l.
Jack Stephens 2; Hubbard Squash.
Ruth Thomas 1, Douglas Thomas 2;
[Vegetable .Marrow, W. L. Hodgson jr.
,1. John Le JIare 2; Citron, Jlirren
Thomas 1, Robert Hornal 2; Cucumber, Waller Edwards I; Corn. Walter
Edwards 1. W. L. Hodgkin jr.. 1;
Green Peas, Roy .Morrison 1. Walter
Edwards 2; Beets. Walter Edwards 1.
John Isenor 2; Onions, Jimmy Thomas 1. W. L. Hodgkin jr. 2; Carrots,
Roy .Morrison 1. John Isenor 2; Pnr-
snips, Walter Edwards 1. John Le
JIare 2; Potatoes, curly. Hoy Morris
on 1. John Isenor 2; Potatoes, late,
.Mnrgaiel Kulght 1. John isenor 2;
Outdoor Tomatoes, Doris Mulch, rs I
John Isenor 2; Cabbage. John Isenor
1, Jack Stephens 2; Sweet Peas, Phillip Lo ..Mure l. Walter Edwards 2;
Nnsturliliins, John Le Mure 1, Mar
garet Knight 2; Asters. David Avent;
Collection Cut Flowers, Charles Loed
hum 1, Gladys Kerton 2; Collectloi
Vegetables, John Isenor. I, W. :.
Hodgkin 2, Phillip Le JIare 3.
Needlework—Girls under Is
! Crochet yoke, Pearl Lupton; Knitted wool sweater, Irene Smith; Knitted baby's bonnet, Irene Smith.
! Girls under 14—Dressed Doll, Evelyn Hilton;Fanc y apron. Margaret
Crockett; Crochet yoke. Evelyn Hilton; Patch on cotton goods. Evelyn
Owen l. Jlnry Stewart 2; Handmade
handkerchief, Evelyn Owen 1. Mary
Stewart 2.
Conking
Under 16—Layer cake. Marjorie
Hopkins 1. Morgarel Crockett 2; Pie,
apple, Phillip Le JIare 1, Barbara
Crockett 2; Unking Powder Biscuits,
Jean Dingwall 1, Roberta Hopkins- 2
Under M—Layer cake, Walter Carter 1, Olive Anderton 2; Lout white
bread, Olive Anderton 1. Margaret
Knight 2; Apple Pie, Olive Anderton
1. Jeun Dingwall 2.
Get the Habit-
Visit the Ilo-llo and
Gaiety Theatres
A prize of $ltU00 weekly, offered
by a Chicago publication for a deed
rf bravery, comes to Canada for
the'first time. J. B. PartticImg, fireman on the Cana.lhin Pacific Railway, on the run between Calgary,
Alta., and Field, B.C., is to receive
the reward for saving the lives of
five men who were in danger from
a huge rock and mud slide on tho
Field Hill, August 21  last.
RE~
y
Now is
the time
to Eat
Comox Creamery Pure
Jersey Ice Cream
SOLD AT YOUR FAVORITE FOUNTAIN
REMEMBER OUR OTHER   PRODUCTS—
COMOX BRAND POTATOES, COMOX WHOLE WHEAT FLOW*, COMOX GRADED
EGGS, COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C.
Canadian roses grown at Brampton, Ontario, and sent to Sir George
McLaren Brown, European general
manager of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, stationed in London, score I
a decided hit with Londoners. Large
crowds gathered to see the Canadian I
blooms which wcre on display in |
the windows of the offices of (he
Canadian Pacific Railway in Trafalgar Square.
LOST—White Gold Wedding Ring,
engraved. Will Under please return
same to  Islander Oilice. Ii
LOST—Navy Leather Hill Hook with
sum of money. Reward on return
lo Islander Olllce.
h'dlt SALE—Five Passenger Chevrolei
Atilomohile; a Snap I'or cash. }200.
Also Household Furniture, Apply
in John AloWhirter. Camp. "!S-!i
Kill! SALE—8 Milking Cows. ApplJ
Sid Hunt, Rural Route Xo. 1, Cum-
berland, II. (.'. 87-8f
POR 8<UiE—AUTUMN FL0WBR8, lu
eluding Chrysanthemums, Asters
Carnations, Roses, etc. .Apply Mrs.
It. It. McQUillam, I'nlon Uay Road,
Courtenay,   i'hone 20.
RANCH FOR SAI.K ;Contulning 00
acres, 10 acreH cleared, orchard
bearing. Six-roomed House and
buildings, etc. Situate close to Xo.
8 .Mine and known as Perez Park
Ranch, Por further Information
apply to owner, M. Perez, Royston.
:i7-:is
FOR QUICK SALE—4 roomed House
with Pantry, cheap for cash. -?17ia.
Also good Cooking Stove uml Wicker Huby Buggy, cheap. Apply Box
80, Cumberland. 11 j
1
WANTED—We    want    cars.   If   you:
have a car and need cash, write or
call  B.  0,  Motor  Exchange  Ltd., I
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     t.f.n. I
Ilo-llo   Theatre
Friday, Saturday, Sept. 17, 18
MATT MOORE, ZASU PITTS
and KATHRYN PERRY in
"Early to Wed"
also the sensation picture of the year
WILLIAM POX
presents
FLOOD
Monday, September 20
Harry Carey in
THE PRAIRIE
PIRATE
Tuesday, September 21
MANNEQUIN
Fannie Hurst's $50,000 Liberty
Magazine Prize Story with
Alice Joyce and Warner
Baxter co-stars
Wednesday, Thursday, Sept. 22, 23
Big Double Attraction
Jack Hoxie
with Scout the wild mare in
The White Outlaw
and
Laura La Plante
"The Teaser"
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 24-25
WILLIAM S. HART in
TUMBLEWEED
. a tremendous romantic drama of tht great
West I-' the only tcrcon star who know* thai
vast region an<1 the ways of its vaster pcopl*.
hit'iory is
recorded in
heart thr   .'.
iit a great
{HaWc stirring
epic depicting
frontier life,
its hardships
arid its joys.
Story by dial G. &1
CUaptedJbrthe Screen
by C. Gardner SulUiKot
Directed  by........
King Baggot, PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.
New Garments for Baby
The largest assortment of garjnents for Baby we have
ever placed in stock, are now on view.
Baby's Cream Cashmere Dresses, silk embroidered.
A really good selection to choose a dress for Baby.
White Silk Dresses in sizes 16 and 18, heavy quality
silk, smartly trimmed.
Silk Caps, wool lined, a cosy Cap for Baby.
Silk Caps, unlined, in Cream, Blue and Pink.
Baby's Wool Bonnets, a variety that will give great
pleasure to anyone desiring something smart for Baby.
Baby's White Wool Pullover, with and without feet,
keep Baby warm.
Baby's Wool Coats, a splendid assortment of dainty
Coats.
Baby's Overalls in Wool, white only.
Baby's Panties, all wool.
—For Baby's Clothes—
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr. John Newman, of the Townsite,
Cumberland, returned to his home last
week after spending the past few
weeks at Harrison Hot Springs. Mr.
Newman, who has not been in the
best of health, returns from the famous Hot Springs very much benefitted
by his stay there and speaks In glowing terms of the treatment and service
received at the new Harrison Springs
Hotel.
* *   *
Rev. James and Mrs. Hood were
j visitors to Cumberland during the
week, returning to the capital city
Thursday.
.   .   .
; MrB. C. V. Dando returned to Cumberland Saturday last after a week's
holiday spent with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Hugh Mtlchell, Extension.
* *   •
i Mrs. Harry Bryan, Maryport Ave.,
! arrived home on Thursday, after
spending the past three months in
the City of Victoria, undergoing medical treatment. Her many friends will
be pleased to hear of her improvement in health.
* *   *
Mr. Douglas Sutherland left yesterday morning to resume his studies at
the Portland Dental College, Portland,
Oregon.
UP-ISLAND FOOTBALL
TO OPEN WITH AN
EXHIBITION GAME
An exhibition game of football has
been arranged between the newly
organized Canadian Collieries team
and the Xanaimo eleven, to be played
at Nanaimo on Sunday, and we are
given to understand that Nanaimo will
play a return game at Cumberland,
probably on the 2nd of October.
Nanaimo will have sixteen signed
players to choose from. Eight of
them are pure-bred local juniors,
most of whom have risen from the
ranks of local juniors' football. Tait,
Edmonds, Perry, Knight, Wilson and
Thompson are counted as former
junior players, while their ranks will
be added to this year by the inclusion of Sandland and F. Bell. The
veterans of the line-up. and who have
learned their football in other company, include Routledge, McFarlane,
Stobbart, Clarke, Husband and Mlmo.
No choice has been made from the
above players for Sunday's game.
Cumberland players reported to
have signed Include Orr, Stewart,
Monaghan, Brake, Plump, Hitchens,
Fowler and Conti. All Ladysmith
players, lt is expected, will be signed
up this week-end, and with the inclusion of one or two new faces,
first class team should be built up.
WARNING TO COURTENAY
3 Bad Men are coming to town but
don't shoot for the 3 Bad Men are
dead shots themselves. Watch your
step!    Be cool!
"3 Bad Men," cast of 25,000, with
George O'Brien and Olive Borden, will
be at the Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay,
on October 21, 22 and 23. Greater
than "The Covered Wagon" ami with
more covered wagons than "The
Covered Wagon."
Attractions  Gaiety   Theatre  Courtenay
This Saturday
Tuesday, September 21
Harry Carey in
THE PRAIRIE
PIRATE
Wednesday, Thursday, Sept. 22, 23
Kvuot murderous moors and red-blooded rom/iuce
WILLIAM" FOX fments
WINDING
S
As Good as
ever
LANGS CREAM
OF LILIES
50 cents per bot.
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
tUMBLEWEQtf
Not a Cowboy Picture
Monday, September 20
MANNEQUIN
Fannie Hurst's $50,000 Liberty
Magazine Prize Story with
Alice Joyce and Warner
Baxter co-stars
Ire-. tktnMllf
A.liWtlASON
■with
'HMUND LOWE
ALMA RUBENS
WARNER OLMD
lUiM HWIIIM
EHILY FITZR0Y
.CHESTER CONKUN
Jceturieif JULIAN U'hOIHE
JOHN Giff ITH Wm«>
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 24-25
The Johnstown
Flood
Jbrd
Good Buys
OVERLAND TOURING  _... $150
OVERLAND TOURING   $235
OVERLAND LT. DELIVERY   $275
DODGE TOURING   $225
MacLAUGHLIN TOURING   $200
MacLAUGHLIN TOURING   $225
FORD TOURING   $ 85
Look these over for Hunting
at
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
Phones <|6 and 182 Courtenay, B. C.
"JOHNSTOWN FLOOD"
WIDELY DISCUSSED
AS BIG PHOTOPLAY
Theatre-goers know a good picture
when they aee it.
This la an accepted view ot the
majority nl theatre-managers ot the
United States, and "Tho Johnstown
Flood" a dramatic narrative woven
around one ni the most famous disasters of all time, the devastating Inundation of Johnstown, Pennsylvania
in 1890, is drawing crowds which
comes to the Ilo-llo Theatre tonight
(Friday) and tomorrow night.
The great dramatic quality of the
production and thu magiiitudinous
scenes depleting the washing away of
entire cities and town sit s have created no end of discuslon among the
reviewers of the hig drama to dutc.
and Ihe speedy action of tlle play has
developed extraordinary praise from
patrons, It. is asserted.
"The Johnstown Flood" produced by
Fox Films under the direction of Irving Cummings deals with the calamity
which shocked tlie world und brought
to the fore legislative activity and Inspection of thc great water strongholds of the nation, which no doubt
prevented a similar occurrence In
many sections.
While the magnitude of such a
theme is one of sufficient strength to
hold interest there Is also a dramatic
adventure Intertwined wth the historical narrative which contains so
ninny thrills of original alld Interesting nature.
George O'Brien In the lending male
role is adequate assurance that the
part will be well handled. Opposite
tlie stalwart, star are two players of
sterling talent. Janet Qaynor, a new
Fox Films dramatic find, and Florence
CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY
Today Is thc anniversary of the reestablishing of our business, and we
take this opportunity of thanking our
many patrons lor the confidence, they
have bestowed In us. Today we have
patrons who have been dully dining
at our establishment for the past ten
years, whicli Is tlie evidence of quality
and satisfaction.
McBryde's Bakery and
Courtenay Tea Booms.
CARD OF-THANKS
1 wish to litank all those kind
friends who assisted In making the
recent benefit dance the financial success it was, particularly Mr. Bickle
who donated thc Ilo-llo Hall und the
printing, Thanks arc also extended
.Mrs. Hudson, Mr, Walker, Mr. Newman and Jlr. McLellan, who provided
the music; St. John's Altar Society
for providing refreshments, and most
particularly Mrs. Hayman, who worked so hard to assure the success of
the dance.
Mrs. Mclllfatrlck.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. J. Walter and family tender
heartfelt thanks to all those friends
who, by their timely assistance and
expressions of sympathy, did so much
to alleviate the pnln occasioned by the
death of a loving wife nnd mother.
Gilbert portray the chief roles of feminine interest. In other strong supporting roles are such players as
Anders Randolf, Max Davidson, Paul
Panzer, Paul Nicholson and Walter
Perry.

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