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The Cumberland Islander Jun 18, 1926

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Array Provlnclal Library
FHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
4
With which to consolkbtted the Cumberknd Hews.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 25.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1926.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Harold Jones Too
Good For Anderson
|   ' Courtenay'o boxing bouts staged in
the Gaiety Theatre last Monday night
were not what they were cracked up
to be. For one thing, the attendance
wbh not so good; and tor another, the
principles ln the mala bout were not
really head-line boxers, this being
the reason, doubtless, tor the poor
support accorded the show by light
fans. But nevertheless, no one was
disappointed. The card was replete
with slashing good lights and plenty
of action.
Henry Polled, of Nanaimo, featherweight champion of Vancouver Island,
and Al Gallagher, of Vancouver, stepped eight lively rounds to a draw ln
the main event, although Pollett
appeared to have the edge all the
way. He hit Gallagher with everything he had except one of the ring
posts and had he used that we honestly believe the tough Vancouver lad
would have taken It and come back
for more. How that boy can take
punishment! But dont kid yourself
that he took all and gave none.
Time after time when he seemed
apparently out on his feet he came
back and hit Pollett so hard that even
the "ring-worms" felt the socks. It
was a fast and furious tight with the
cleanest of clean breaks. A draw,
though not popular with some of the
fans, was a good decision. We were
entirely satisfied, even though we gave
Pollett the third and seventh and
favored him to win. The remaining
rounds were even.
JOKES WON HANDILY
! Poor  Harry  Anderson!     Knocked
out Saturday night at Victoria and
again k.o'd. on Monday night! We
dont know how it feels to be hearing
birdies and seeing stars but lf Harry
would take our advice he'd decide
that boxing ls a very nice profession
—to keep away from. Being knocked
cold twice within the space of three
days Is no joke and no doubt Anderson wont deny lt. Harold Jones,
Cumberland's pride ln the 144 pound
class, took the part of the mother in
this "Rock-a-bye baby" act. He had
Anderson, who halls trom Vancouver, outclassed at all times; took the
first round handily, put Anderson
down for the count of nine in the
second, and put him to sleep In the
third. But If Anderson had landed
one of his wild swings Jones would
be sleeping yet. Harold has a good
knowledge of the fine points of the
game, has a hefty wallop In either
" mitt, but lacks speed.
PRELIMINARIES (.001)
The three preliminaries were good
In the first young Tom Taylor, of
Oyster River, waB very much outweighed by Kid Townsend of Vancouver, but put up a good scrap until
a suspiciously low wallop took the
wind out of his Balls. He calmly
sank to the floor in the third and was
counted out, though not actually out.
Nodgi Margl and Young Corbett, of
Vancouver, went four rounds to a
popular draw. It was a slam-bang
fight with no quarter asked and none
given.
The third preliminary went to
Young TownBend, of Vancouver, by
a wide margin over his opponent, Vic
Spencer, of Courtenay. Vic was game
but Townsend was too good and ln
the second Vic went to his knees and
was counted out In spite of the insistent clamorings of his seconds to
'get up!' We didn't blame Vic at
all. When the first sock puts out one
of your lamps then it's time to sit
down before you get knocked down
—and stay down.
Harry Jackson, of Cumberland,
refereed all bouts.
DANCE TONIGHT IN
AID OF SOCCER TEAM
In an endeavor to raise funds to
tide the Club over the coming season
the management of the Cumberland
Intermediate soccer team Is holding
a dance ln the Ilo-llo Hall this evening from 9:00 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Invitations have been sent out merely
as reminders to the dance-going public, and as lt Is practically Impossible
to Include everyone in this manner
COURT HOLDS FUEL 0ILTENN,STEAP0STP0NED
w**-1    UNTIL NEXT WEDNESDAY
TAX INVALID
Province Lost Appeal Involving
Half Million Yearly
In a judgment handed down  last
Monday morning the   Appeal   Court
upheld the lower Court ruling that
the members of the team would like' collection of the tax on Fuel Oil Is
beyond the powers of the Legislature.
to state that everyone is welcome,
whether ls receipt of a regular Invitation or not.
Plump's Orchestra will be in attendance and an enjoyable evening of
dancing to the very latest music Is
guaranteed. Gentlemen will be required to pay seventy-five centB, with
twenty-five cents as the charge for
ladles.
Chaplin Portrays
Great Loneliness
But He Makes Comedy of It All
in His New Film, "The
Gold Rush"
Were you ever out in the great alone.
When the moon was awful clear,
And the Icy mountains hemmed you ln
With a silence you 'most could hear.
Then you have a hunch what It is
to be alone in a crowd, a stranger in
a strange land—among strange people
where every man is for himself. If
you don't know what this feels like,
then see Charlie Chaplin In his great
comedy "The Gold Rush," playing at
the Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday, June 25 and 26.
See the little tramp, a disappointed
prospector, amble into the dance-hall
seeking, searching for a little companionship—surrounded by the merry makers, but with never a sign of
welcome from anyone. Then left
alone while tbe crowd of lucky ones
go on with tbe dance.
Until, a smile from "the girl" seems
to kindle a spark, and as he steps
forward to the greeting—finds that lt
is for someone else.
This, and many other little touche.i
ot life's Ironies is what makes "The
Gold Rush" the great picture lt has
been acclaimed by press and public.
The court dismissed the appeal of
the Attorney-General against the
judgment of Mr. Justice Aulay Morrison, in which he declared the tax
was Illegal because it was indirect
and beyond the powers of the Provincial Legislature to enact.
Mr. Justice Morrison's judgment In
two cases on the same subject—the
C.P.R. and the Union Oil Company-
was upheld. Mr. Justice Martin and
Mr. Justice McPhlllips dissented on
each appeal.
The estimated revenue from the
fuel oil tax was stated to be nearly
half a million dollars yearly.
QUATHIASKI COVE
LOST TO LOCAL TEAM
CUMBERLAND LOSES
TO ST. SAVIOURS
CLIFFE RETURNS HOME;
IS CONFIDENT HE CAN
BEAT OWENS ANYTIME
Roy Cliffe arrived home on Tuea
day night's train from the sunny
south and looks in the pink of condi
tion and none the worse for his light
a week or so ago with Ernie Owens.
He feels confident that he can beat
Owens at any time and Is only wait-
Ing for a chance to meet him again.
Roy showed clippings from five of the
Los Angeles papers and four out of
the five said that the fight belonged
to Cliffe and fifth called it a draw.
Roy has agreed to step out of his
class and fight Ole Anderson, 195
pounds, at the stadium in Courtenay
on Dominion Day, July 1st. According to Roy, Anderson is a hard-hitting
fighter and has fought many heavyweights of note, but Cliffe thinks that
he has more speed and can offset his
hard hitting and longer ring experience with thla advantage.
It ls interesting to note that this Is
the lirst time that Cliffe has taken
on a heavyweight of any importance,
and It was in Courtenay at tho stadium just two years ago that Roy
staged his first light-heavyweight
fight. Here Is wishing the local boy
the same good luck In this class that
he has gained for himself In the light-
heavy division.
NEW  CHURCH  DEDICATED
AT QUALICUM BEACH
On the evening of June 11th the
new Church of St. Mark's was dedicated by the Bishop of Columbia.
Amongst the many clergy assisting
in the service were the Rev. J. W.
CONDUCTS INQUIRY INTO
COURTENAY'S BIG FIRE
Mr. J. A. Thomas, Provincial Fire
Marshall, has been conducting an enquiry In connection with the recent
Courtenay Are. The Arst sitting of
the court of Inquiry was held at the
Flinton. of Courtenay, who preached, j City Hall, Courtenay. on Thursday,
and Rev. E. 0. Robathan, of Cumber- June 10th, and was adjourned to a
land. In the congregation there were j further sitting which was held at
members of Holy Trinity Choir.   The Vancouver yesterday.
Church, which was designed by Mr.	
J. C. Keith, of Victoria, is situated j Mr. and Mrs. Sykes and Mr. and
close to one of the drive entrances j Mrs. Basil Littley, of Corbln, B. C,
to the famous Beach Hotel, and will who have been attending the Odd-
be visited by the many tourists who fellow-Rebekah convention at Vern-
come to the neighborhood each sum- on, are at present the guests of Mr.
mer. Rev. J. Popham, of Parksville, and Mrs. James Quinn, of the New
will have charge of the services.       Townsite.
St. Saviours gave two thousand en
thusiastlc football fans a surprise at
Vancouver last Saturday afternoon
when they ran the powerful Cumberland eleven ragged to score a 6 to 2
victory in the Pacific Coast League
game.
The Vancouver lads excelled ln all
departments and in the first period
scored four times without a reply.
The visitors got two in the final period against one by the Saints. The
long passing game in which the forwards got inside the slow-moving
Cumberland defense, proved effective
for St. Saviours.
One Was Penalty
Cumberland uncovered a lot of pretty combination play, generally started by Hitchens, outside left, but they
were harrassed as closely by the
speedy' locals and they seldom got
an opportunity to get set for a hard
shot. Giant Mortimer, who looks
more like Jim Jeffries in his prime,
got peeved by the manner ln which
the youngsters kept pressing him,
and was twice pulled up for tripping,
once Inside the penalty area, which
cost a goal.
Moffat got the first counter on a
penalty after Mortimer had handled
Fred Roots got the next two with
pretty shots, his second effort being
individual, when he carried the ball
nearly the length of the field to beat
the opposition. Hammond took a pass
from Moffatt to get the final tally of
the period.
Campbell scored after a fast break
away for Cumberland In the second
period, but Moffatt got the goal back
on a penalty kick. Fowler tallied for
the vlsltofs when Roots dropped the
ball trying to relieve. Roots saved a
penalty from Brake just before time.
Jack Armstrong was referee and the
teams were:
Cumberland—Orr, Mortimer, Stew
art; Monaghan, Brake and Gough;
Bannerman, Campbell, Fowler, Plump
and Hitchens.
St. Saviours—A. Roots; Constable
and Butchart; Coulter, Cameron and
Robertson; Moffatt, Perrltt Hammond
Hendry and F. Roots.
The hoodoo recently trailing the
Intermediate soccer team of Cumberland at last seems to have turned
tail and fled—let us hope for good.
The teams list of defeats so far this
season Is broken.
The break came Sunday afternoon
last when the locals romped through
the heavier but less experienced
Quathiaski Cove team to the tune of
three goals to one ln what proved to
be a fairly good but rather uuexclt
ing game. The spectators were not
numerous, owing to tbe fact, doubtless, that the local team is but recently organized and can not as yet put
up the brand of ball formerly seen
among Intermediate teams in this
city. The players are improving
rapidly In form, however, and soon
hope to be drawing as many spectators and furnishing as much excitement in their games as the senior
team does.
Poor shooting on the part of the
Cumberland forwards was the cause
of the score reading three to one Instead of something like nine to one.
The Cove was outclassed, but just
tbe same put up a bard fight and re-,
fused to give up trying until the
final whistle blew. Only at one time
did they prove dangerous and that
was In the dying minutes of the game
when Cumberland began to ease off.
The visitors' one and only goal was
the result of this slackening of pres-1
Owing to counter attractions the
afternoon tea under the auspices of
the Cumberland Tennis Club arranged
for last Wednesday was postponed
until next week. The tea will bc
given by Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Stacey
and will be held Wednesday on the
verandah and lawn at the home of
Dr. and Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton,
Windermere Avenue. Those attending the tea may also enjoy a tew sets
of tennis as the courts are nearby.
GUNBOATS IN HARBOR
After touching at Esquimalt and
cruising up the west coast as far as
Bamfleld, H.M.C.S. Patrician arrived
at Comox on Tuesday afternoon, preceded by the Thiepval. The Patrician
will be here on and off for two weeks.
Roy Cliffe Fights
Here July First
To Fight in Heavyweight Class
For First Time at Stadium
At Courtenay
Roy Cliffe, who has been fighting
In the light-heavy division tor the
past two years, has signed to meet
Ole Anderson, heavyweight, In the
open air stadium at Courtenay on the
first of July.
Anderson is 28 years old and has
fought all the best men in the United
States except Jack Dempsey. He has
lost a close decision to Harry Wills
who ls billed to meet Dempsey this
Fall. He has won decisions over
8ureAAt'halfAlm7"tn7s"core"s7oodlCarl Morri8 <the Oklahoma Giant),
one to nothing for the locals, John I mn* MlBke anU FraI,k Fa™**r' and
Stevenson rushing in the lone tally.
H. Gibson and W. Walker added one
each In the second period. Tom Carney handled the whistle.
Cumberland wlll travel to Quathiaski next Sunday for the return
match and the following week Port
Alberni will be here.
ATTREE DANCERS PLEASED
SOCCER FINALS TO
BE PLAYED IN JULY
Tentative arrangements hnve been
niiide for the winners of the Alberta
section of the Connaught soccer cup
series to meet the llritish Columbia
victors in Vancouver on Saturday,
July 17. Secretary Sam Davidson, of
the Dominion Football Association,
states, however, thut this ls subjecl
to the approval of the Canadian Council. It Is practically certain July 17
will be the first game, and the second
will be staged early in the following
week.
The Connaught Cup Is the emblem
of soccer supremacy ln Canada, and
separate competitions are played in
each province before the final playoffs. The series In this province has
reached the penultimate stage, and
the first of the seml-Ilnals will be the
attraction In Con Jones' Park on Saturday afternoon, when Westminster
United and Sapperton tangle. Canadian Collieries and Nanaimo meet in
the other seml-flnal.
The Attree dancers scored a big hit
with their audiences at the Ilo-llo
Theatre last Monday and Tuesday
with their pleasing dances and songs,
and at Courtenay the following night
the Gaiety Theatre was taxed to the
limit to contain the enthusiastic patrons. Applause for the skill ot the
entertainers was given unstintedly.
SCOUTS TO CAMP AT
QUALICUM BEACH
The Troop Committee of the local
Boy Scouts met on Tuesday evening
to discuss ways and means of raising
funds for the camp to be held this
summer, and It was decided to make
1100.00 the objective. It was felt
that the cost to each boy should be
reduced aB much as possible, and the
Committee felt that it this sum could
be raised It would be possible to
bring the camp within the range of
all the boys. Nothing definitely was
decided upon hut It was suggested
that a dance would be a good way
to bring in a portion of this amount.
The camp will probably be held at
Qualicum Beach as word has been
received from the West Coast that
the camping site at Toflno ls not
available.
The Wolf Cubs will possibly camp,
the first week in August, and will
then be followed by the Scouts. The
Troop Committee consists of the
following: Rev. E. O. Robathan, chairman and Scouler; Mr. MacLean secretary-treasurer; Mr. Frank Martin,
Assistant   Scouler;    Messrs.   Taylor,
has knocked out Bill Brennan, Sam
Baker, Jim Flynn, Clem Johnson and
Floyd Johnson.
The balance of the card will most
likely be a 6 round bout between
Harold Jones, of Cumberland, and
Charlie Bradshaw of Duncan; Ernie
Woodley of Victoria In 6 rounds with
Eddie Gross of Seattle; and 4 rounds
between Adam Monks and Jack Foster, as well as other preliminaries
NEW CATHEDRAL TO
BE BUILT IN VICTORIA
Last Sunday morning the congregation of Holy Trinity Church was
addressed by Mr. A. R. Merrlx, Organizing secretary of the new Cathedral Building Campaign, Victoria. Mr.
Merrlx has been visiting the parishes
in the upper part of the Island, his
itinerary Including Nanaimo. Parksvllle, Qualicum, Cumberland. Comox,
Courtenay and Alberni. In thc course
of his address the need for such a
building was explained, and lt was
Interesting to note that in design and
dignity the new Cathedral compared
very favorably with some of the
smaller Cathedrals  in    England.   A
Cumberland And
Alberni Road
Is Endorsed
At lhe regular monthly meeting of
the Cumberland Board of Trade, held
last Tuesday evening In the City
Hall, a resolution endorsing the proposed C'umberland-Alberni Road via
Comox Lake was passed and ordered
forwarded lo the convention of the
Associated Hoards of Trado which
takes place next month at Port Alberni. The Increased prosperity that
this road would bring both to the west
coast and to the Comox District,
makes the project one of vital interest here and It should not be passed over lightly. The Board of Trade
fully realizes this and will not let it
drop until al least some action ls
secured.
(AMI' SITE PROPOSED
The question of clearing a tourist
camp site at Comox Lake was gone
into fully and a committee was
appointed to visit the Lake tomorrow
In order to decide on the best location
for such a site. If the necessary permission Is secured, clearing of the
undergrowth on the site will be proceeded with immediately. Most of the
big trees, which reach an enormous
size near the Lake, will be left standing.
A SPORT SUGGESTION
Cumberland now has a senior football team and an Intermedial one,
and Cumberland soccer fans have not
been treated to n real good game of
football for some time. Why not,
then, pick two evenly balanced learns
from the existing teams, mixing Intermediates with seniors, and play a
match or scries of matches, say at
6:00 o'clock on Wednesday evenings.
It would be good practice for all the
players and the fans would certainly
appreciate it.   How about it?
STRAWBERRY SOCIAL
DREW LARGE CROWDS
Attended by perfect June weather
and by one of the largest crowds on
record, lhe Strawberry Social and
sale of home cooking held last Wednesday afternoon on tlie lawn at the
homo of Mr. and Mrs, ('. J. Parnham
was an even greater success than the
committees bad dared to hope for.
It was the first social event of any
magnitude given under the auspices
of the recently fronted Ladles Aid of
the Cumberland United Church and
was an excellent indication of what
the future holds In store for the new
Church. The monetary returns from
the social were mure than gratifying.
In charge nf the home cooking stall
were Mrs. A. Holland. Mrs. Farr, and
Miss A. Haywood, while Mrs. Hick*.
Mrs. Ledinghiim. Mrs. Nash. Mrs. J. (*.
Brown Mrs. Richardson, Mlse Mann
and Mrs. A. Parmer were iu charge
of Ihe  tea   tables.   The   strawberries
great many leading architects In the
Old Country and the United States and Ice cream were looked after by
had congratulated Mr. J. C. Keith, of j Mrs. Hunden, Mrs. Donald. Mrs. ('.
Victoria, who had drawn up the plans Whyte, Mrs. Lockm/r and Mrs. It.
and had been  working on them for' Strachan.
something like thirty years. j     Hev. ami  Mrs. Ilewiil   were In nl-
Excavation work has already com-  tendanco and were introduced to (he
menced on the site and the founda- j many   visitors   by   Mrs.  (i.   K.  Mnc-
tion stone will be laid by thc Bishop ; Naughton,  president  nf tho    Ladles
of London who wlll visit the capltol
city in September. Embodied In lhe
foundation stone wlll be a stone sent
out from the old cathedral of Canterbury.
It has been decided to carry out
a vigorous campaign In the Diocese
for raising funds sometime ln the
Fall, on lines similar to those followed during the Forward Movement.
The first unit to be built wlll be Hie
Nave al a cost of J.100,000 of which
sTraohan, Apps"Copei'coi, Villiers;i**lj?'* A^^JfJ?!^ M
and Mesdames Clinton, MacNaughton,
Stevens and Banks.
ELOCUTION CLASS
TO BE HEARD TONIGHT
The Union Bay Junior Elocution
Class, under the direction of Miss
Grace Searle, will present their entertainment "Fun In the Magic Rose
Garden' this evening In the Parish
(Anglican Church) Hall. Some 20
children wlll take part in the performance, and will surprise the audience
with their training. The proceeds of
the entertainment will go towards the
Renovation Fund of thc ParUh
Church.
Merrlx has received encouraging re-
ports in all the places he has visited
and has no fear that the objective will
not be reached.
Upwards of two hundred attended
the picnic of the Welsh Society held
at Mallard's Beach on Sunday last.
Games, races, and competitions were
the means of bringing much enjoyment to the large number present.
Ice cream In abundance was served
tn the children.
.   «   «
The many friends of Mrs. J. Spicer
will be pleased tn hear that she has
completely recovered after several
weeks' Illness In the Cumberland
General Hospital.
Aid.
ROOF FIRE SUNDAY
CALLED OUT BRIGADE
A roof fire al Ibe shack of I long
Lee. Chinatown, called out lhe local
lire department last Sunday afternoon. Their assistance was however,
unnecessary, for neighboring cliiiH'M'
had Ihe lire under control when the
trucks arrived on the scene. An
overheated Move-pipe was the cause
of the blaze.
INDUCTION SERVICE
TO BE HELD TUESDAY
Induction service wlll be held nt
the Cumberland Culled Church (formerly St. Genrgo's Presbyterian) on
Tuesday evening. June !2nd, at 8:00
o'clock, when the Hev. J. It Hewitt,
late of Duncan, will bc Inducted lo
his new church, Cumberland United.
The officiating clergymen will be Hov.
Mr. Wcstan, of Victoria, anil Hev. Mr.
Nixon, nf Nanaimo. A cordial Invitation to all members of tbe church ami
their friends to ho present nt this
service is extended.
Charlie Chaplin in "The Gold Rush" June 24, 25, 26 PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1926.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY. JUNE 18, 1926.
HORSE SENSE Frugality and economy are
homely virtues which are
needful to the prosperity of the home.
Great and good old Dr. Johnson wrote, out
of the ripeness of experience: "Frugality may
be termed the daughter of prudence, the sister
of temperance and the parent of liberty. He
that is extravagant will quickly become poor, and
poverty will enforce dependence and invite corruption."
How we need to heed these words of wisdom
in this rushing day of stepping on the gas and
burning up money. This need of practicing economy belongs to every one whether in the possession of an income more than is sufficient for a
family's requirements or of a large fortune
which banishes financial adversity from the mind.
To manage a little well is a vast and glorious
merit in house managing.
He is a good driver of a flivver who can turn
in a little room.
He is a sensible and safe man who knows how
to enjoy and get the most out of life and still
lay by something for a rainy day.
This is the part of wisdom, particularly since
those who manage a little well are the most likely
to succeed in the management of larger matters
and also to have the larger matters to manage.
But woe to the frugality that is allowed to
degenerate into parsimony, stinginess or meanness. You got to know how to spend and how
to save.
In other words, don't pick 'em up on the
street. Recognize no man to whom you have
not been properly introduced by a mutual friend
who will give you some information about Him;
A casual acquaintance may prove a true gentleman, but the chances are that he will not. You
know nothing about him, and consequently the
risk'is very great. Many a girl has had cause
to rue the day that she encouraged the advances
of a man she met by chance at some place of
amusement.
When you become acquainted with a man in
the proper manner, which, although orthodox,
is the only safe, way in which to from an acquaintance, then you can set to work to study the prin
ciples of his character and decide for yourself
whether he is worthy of your friendship or not.
DON'T PICK 'EM UP No better advice was
ever bestowed upon a
girl than that givn by a worldly wise matron to
her daughter on the subject of men acquaintances. "My dear," she said, "you cannot be too
careful in your choice of companions of the opposite sex. Men are not always what they
seem to be, and it is necessary for your happiness that you should make a close study of any
man who seeks your friendship and society."
Of course, all men have their petty faults, which
are not very important. What you have to find
out are their great failings, which have so much
influence upon the happiness and success of life.
THE ART OF RESTING Rest and sleep are
the Sisters of Mercy
wiio go about to smooth the wrinkles away from
women's foreheads and otherwise repair the ravages of too strenuous days. The idea of constant occupation is all wrong, and the woman
who has acquired the art of resting—for it is
an art—will be able to show in middle age a face
luminous with life and youth when her industrious sister is sere and gray.
This is not a plea for idleness, because whatever her condition in life may be, the woman who
has nothing to do is not only unhappy but also
dangerous. She is bound to stray over into the
country of the arch enemy and find the mischief
especially reserved for unoccupied hands.
The homekeeper who carries the affairs of
her household on successfully is entitled to the
honors of the general in the field of war. But
there are times when she must rest in her tent
if she would continue strong and capable of carrying on the long campaign. Then she must go
to her room and lock the door upon her cares
and her family alike and throw herself down for
a sweet, reviving snatch of slumber.
Nature makes no mistakes even if she does
shock the comunity, and no matter what the
hour may be, it is time to sleep when one feels
sleepy, and a wee nap in the very midst of the
day's work will sometimes prove a source of
splendid strength for the remainder of the day
If at first we find out where we are and
whither we are tending, we can then know better
what to do and how to do it. Ab. Lincoln
*   *   *   *
To go on cherfully with a petty round of little
duties, to smile for the joy of others when the
heart is aching. Who does this, his works will
follow him. He may not be a hero to hte world,
but he is one of God's heroes. Canon Farrar
UP-ISLAND BOARDS
READY FOR SESSION
Alberni and Port Alberni will cooperate In formulating a program for
the Associated Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island to follow while ln
convention In the former city on July
13 and 14. At a meeting recently of
the Alberni Board of Trade it was decided to approach the Port Alberni
Board and ask for cooperation in formulating a program for the convention. This was done, co-nperation was
assured and the two up-Island towns
are now making ready for the reception of visitors from other parts.
A committee composed of members
of both boards has been appointed.
Among the resolutions to be pre
sented at the forthcoming convention
is one which protests against the employment of Japanese fishermen In
the East Coast herring industry, and
another advocating tbe immediate
construction of at least a portion of
the Cumberland-Albernl highway
through the Alberni Valley.
Bear Hunting In Rockies Best In Spring
(he BU* Bund district of the
Upper Columbia River in British Columbia lies thc largest tract
of grizzly bear hunting territory
In the Dominion, On the two hundred mile stretch between Beaver-
mouth and Revelstoke, both on the
main line of thc Canadian Pacific
Railway, there are approximately
thirty creeks, some large enough to
be classed as rivers. Of these at
least twelve arc known to be the
habitat of the gristly while many nf
them have not heard the sound of
a  rifle  in years.
This sprint; a systematic effort
was made to place the hunting possibilities of this great district within the reach of prospective visitors
In search of the thrill which only
close quarters with Ursus Horribilis
can produce. Through the co-operation of all Uie best known River-
men on tho Upper Columbia, trips
can be made in comfort. Game and
fish arc plentiful and the scenery
is sufficient to satisfy the desire
of the most exacting mountaineer.
At low water such as exists up to
about thc end of May it is possible
to run in safety such well known
waters as Surprise, Kimbaskct, Gordon, Priest and Death Rapids, as
well as the far-famed Canyon of the
Columbia itself. This trip appeals
tn many as fully as the actual hunting
Cumberland
Betty
Brown
Dresses
JUST RECEIVED
A new shipment featuring -the
latest   New   York   and   Paris
Styles in New Materials.
Specials this week
Ladies' Summer Under Vests in
White, Pink, Peach and Mauv:
Special at
3 for .".	
Ladies' Bloomers in Peach, Pink
Mauve and White. ftA«
$1.00
^mJ.
FORD CARS
LOWEST IN UPKEEP
LOWEST IN FIRST COST
—BEST VALUE FOR THE DOLLAR—
f.o.b. Courtenay
Cash
Monthly
with balloons
Down
Payments
$(361.00
RUNABOUT
$150.00
$25.00
682.00
TOURING
175.00
25.00
755.00
SPORT ROADSTER
225.00
30.00
836.00
COUPE
250.00
35.00
863.00
COACH
250.00
35.00
1       SPECIAL SPORT TOURING, $787.00
I
SOLD OUT BUT MORE
COMING
Special at per pair
Dress Ginghams & Chambrays,
Special at QF»/»
3 yards for  VOL
Special Bargains in Shelf Oil- * Rsi
cloth at OKn
2 yards for  £*J*L
Cork Linoleum Mats, 21 x 36.
Special price, d»i   ftft
each  tj)l.*7U
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Phones 46 and 182. Courtenay, B. C.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
"Fashion Craft" Tailor Made'[<?>,•
Suits in Navy and Brown, all:™
sizes, and CQC ftft H£
Special at  «DOt>.UU jjj
Custom Made Suits in Tweeds:
and Worsteds from [
$22.50
Men's   Grey
Pants, special
value @ 	
to
$27.50
Flannel   Outing
$5.50
White Duck Pants   d»Q OK
from $2.75 to  tpO.£t>
Balbriggan and Hatchway Summer Underwear for Men  and
Youths
Shirts, Straw Hats, New Jazz
Sweaters, Plaid Flannel Blazers,
Bathing Suits and Canvas Footwear.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Excellent sulalne—
For reservations Phase U.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service.
It   rooms,   eleatrloalk/   heated
B. TATBA, Manager
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service,  reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
Upper—A couple of hiinlcrn willt some of their game. Lower left
—On the war path. Lower right—Beaver Canyon, near Beiivirmouth,
B. C.
As far es Is known, no party of
non-residents has ever made such a
trip. The last pair of local hunters,
who spent twenty-one days en route,
brought  in  a  bag of over  fifteen
According to J. H. Munro, of
Revelstoke, B.C., the bears in this
district are on the move from April
20. While there are more to be
had later on, the earlier the bear is
bears, Including several  very large   killed the better condition his claws
grizzlies and three live grizzly cubs.
This happened several years ago
when the present bag limit of three
bears per sportsman was not in effect.
and pelt are in. Arnold Borlon,
one of the best known Banff guides,
also advises that April and May
are the best months for hunter!
seeking bearskins as trophies.
LOST—DOUBLE BAR-PIN, set with
three purple stones, center one
surrounded by small pearls. Losl
on or near Dunsmuir Ave. last
Saturday. Reward of 12.00 on return to Mrs. W. Davis, Minto, or
to Islander Office. lt.
FOR SALE—Small Kitchen RANGE.
Apply 204 Derwent Avenue, Cumberland. It.
FOR SALE—Baby Buggy In lirst class
condition, new tyres, etc. Price
114.00. Tel. 178 or apply 138 Maryport Avenue, New Townsite.       lt.
BARRELS    POR    SALE—Apply    al
McBryde's Bakery, Courtenay, B.C.
tfn
"WANTED—Wo want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchango Ltd..
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     t.f.n.
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
Preliminary Notice of Unreserved
Sale of 10 acres, with House
at Royston
Comprising five acres cleared and ready for the plough, the
balance in standing timber—about ten thousand feet, mostly fir.
The property Includes a neat three-roomed dwelling house,
surrounded by a young, bearing orchard, large garden, small
fruits, chicken house and a never-tailing spring--belng Lot 9,
subdivision of the N.W. Vi and S.W.  *A section 28, Map 1931,
"Township 11, Nelson District, of Comox District, Province ot
British Columbia. The property is most pleasantly situated
on thc cast side of the main RoyBton-Oumberland road, about
>& mile from Royston-station, school and beach, and may be
recommended as a sound investment. Duly instructed by the
ottiier, Mr. A. Charles Seott. I shall, on the 7th day of July
-1926, sell the above, and also the household  furniture,  tools,
some poultry, etc.
For full particulars sec  posters or
E. FELIX THOMAS
Telephones  161 anil  24L.
Courtenay,  B.C.
np^aaarnK^jaJ
GAIETY, COURTENAY, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23rd P4GE FOUR
THUS CUMBERLAND ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1926.
/\^
A Few Observations About The
Clinical Thermometer
In winter and spring when la grippe
Is rampant, many of us make use of
clinical thermometers, but few give
thought (especially lf the mercury
reads above the "normal*' point) to
the nature of the little Instrument
which is found ln practlcalyy every
household. Probably the clinical
thermometer is the most widely used
of any pathological Instrument, and,
although familiarity may breed con
tempt the accuracy of these small
thermometers does actually compare
very favorably with that of the much
more costly and larger Instruments
use In scientific laboratories.
'The clinical thermometer, In common with Its larger brethren, ls subject to errors which may give rise to
fictitious Indications.   Unless special
£b is used for the thin bulb coning the mercury, errors will ac-
cuniulate for some considerable time
after manufacture, due to a slow
shrinkage which tikes place—extending sometimes for years.   Often*,' too,
gat   entrapped Ih the walls of the a labored breath.
Puzzle No. 135
Find a mountain concealed In each
ot the following sentences:
He claimed the property.
Bab, row near the shore.
On Friar St he lent the money.
Do you like Ell as well as Fred?
Have the Ice and snow dote very
much damage here?
That womap Is Washing tons and
tons of clothes.
This is the hook Eric lost in the
brook.
Her monograph in unknown.
Do you think the name Idaho odd?
He was ev*r establishing buildings.
•   *   •
Puzzle No. 136
"Chief" answers the first description. Now see how many of the
other words you can discover:
Remove the letter I from a leader
and leave a cook.
Remove I from spoken and leave
mournful.
Remove I from girl and leave enraged.
Remove I from destruction and
Ifl&VB to flee
Remove I from bodily suffering and
leave a cooking utensil.
Remove I from a pigment and leave
thermometer stem passes ■ Into the
She capillary hole anrf results'in portions of mercury becoming detached
from the main column. These pieces
may pass unnoticed, and incorrect
temperatures may be Indicated.
Then too, clinical thermometers
have troubles of their own—due In
thai main to the constriction which
enables the mercury column to retain
its" reading after removal from the
patient's mouth. The making of this
constriction calls for great skill on
thki part of the glass blower. It the
thermometer Is over constricted the
mercury will rise by large jumps,
causing errors, and the column will
be | trapped effectively, otherwise ■
fall will take place In the Index, when
the thermometer Is removed for reading, giving a temperature which Is
too low.
These errors are quite frequently
encountered. The National Physical
Laboratory in England reported that
In one series of nine thousand thermometers twenty-eight per cent were
found unreliable. Good makers have
a much smaller percentage ot failures. As a comparison with the figures just quoted, one firm in the
same year had only twenty-five instruments rejected out of fifteen
thousand and most of those were for
minor defects.
Af the National Physical Laboratory the number of clinical thermometers tested has averaged as high as
twenty-five thousand per week during
the year—this figure giving some Idea
of the number ot clinical thermometers in use. In Canada, teats to
clinical thermometers similar to those
made at the National Physical Lab
oratory are undertaken by the Physic
al Testing Laboratory, Topographical
Survey, Department of the Interior,
Ottawa. This laboratory has special
equipment for thermometers tor the
Government service, hospitals, sana
toria and the Canadian public generally.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
131R —PHONE- MIR
COURTENAY, B. 0.
■U'Jt'  ia!.-!   n  a..''
Remove I from calmness and leave
a government grant.
• •   *
Puzzle No. 137
Place a word ln the first space and
repeat it in the second, although it
may have a different meaning:
It was not, with so small a	
to make the business a  one.
Unless he could prejudices he
had no other   than to leave
the county, i
She, taking the boy's   him
away from, the toy he so roughly	
The fencers were   to commence  when lt was discovered they had forgotten, their masks.
• •   *
Puzzle No. 138
iBsop tells of a sportive young hare
that raced a tortoise around a circular track, which was 100 yards In
dameter, giving him a start of one-
eighth of the distance. The hare
held such a poor opinion of the
other's ability that he loitered along
nibbling the grass, and only realized
that the tortoise was putting up a
great race when they met at a point
when the hare had run but one-sixth
of his distance. How much faster
than he went before must the hare
now run to win the race?
• • < *
Puzzle No. 139
Take a beverage, add a drawing-
room fixture, subtract a pair, add
Carmen, add a binding, subtract a
rodent, subtract another animal and
the resulting letters will spell ANTELOPE.
.   .   .
Additional pussies, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
in this column next week.
Answers to Last Week's Pussies
No.  130—The hole   when   finished
was 106 inches ln depth.
No. 131—Trade, rated; Takes, skate.
Rates, Stare; Horse, shore; Heirs,
shire; Palms, lamps; Stone, Tones;
Times, Items; Stove, votes; Saves,
Vases.
No. 132—From the hotel to the way-
house was 6 miles and from there to
Piketown 3 more, so, lf the traveller
took the Btage to the wayhouse and  gone lust half the remaining distance ' clear that they consumed 180 minutes
then  walked to  Piketown  he  would
beat the stage 16 minutes.
No. 133—MACE minus ACE plus
BUGLE plus GOOSE minus BUG minus LEG equals MOOSE.
No. 134—After traveling forty minutes the guide stated that they ha'l
to Pixley, so lt is clear that the time j between Pixley and Qulxley. Thus
between Blxley and Pixley consumed: we have the time of the whole i >ur-
120 minutes. Later on between Pix- ney as five hours, lt requlrcl 200
ley and (Juixley he stated they were minutes for the seven-mile suetcli,
Ju.t half as far away from Qulxley,so the distance covered between Blx-
as from Pixley. Then they reached ley and Qulxley in 300 minutes must
Qulxley in an hour, which makes it   have been  ten  and a half mlle3.
I                    ft
1         ^iu«-.i   u   ,Bta    ~*    .
II
Jf            IF YOU DON'T GO TO THE ILO-ILO THEATRE,
II
/^        fjp                            CUMBERLAND, AND SEE
Sr    Charlie Chaplin
Wit          "THE GOLD  RUSH"
II
M^k                                             YOU'LL BE SORRY!
M       \\                      SHOWING   JUNE   24th,   25th   AND   26th
I
TENDERS WANTED
TENDERS for the painting of the
outside of the Cumberland School
Buildings and tor the painting of the
foot of one building, will be received
by the undersigned up to Wednesday,
June 23rd, 1926, at 6:30 p.m.
. All paints and stains used to be of
the best quality and work to be done
tn • workman-like manner.
Work to be commenced within fifteen (16) days after signing of contract and to be completed on or before the 16th. of August. Successful
tenderer will be required to furnish
suitable bond tor the faithful carrying out of the Contract. Further
particulars as to work to be done and
materials required may be obtained
from the Secretary.
Tenders to be marked, "Tender for
Painting Cumberland Schools," and
addressed to tbe undersigned.
The lowest or any Tender not
necessarily accepted.
"A. McKINNON, Secretary,
Board of School Trustees.
Cumberland, B. C.
June 4th, 1926. 23-26
CITY MEAT
^ For Beat Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
SPECIALLY CATERMD TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY  AND SERYJGJT
a1* I ,* ',r  .
W. P. Symons
ywprjsts?
CAR m HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Q.rWione25
Residence Phone 22
?<*•< M '*.■* '
See[Geo. Mason
laoa
gas
Try
OILS
Henderson's  Garage
FOR SERVICE
We handle Firestone Tires and have secured the sole
agency for Gutta Percha Tires.
Cylinder Honing and' Repairs of all Description.
THIRD STREET, CUMBERLAND.
GAS OILS
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND* GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
See Charlie Chaplin in "The Gold Rush"
«
P.P.HarrisQjti,MX.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Offlce
Courtenay           Phone ttt
Local Offlce
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone 116R or 34
Lumber
In every torts of building materials,
MOULDINOS,
WINDOWS, DOOM,
SHINSLES.
i,
KILN DRIED FLOO«INSS,
AND    rURMSHINOS
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE OHAROBS
Royston Lumber Co.
'    "     Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Piinism-H lN,,fct ""'• U4X 0"r""'
For the best quality
MEATS
aw
plus service at reasonable prices
it pays to deal at
Wilcock Bros.
aHaaE/cS3iHSH*5isis^
WE DELIVER ANYWHERE
H'MiWLMfflEirMM'r'i'M
A trial will be appreciated.
ICE FOR SALE IN SMALL OR LARGE
QUANTITIES
NOTE—We do not solicit orders under any business
name other than our own.
J
*****
nmtam
PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU   CAN
HELP
B.C. FOREST SERVICE FRIDAY, JUNE 18. 1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
it
The Radio Detective"
B'
CHAPTER  XII
"MAN OVERBOAttD"
ilNNACLK INN waa a quaint old
roadhou.se by the -shore. It had
once been a grand country mansion of a wealthy hunker.
We entered the dining mom which
was a huge room facing the harbor.
Everywhere on lhe walls were relics
of the sea. Anchors, pilot wheels,
ropes, cordage, every conceivable
thing that smacked of the nautical.
Through the windows one caught
glimpses of the water out through
two headlands that made the harbor.
Near the door stood a neat sign:
Radio Concerts Daily. This seemed
to interest Kennedy and Kaston, too.
I think Ken was ready to eat again.
Hut there was not even a waiter in
sight. These places all did business
at night. It was, however, precisely
the opportunity  Kennedy desired.
Kennedy assured himself that there
was no one within easy hearing distance.   Then he started  upstairs.
"If anyone asks what we are doing,"
he winked, "we are expecting to give
a banquet to a select number of our
friends."
No one interfered, though. And we
did actually find upstairs a private
dining room. Here, too, was another
radio, and that, again, interested Kennedy. No one was in the room and
no one had seen us enter. Craig stationed Ken on guard to let us know
If anyone approached, then started a
systematic search  of the  room.
"That's a wonderful roof to place
an aerial on," remarked Easton us he
stood over by the fireplace at one end
and examined the radio outfit up
here. "Did you notice how large it
was und how Hal?"
Ke.inedy was over by a cedar chesi
on the other side of the room.
He dived into the chest and rummaged around.
"Here's a camera—autographic—
and a pretty good one. There's some
other stuff, a girl's sweater. By
jingo. I've seen Vira wear that. Aud
here's a class jersey of Rockledge.
class of '25, that I could swear belonged to Glenn Buckley. I was su^e
this was a hangout of those young
people.''
Easton was a bit sour. They had
never taken him into their confidence
but then he had not been a sport.
"Ah!" Kennedy rummaging about
had brought to light a roll of film.
It gave him an idea. He looked once
more at the camera. "Set for number
five, about to be taken. I think I'll
just slip this roll of partly exposed
film out and take it along. This may
be evidence."
Easton was still over by the radio
■when we heard a sudden exclamation
from Ken. Craig softly closed the
ltd of the cedar chest and restored
the lock.
"What is it, Ken?" he whispered.
"Someone coming?'
"No. Look!" The boy was pointing out of the window. "There's the
Scooter!"
We peered out over the hay. Sure
enough, the scout cruiser had slipped
up and was anchored off the shore.
Now from where we were we could
see a tender putting off from it and
starting for the shore.
In front of the Binnacle the land
had been bulkheaded out aud Riled in.
From that point huge concrete piers
had been built to carry a dock and
out at the end of the dock was a runway and float. The tender was headed apparently for the float. In it were
two sailors and a boy.
Easton and I loked to Craig wondering what plans to make. Kennedy
looked up the shore. There was a fine
road which swept its way down to the
dock and then turned and proceeded
along the shore itself, a sort of beach
drive.
"The plan must be to transfer him
from the Scooter to the gray racer
that has been camouflaged, then to
whisk him away to some new hiding
place on land." Kennedy was trying
to piece it together. "That means
that the gray racer will have to approach from this shore road. If we
can get hack of thai long line of hath
houses where they cannot see us, and
we may be able to spring between
them as they land the boy. I believe
we can do It. Let's go down there
under cover.* The tender is coming
right along."
We made our way downstairs without being seen. Once outside, we got
out behind the bathhouses and waited.
Peering out, 1 could see that along
the shore where the shore drive turned from the dock there was a sea
wall completing the bulkhead and beyond it the drive lowered to the level
of the beach itself running along well
up beyond the high-water marks.
The tender hud come up to the float
at the end of the dock and now we
could make out the features of Dick,
alert, and two quite evil-looking customers who had bim fn charge, one
of them operating the rudder, the
other the little engine
Tbey nosed the boat into tlie dock
flout. It was a moment that required
most of the attention of the two men.
Kennedy quietly stepped out from
the protection  of  the bathhouses.
Dick, happening to glance up,
caught a full shot of Kennedy. He
did not betray by word or muscle thut
he had seen. His mind must have
worked fast. This was the time, if
ever, to make his getaway, before the
arrival of the car caused us to be
outnumbered.
Without warning, Dick rose, poised
an instant on the seat of the tender,
und leaped.
"Man overboard!" sang out the one
at the tiller as the other man was
tying up at the" dock.
We now emerged from hiding, all.
There was no use in keeping under
cover now. Besides, so interested
were they in getting Dick that they
did not see us, anyhow.
My heart was in my mouth. Dick
did not come up!
Where was he—drowned? Had his
head struck some sunken rock or a
pile?
It was nearly a minute that our
eyes were glued to the spot where
tlie lithe body of the boy had disappeared.
"There he is!" It was Ken and he
was pointing some thirty or forty
feet away from the spot at which we
were focusing our attention. Sure
enough there was Dick, bobbing up,
and striking out with his powerful
crawl for the shore diagonally from
the dock, headed for the spot where
the bulkhead ended aud the beach
again began. "I knew it! pick's
the best, under water swimmer in the
troop."
Once the men in the boat had seen
him," however, they were not long in
forming their plans to head him off.
Tho fellow at the engine quickly cast
off the dock and started up, in as
quick a sweep as he could to head
Dick off from going too far down the
beach. The other fellow, still unmindful of us, started up the doc1:
to gain the bulkhead along the shore
down which he was going to run to
head off Dick  in that direction.
Tha man in the tender was off. and
it was certain he would force tlie boy
to swim ashore. Our part was to
lake care of the thug on (he sea wall.
Easton was quite unable to restrain
himself any longer. He leaped like
a tiger at the powerful thug, who was
running to head off Dick. Craig now
forged ahead in the effort to get *o
Dick as he scrambled out of the water
on the beach.
I turned with an effort to see how
Easton was getting on. The thug had
actually extricated from his pocket
a small blackjack. Easton had broken
tlie   force   of   the   blow,   but   It   had
struck liim, hampered him. I 'started
toward them. Easton was recovering
a bit, but was groggy as the thug,
perceiving me, made a lunge at him.
They grappled an instant, then both
toppled into the water from the top
of the sea wall. 1 glanced over. The
plunge had quite revived Easton. He
had his man out of the running anyhow, and was striking out for the
beach  where Dick  was  headed.
Kennedy was leaping along to pull
Dick out the moment his feet touched
bottom. Suddenly a bullet clipped the
sand ahead of Kennedy. 1 turned.
Down the shore road now was roaring u gray racer!
I ran faster. Ken was now struggling to hurry up to me, as Dick's
feet evidently touched bottom and he
began to drug himself to shore, just
ahead of the qucoming tender. The
tender turned not a moment too soon
to prevent it running aground.
Dick was some fifty feet down the
shore from Kennedy aud had seen
the approaching racer in battleship
gray. He sensed trouble. He started
to run along the shore.
The gray racer swooped off the
road onto thc wet sand and came on
down the shore, firing at Kennedy
ahead as it rapidly overtook the boy
und his pursuer.
Who would get to Dick first?
(Continued Next Week.)
24 TELEPHONE-
TAXI
ASK FOK CHARLIE DAI-TON
Car   loaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets  boat at Union Bay.
•Cumberland
J Commercl
aileadij..liners
Kales
Reasonable f
Is Hotel
ACCOMMOllATIOX TUB BEST
Kooms Steam llcntcd
W. MEBMMEM), Prop.
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cor. 6th and Dunsmuir.
Phone 122 Cumberland
MANN'S BAKERY
The home of high class cakes and pastries.
Large and varied selection.
Freshly baked daily.
APPLE, RAISIN, and PINEAPPLE PIE&
BUNS, BISCUITS, COOKIES, SCONES, etc.
Try some "Golden Brown Doughnuts" for Saturday's
dinner.   The kiddies like them.
Cream Rolls, Cream Cakes, etc., dainty looking and
delicious tasting.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 50(1
Children's hair cut any style 35*r
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzle with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a i/g-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
^Summer V&c&timi
—-With a thrill &t Every Ghnce[
/
J^\
LOW EXCURSION
FARES EAST
On Sale Dally to September 15—Return
Limit. October 31
Alaska aS«C„ $90
Choice of Routes and  Liberal Stop-Overs.
ii rA   A
km
E. W. BICKLE
Agent
Phone 35
Canadian National Railways
■ WI CAHIPIIB IUT1M|
HHH
■III
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
FIFTY TELEPHONE    1
EXCHANGES 1
The   B.   C.   Telephone   Company   now   operates II
more than fifty telephone exchanges, serving ninety =
thousand telephones. H
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY H
Tfre$tone
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
A buying organization with ten separate
offices in the rubber growing centers of
the British and Dutch Colonies enable
Firestone to obtajn the highest grade of
rubber and insures an adequate supply by
purchasing at the source of production.
See Sole Cumberland Agents:
HARLING &
LEDINGHAM
Cumberland. FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
News of Courtenay and District
CAMPBELL RIVER
SHOWS OPTIMISM
CAMPBELL RIVER, June 16 —
This district ls looking forward with
considerable anticipation to the open-
log up of the Campbell River Falls to
Industrial de *elopment, now that the
power reserve has been lifted thereon. It is realized that no section of
Vancouver Island stands to benefit so
much as the settlement nearest to
the celebrated Falls.
Th community, which largely depends upon the tourist and sportsman for its development, ls anxious
to see the long-awaited connection
with the Sayward Valley by the .extension or the roads through the latter valley southward to join the line
marine drive which exists for some
ten miles south of Campbell River
wharf.
Meanwhile between Campbell and
Oyster River settlements, the Provincial Government ls carrying out
extensive road works, regradlng and
realigning the route through the forest, much of which developed from
un old trail. When this work ls carried out It will prove one of the best
and straightest on the whole of Vancouver Island.
It ls hoped to have a superior
school In the district, to keep the
children home for their education as
long as possible, and efforts to that
end are now being made, based on
encouraging .experience elsewhere.
Since the reopening of the hospital
cases are coming ln from all quarters.
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
CAMPBELL RIVER, June 16.—Mr.
Jasper Sutherland, of Forbes Landing, Campbell Lake, Is In St. Paul's
Hospital at Vancouver. He underwent another operation on his arm
and Is progressing favorably.
Mrs. Robt. McCualg returned on
Tuesday after several days' visit at
Vancouver.
Miss Leah Johnson, of Bevan, is
on the staff of tbe Lourdes Hospital
at Campbell River.
Mr. George West, of Vancouver,
was a visitor to Campbell River during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Cobb, of the
International Timber Co., are visiting
with friends at Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. Fortune Salvail are
spending a few weeks' holiday at
Vancouver.
Mrs. M. Atchison, of Newton Station, Is the guest of Mrs. B. Parlies.
MIbs Alyse Slavlch and Mr. Richard
Atchison, who were united in marriage at Nanaimo on June 5, spent
their honeymoon at Vancouver.
Mrs. Louis Titus and family left on
Sunday morning for their new home
at Buttle Lake. The Chateau is built
of barked logs and consists of seven
large rooms with all the modern conveniences. The small four-roomed
cottage is also pretty and comfortable.
The residence is beautifully situated
four miles up Buttle Lake, with a
wonderful view of the mountains.
The following guests registered at
the Willows Hotel during the weekend: Mrs. Louis Titus and sons,
Louis and Tommic, and maid, H.
Clark, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Cot-
terall, Vancouver; Mr. and Mis. D. G.
Baker, Vancouver; A. G. Cooper, D.
G. Aimers, Edinburgh; Mr. und Mrs.
"Wm. Clark, Vancouver; W. Lalng,
Victoria; A. G. Hawkins and T. H.
Wilson, Victoria; W. R. Barkes, Ana-
cortes, Wash.
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Cross left for
their Summer home.
The following registered at Forbes
Landing during the week; Thos. J.
Grant. Victoria;  Bert Graham,  Mrs.
C  U  N A R   D
ANCHOR
ANCHOH-nnNAI (1 ,ON
CANADIAN NKHVK'K
FROM  MONTIIKAI,
To PlrmoutMlbc-rhoiaTg.l.ondon
Ascanla June 26.       Ausoiiln July 3.
To Liverpool
Auranla July 2, 30, Aug. 27.
To llelfiisl and (alafwow
Letltla June 25.        Athenla July 0
FKOM XKff YORK
To Queeostown and Liverpool
Laconia June 26.    Franconia July 3.
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Aqultanla July 7, Aug. 4, 24. Sopt. in
Berengarla July 14. Aug. 11, Sept. 1.
Mauretanla June 30, July 21, Aug. IS.
To Londonderry nnd (llasgow
Transylvania June 26.
Caledonia July 3.
To Plymooth.HOTre.Lomlnii.
Caronia June 26.     Carmania July 7.
To Plymouth-Chert rir-llnmliiirtr.
Andanla June 30, July 31, Sept. 2.
FROM BOSTON
To Qneenstnwn and Liverpool
Laconia June 27. Samaria July 11.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers
Cheques at lowest rates. Full Information from local agents or Company's
OIBcea, 622 Hastings St. W., Vancouver. B. C.
R. Young and Miss Jean Henderson,
Vancouver; Mr. Dan Charles, San
Francisco; Miss Irene A. Meyer,
Hollywood; Mr. and Mrs. P. Llndley,
Los Angeles; Mrs. Jean Stevenson,
Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Chldester, Jack
Chldester, San Mateo, Cal.; Richard
Jebb, England; A. H. Jebb, Alberni;
Mr .and Mrs. Colin Reid and family,
Yakima, Wash.; Mr _and Mrs. John
Reid, Union Bay.
Mrs. R. S. Young and Miss J. Henderson, of Vancouver, motored to Victoria on Tuesday from Campbell
Lake.
Mr. D. G. W. Aimers, of Edinburgh,
had most excellent fishing during his
short visit here, having caught 5 nice
springs.
Mrs. Oscar Thulin is at present on
a visit to her parents at Lund.
LOGGERS FINISH WORK
UNION BAY, June 16.—K. Kawasaki & Company, who have been logging just north of the Bloedel Stew-
are & Welch camp, on Union Bay-
Courtenay Road, have completed
logging operations and leave today
for Sechelt. Mr. Kawasaki has been
cutting this tract for the last Ave
years, and used a skidway across the
Island Highway, down which his
horses hauled logs to the waterfront,
where they were boomed. All his
buildings have now been dismantled
and the tug, Red Flr, took away the
final boom today.
BOYS' BAND PERFORMS
Previous to going out to the Hospital Bazaar at Comox Wednesday, the
Courtenay Boys' Band gathered at the
corner of Union and Isabel streets
and played several selections under
the leadership of Mr. H. E. Murray.
They did remarkably well considering the short time they have had their
Instruments and also the fact that
many of these boys had never had any
previous musical Instruction.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAHENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east ot that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
Is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and improvements made
to value of ?10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received,'for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price ot first-class (arable) land Is $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
if Crown lands In given ln Bulled
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the first year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled and
lund has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areus not exceeding 640 acres
may he leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and tho range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
mny form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
Report of a discovery of coarse
gold at Flat Creek In the Muddy river
of the Cassiar mining district in
northern Britisli Columbia, ls said to
have started a small stampede to that
country.
*   *   *
BETTER CN.lt. EARNINGS
The gross earnings of the Canadian
National Railways for the week ended June 7, 1926 were $6,048,860, as
compared with $4,029,141 over the
same week of 1925, an Increase of
$1,019,719, or 26 per cent.
.   *   .
BANKERS GO TO JASPER
For the first time the annual convention of the Investment Bankers'
association Is being held west of Winnipeg, when from June 16 to 18 the
members of this assoclallon will
gather at Jasper Park Lodge for their
yearly conference. Following this
meet the convention party will pro-
coed over Canadian National lines to
Vancouver, where they will be entertained by the British Columbia section of the organization.
*   *   *
NEW FIND AT WOMAN LAKE
Frequent reports are being received at Sioux Lookout of the high
value of samples brought from the
new gold (Ind at Woman Lake, about
30 miles east of Red Lake. An active rush to the latest And is now
going on, many of the prospectors
utilizing aeroplanes to get Into the
district.
NEEDINt. BEE MAKES RECORD
A world record In seeding operations is reported by the Colonization
Department of the Canadian Natlon-il
Railways from Spring Coulee, Alta.,
where 360 horses, 41 cutivators and
20 seed drills were used simultaneously on a 300-acre farm. This* Intensive cultivation was the result of
a seeding bee organized by formers
in the district to assist a neighbor.
Mrs. H. Jollier, whose husband died
recently.
*   *   *
INCREASE  IN  GRAIN SHIPMENTS
Shipments of Canadian grain to
British and European ports during
the winter season from Saint John
totalled 17,338,000 bushels, an increase of more than 4,000,000 bushels
over the season 1924-25.
PAGE FIVE
4
w^mwmsMiW.iWMEmffl®$Mimi^rmsMsisi&M
Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC
WORKS
Bituminous Surfacing Work on
*   the Island Highway and
Cumberland Road, near
Courtenay.
During the time the above work Is
in progress, commencing Month},
Juno I llh. sections of the roads noted
will be closed to traffic. All detours
will be plainly marked.
P. PHILIP,
Deputy Minister and
24-25 Publlc  Works  Engineer,
Friday and Saturday of this week
AH.Sebattia.il
present!
II
Ptadiutdtx
Pioducei-s [jfslrihiilliin
*»,,«*,,„.„-     ~-        -^ ^,  s±j        l_JaVJ
Monday, June 21st
HARRY.
vCAR]
"Cjte Tfexas
lis - nix rii in untii:
CA HUNT* STRQMBERfi
tuWsotttiMti ittpttyiftd •     *
New Low Prices
on all Models
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
PHONE 61, COURTENAY, B. C.
j1SI3EI3IBIB*®SIBISIBIrW
Tuesday, June 22nd, No Show
^EiBiBEiaaiiaHEKiaiBiaEiaEiBaw
Wednesday, June 23rd
-WiLUAM FOX presents —
% DIXIE
MERCHANT
From the NoveKTto Chicken-Wafoi*. Family"
v usSm,.      *<y Barry Benefield
'with
MADGE BELLAMY
^JACK MULHALL
A^V MMUU MK00NA19
^ SkH  PAUL PANZER^
\HARVEY CLARK
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
PRODUCTION
cenario by
KENNETH 8. CLARKE
Thurs., Fri., Sat., June 24, 25, 26
:•■• • **j :y '■*••)
THE CHAPLIN
GENIUS
Swilchs the hardships
and heartbreaks uf our
every day life into hilarious fun and uproarious
laughter. Yet there is
the Chaplin the whole
world laughs at—Chaplin of the big shoes, the
trick derby, little cane,
thc baggy trousers and
thc funny, shuffling gall
■       THE      4
COLD RUSH
<AT)ramatk Comedy
Written miDirected by
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
i
i
3
a
I
I
m
6'L*Jfl!HvEBS'i?J2MSiai'''JBJSE^^ PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 19i6.
New Summer
Millinery
We have just received a shipment
of some smart Hats In the new lines
of Millinery for Summer.
Smartly trimmed White Dress Hats
a fair selection to choose from and
price right at  $3.95
Leghorn Trimmed Hats, large size,
with varlgated trimming .... $5.95
NEW DRESS SCARVES
Some new novelties ln Ladies' Dress
Scarves have arrived, showing a very
beautiful combination of colorings.
Prices $3.50 and  $3.95
Girls' and Ladles' Art Sllk Scarves
ln about twelve different colorings.
A real snap at each   $1.00
NEW BATHING SUITS
A good selection of Ladles', Men's
and Chilren's Bathing Suits ln all
wool. Every garment 100 per cent
all wool. Will give the utmost ot
satisfaction.
NEW UMBRELLAS
Two new lines of Ladles' Umbrellas
have arrived, and are shown with the
latest handles and good coverings.
Prices $3.95 and  $4.95
SPUN SILKS
Spun Silks are as good as ever for
Dresses, and make useful aa well as
a smart Dress at a cheap price. In
a great variety of colorings, only one
quality kept.     Special per yd. 91.00
BROADCLOTHS
New Broadcloths ln a variety of
colorings and stripes. A specially
good cloth for the money, and fully
36 Inches wide.   Per yard ...... 50<£
FOUND
A sum of money found last Saturday
between  4 ant} 7 o'clock.   Apply at
the store.
Sutherland's
CUMBERLAND
Miss Edith Bickle and Miss Nellie
Ronald, of Los Angeles, Cal., who
have been spending a vacation with
Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Bickle, returned to their home in the southern
state on Saturday last.
* .   .
Mr. and Mrs. V. Fouracre, of Victoria, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. L.
Finch for a few days.
• ■ ♦.  •
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lockner were visitors to the city of Nanaimo during
the past week.
BE PREPARED TO
CAN WHILE YOU CAN
Strawberries, the first of the berry
crop, are now ln season and within
a few weeks they will be plentiful
and selling at a reasonable price for
preserving. The strawberry ls without doubt the favored berry for Jam,
and the housewife who realizes that
they are only In season for about
two months and wishes to keep her
family supplied throughout the winter, will go over her preserving equipment now and add to it or replenish
any utensils or accessories.
The spring sales advertised in this
newspaper feature all the necessary
equipment—enameled ware preserving kettles and funnels, long-handled
spoons, skimmers, colanders and the
necessary glass Jars.
Be prepared to take advantage of
the low price your dealer will ask
for strawberries when he finds that
he has overstocked.
F
1*0©
fcooMets
on the care and
feeding of babies
will be sent you
for the asking
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk
Tht Borden Co., Limited
VANCOUVER        20.8
Personal Mention
ENGAGEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Treen announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Iris, to Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs.
T. C. Wood, of Sandwick. The marriage will take place shortly.
Mr. Hall and Mr. Christie, of Victoria, were visitors to Cumberland
on Thursday last.
♦'  • ■*
Mr. and Mrs. J. Horbury and family are now residing at their summer
home at Comox Lake.
* *   *
Mr. A. Thompson lett for Nanaimo
Wednesday last. He will return to
Cumberland tomorrow.
* *   *
Mr. Edward W. Bickle returned
this evening from a three-day business visit to Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. and Mrs. J. Emily and family
are now at Comox Lake where they
will reside during the summer.
* *   •
Mr. and Mrs. James English, of
Campbell River, were visitors to this
city for a few days last Monday.
* •   •
Mrs. H. Parkinson who attended
the Rebekah Grand Lodge meetings
at Vernon last week, returned to this
city on Sunday.
.   .   .
Mr. and Mrs. John Walton and Miss
Rhoda Walton motored to Victoria
Tuesday morning and will return to
Cumberland on  Sunday.
* *   *
Mr. Donald Watson, of the Royal
Bank of Canada, Nanaimo, ls spending a three week's vacation with his
mother at Cumberland.
* •   •
Mr. John C. Brown returned Sunday last from Vernon where he was
in attendance at Grand Lodge meetings of the I. O. of Oddfellows.
* *   *
Mr. Thomas Graham, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., motored to Nanaimo
Wednesday morning last and ls expected  to  return tomorrow  evening.
* *   *
Messrs. James Quinn, W. Sykes and
B. Ltttley have left for a week-end
fishing trip to Campbell H'ver.
ESSEX COACH
■SK CYLINDER-
at your door
$1198
THE ABOVE PRICE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT:
FRONT AND REAR BUMPERS, AUTOMATIC WINDSHIELD CLEANER, REAR VIEW MIRROR, TRANSMISSION LOCK BUILT IN,
RADIATOR SHUTTERS, MOTOMETER, COMBINATION STOP AND
TAIL LIGHT
Pidcock & McKenzie
Agents
PhOM 25 COURTENAY Phone 25
Mrs. James (Skipper) Murray begs
to announce that she has commenced
business   in   Ladles'   marcelling   and
trimming at her residence, DunsmuirI
Avenue,  Cumberland,   (last house  of'.
Company houses).   Terms reasonable.j
Messrs. T. H. Carey, C. J. Parnham,
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, J. Conway
and J. Walton left by motor for Victoria Tuesday morning to attend the j
Masonic Grand Chnpter and Grand
Lodge meetings.
t" t   *
Mr. James Bennie returned to this i
city on Tuesday last after spendim*: j
the past three months at Coalmont, j
B. C.
-*»
USEFUL RECIPES
RICE PUDDING THE CHILDREN
WILL LIKE
Mothers realize the healthful prop
erties of rice and its importance in a
child's diet, but often find that the
simple methods of serving it boiled
or as a baked custard become monotonous and distasteful. By combining
it with fruit It takes on an entirely
different appearance which is sure to
appeal  to  the child's appetite.   And
Motorists!!
OUR AMBER HORN RIMMED GOGGLES ARE
JUST THE THING FOR YOU TO USE ON SUNNY
DAYS. THEY ALSO PROTECT THE EYES FROM
THE GLARE OF HEADLIGHTS AT NIGHT.
75c
TO
$1.00
CREAM OF LILIES
LANG'S  CREAM  OF  LILIES  CURES  SUNBURN
AND WHITENS THE SKIN
Per bottle     tIA«     Per bottle
50c
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
S, tt£ ~ otSlSee Charlie Chaplin in "The Gold Rush"
ment—in  fact  more,   because   fresh
fruit Is also beneficial.
This pudding, which Is easily prepared, can be served as a main luncheon or supper dish for children,
and with a few added touches becomes a dainty dessert for the grownups.
Boil one cup of rice in a quart of
salted water until very soft. Drain
the rice, add a cup of milk and then
cook until it is like mush. Add a
tablespoon of butter, half a cup of
sugar, a tablespoon of lemon juice
and a little of the grated rind, and
two well-beaten eggs. Arrange in a
well-buttered enameled ware baking
dish, place halved ripe peaches over
the surface, with a split blanched
almond in each cavity, If desired.
Then brush over with melted butter I
and sprinkle thickly' with powdered <
sugar. Bake in a hot oven about 30
m|nutes. For the children, serve it
plain, either hot or cold from the
dish in which It is baked. For tho,
grown-ups, prepare a hard sauce as
usual, beat well, then fold in some
peach pulp to flavor well, also if
desired the stiffly beaten white of one
egg.
AT every price, from 75c
. to £2.00, Monarch-Knit
Hosiery presents uncommon
value. Here's one example
—Monarch Green Stripe at
£1.00. Pure silk, for rich
sheen and lasting smoothness
—rciniorced with fibre silk
for long wear. Every newest
color—and if a "run" should
start it cannot pass the second "stop run."
MONARCH G™IPE
HOSIERY
Dunnville, Out
One of Reginald Denny's Best Pictures
DON'T FAIL TO SEE IT.       Laugh Follows Laugh
Carl Liemmle presents
^gtoafef
At the Ilo-llo Theatre, Cumberland on
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, July 1, 2 and 3

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