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The Cumberland Islander Feb 28, 1920

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 9.
With which is consolidated the Cumberland Jews.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH COLUMBI A, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1920.
GOVERNMENT INSURANCE
HANDED TO A MINISTER
FIRM OR WHICH PROVINCIAL MINISTER OF FINANCE IS A
LEADING MEMBER WALKS OFF WITH NICE PLUM IN
THE SHAPE OF INSURANCE ON THE PACIFIC GREAT
EASTERN PROPERTY TO THE AMOUNT OF NO LES%
THAN $2,241,000, WITHOUT EVEN TENDERING FOR IT.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Special Despatch to The Islander.
Victoria, Feb. 27.—Messrs. Gillespie, Hart & Todd Limited of
Victoria, the firm of which Hon. John Hart, minister of finance, is
a leading member, has walked off with a nice plum in the shape of
insurance on the Pacific Great Eastern property to the amount of
no less than $2,241,970. And they got it despite the fact that
while tenders were.called for by the government, they did not
tender but were awarded the business at a figure considrably
higher than that bid by well-known fire insurance -concerns.
This is the information secured by the opposition through
questions asked of the government. It is one instance of the importance, from the opposition standpoint, of the right to quiz the
government. Only by that method can the intimate details of
.government administration—and its solicitude for its friends—
oft-times be secured.
The Victoria firm with which the finance minister is connected
was awarded the insurance on the government-owned property at
a rate of forty-two cents per $100. Bids were received, according
to the government advertisement, from the following firms only:
United States Fire Insurance Company, New Jersey Insurance
Company, Stuyvesant Insurance Company and the Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania,- at thirty-five cents; the Home
Insurance Company of New York, at fifty cents, and the British
Crown Assurance Company, an Old Country concern with assets
of $90,000,000, at forty cents. But despite these lower figures,
Hon. Mr. Hart's firm got the business for a Yankee concern they
represent.
Another item of interest was that the Victoria Daily Times, a
strong party organ, was paid $1500 of the people's money for publishing matter supplied by the government and published in a
recent special edition of that paper.
Mayor Macdonajd's Appeal
To the People ot Cumberland:
Because it has an Important bearing on civic welfare in Cumberland, as. well as on individual welfare in countless cases, I
feel tt m duty to call attention to the well-conceived Father and
Son movement.
The purpose is admirable. Anthlng that tends to bring father
and son more Intimately together cannot but be beneficial to
themselves and the community.
I believe that fathers can do more than any others to stem
the great and alarming tide of wawyardness in youth and the
dropping out ot school which carries many boys out Into the
world unlit to take their proper places.
Many boys grow to manhood virtually Ignorant of even the
simplest processes of government. These every father can explain to his son. The son in every case should become better
than his father—that marks progress.
The Father and Son events that are coming will suggest
many ways in which fathers may gain more completely the confidence of their sons, with all that It means of effective guidance
and unresented control.
I therefore call upon the fathers of this city and request
their co-operation in this important movement by attending with
their sons the banquet on Thursday night, March 4, in the Parish
Hall at 6:30 o'clock. I hope the men who have no sons will befriend the boys who have no fathers.
(Signed) D. A. MACDANALD,
Mayor.
CITY FIRE FIGHTERS
DO SPLENDID WORK
MEN SENT HERE BY THE FIRE UNDERWRITERS PAY
TRIBUTE TO THE MEN WHO GUARD THE CITY FROM
FLAMES—APPARATUS DECLARED TO BE VERY GOOD.
WHILE WATER PRESSURE IS EQUAL TO REQUIREMENTS—CITY NEEDS A THOROUGH CLEANING UP,
SAYS INSURANCE MEN.
Government to Complete Shipbuilding
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Ottawa, Feb. 27.—Hon- Mr. Ballantyne, Minister of Marine,
stated today that the government would ask parliament for a vote
of $20,000,000 to complete the government mercantile marine
shipbuilding programme which called for a total of sixty-two
ships. Of these thirty had already been launched while a number
of others are being built. Hon. Mr. Ballantyne would give no
information with regard to the government's naval policy. Lord
Jellicoe's report is now being printed and it is thought it will be
known as soon as it is out of the hands of the printers. It may be
brought before the House within a week. Asked whether the
government proposed introducing any legislation based on the
report the minister would say nothing. All the information he-
would give was to the effect that the government had decided on
a course which it is proposed to pursue, but it was premature to
make an announcement at present.
Soviet Promises to Stabalize Conditions
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Washington, Feb. 27.—In the new peace proposal to the great
powers reported in official dispatches today , the Soviet of Russia
pledges the establishment of democratic principles in Russia-and
the calling of a constituent assembly. It promises further to*
withdraw the decree annulling Russia's foreign debt. In return
and in addition to the formal peace treaties the Soviet governmeni
will require Great Britain and other countries to abandon all
intervention in Russian affairs. It % also, proposed that thc
United States allow a credit to Russia conditioned upon considerable concessions in that country.
[Joint Move to
Recognize Soviet
Resolution   Offered  in   United
States Senate With that
End in View.
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Washington, Feb. 27.—A Joint resolution providing tor the recognition
of tbe Soviet of Russia was offered In
the Senate today by Senator France
of Maryland, Republican. It was referred to the Senate foreign relations
committee.
Premiers Answer
Wilson Quickly
Little Time Wasted in Replying
to President on Question of
Adriatic Settlement.
Bevan Notes
Canada Given Assurances  of  Status
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
New York, Feb. 27.—The New York Times prints a letter
from George Wrong, professor of history in'the University of
Toronto, in which Canada's position in regard to the League of
Nations is clearly set forth. Forceful arguments are presented
in support of the contention that the Dominion of Canada must
not yield her place to satisfy any demands of the United States
senate. The letter reviews the political growth of the Dominion
towards full nationhood which culminated in the experience of the
Great War and the latest step towards the organization of the
Canadian diplomatic system. "When this is achieved," says the
professor, "representatives of Canada will negotiate directly at
foreign capitals with foreign governments and Canada's national
life, complete in domestic affairs, will be complete too as regards
other natiohs. Canada went into the war on her own motion and
not through any urging from Great Britain." It was at the request of the Prime Minister of Canada that the declaration was
signed on May 6,1919, by the President of the United States, the
Premier of France and the Premier of Great Britain, to the effect
that no limitation would be placed-on the rights of Canada as a
nation to be a full member of the League of Nations, quite inde
pendently of Great Britain.
A little mishap occurred on Thursday night, when three of Bevan's
"hoppers" who were travelling to
Cumberland to attend the dance via a
'speeder," left the rails and Ralph's
dancing foot was reduced to "D" class
for tbe big occasion.
Work on the building of the new
lumber mill will Boon begin. The boilers, brickwork and some of the machinery have already arrived from
Headquarters. When completed, this
will be one of the finest mills In the
district.
The petition for tbe road between
Bevan and Headquarters has been
largely signed by tbe local residents.
Mr. Bert Davis will leave for Nanaimo shortly, where he Intends to reside. Bert will be greatly missed on
the local ball team and his position
will not be an easy one to fill.
Mrs. A. C. Wright arrived ln Bevan
on Saturday and will reside here.
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Paris, Feb. 27.—Premiers Mlllerand
and Lloyd Oeorge were able to quickly
reply to President Wilson's note regarding the Adriatic. In line with
their action Premier Nltti ot Italy haB
consented to enter Into fresh negotiations with M. Trumblch, Jugo-Slav
foreign minister, says Pertlnax, political editor of Echo de Paris. The
British and Italian premiers therefore
hastened to make known this new
Italian concession to President Wilson,
begging blm to use his good offices to
facilitate an agreement. Their note
to this effect was received at the White
House today.
TWO FIRES OCCUR IN
RAPID SUCCESSION
AT THE CITY CHURCHES.
Sugar Prices Likely to Ascend Again
(Special Dispatch to The Islander.)
Ottawa, Feb. 27.—An increase in the retail prices of sugar
may follow the abrogation of the sugar control by the board of
commerce. Retailers recently pressed their appeal to the board
for permission to take a profit of three cents per pound instead
of one cent and a half allowed under the control. Now that the
fixed price is abolished a rise in the retail price seems likely.
Holy Trinity Anglican—8:30 a.m.,
holy communion; 11 a.m., Sandwick;
3:30 p.m., Royston School; 7 p.m.,
Cumberland. Lenten service every
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
St. George's PresbyterlanThe usual
Sunday services will be held tomorrow.
Grace Methodist—Services wlll be
held tomorrow at the usual hours.
Fire Fighters Hare a Run Near Mid.
night and Another at Noon Ihe
Following Day.
At about 11 o'clock on Thursday
night an alarm of fire was sounded for
a blate In the east end of the city, In
a house occupied by Mr, Peter Camllle
and Mr. D. Tasso. The brigade was
quickly on the spot and succeeded in
extinguishing the fire before it had
done further damage than destroying
the roof. AH the contents of tbe building were saved.
At noon on Friday the brigade was
again called out this time to the home
ot Mr. John Gibson, where lire had
caught In the roof. This waB also
extinguished in short order, the loss
being not more than $15. In the latter
Instance the brigade was back In the
hall after having put out the Are in
about twelve minutes, which Is considered a very good record.
Fortunately the representatives of the fire underwriters were
here and on the main street when the alarm sounded calling the
department to a fire at the home of Mr. John'Gibson, because they
were given the opportunity of getting first-hand information as
to the efficiency of the brigade. The two representatives are Mr.
F. C- Broadfoot and Mr. F. F. Dowling. From the time the alarm
first sounded until the firemen were back in their hall again only
twelve minutes elapsed. And it must be understood that no
member of the fire department nor any city official was aware that
the fire insurance men were in town.
Messrs. Broadfoot and Dowling were sent here to look into the
conditions prevailing iff this city with regard to fire protection,
and their introduction to the fire department came under most
auspicious circumstances. Later on in the day these gentlemen
got in touch with Chief Banks and Deputy Chief Parnham of the
fire brigade, and arrangements were made to test the water pressure under conditions such as would prevail during the course of
a fire. Accordingly two lines of hose were attached to the hydrant
at the corner of First street and Dunsmuir avenue and one at the
corner of Second street.
At the first test all three lines were used at the same time.
Of the two at First street, one had a 3-4 inch nozzle while the
other was 1 1-4 inch, and the Second street nozzle was 1 1-4 inch.
When the full force was turned on it was found that the nozzle
pressure of the two at First street was 30 and 20 pounds, respectively, while at Second street it was 30 pounds. At the second
test only the two at First street were used and the pressure was
found to be 40 and 30 pounds, respectively. When the three
j streams were running there passed out of thc nozzles 592 gallons
'of water,and when but two were in use there were 400 gallons.
While the three streams were in use the pressure on the water
mains was 80 pounds, and when two were used the pressure was
100 pounds. In each instance the pressure on the water mains
before the hydrants were opened was 140 pounds.   -
Speaking of the tests afterwards, Mr. Broadfoot stated he was
well satisfied with what he had seen. The department, he said,
was a good one. At his request an alarm was sounded unknown
to the men in the evening, and within one minute after the bell
sounded twelve firemen were at the hall ready for duty. He had
also watched their work in the afternoon with pleasure.
Regarding other conditions in the city, Mr. Broadfoot did not
have such nice things to say. He had been looking around and
had discovered that people were in the habit of piling ashes
against the fences in the rear of their buildings. This, he said,
was a great source of danger. There were also too many small
"shacks" in the rear of the main business places which besides
being dangerous were a great hindrance to the firemen in doing
their work. If the city were given a thorough cleaning and overhauling and useless and dangerous outbuildings removed, there
should be no reason why the insurance rates could not be lowered.
Ip conversation with Mayor MacDonald Mr. Broadfoot and Mr.
Dowling stated they were here to work with and not against the
civic authorities and they were ready to give them every assistance and advice in order to lessen the danger of loss from fire.
Testing of the water pressure will be continued this morning,
when four and possibly five streams will be utilized tit the same
time.
Yukon Has Gone
to Dry Column
(Spcclul Disputed tu The Islander.)
Dawson, Feb. 27. -Incomplete figures in connection with the Yukon
territorial-wide liquor plebiscite indicate that the area is shortly to become as "dry" as the rest of Canada.
Thos. Hodgson left for Victoria on
Monday.
Mrs. Thomas Michell left for Vancouver on Thursday.
Donations Acknowledged.
Miss Brown, matron of the Cumberland General Hospital, wishes to acknowledge with thanks tbe following
donations received during the past
month: Mrs. Slmlster, sack of sugar;
Football Club, cake; Mrs. Hamilton,
Union Bay, box of apples.
P. S. Fagan of Victoria, assistant
secretary of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, arrived at Union
Bay on Friday.
Constable Promoted.
Constable J. Healey, who has been
stationed nt Cumberland since August,
1919, has been promoted to corporal
aud transferred to Nunalinu, where he
is in charge of that detachment. Constable W. Bolous of Gsqulmalt is replacing Constable Healey at Cumberland.
W. Matthewson and W. Horwood,
who have been the guests of Mrs. S.
Horwood for the past month, left for
Revelstoke on Saturday.
Yankees Want
Canadian Pulp
(Special IMmxiIWi I*i Tin* Islander.)
Washington. Feb. 27.--TI10   Senate
today adopted (ho I'mlerwuod roaolU-
llon to create n commission to negotiate with Camilla regarding modification of tht' embargo nn wood pulp uml
prin'. paper
James M. Savage of Victoria general
manager of the Canadian Collieries,
accompanied by Mrs. Savage, arrived
ou Tuesday nnd a*e staying at Beau
fort House, the official residence or
the Canadian Collieries.
To Import Bees
By Air Route
Spcclul Hcspiifrli lo The Islander.
Birmingham, Alabama, Feb. 27.
Canadian beekeepers are lo receive
$1,100 worth of houoymakors by airplane, according to an announcement
made by (he Alabama Apiary today.
The Announcement stales tills shipment marks (lie solution of transportation difficulties in shipment of bees
"'or long distance for breeding purposes.
A. Wilkinson left for Vancouver on
Monday and returned ou Tuesday.
W. A. Owen, cojl.truetlan engineer
M the Canadian Collieries, returned
WmhllJKiinv
from Van Page Two
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B.C.
February 28,1920.
Music and Photoplays
The Chernta'vsky Trio at its appear
ant-e recently with the Los Angele
Symphony Orchestra, that newest an-,
very thriving organization in thr
southern city, received great praise foi
its work. Their programme included
the Tschaikowsky violin concerto in D
major by Leo Cherntavsky, the Ool-
tennan 'cello concerto by Mlschel
Cherniavsky and Ihe Liszt phantaisc
for piano and orchestra by Jan Cherniavsky. The Los Angeles newapaper
critics spoke in Ihe warmest terms ol
their performance. There is a possibility of these talented brothers joining the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the near future:
a     a     a
At last Ethelbert Nevin's most popular piano piece. "Narcissus," has been
arranged as a song. John Marten, whr
lias arranged the lovely theme, has
realized that the main theme is not r
vocal one, accordingly he lias written
for the piano accompaniment the piano
piece ns written by the composer, and
against it has written a counter-subject for tlie voice to words by P. C
Warren. In the middle section, where
Nevin got away from his key a bit
Mr. Martel has handled the voter
freely, always In taste, using contrary
motion between the piano and the
voice at times, with excellent results,
and always in keeping in the spirit of
the composition. The last lime that the
melody appears Mr. Martel gives It to
the voice, thus saving It till tlie voice
by virtue of the. fact that It has not
sung it In tlie song before, lias a real
opportunity to sing this tune beloved
of all who like "popular favorites."
.   *   •
"A Hebrew Legend," Israel Joseph's
charming violin solo, is being featured
by violinists all over the United
States.
.   .   .
Of all the light operas of the heavenly twins, "G. and S.", "Thc Yeoman of
tlie Ouard" is the most definitely old
English and old Londonish. It Is the
one straight story, without fairies, ot
sorcerers, or farcical judges, or Impossible emperors. It appeals to the
heart, it is dated by the "H. R."—Hen-
rlcus Hex—King Henry on tlie tunies
of the yeomen who guard the Tower
of London; It is considered SulllvanY
best Savoy work, and It is now the
most old-fashioned of them all and
has probably tbe least drawing power.
Strange that the 400-year-old story
should have gone stale In thirty-one
years. "The Yeoman of the Guard"
has a style all its own. In the "Sorcerer" (1877) and "Ruddigore" (1887),
the style Is mostly melodrama-burlesque. In "Iolanthe" (1882) there is
romantic poetry, with fairies and human beings mingling in modern London—quite a new art form—"H. M. S.
Pinafore" (1878) and "Patience"
(1881) are satires on well-known social fads of the periods. "The Mikado,"
with its Japanese lacquer over a body
of tunc and rhythm, wit and rhyme, is
certainly the most popular of the Gilbert and Sullivan productions. If not
tbe most popular comic opera ever
produced. And then there are "The
Pirates of Penzance" (1880), "Princess
Ido" (1884), "The Gondoliers (1889),
and several more.
.   .   .
Probably the most striking operatic
novelty of the season in Europe so far
wns "Tarali-Bulba," by Marcel Samutl-
Roussetau, which was recently produced for tbe first time on any stage
at tho Theatre Lyrique du Vaudeville,
Paris. Tlie libretto, from the story of
I bo same name by Nikolai Gogol,
called "father of modern Russian
realism." as lie lias been credited with
the creation of all the types which we
meet lu tlie great novelists who followed him, is by Louis de Grammont,
who has made a striking work from
the original, omitting much of its
sombreneBB nnd violence. Tho composer, Samuel-Itousseau, was formerly a student at the Conservatoire, wln-
niing tlie Grand Prix de Rome In 1(105.
a    a    a
Old Japan and the younger generation, whether in politics, or social life,
or In music, or ln art, are engaged in
serious conflict. This invades publlc
and private life. A little while ago
several Japanese young men of noble
families organized a dramatic company with a view of studying modem
dramas, with Count Hljlkata as stage
director and Viscount Konoe in'charge
of (he musienl part. Actresses were
selected and arrangements made for a
maiden performance In November
from plays by Maeterlinck. The matter
was duly reported at length In the
press, on wliieh a panic seized the officials of high rank in the department of
tlie imperial household, in whose ethical conception It appears the stage
does not cut a commendable figure.
What happened? The noble aspirants
for musical and dramatic fame were
politely told that the best thing that
they could do would be to break up
the organization.
"When a husband is niggardly
nough to deny his wife an allowance
o do with as she sees'fit, he must ex-
>ect unpleasant situations to aiise in
lis home," opines Margarita Fisher,
vhose latest American production.
'Charge It to To," is a merry farce
revolving around that subject.
"While 'Charge It to Me' Is manl-
.'estly a farce," she added, "it present
an embarrassing condition that is qui
likely to result In any home where Uv
husband insists on paying all tlie bills
and the wife has no rendy cash to me:t
the hundred and one trivial needs that
every woman knows.
"Why, 1 know-nt least* a dozen ma -
•led  women, living  in more or  les"
uxury, who have to humiliate thorn-
elves right along by conniving with
iT-essmakers and tradespeople to 'pad'
he bills and then refund the overpayment when the husband's cheque ai-
■ives.   The women hate to do it, not
nily  because of personal  pride, but
jecause it puts them to a degree at
he mercy of these people.   But what
ire they going to do when stratght-
orward appeals for a regular allow-
.nee meet with nothing but refusals?
"Mabe   some  of   these   wives   who
;ome to see 'Charge It to Me' will
akc a tip from what happens in tlie
case of  Winnie  Davis—that's me in
the   picture—and   stage  a  somewhat
similar ee-opener in their own homes.
Lots of husbands mean all right, but
the old-fashioned ideas of family finance are so firmly planted In  their
Hinds that it takes nothing short ot
an operating or an explosion to sap-
plant  them  with   the   modern   Ideas
which the modern woman insists upon.   'Charge It to Me' ls a little postgraduate course In  domestic  finance
for both hubby and wifle."
Miss Fisher's philosophy Is Interesting, and so Is the way her new picture
sets it forth. "Charge It to Me" will
>e at the Ilb-Ilo Theatre on Wedneis-
lay evening next.
* . *
Grief over the mistaken belief that
lis son is a check forger, causes the
eath of the prominent hanker, James
Warren, in "Her Kingdom of Dreams,"
starring Anita Stewart and which will
ie shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Thursday and Friday evenings.
As his last wish the elderly Mr.
Warren asks that his son Fred marry
his stenographer - secretary, Judith
Rutledge, played by Anita Stewart.
The ceremony is performed and Warren passes away unknowing that the
person who forged the check is tlie
same one who will undermine the
happiness of Judith and Fred.
Judith's marriage to Fred probably
saves the latter the difficulty of a proposal of his own volition for he was
deeply In love with Judith and he felt
that his affection was returned. However, the marriage was performed
under such unusual circumstances
that both Fred and the lovelorn Judith
make efforts at first to conceal their
mutual love.
Reason to believe that Fred sincerely loved her was in process of
fomentation In Judith's mind when a
series of affairs with questionable
women seemed to occupy Fred's atten--
tlon.
How  Judith's   loyalty    nnd    good
judgment served to incite Fred to let
ills wife know that he loves her, forms '
the basis of this most pleasing picture. ,
FINDS CADILLAC TRAVEL
BETTER THAN RAILROADS
Western Trains Invariably I.nte, While
Millar Cur  Hakes Chosen  Points
on Schedule.
"The most Impressive object lesson
I received In the West," says Lynn McNaughton, general sales manager of
the Cadillac Motor Car Company, or
Detroit, "was the difficulty of schedule
travel by train, because all the trains
are running late, and the ease of It
by means of a Cadillac." Mr. Mc
Naughton has just returned from a
trip which took him to the Pacific
coast and back.
"The first time I encountered this
difference was in making a run from
Denver to Colorado Springs. The distance between the two cities is about
70 miles. It takes the trains three
hours to cover the distance. Two hours
is all the time the Cadillac requires.
"In California, in the course of one
week, I travelled 1500 miles ln a
Cadillac. Ont trip In particular was
llllumlnatlng. We were starting from
Oakland at 9.45 In the morning; our
driver said we would be In Sacramento
by 9.30 that evening. We stopped In
Fresno for business and lunch, and
had our dinner at Stockton. At 9.30
In the evening we were in Sacramento.
Everywhere I travelled ln the motor
car we made our schedules in the same
fashion. Nowhere did I encounter a
railroad conductor who would say
exactly how late his train wns, nor
how much time might be made up In
arriving at a given point."
Illllllllll
THE RED MASK OF EVIL hides tht leering face of-Whom?
Lurking in the shadows—spying at all times—clutching at the destiny
of this brave man and his spirited love-mate, this figure of mystery is
ever alert on its mission of terror!
WHO 75 THE RED MASK?
See ANTONIO MORENO and CAROL HOLLOWAY
in VITAGRAPH'S Greatest Melodramatic Mystery Serial
"THE
K-^£«a*£w  iron
TEST"
ILO-ILO f HEATRE
Every Saturday Evening.      •
W •!• iw-iai ..;■ .augBin »* VsUuVhJi.1... .'■    tt       :tts——taanmm—MM
U'lWim isaui  ■■<*.--,:•-;:•. -is   -      .   ■ -
aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
■^
NEXT WEEK
ILO-ILO THEATRE
TONIGHT
THE IRON
TEST NO. 6
Miss
Bessie
Barriscale
IN
Tricks of Fate
Comedy
FATTY'S
HOODOO
DAY
Monday,-March 5
Tom Moore
IN
Toby's Bow
Tuesday, March 2
Mabel Normand
IN
The Pest
Wednesday, March 3
Margarita Fisher
IN
Charge It To Me
Thursday, March 4
V
AND
Friday, March 5
Anita Stewart
IN
Her Kingdom
of Dreams
Son of a Gun
Sunshine Comedy w
February 28,1920.
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Page Three.
ROYSTON ROAD TO RECEIVE
ATTENTION OF GOVERNMENT
Minister of Public Works Informs Board of Trade That Its Representations Regarding That Highway Will Be Investigated and
Action. Taken—Delegate of Board Receives Instructions as to
'"" Matters to Be Brought to the Notice of Authorities at Victoria
—High Insurance Rates Come in for Consideration.
IP the department of public works at Victoria lives up to the
statements contained in a letter which the Board of Trade this
week received from Hon. Dr. King it should hot'be long before
a gang of men are at work repairing the road between Cumberland and Royston. Dr. King's letter was in reply to a communication from the board drawing to his attention the almost impassible
condition of the highway between here and Royston, and the minister stated the representations of the board would receive immediate attention. This was brought out at the meeting of the Cumberland Board of Trade held last Monday evening in the City Hall.
^President G. W. Clinton occupied the chair an<j there was a
large turnout of members, and if the enthusiasm manifested at this
meeting is any indication of the future there will be no doubt as to
the permar. >ncy of the organization this time. Organization has
not been entirely completed, as the members thought it would be
better to. wait until after Mr. Warren, president of the Victoria
Boaord of Trade, had been consulted at the banquet to be given at
the Cumberland Hotel next Wednesday evening. During the meeting the question was brought forward as to the eligibility of members and it was decided to leave the matter in abeyance until after
Mr. Warren had been consulted. The opinion, however, appeared
to be general that the restrictions as to membership should be as
few as possible so as to permit of a much larger body than would
be possible if membership were confined within certain defined
lines. The question of incorporation was also left in abeyance.
President Clinton informed the meetiing that he would not be
able to go to Victoria as the board's representative on the deputation which is to wait upon the government, so that Mr. Youhill, the
alternate, would be the delegate. In.case this gentleman finds he
cannot go, an alternate in the person of Mr. R. Rideout was appointed.
The committee appointed to visit the headquarters of Bloedel,
. Welsh & Stewart and also the Merville settlement made their report, which was received with satisfaction.' The petition which
had been circulated in the Merville settlement had been received
"and contained some seventy-five names. This will be handed to the
board's delegate for use when interviewing the government regarding the connecting up of the Headquarters road with the Cumberland-Be van road. Mr. Lymn also volunteered to go over the proposed road and draw a map for use by the delegate, and that gentleman will also furnish an estimate of the cost of constructing the
road.
Another matter which caused some lively discussion was that
of insurance rates. During the discussion it was brought out that
the rate in Cumberland was 7 per cent., while in Courtenay, which
only had a bucket brigade to furnish fire protection, had a rate of
3 per cent. In view of the fact that Cumberland has a first-class
fire department in conjunction with a water pressure of approximately 150 pounds, the board failed to see any reason why the
Cumberland rate should not be as low, if not lower than that
which obtains in Courtenay. In this connection, Vice-President
Willard, who is going to Victoria with the deputation as a representative of the Sel. jol Board, was asked to take the matter up with
the board of fire underwriters in that city with the object of making arrangements for a representative of that body to come here
and make a resurvey of the city. Judging from the remarks made
by many of the speakers, members of the board are determined to
leave nothing undone that will help bring down the insurance
rates here-
A lively discussion ensued when a member brought up the
question of the kind of coal being delivered in the city. According
to this gentleman there was a great deal of rock mixed with the
coal, which caused a great deal of trouble, especially in furnaces.
He also stated that when people purchased fuel they paid for coal
and not rock and they were entitled to get 'what they paid for.
He thought the rock should be taken out of the coal before being
delivered or else the price should be reduced to allow for the rock.
Other speakers expressed themselves in a similar manner, and
it was finally decided to appoint a committee to take up the coal \
question with the company officials.   The president appointed Mr.
P. P. Harrison, Mr. T. E. Bate and Mr. T. H. Mumford as the committee.
Mr. W. G. Marshall was appointed chairman of the committee
to make arrangements for a programme of music and addresses
at the banquet to be held at the Cumberland next Wednesday, the
other members of the committee to be selected by Mr. Marshall.
illlllllllllllllllllD
WIRING
gH This Company begs to bring to thc notice ot Its customers
55     that all new wiring connected to its lines must be done in ac-
1**=     cordahce with the regulations of the National Board of Fire
Underwriters.
No connection will be made unless the wiring comes up to
this standard and the wire and fittings Installed bear the stamp
      of the Laboratories of the above board.
m
*****£ This Company also reserves the right to disconnect from Its
a     source of supply any wiring, repairs or extension of wiring
which is not up to standard.
g| Upon request we will Inspect free of charge any wiring or
== repairs to existing installations and in all cases do so in new
= installations.
9
5*5 The idea of this ls to see that you get an Installation that is
H| absolutely sate, as a small fault is a potential source ot danger.
ff| We only Install the best material and do the best workman-
§H     ship, as it ls the cheapest for our customers In the long run.
B
o A copy of the Fire Underwriters' regulations as .well as any
==     advice on your wiring, fittings, or any matter electrical ls yours
=     for the asking.
S     CUMBKltLAKD A UNION WATERWORKS COMPANT LIMITED
WHEREAS, certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valves on the mains of this company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run waste, we
therefore wish to point out that it Is a serious offence to
tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties
be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the very fullest
extent ot the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. 0. 314
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,  LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
Cascade Beer  The Beer Without a Peer.
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Say Farewell to
Popular Lady
Friends of Miss Eva G. Bickle
Gather to Say Good-bye Before Her Departure.
A large number of the friends of
Miss Eva Q. Bickle gathered at the Ilo-
llo Dance Hall on Thursday evening
of last week for the purpose of bidding
her a formal farewell before her departure for California, where, upon
her arrival, she ls to be married to
Mr. C. R. DVader, at one time principal
of the Cumberland High School. Earlier'In the evening Miss Bickle's lady
friends held a linen shower in her
honor, when the many beautiful presents received testified to the esteem
In which the recipient Is held ln this
city. Shortly after nine o'clock the
guests commenced to arrive, and in a
few moments the hal. was well filled,
and dancing bad commenced. Mrs.
Bickle, mother of the bride-elect, acted
as hostess, welcoming each guest as
he or she arrived. She was assisted
by Mrs. S. Horwood, while later in the
evening refreshments were Berved by
a number of the young ladles present.
The affair was most informal, and
many regrets were expressed at the
departure of Miss Bickle from the city,
although accompanied by the best of
good wishes. Dancing was maintained
until long after midnight. Following
ls a list of the guests:
Mr. and Mrs. James Dick.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Rideout.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Owen.
Mr. and Mrs. O. Hassell.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Lymn.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Nunns.
Mr. and Mrs, S. Horwood.
Mr. and Mrs. F, A. McCarthy.
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
Mr. N. Hawkins.
Mr. T. W. Scott.
Mr. Charles Oraham.
Mr. W. Richards.
Mr. D. Richards.
Mr. A. Winiilnghara.
Miss Lena Carey.
Miss Oladys Dando.
Miss Blanche Dando.
Miss Olive Bickle.
Mr. Val. Dalby.
Miss Janet Oraham.
Mr. Colville Graham.
Miss Bessie Stewart.
Miss Nellie Ronalds.
Mr. Paul Deconink.
Miss Maude Evans.
Mr. Dan Stewart.
Miss Dora Hutchinson.
Mr. R. Robertson.
Miss Laura Robertson.
Miss Jessie Stevenson.
Mr. Amos Farmer.
Mr. Johnnie Duncan.
Miss C. Gray.
Mr. Charles Pearse.
Mrs. Baldwin.
Mr. Jack Vaughan.
Mr. Fred Nichols.
Mr. C. Anderson.
Mr. W. Matthewson.
Mr. W. Horwood.
Mr. Edward Macfarlane.
Mr. W. Brunette.
Miss Annie Reese.
Miss C. Bannerman.
MIsb A. Potter.
Miss G. Watson.
Miss H. WatBon.
Miss A. Watson.
MIsb H. Rogers.
Miss E. Percival .
Miss T. Galavan.
Mr. Charlie Nash.
Mr. A. Lee.
Mr. R. Gibson.   -
Miss Leslie.
MIsb Smith.
Mr. George Tarbell.
MIbs Mollle Tarbell.
Mrs. Armstrong.
Mr. W. Urquhart.
Mr. B. Kllpatrick.
Mr. Troy Hodgson.
Mrs. Hurst.
Mrs. Frost.
Mr. W. Woods.
Mr. Paolo Monte.
Mr. A. J. Richards.
Miss Tourlgny.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and^Courtenay, B.C.
License No. 8-25489
Miss H. Harrison,
Miss Nettle Robertson.
Mr. W. Parkin.
Mr, F. McKenzie.
' Mr. W. Hutchinson.
Mr. M. Brown.
Mr. P. Shearer.
Miss Edith Bickle.
Mr. W. Whltehouse.
Mr. R. Robertson.
Mr. O. Michell.
Miss Ida McFadyen.
Miss Babe McFadyen.
Miss A. Haywood.
Mrs. Rickson.
Mr. W. Rickson.
Miss Beatrice Bickle.
Mr. W. H. Youhill.
Master Edward Bickle.
Master Leslie Dando.
Master Archie Dick.
Mrs. C. Dando.
Mrs. H. Brown.
Corporal Cronk.
Provision Is being made for the
minting of a new Canadian cent. It
will approximate the United States
cent In size. .
The Prescott-Ottawa Road will bo
called The Prince of Wales Highway.
Hog's Back Falls on the Rldeau River
will be known as Prince of Wales
Falls.
The Dominion of Canada Rifle As.
sociatlon will send a team to Bisley
this year, and will also resume the
Rockcltffe Range annual prize competition,
Can't
Afford
THERE may be some people who can't afford to
have their teeth put into proper shape, but I doubt
it. On the other hand, there are many people who'
offer that as an excuse- Yet if these people were
perfectly honest with themselves they would readily
admit that they have spent many hard-earned dollars
on things not half so necessary as good teeth. Were
they to keep a strict account of their disbursements
they would find that within, say, three months, they
had squandered on trivial, unnecessary things enough
to put their teeth into good shape for years to come.
Ever .figure it out that way?
Dr. M. F. Keeley
Corner Hastings and Granville Streets, Vancouver.
Keep Warm
Prices are still advancing, but while our stock lasts
we sell at present prices.
12|4 Flannelette Blankets &A QF
"St^l $16.00 ,„ $18.00
Grey Blankets, a pair, (j*-i <y AA
c°^r.":.!"h.'. $4.00 * $28.00
Why go Coldr
A Fairy Oak or a New Retort
Hot Blast Heater will warm you
up. Don't forget we can furnish
your home complete.
A. McKinnon
THE  FURNITURE  STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood R'auling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture; and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C. Page-Four
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
February 28,1920.
®lj? Matttor
Published every Saturday morning at Cumbrland, B.C.
W. H. YOUHILL, Editor.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1920.
FATHER AND SON.
AT the present time there is throughout the
whole country a movement on foot which has
for its object the promoting of more intimate
relations between fathers and their sons, and it
is a move which should receive the hearty support of everyone. In another column will be
found an appeal to the people of Cumberland by
His Worship Mayor D. R. Macdonald, also the
announcement of a banquet to be attended by
fathers and sons. The married man who has no
ton is asked to bring a boy who has lost his
lather, and the same request is made of the
single man.
Those who were boys two score years and
more ago, and even later than that, can look back
with pleasurable recollections to the time when
they and their fathers were veritable chums. In
those days it was the custom, nay more, it was |
looked upon as a duty, that the father should
interest himself in the pleasures and amusements
of his son, and in the majority of instances
where one was the other was also. In those days
the fathers took counsel with their boys^ warning them against the many pitfalls which they
would encounter not only during their youth but
also in later life, lessons which they in turn had
learned from their fathers. In the games and
sports the grown-ups always took a hand; perhaps they were not all able to join actively in
the games, but they were able to and did lend
their presence. An in those days a boy very
rarely decided upon doing anything without first
consulting his father.
What a change has come over the world since
then ! Today it is a rarety to find a father and
son "chumming" it together; the boy is allowed
to drift at will, not, perhaps, because the father
has any less affection for him than was the case
in clays of yore, but because the fathers themselves have drifted into paths which were foreign
to their ancestors. Today the whole world is
"joy-riding"; it has gone mad over the pursuit
of selfish pleasure—pleasures which even when
attained do not satisfy, but prompt to further
excesses. And in the pursuit of these pleasures
the father is estranged from his son; he is not
willing that his boy should frequent the places
where he seeks his amusement; he is even
ashamed to let his boy know what he does. In
his mad b'"-.t ior pleasure the father throws the
boy **ii his own resources and allows him to do
pretty much as he pleases; he has no time to
devote to his son. The result is quite natural.
Youth is very observant, and sooner or later the
boy discovers the doings of the father, and he at
once starts in to emulate his parent; there is a
natural desire in the boy to follow in the footsteps of dad.
The time has arrived when it is well for the
fathers to stop and consider what they are doing.
Let them ask themselves if -they are doing their
duty towards their boys; if they are giving their
sons the start in life which their fathers gave
them; if they are arming their children to ward
off the temptations which beset them on all sides
now and those which will confront them in the
future. Let them ask themselves the question
if they are fulfilling the trust which was imposed
upon them when their sons came into the wprld.
If they will but halt in their mad career and
ask themselves these questions, and pay heed to
the answers which their consciences give, there
need be little cause for despair of the future of
the rising generation, or of the nation in the days
to come-
The father and son movement which is being
inaugurated in this city during the coming week
is worthy of the utmost support and endorsa-
tion.
slow to learn their lesson, but once having learned
it they never forget. And they have learned that
if they do not purchase goods in the United
States it will make absolutely no difference to
them at what price sterling exchange is quoted
in New York. The Canadians have also
learned the same lesson, although they do not
appear to profit by it to the same extent as do
the people of the British Isles. And yet there
is a marked tendency on the part of Canadian
purchasers to decline to buy United States goods.
Reports are continually coming from the
South that manufacturers in the United States
find their warehouses piled to the roof with
goods which they expected to dispose of in British possessions, and they cannot find a market
for them. Their agents and middlemen are sending out their S.O.S. calls, but they are going unheeded; instead the people in Great Britain and
in Canada are turning their orders either into
British or Canadian manufacturers. As well,
there has been started a campaign in this
country against the purchase of United States
goods irrespective of what inducements may be
offered- Commercial drummers one after the
other report that it is next to impossible to dispose of Americ;,n-made goods, and even the
larchants who have them on hand are doing their
best to conceal the source from whence they
came. All of which goes to show that Canadians
have at least partly learned their lesson.
It i.-. by this menas that the people of the
United States have been enabled to discover
their error. Thoy begin to realize what the loss
of trade will mean to them, and they are doing
everything in their power to prevent any more
of it slipping from them. On the other hand,
the people of Great Britain and Canada have
discovered the advantages of dealing with one
another, anil it is certain that trade between the
Motherland and the dominions will increase
rapidly from now on. In days to come Canadians, being such close neighbors of the United
States, may have a tendency to forget what has
been transpiring recently, and they may possibly
resume the purchase ef American goods as in
the past, but the people of the British Isles will
never forget. It is pot a difficult matter to fool
John Bull once, but when he has learned his
lesson a second attempt is doomed to failure.
It is to be hoped that the manufacturing
interests of Canada will grasp their opportunity
and place on the market goods which are the
equal of or superior to those which can be procured in the United States. By this means they
will not only hold the trade which has been
turned in their direction, but they will be able
to increase that trade until such time as United
States-made goods can find no place in Canada
where goods of the same class manufactured at
home may be procured.
The exchange lesson has been a costly one,
but it will not have been too dearly purchased
if it prove a lasting one.
c§m0^
m
Mens' Suits
TEMPERANCE AND PROHIBITION.
THE
SOWING THE WIND AND REAPING
WHIRLWIND.     '
WHEN the people of the United States started
out to knock down the price of foreign exchange they could not have thoroughly understood what they were doing; or at least they were
unable to peer into the future sufficiently to rea-
liz the possibilities, not to speak of the probabilities. Had they been able to see what was in store
for them it is safe to say hey would never have
embarked on their exchange campaign. But
they were blind to everything but one fact: they
saw an opportunity of making a few dollars at
the expense of other nations, and in their anxiety
to amass wealth rapidly they plunged headlong
into the whirlpool oblivious of what the end may
be. They are now beginning to realize their mistake ; they find the volume of their trade with
foreign nations rapidly diminishing, and more
especially with Great Britain and her colonies,
and they are now at their witsend to find the
means whereby they can prevent further declines in their exports.
That the exports from the United States to
Great Britain and the overseas dominions will
continue to decline there can be little doubt. It
is a matter of history that the British people are
MOW that the question of placing further restriction on the purchase of liquor is being
brought before the Provincial Legislature, it
might be well to consider for a moment as to
what is likely to be the outcome and to what
extent it will affect the general public. If the
measure which has been promised by the attorney-general is brought into force, ostensibly it
will not be possible to obtain liquor in the same
quantities as now, at least not from the government dispensaries; that is a doctor will be able
to prescribe only eight ounces at a time, and
they will be restricted to certain number of
prescriptions each month. It is claimed by the
attorney-general that this will curtail the consumption of liquor. To our way of thinking he
is either insincere or else he does not know what
he is talking about.
There are thousands of people in this country
who believe in the temperate use of liquor who
are-entirely opposed to absolute prohibition, and
we believe these are in the majority. Many of
them are opposed to the invasion of their personal rights and liberties, while all of them
recognize that under existing conditions absolute
prohibition is impossible. There is only one way
of prohibiting the consumption of strong drink,
and that is by prohibiting its manufacture. So
long as men are allowed to manufacture it, other
men will find a means of obtaining it. That has
been proved times out of number.
Human nature is perverse; it always has
been and it will probably always will be. The
average man will not be coerced; he will consent
to be led, but he refuses to be driven. There is
but one logical way of handling the liquor question: Place the liquor traffic under government
control, to be dispensed from government stores
conveniently situated, and then let those who
have the temperance movement at heart get busy
and convince the people that it is to their interests to either refrain from the use of liquor
altogether or take it in moderation. We believe
that is the only successful method of combatting
the evil of drinking intoxicants.
After belching wind for over three weeks,
the talking machines at Victoria appear to have
played out. The earnest legislator will probably
get a chance now.
YOU yourself know whether or not you need Clothes this
Spring.   We know that if you  need them  and  buy
Campbells Clothing you'll get more satic "action than
from any clothes you have ever worn.
Men's Suits in Tweeds of brown and gray mixtures, at $22.50,
$25.00 and $27.50.
Worsteds in stripes and broken checks, at $30.00, $32.50 and
$37.50.
Special value in all-wool Serge Suits, in brown only, $49.50
Newest Novelty Styles in young men'3 Suits at popular prices.
Ties
W, G. & R. Shirts in the hewoat patterns
of best quality Percales and Cambrics;
also in Silk and Silk Stripas, with the
double wear' -reversible soft cuff, from
$2.00 to $7.50.
Hats and Caps
Just received the newest styles in Men's
Hard Hats. These are made of the best
quality fur felt, at $6.50.
Men's Tweed and Silk Caps, in the newest
shapes.
Trunks,
Suit Cases
and Club Bags
Newest Spring Novelties in Men's Neckwear.
Shoes
The Geo. A. Slater Invictus Shoe, "The
Best Good Shoe for Men." These are
made on the newest lasts, in best quality
calf and vici kid, in black, tan and
Havana brown; also with colored tops.
Priced at $12.00 and $13.50.
Shoes by other reputable makers, in black
and brown, with or without neolin soles,
at $6.50, $7.50, $8.75 and $9.25.
A complete stock of Boys' and Youths'
Shoes-
On display at Our Garage, Nanaimo,
FIVE CARLOADS
OF NEW CARS
They Comprise
BABY GRAND CHEVROLET - - $1895
490A TOURING CHEVROLET ■ - $1155
390A Light DELIVERY CHEVROLET $1125
MODEL 4 OVERLAND      -   ■   -   -   $1378
For Further Particulers Call or Write
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay
1
1 if-
February 28,1920.
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Page Pive.
BRIGHT
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
BREEZY
BOXING
ATHLETICS
SPORT
CUMBERLAND WILL They Did It 0nce> and They Can and Will Do It Again ALL STARS DEFEAT
WIN CHAMPIONSHIP    ^-^-—^^^^^    UNITED IN A FAST
ONCE AGAIN TODAY 11 EXCITING CONTEST
Team Which Went Through League Without a
Defeat and was Awarded First Place Is Giving
South Wellington Another Chance at thc Title
—Men All in Good Shape and Confident of
Bringing Home the Silverware.
PROVIDING South Wellington does not again
take stage fright and refuse to go on tlie
field, there should be a battle royal at
Nanaimo today when the Cumberland team,
which went through the past season's schedule
without a defeat and which was awarded first
honors by the league when .South Wellington
refused to play when ordered, will again stack up
against their old rivals. Naturally, the Cumberland men feel that they should ljot be called upon
to play this game after having once being proclaimed champions by the league, but they are
obeying the order of the league officials, the only
thing real sports can do,
rstwhile Champions Put on the Short End of a
Two-One Score in a Game That Was Replete
With Sensational Plays—Wilkinson and
Cairns Afcsent From United— Harrison Regains His Old-Time Form—Rickson Shines.
rVHE above group Is the Cumberland Football Team which won the championship ot the Uper Island League
•»- once this season, but which has bowed to the new ruling of the League, and will play South Wellington at
Nanaimo today. Their names are: Top row (standing) Hugh Doherty, Harry Farmer, CainiB, J. Brown, W. Walker,
A. Wilkinson, Alex. Ilowan, (trainer), Jim English, R. Brown, (manager); second row (kneeling) Bobbie Brown,
Thomas Jackson, Jack Williams; tront row (sitting) Dan Bannerman, T. Jackson, Billie Brown, Sackle Conti,
Ed. Hunden.
The team is composed of the same men who travelled south to
play the final game at Ladysmith and the team opposing them
will be the same which played against Cumberland in South Wellington when the men from the north defeated that team on their
own grounds. Every man on the team is confident that victory
will again perch on their banner. They have been training consistently and the trainer, Mr. Alex. Rowan, declares they are in as
good shape as could be expected after such an extended term of
idleness.
That the team has the backing of the whole city there can be
no doubt, as the city merchants have decided to close their places
of business, not only in order to see the game themselves but also
to permit their employees doing the same. A special train has
been chartered which is timed to leave here at 8 o'clock this
morning, connecting with the E. & N. at Royston. Returning, the
train will leave Nanaimo at 10 o'clock on Saturday night. At the
time of writing it looks as though practically all of the men of the
city as well as many of the women will travel south to witness the
big contest.
The importance of the game to be
played today in Nanaimo has caused
made demands on the Sporting Editor
for a hlBtory of the team. As the policy
of this paper ls always to satisfy the
public, we have made a brief resume
of each individual player. There may
be some slight inaccuracies In the
biographies as rendered, but we hope
the players will forgive any discrepancy, as we have been forced to rely
on their friends for most of the Information in the following.
William Walker.
Starting at goal, we have the redoubtable "Big Bill" Walker between
the sticks, and as a net guardian he ls
hard to beat. Big Bill describes him ln
more ways than one; he is a big man
and a big goal keeper. Walker can
count the number of games he has lost
on the lingers of his hands, and as far
as Cumberland football team Is concerned Bill has never lost a game.
Born ln Lethen Hill, Ayrshire, Scotland, Bill did not play much In the
land of his birth, but on his arrival in
Nanaimo It was not long before he was
playing for the team of that city. His
sterling worth between the sticks soon
attracted the attention of the United,
then contenders for the Pacific Coast
championship. Bill played for the
United all through the strenuous
games that were played for that championship. He was a big, thin strapling
ln those days. He has added weight
and experience to his ability, and today he stands as one of the best goal
keepers in British Columbia football.
Corbln was another place where Bill
ployed against all the stars of the
Crows Nest and his record was then
undiminished, when he guarded the
sticks for the crack Corbln team, a
team of all stars picked to beat the
best the Crows Nest held. He eventually landed in Cumberland and the
public of this district do not need to
be told anything about the games he
has played in this league. As a goal
tender and sport, Bill Walker ls hard
to beat.
Andy Culms,
better known as "Wisey," at full-back,
Is also well known to all football enthusiasts throughout British Columbia and Alberta. Andy has played for
Coleman, Corbln, Carbonado, Cumberland Mixtures, Naifaimo United, Black
Diamond, Roslyn and eventually with
the present Cumberland team. Andy,
in shape, ls one of the best backs in
Island football; dependable, with a
world of experience; any man who
beats him has to travel all the route.
To Fifeshlre, Scotland, goes the honor
of Andrew Cairns' birthplace.
Arthur Wilkinson.
Cairns' partner, Arthur Wilkinson,
born In Vancouver, a former Rugby
star, was one of the biggest Hilda that
has been recorded for years, and as n
British Columbia product, and especially Cumberland who gave him his
first tryout in big time, he is a credit.
Clean-living, well-built, a wonderful
kicker from any position, with a beautiful recovery, he is rated as one of the
best  full-backs  lu  British  Columbia.
Fred's and Joe's Place
CUMBERLAND
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
THE ATHLETIC AND SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
CUMBERLAND     DISTRICT.
WAVERLY   HOTEL
The Home of Quality.
Phone 69.
Cumberland, B.C.
All of his football experience lias been
gained on Vancouver Island. Let him
live long, and more power to his kicking.
Hubert Brown.
Bobbie Brown is the next man on
the list. Bob was born in Fifeshlre,
Scotland. He has played oh every team
and against every team ln Cumberland. A hard-working half-back, with
a world of experience, and personally
one of the finest fellows ln the world.
Bob has had hard work netting goals,
but last year when he was the Mayor
of Bevan he managed to net one ln the
City League, and Bob Brown, the manager of the team thought the effort
was worth a medal, and today one of
Bob's most prized possessions is his
goal-scoring medal. Bobble Is In top
form always and can be expected to
do or die.
Thomas Jackson.
Tom Jackson. centreJialf . superb,,
Dick Stobart's shadow, the "Slick Un,"
and various"other pet names given him
by his admirers, was born in Wigan,
Lancashire; immigrated to Canada;
started playing with the Crows Nest
teams, Coleman, where he starred for
several seasons. His first appearance
here was against the Calgary Hill-
hursts, where he made such a favorable impression that he was prevailed
on to make his residence permanently
here. Tom has never missed a game
and can be depended upon today to
live up to his reputation as Dick Stobart's shadow.
John Wllllnms.
Jack Williams, the silent Welshman,
born in the land of the leek, Immigrated to Canada, at present playing
half-back for the Cumberland United;
another boy who played all his foot-
hall in Cumberland, starting out with,
the famous No. 5 team and keeping at
it until today he holds the reputation
of being one of the hardest half-backs
In the game. Jack ls always ln shape,
and can be depended upon to play the
game of his life when he captains the
team today.
Daniel ltumiermun.
Danny Bannerman, the speedy right
wing of today's team, was born in Nanaimo, moved to Cumberland, and
over since his school days has been
playing at football. Dan won fame
with the Sidesteppers of Cumberland
at his first venture and has been playing steadily ever since. He has gained
a good local reputation as a sprinter,
baseballer and footballer, and with a
little more confidence at shooting for
goal will be hard to replace. He is
strictly a Cumberland product and
says he will make them go some today.
Edward Jackson.
Ted Jackson, inside right, was born
ln Lancashire, England. Teddy is really a half-back and one of his most
valuable assets at Inside right is his
timely help to the half-backs. Teddy
is filling a utility roll and fillinig it
well. He has played in Corbonado, Corbln, All Overseas Forces, West, Cumberland, and now the United. Teddy
says "Show me the goal."
Thomas Conti.
Sackl" Conti, the hustling, bustling,
sure-kicking, black-haired demon from
Ladysmith, was born in Wellington.
He started his football career ln junior
company in Ladysmith, turning quickly to Intermediate and then to senior
company with Ladysmith, then to
Cumbmerland. Sacki has played well
all year, and has trained faithfully and
bard for the contest today. Sacki is
body and soul for a win, and he can
rest assured that the people of Cumberland put great faith in him to do
his best for the honor of the home
team.
William Brown.
Billy Brown, born in Yorkshire,
England, ls one of the trickiest and
fastest little men on the Island; a
great selzer of opportunities, very
dangerous in front of goal, a travelling fiend, and all full-backs' foe. Bill
can be depended upon to do his bit. He
has played with a great many teams,
but his best work has been with Cumberland, where he started with the
juuiors and has kept going ever since.
Edward Hunden.
Ed. Hunden, Welsh-Canadian, was
born in Wellington; started his foot
ball career ln
juniors and finally graduated into
senior company. A hard man to beat,
with a ball, stubborn to a fault; has
necessary speed, and keeps in  good
LAST Sunday an aggregation of round-ball
kickers known as tho All Stars climbed out
on the sunny side of the schoolhouse and
put the United on the small end of a two-one
score. The match was in the nature of a practice
?ame and also to give the public a chance to size
tp the new talent that has lately arrived in the
city. ■ The United were weak, Cairns and Wilkinson being absent, and when these two are taken
out of a team it makes quite a hole, although no
discredit is coming to Scavardo and Rickson for
the United defeat, as they played a whale of a
game, and Scavardo was suffering injury to the
ankle from a previous game. At that the United
showed a great improvement in form, and had it not been for the
stellar work of Jock Clark in goal for the Stars the decision might
have been reversed. Bannerman tried Jock with two nice shots,
and Conti netted the United's goal. Over-anxiety on the part of
Teddy Jackson spoiled two or three good chances for his team.
Billy Brown was in the limelight, but his shots were out of line-
For the All Stars, Sullivan, at centre half, was a tower of strength.
His control of the ball is very good and the openings he made for'
the forwards were par. Boothman is improving rapidly and by
the time the McBride series opens will be in good shape. Ollie
Harrison, who has not been playing all season, played a great game
with Boothman on the left wing. Harrison's crosses were perfect
and the goal he got from the line is one of the best goals scored in
these parts for many moons. Gibson is fast and tricky, and keeps
a centre half looking after him all the time. Hec Smith at back for
the Stars met with an injury in the first ten minutes of play and
was forced to retire from the game. He made a favorable impression in the short period he was on the field. His kicking was nice
and clean and he seems to use his head well. Nesbitt was the pick
of the wing halfs for the Stars, while Williams played a whale of
a game for the United. Hunden was unable to play owing to a cold
and Slaughter filled at outside left. He showed up nicely.
shape. He netted Cumberland's lone
goal against South Wellington at the
southern city aud can be depended on
to bang 'em in. Wicked shot! Keep
your eye on Ed.
Frank Slaughter.
The team's first reserve is Frank
Slaughter. He was born in "Brunima-
gum," started his football career in
this country with the Cumberland
juniors, and has now graduated to
senior company. Frank's best showing
last year was against the Calgary Hill-
hursts;, his game was perfect and he
was the pick of the half-backs that
day. If Frank had Bobby Brown's constitution he could not be kept off any
team representing Cumberland.
Hugh Doherty.
Hughic Doherty, born In the county
where Wallace's sword lies, Stirlingshire, had some experience in Old
Country football; played with Nanaimo
United, and is still a-war-horse of
some standing. Give Hughle a grass
field and he takes an awful beating
Cumberland with the | for ,lls posse88lon o( ,ett baIf    .
Hubert Brown.
Bob Brown, who wns manager of
the team on the last trip for the cham
pionship, Is worthy of mention for his
enterprise, business ability and clean
sportsmanship in building the team,
giving time, money and energy to
make the Cumberland football' team
a living advertisement of the sporting
spirit that pervades our town.
Henry Farmer.
Harry Farmer, tlie present manager, needs no introduction to anybody interested in athletics ou this
Island. Harry has played football,
basketball and baseball and was always mentioned In the notable column.
He is frank and straightforward nnd
will do his best to weld the team
spirit that is necvessary to win games.
Managership lias Its difficulties, but
Harry will surmount them.
A. H. Rowan.
Alex. Rowan, trainer, is another
man well known on the Island; a
good athlete In his day, who now
makes training the othor rcllow his
hobby since injury has stopped him
from sporting activities. He has
had a world of experience In all athletics and it can be depended on he
has worked his bead off to get bis
team in shape, lie vouches for the
boys.
FRESH FISH
EVERY DAY
Fish and Chips Every Day
6.30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Rowan's Fish Market
Oppoiite the Post Office
SILVER
is becoming so valuable, that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflltiance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B.xC. Page Four
THE ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
February 28,1926.
Published every Saturday morning at Cumbrland, B.C
m
W. H. YOUHILL,
Editor.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1920.
FATHER AND SON.
AT the present time there is throughout the
whole country a movement on foot which has
for its object the promoting of more intimate
relations between fathers and their sons, and it
is a move which should receive the hearty support of everyone. In another column will be
found an appeal to the people of Cumberland by
His Worship Mayor D. R. Macdonald, also the
announcement of a banquet to be attended by
fathers and sons. The married man who has no
son is asked to bring a boy who has lost his
lather, and the same request is made of the
.single man.
Those who were boys two score years and
more ago, and even later than that, can look back
with pleasurable recollections to the time when
they and their fathers were veritable chums. In
those days it was the custom, nay more, it was
looked upon as a duty, that the father should
interest himself in the pleasures and amusements
of his son, and in the majority of instances
where one was the other was also. In those days
the fathers took counsel with their boys^ warning them against the many pitfalls which they
would encounter not only during their youth but
also in later life, lessons which they in turn had
learned from their fathers. In the games and
sports the grown-ups always took a hand; perhaps they were not all able to join actively in
the games, but they were able to and did lend
their presence. An in those days a boy very
rarely decided upon doing anything without first
consulting his father.
What a change has come over the world since
then ! Today it is a rarety to find a father and
son "chumming" it together; the boy is allowed
to drift at will, not, perhaps, because the father
has any less affection for him than was the case
in days of yore, but because the fathers themselves have drifted into paths which were foreign
to their ancestors. Today the whole world is
"joy-riding"; it has gone mad over the pursuit
of selfish pleasure—pleasures which even when
attained do not satisfy, but prompt to further
excesses. And in the pursuit of these pleasures
the father is estranged from his son; he is not
willing that his boy should frequent the places
where he seeks his amusement; he is even
ashamed to let his boy know what he does. In
his mad h'"*.t tor pleasure the father throws the
boy ■•! his own resources and allows him to do
pretty much as he pleases; he has no time to
devote to his son. The result is quite natural.
Youth is very observant, and sooner or later the
boy discovers the doings of the father, and he at
once starts in to emulate his parent; there is a
natural desire in the boy to follow in the footsteps of dad.
The time has arrived when it is well for the
fathers to stop and consider what they are doing.
Let them ask themselves if -they are doing their
duty towards their boys; if they are giving their
sons the start in life which their fathers gave
them; if they are arming their children to ward
off the temptations which beset them on all sides
now and those which will confront them in the
future. Let them ask themselves the question
if they are fulfilling the trust which was imposed
upon them when their sons came into the world.
If they will but halt in their mad career and
ask themselves these questions, and pay heed to
the answers which their consciences give, there
need be little cause for despair of the future of
the rising generation, or of the nation in the days
to come-
The father and son movement which is being
inaugurated in this city during the coming week
is worthy of the utmost support and endorsa-
tion.
slow to learn their lesson, but once having learned
it they never forget. And they have learned that
if they do not purchase goods in the United
States it will make absolutely no difference to
them at what price sterling exchange is quoted
in New York. The Canadians have also
learned the same lesson, although they do not
appear to profit by it to the same extent as do
the people of the British Isles. And yet there
is a marked tendency on the part of Canadian
purchasers to decline to buy United States goods.
Reports are continually coming from the
South that manufacturers in the United States
find their warehouses piled to the roof with
goods -which they expected to dispose of in British possessions, and they cannot find a market
for them. Their agents and middlemen are send
ing out their S.O.S. calls, but they are going unheeded ; instead the people in Great Britain and
in Canada are turning their orders either into
British or Canadian manufacturers. As well,
there has been started a campaign in this
country against the purchase of United States
goods irrespective of what inducements may be
offered- Commercial drummers one after the
other report that it is next to impossible to dispose of American-made goods, and even the
terchants who have them on hand are doing their
best to conceal the source from whence they j
came. All of which goes to show that Canadians i
have at least partly learned their lesson.
It ie, by this menas that the people of the
United States have been enabled to discover
their error. They begin to realize what the loss
of trade will mean to them, and they are doing
everything in their power to prevent any more
of it slipping from them. On the other hand,
he people of Great Britain and Canada have
discovered the advantages of dealing with one
another, and it is certain that trade between the
Motherland and the dominions will increase
rapidly from now on. In days to come Canadians, being such close neighbors of the United
States, may have a tendency to forget what has
been transpiring recently, and they may possibly
resume the purchase of American goods as in
the past, but the people of the British Jsles will
lever forget. It is pot a difficult matter to fool
John Bull once, but when he has learned his
lesson a second attempt is doomed to failure.
It is to be hoped that the manufacturing
interests of Canada will grasp their opportunity
and place on the market goods which are the
equal of or superior to those which can be procured in the United States. By this means they
will not only hold the trade which has been
turned in their direction, but they will be able
to increase that trade until such time as United
States-made goods can find no place in Canada
where goods of the same class manufactured at
home may be procured.
The exchange lesson has been a costly one,
but it will not have been too dearly purchased
if it prove a lasting one.
TEMPERANCE AND PROHIBITION.
SOWING THE
WIND AND REAPING
WHIRLWIND.
THE
■\lfHEN the people of the United States started
out to knock down the price of foreign exchange they could not have thoroughly understood what they were doing; or at least they were
unable to peer into the future sufficiently to rea-
liz the possibilities, not to speak of the probabilities. Had they been able to see what was in store
for them it is safe to say hey would never have
embarked on their exchange campaign. But
they were blind to everything but one fact: they
saw an opportunity of making a few dollars at
the expense of other nations, and in their anxiety
to amass wealth rapidly they plunged headlong
into the whirlpool oblivious of what the end may
be. They are now beginning to realize their mistake ; they find the volume of their trade with
foreign nations rapidly diminishing, and more
especially with Great Britain and her colonies,
and they are now at their witsend to find the
means whereby they can prevent further declines in their exports.
That the exports from the United States to
Great Britain and the overseas dominions will
continue to decline there can be little doubt.   It
After belching wind for over three weeks,
the talking machines at Victoria appear to have
played out.  The earnest legislator will probably
is a matter of history that the British people are | get a chance now.
MOW that the question of placing further restriction on the purchase of liquor is being
brought before the Provincial Legislature, it
might be well to consider for a moment as to
what is likely to be the outcome and to what
extent it will affect the general public. If the
measure which has been promised by the attorney-general is brought into force, ostensibly it
will not be possible to obtain liquor in the same
quantities as now, at least not from the government dispensaries; that is a doctor will be able
to prescribe only eight ounces at a time, and
they will be restricted to certain number of
prescriptions each month. It is claimed by the
attorney-general that this will curtail the consumption of liquor. To our way of thinking he
is either insincere or else he does not know what
he is talking about.
There are thousands of people in this country
who believe in the temperate use of liquor who
are-entirely opposed to absolute prohibition, and
we believe these are in the majority. Many of
them are opposed to the invasion of their personal rights and liberties, while all of them
recognize that under existing conditions absolute
prohibition is impossible. There is only one way
of prohibiting the consumption of strong drink,
and that is by prohibiting its manufacture. So
long as men are allowed to manufacture it, other
men will find a means of obtaining it. That has
been proved times out of number.
Human nature is perverse; it always has
been and it will probably always will be. The
average man will not be coerced; he will consent
to be led, but he refuses to be driven. There is
but one logical way of handling the liquor question; Place the liquor traffic under government
control, to be dispensed from government stores
conveniently situated, and then let those who
have the temperance movement at heart get busy
and convince the people that it is to their interests to either refrain from the use of liquor
altogether or take it in moderation. We believe
that is the only successful method of combatting
the evil of drinking intoxicants.
Mens' Suits
YOU yourself know whether or not you need Clothes this
Spring.   We know that if you  need  them and  buy
Campbells Clothing you'll get more safe'action than
from any clothes you have ever worn.
Men's Suits in Tweeds of brown and gray mixtures, at $22.50,
$25.00 and $27.50.
Worsteds in stripes and broken checks, at $30.00, $32.50 and
$37.50.
Special value in all-wool Saige Suits, in brown only, $49.50
Newest Novelty Styles in young men's Suits at popular prices.
Shirts
Ties
W. G. & R. Shirts in tlie newest patterns
of best quality Percahs and Cambrics;
also in Silk and Silk Strip-;s, with the
double wea* reversible sort cuff, from
$2.00 to $7.50.
Hats and Caps
Just received the newest styles in Men's
Hard Hats. These are made of the best
quality fur felt, at $6.50.
Men's Tweed and Silk Caps, in the newest
shapes.
Trunks,
Suit Cases
and Club Bags
Newest Spring Novelties in Men's Neckwear.
Shoes
The Geo. A. Slater Invictus Shoe, "The
Best Good Shoe for Men." These are
made on the newest lasts, in best quality
calf and vici kid, in black, tan and
Havana brown; also with colored tops.
Priced at $12.00 and $13.50.
Shoes by other reputable makers, in black
and brown, with or without neolin soles,
at $6.50, $7.50, $8.75 and $9.25.
A complete stock of Boys' and Youths'
Shoes-
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
S
On display at Our Garage, Nanaimo,
FIVE CARLOADS
OF NEW CARS
They Comprise
BABY GRAND CHEVROLET - - $1895
490A TOURING CHEVROLET - ■ $1155
390A Light DELIVERY CHEVROLET $1125
MODEL 4 OVERLAND      -   -   -   -   $1378
■\
I
[
For Further Particulers Call or Write
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay %
February 28,1920.
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Page Five.
BRIGHT
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
BREEZY
BOXING
ATHLETICS
SPORT
CUMBERLAND WILL They Did It 0nce> an(j They Can and Will Do It Again ALL STARS DEFEAT
WIN CHAMPIONSHIP    ■..^m^^m^^^^^^^^^^JL-    UNITED IN A FAST
ONCE AGAIN TODAY 11 EXCITING CONTEST
Team Which Went Through League Without a
Defeat and was Awarded First Place Is Giving
South Wellington Another Chance at the Title
—Men All in Good Shape and Confident of
Bringing Home the Silverware.
PROVIDING South Wellington does not again
take stage fright and refuse to go on the
field, there should be a battle royal al
Nanaimo today when the Cumberland team,
which went through .the past season's schedule
without a defeat and which was awarded first
honors by the league when South Wellington
refused to play when ordered, will again stack up
against their old rivals. Naturally, the Cumberland men feel that they should not be called upon
to play this game after having once being proclaimed champions by the league, but they are
obeying the order of the league officials, the only
thing real sports can do.
rstwhile Champions Put on the Short End of a
Two-One Score in a Game That Was Replete
With Sensational Plays—Wilkinson and
Cairns Absent From United— Harrison Regains His Old-Time Form—Rickson Shines.
'T'HE above group Is the Cumberland Football Team which won the championship ot the Uper Island League
-t once this season, but which has bowed to the new ruling ot the League, and will play South Wellington at
Nanaimo today. Their names are: Top row (standing) Hugh Doherty, Harry Farmer, Cairns, J. Brown, W. Walker,
A. Wilkinson, Alex, rtowan, (trainer), Jim English, R. Brown, (manager); second row (kneeling) Bobbie Brown,
Thomas Jackson. Jack Williams; front row (sitting) Dan Bannerman, T. Jackson, Billle Brown, Sackte Conti,
Ed. Hunden.
The team is composed of the same men who travelled south to
play the final game at Ladysmith and the team opposing them
will be the same which played against Cumberland in South Wellington when the men from the north defeated that team on their
own grounds. Every man on the team is confident that victory
will again perch on their banner. They have been training consistently and the trainer, Mr. Alex. Rowan, declares they are in as
good shape as could be expected after such an extended term of
idleness.
That the team has the backing of the whole city there can be
no doubt, as the city merchants have decided to close their places
of business, not only in order to see the game themselves but also
to permit their employees doing the same. A special train has
been chartered which is timed to leave here at 8 o'clock this
morning, connecting with the E. & N. at Royston. Returning, the
train will leave Nanaimo at 10 o'clock on Saturday night. At the
time of writing it looks as though practically all of the men of the
city as well as many of the women will travel south to witness the
big contest.
WHO AND WHAT THEY ARE
The Importance of the game to be
played today in Nanaimo has caused
made demands on the Sporting Editor
for a history of the team. As the policy
of this paper is always to satisfy the
public, we have made a brief resume
of each Individual player. There may
be some slight Inaccuracies ln the
biographies as rendered, hut we hope
the players wlll forgive any discrepancy, as we have been forced to rely
on their friends for most of the Information in the following.
William Walker.
Starting at goal, we have the redoubtable "Big Bill" Walker between
the sticks, and as a net guardian he ls
hard to beat. Big BUI describes him ln
more ways than one; he ls a big man
and a big goal keeper. Walker can
count the number of games he has lost
on tbe fingers of his hands, and as far
as Cumberland football team Is concerned Bill has never lost a game.
Born ln Lethen Hill, Ayrshire, Scotland, BUI did not play much in the
land of his birth, but on his arrival ln
Nanaimo It was not long before he was
playing for the team of that city. His
sterling worth between the sticks soon
attracted the attention of the United,
then contenders tor the Pacific Coast
championship. Bill played for the
United all through the strenuous
games that were played for that championship. He was a big, thin strapling
in those days. He has added weight
and experience to his ability, and today he stands as one ot the best gonl
keepers tn British Columbia football.
Corbln was another place where Bill
played against all the stars of the
Crows Nest and his record was then
undiminished, when he guarded the
sticks for the crack Corbln team, a
team of all stars picked to beat the
best the Crows Nest held. He eventually landed In Cumberland and the
public of this district do not need to
be told anything about the games he
has played in this league. As a goal
tender and sport, Bill Walker ls hard
to beat.
Andy Cairns,
better known as "Wlsey," at full-back,
Is also well known to all football enthusiasts throughout British Columbia and Alberta. Andy has played for
Coleman, Corbln, Carbonado, Cumberland Mixtures, Naifaimo United, Black
Diamond, Roslyn and eventually with
the present Cumberland team. Andy,
In shape, is one of the best backs iu
Island football; dependable, with a
world of experience; any man who
beats him has to travel all the route.
To Fifeshlre, Scotland, goes the honor
of Andrew Cairns' birthplace.
Arthur Wilkinson.
Calms' partner, Arthur Wilkinson,
born In Vancouver, a former Rugby
star, was one of the biggest finds that
has been recorded for years, and as a
British Columbia product, and especially Cumberland who gave him his
first tryout 111 big time, he is u credit.
Clean-living, well-built, a wonderful
kicker from any position, with a beautiful recovery, he is rated us one of the
best full-backs  lu  British Columbia.
All of his football experience has been
gained on Vancouver Island. Let him
live long, and more power to his kicking.
Hubert Brown.
Bobbie Brown is the next man on
the list. Bob was born in Fifeshlre,
Scotland. He has played on every team
and against every team in Cumberland. A hard-working half-back, with
a world of experience, and personally
one of the finest fellows ln the world.
Bob has had hard work netting goals,
but last year when he was the Mayor
of Bevan he managed to net one In the
City League, and Bob Brown, the manager of the team thought the effort
was worth a medal, and today one of
Bob's most prized possessions is his
goal-scoring medal. Bobbie is in top
form always and can be expected to
do or die.
Thomas Jackson.
Tom Jackson, centrejialf . superb,,
Dick Stobart's shadow, the "Slick Un,"
and various*other pet names given him
by his admirers, was born in Wigan,
Lancashire; immigrated to Canada;
started playing with the Crows Nest
teams, Coleman, where he starred for
several seasons. His first appearance
here was against the Calgary Hlll-
hursts, where he made such a favorable impression that he was prevailed
on to make his residence permanently
here. Tom has never missed a game
and can be depended upon today to
live up to his reputation as Dick Stobart's shadow.
John Williams.
Jack Williams, the silent Welshman,
born ln the land of the leek, Immigrated to Canada, at present playing
half-back for the Cumberland United;
another boy who played all his football In Cumberland, starting out with
the famous No. 5 team and keeping at
it until today he holds the reputation
of being one of tlie hardest half-backs
iu the game. Jack is always in shape,
and can be depended upon to play the
game of his life when he captains the
team today.
Dnnlel lluiuieriniin.
Danny Bannerman, the speedy right
wing of today's team, was born In Nanaimo, moved to Cumberland, and
over since his school days has been
Fred's and Joe's Place
CUMBERLAND
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
THE ATHLETIC AND SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
CUMBERLAND     DISTRICT.
WAVERLY   HOTEL
The House of Quality.
Phone 69.
Cumberland, B.C.
playing at football. Dan won fame
with the Stdesteppers of Cumberland
at his lirst venture and has been playing steadily ever since. He has gained
a good local reputation as a sprinter,
baseballer and footballer, and with a
little more confidence at shooting for
goal will be hard to replace. He is
strictly a Cumberland product and
says he will make them go some today.
Edward Jackson.
Ted Jackson, inside right, was born
In Lancashire, England. Teddy is really a half-back and one of his most
valuable assets at inside right ls his
timely help to the halt-backs. Teddy
is filling a utility roll aud ttllinig it
well. He has played In Corbonado, Cor-
bin, All Overseas Forces, West. Cumberland, and now the United. Teddy
says "Show me the goal."
Thomas Conti.
"Sacki" Conti, the hustling, bustling,
sure-kicking, black-haired demon from
Ladysmith, was born in Wellington.
He started his football career In junior
company ln Ladysmith, turning quickly to intermediate and then to senior
company with Ladysmith, then to
Cumbmerland. Sacki has played well
all year, and has trained faithfully and
hard for the contest today. Sacki Is
body and soul for a win, and he can
rest assured that the people of Cumberland put great faith in him to do
his best for the honor of the home
team.
William Brown.
Billy Brown, born in Yorkshire,
England, ls one of the trickiest and
fastest little men on the Island: a
great seizer of opportunities, very
dangerous in front of goal, a travelling fiend, and all full-backs' foe. Bill
can be depended upon to do his bit. He
has played with a great many teams,
but his best work has been with Cumberland, where he started with the
Juniors and has kept going ever since.
Edward Hunden.
Ed. Hunden, Welsh-Canadian, was
born in Wellington; started his football
Juniors and finally graduated Into
senior company. A hard man to beat
with a ball, stubborn to a fault; has
necessary speed, and keeps  in  good
AST Sunday an aggregation of round-ball
. kickers known as thc All Stars climbed out
on the sunny side of the schoolhouse and
put the United on the small end of a two-one
icore. The match was in the nature of a practice
?ame and also to give the public a chance to size
tp the new talent that has lately arrived in the
city. The United were weak, Cairns and Wilkinson being absent, and when these two are taken
out of a team it makes quite a hole, although no
discredit is coming to Scavardo and Rickson for
the United defeat, as they played a whale of a
game, and Scavardo was suffering injury to the
ankle from a previous game. At that the United
showed a great improvement in form, and had it not been for the
stellar work of Jock Clark in goal for the Stars the decision might
have been reversed. Bannerman tried Jock with two nice shots,
and Conti netted the United's goal. Over-anxiety on the part of
Teddy Jackson spoiled two or three good chances for his team.
Billy Brown was in the limelight, but his shots were out of line-
For the All Stars, Sullivan, at centre half, was a tower of strength.
His control of the ball is very good and the openings he made for '
the forwards were par. Boothman is improving rapidly and by
the time the McBride series opens will be in good shape. Ollie
Harrison, who has not been playing all season, played a great game
with Boothman on the left wing. Harrison's crosses were perfect
and the goal he got from the line is one of the best goals scored in
these parts for many moons. Gibson is fast and tricky, and keeps
a centre half looking after him all the time. Hec Smith at back for
the Stars met with an injury in the first ten minutes of play and
was forced to retire from the game. He made a favorable impression in the short period he was on the field. His kicking was nice
and clean and he seems to use his head well. Nesbitt was the pick
of the wing halfs for the Stars, while Williams played a whale of
a game for the United. Hunden was unable to play owing to a cold
and Slaughter filled at outside left. He showed up nicely.
shape. He netted Cumberland's lone
goal against South Wellington at the
southern city and can be depended on
to bang 'em in. Wicked shot! Keep
your eye on Ed.
Frank Slaughter.
The team's first reserve Is Frank
Slaughter. He was born In "Bruinma-
gum," started his football career in
this country with the Cumberland
juniors, and has now graduated to
senior company. Frank's best showing
last year was against the Calgary Hill-
hursts;, his game was perfect and he
was the pick of the half-backs that
day. If Frank had Bobby Brown's constitution he could not be kept off any
team representing Cumberland.
Hiifth Doherty.
Hughle Doherty, born In the county
where Wallace's sword lies, Stirlingshire, had some experience in Old
Country football; played with Nanaimo
United, and is still a • war-horse of
some standing. Give Hughle a grass
field and he takes an awful beating
career In Cumberland with the j for h(s pos8e8sloil 0, ,„.t bult   _
Robert Brown.
Bob  Brown,  who wus manager of
the team on the last trip for the cham
pionship, is worthy of mention for his
enterprise, business ability and clean
sportsmanship in building the team,
giving time, money and energy to
make the Cumberland football' team
a living advertisement of the sporting
spirit that pervades our town.
Henry Farmer.
Harry Farmer, the present manager, needs no Introduction to anybody interested In athletics ou this
Island. Harry has played football,
basketball arid baseball and was always mentioned in the notable column.
He is frank and straightforward nnd
will do his best to weld the team
spirit that is necvessary to win games.
Managership has Its difficulties, but
Harry will surmount them.
A. H. Huwan.
Alex. Rowan, trainer, is another
man well known on the Island; a
good athlete in his day, who now
makes training the other fellow his
hobby since injury has stopped him
from sporting activities. He has
had a world of experience ln all athletics and it can be depended on he
has worked his head off to get bis
team in shape, He vouches for the
boys.
FRESH FISH
EVERY DAY
Fish and Chips Every Day
6.30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Rowan's Fish Market
Opposite the Post Office
SILVER
is becoming so valuable, that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and Ihe discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of affiuance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B.\C. rmammmem
HR
Page §ix.
THE  ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. 6,
February 28,1926.
GOVERNMENT MISMANAGEMENT
EXPOSED BY OPPOSITION LEADER
Premier Writhes Under Mr. Bowser's Slashing Criticism of the
Government's Failure to Redeem Its Pre-election Pledges-
Minister of Agriculture Forced to Admit That Thousands of
Acres of Land Unsuited for Agricultural Purposes Had Been
Palmed Off on the Returned Soldiers—Charges Cause Retirement of Prominent Official of Land Settlement Board.
VICTORIA, Feb. 27—The week has seen the end of that legislative forensic debauch which, under the guise of the debate or;
the address in reply to the speech from the throne, has broken
all records in point of time devoted to it. Three weeks of talk, to
the exclusion of any. real business, has been spent on it. But at
least it has served the purpose of permitiing the government time
to get along with the preparation of its legislation now considerably behind its schedule. While tangible results so far as the well-
being of the people is concerned are not discernible, it is possible
that from now on some real business will be done. Undoubtedly
the feature of the week's happenings in the House has been the
coming into action of the "big guna," the leaders of the government
and of the Conservative opposition. Comment in the corridors
gave the honors to the energetic and keen-witted opposition leader,
whose criticism of the government and its record was forceful and
logical while unmarked by acrimony. The Premier, too, displayed
his wonted ability to defend his position and he developed an unusual good humor, his erstwhile political rancour being less marked
than usual with him. But it cannot be said that there was any
display of originality in his defense.
To Mr. Bowser's slashing criticism of the government's failure
to redeem its pre-election pledges, of its failure to display any
initiative other than in taxing to the utmost limit the people of the
province the while its expenditures kept steadily mounting, the
Premier retorted with a rehash of the old arguments that whatever defects there might be in the present administration, they
were all due to the actions of the previous government; but not all,
either. The Premier has discovered that there is something wrong
with he people of British Columbia. They are averse to hard
manual work which, he says, they consider beneath them. He
advised them to doff the broadcloth and don the overalls. As. Mr.
Hawthornthwaite, who ended the debate, suggested, the Premier's
admonition to the people of British Columbia might at first sight
appear to be a reasonable one were it not for the fact that to a
great extent it was due to the present government's failure to
initiate policies of the progressive, development character that
there are today in the province thousands of men anxious to engage
in hard work but who are unable to secure employment.
The opposition leader devoted considerable time to criticizing the financial record of the government. The
so-called surplus of $1,040,000 claimed
by the minister ot finance for the
fiscal year ended March 31, 1919, he
likened to a smoke screen sent up to
obscure the real situation, a surplus
gained by the simple expedient of
charging some $2,22-1,000 to capital account, thus converting a real deficit
into an apparent surplus. Whatever
might be the claim of the finance minister the real fact was that outlays for
that year had totalled some $12,112,000
and receipts $9,887,000, leaving an
actual delicit of .some $1,181,000. The
government was running tlie business
of tlie country at a loss, borrowing to
make surpluses and then charging
such borrowings to capital account to
hide the fact, A mere book-keeping surplus, Mr. Bowser declared.
Consistency was not a trait of the
government, Mr. Bowser averred, as
he pointed to the fact that in the three
years of office, the present government
lias almost doubled the public debt by
jumping it from slightly over $18,000,-
000 In 1916 to about $32,000,000 today.
He recalled the criticisms the presenl
Premier was wont to direct against
the former administration for Its borrowings. Tlie fact was, as shown by
the I'rice-Watei house audit, one ordered by Ihe present government on
assuming ofllce, that the late government hail something substantial to
show for its outlays. Capital assets of
$39.0110,0(10, an excess of $16,000,000
over capital liabilities, were shown by
that audit. Today that excess has
shrunk fo $13,000,000 through the borrowings of the present Liberal administration, borrowings to permit of
paper surpluses being shown but unproductive of benefits to the people.
While that audit had been undertaken
primarily with the idea of disclosing
wrong-doing by the former Conservative administration, the fact was, Mr.
Bowser asserted, It had proved to be a
veritable certificate of character. The
tremendous borrowings coupled with
the fact that the government has put
on tlie financial thumb screws to the
point where the people are being
taxed to the limit, was ample demonstration that the claim to efficiency in
the financial operations of the present
administration was one that the government could not rightly advance.
Premier Oliver answered the charge
as to borrowings by saying It was due
to the poor financial condition ln which
the late government left the province;
he raked up the old charges of
maladministration in the dealings of
that government with the Pacilic Great
Eastern and the Canadian Northern
Railway interests, and declared that
the resources of the province had been
dissipated by being given to friends ot
the then administration. He asserted
$9,000,000 had had to be borrowed to
meet obligations left by the Conservatives and of the balance of the borrowings the money had been devoted to
purposes of a productive nature, such
as land settlement, soldier re-establishment, irrigation, etc.
Mr. Bowser's criticism of the land
settlement policies of the government
was evidently a telling one for it
moved the minister of agriculture, who
admitted he had not intended participating In the debate, to take the floor.
The net result was a reluctant admission by Hon. Mr. Barrow that to a
considerable extent, at least, the opposition leader's charges were well
founded. The latter had asserted that
the work of the Land Settlement
Board In connection with the Merville
and Creston soldier settlement areas
had proved so costly, through inadequate management, that an undue
financial burden was hellng cast upon
the veterans who would settle on the
lands in those areas. He doubted
whether, in view of the excessive cost,
the soldiers, even if they consented to
lay the province the price asked for
: lie lands, would lie able to secure from
tho federal authorities loans on anything like the valuations fixed by the
province. Especially did he Instance
fhe case of the Creston area where, he
mid, some 2fi00 acres of useless land
was Included in tlie nrea secured by
ihe Laud Settlement Board and Is be-
llg developed along with the good
land for soldier settlement purposes.
vV'ns the cost of this useless portion
tn be charged up against the veterans,
he asked?
Mr. Barrow was forced to admit
that at least 1000 acres of laud unite
unsuited for agricultural purposes Is
ncludcd in the Creston area, that tt
vas to he turned Into holdings and the
cost to the province would be charged
against the soldier settlers. On the
point of the Christian ranch, near Ke-
lowna, another area secured for soldier settlement at a cost to the province of $33,000, of which some $9000
went to the president of the local Liberal association as a rake-off, Mr. Bar-
row tailed to reply to Mr. Bowser's
query as to whether that profit to a
Liberal leader was also to be charged
up against the soldiers.
So far as the Merville settlement
was concerned, Hon. Mr. Barrow confined himself to general statements,
asserting the veterans now there are
enthusiastic over the prospects, but he
failed to explain how It came about
that they have so far refused to accept
the board's figures of cost, that the
federol government refuses to accept
the board's valuations as a fair basis
upon which to advance loans to the
soldiers. He admitted that twenty-five
per cent, of the men who originally
entered upon that scheme have quit.
"Misfits" he called them. To Mr. Bowser's assertion that ap to date some
$333,000 has been spent on the Merville settlement operations to clear
some 117 acres of land and yet not a
single soldier has been settled, the
minister admitted that perhaps mistakes had been made, for the scheme
was merely an experiment; but valuable lessons had been learned, he said.
To Mr. Bowser's declaration that ii
would be most unfair to charge the
returned men with this over-expenditure and that the only proper course
nas for the government to shoulder it
and charge it up to "incompetent administration," neither the minister oi'
agriculture or the Premier vouchsafed
any reply, nor did the opposition
leader's demand for the dismissal of
the present head of the Land Scttle-
nent Board, Mr. M. H. Nelems, on thc
-.core ot incompetency, draw forth a
reply.
No better commentary on tlie justness of Mr. Bowser's charge that tlie
Land Settlement Hoard's operations
liave been a failure could be bad than
ilie announcement mndc today by tlie
Premier that Mr. Nelems has resigned.
The board had been In session here
.'or a mnnlier of days and on Friday
a majority of the directors passed a
vote of want of_conndence in their
chairman and demanded that the government request his resignation. Mr.
Nelems' resignation followed. It is no
secret that his autorcatlc methods and
his refusal to accept recommendations
of the practical members on the
board created differences which ended
in their demanding his removal.
Premier Oliver In his speech on the
address took occasion to.reply to the
charges made by G. S. Hanes, Liberal
member for North Vancouver, to the
effect that through the obstruction of
the work of the government Inspectors
sent out to check up the assets of the
Pacific Great Eastern the Premier had
permitted valuable assets which should
have come into the possession of the
province undor the terms of the settlement arrived at in 1918 between the
government and the Pacific Great
Eastern interests to be lost. The Premier roundly berated the member, suggesting he was afflicted with lunar
madness, and asserted that the province got everything coming to it, but
that It was never intended that equipment and plant of the contractors had
been conveyed under that arrangement.
He inferred that any plant not taken
over came within that category. Mr.
Hanes, however, claimed that fully
$100,000 worth of assets, rightfully the
province's, have been lost, and he informed the House he was ready to
make good that statement If the Premier would only grant the Investigation he had been asking for.
TEMPLETON'S
RHEUMATIC CAPSULES
FOR
fflEUMATISM.NEUBITIS.SCWTlCA
LUMBAGO, NEURALGIA.GOUT ETC
ASIDE RELIEF FOR THE WORST HEADACHE
| $IS» PER BOX
||TtNPtrroNSLran„as.M2Kiwsr.wTaioiin|
Aaenclrt...rrwatrt. Jfnea'nimristlnj'niirlowiiRllithem.
wrttaTempletona WMti-ro Rraurh. Una IM. Victoria. T.H.C.'a
Bulled aDrrrhere fur 11.01, or Buualul lentftua anjnjuaaL
Sole agent for Cumberland, R. E.
Frost.
Jazz Haircuts
A Specialty
For a nice easy Shave and
Hair-cut call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBEH
SHOP
A. Gatz, Prop.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$4.00
BREAD
PRICES
We
wish to   announce   that,
owing
to  the    increase in the
price of flour, we have been com
pelled
to increase the price of
bread,
which will now be Two
Loaves for 25c.
Marrochi Bros.
Jas. Halliday.
by selecting the sheila that
hunters from coast to coast
have proved dependable
under all conditions.
RegaJ
Shotgun Shells
ore a double assurance of
success for the man who
prefers ballistite powder.
Wc also carry a full line of
Canuck and Sovereign Shotgun Shells and Dominion
Metallic Cartridges — e:ic!i
backed by thc b>8 "D"trar''.
mark
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
S. DAVIS,
Shoe Repairer, Dunsmuir Avenue
I wish to inform the publlc that I
am now in a position to repair by
machinery.
Look like new, but wear longer.
A trial will convince.
Rubber Heels While Von Walt.
S. PUIS,    -    -    Cumberland, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
W M. M KK RfWELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave..      I'hhiUtIuimI, B.C.
Canada Food Board License No. 10-4986
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-117*2
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE IUH,W*AY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM   JONES
Cumberland, B. C.
License No. 10-160G
OYSTERS
VENDOME CAFE
The llmisc nt Quality.
Our motto:  To please.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops
AIbo Oysters, Oyster Loaves and
French Fried Potatoes to take
home.
Boxes for Ladies.
Open liny and Night,
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
FURNITURE FOR YOUR
DINING ROOM
should be substantial and well built, as well as attractive.   We offer
DINING ROOM FURNITURE
in the favored period styles and many new and artistic
effects.
Come in and see our Fall designs for every room in
the house.
T. E. BATE
P.O. Box 279. CUMBERLAND. Phone 31.
What do you say when
you answer the 'phone?
IF you work in a store or an office, your ambition is
to give service. What do you answer when the
telephone rings? Hello? Or, do you announce the
name of your firm or the department? "Hello"
signifies only that someone is talking. It entails interrogation and results in loss of time. In many cases,
it causes annoyance. Why not be efficient and
courteous ?
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Limited.
Special Purchase
WE-NO-NAH
BRAND
EARLY JUNE
SIFTED PEAS
30c. value, per tin 25c.
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
A. STANFORD
Practical Automobile Mechanic, Cumberland, B. C.
Pbone 8 (Nlgbt or Day)
Official Repairer to Island Automobile Association.
Oils, Grease and Gasoline.  Cars Kept In Order by Contract Any
Make of Car Secured en the Shortest Notice.
SPECIALTY—A Real Self-Starter for Ford Cars, fully Guaranteed.  The Only Thing. Call and See It.
Don't let your new car fall to pieces—a little practical attention
periodically will keep tt to its standard. Dunlop Tires,
"ISLANDER ADS."
PAY BIG DIVIDENDS

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