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The Cumberland Islander Jun 12, 1920

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER *
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 24.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA,  SATURDAY. JUNE  12.  1920.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
G.W.V.A. CONCERT AND
DANCE GREAT SUCCESS
Local Artists, Ably Assisted by Mr. Gideon Hicks and Mr. D. R.
Christopher, of Vancouver, Contributed Fine Programme—
Dance After the Concert Was One of the Most Enjoyable.
Held This Season—Building Fund Considerably Augmented.
The Construction Fund of the Great War Veterans' Memorial
Hall will receive a good boost as a result of the concert and dance
held in the Ilo-llo Theatre Thursday evening, which are declared
to be the best held in this locality for some time.
In Mr, Charles Graham's brief remarks at the concert, he said
the entertainment had been arranged to augment the Construction Fund of the Memorial Hall. The contract had been let to Mr
H. Trehearne, of Courtenay. All the material required had been
contributed try the Canadian Collieries, and the city had given the
land, while the citizens were expected to provide funds for the
construction. The hall will be dedicated to the memory of the
brave boys from Cumberland who liiid down their lives in the
service of the Empire. It is your duty, said Mr, Graham, to see
that the memorial is sustained.
He thanked the artist3 and the city band ,for their services in
making the concert a success.
The special feature of the evening
was the songs by Mr. Gideon Hicks.
of Vancouver, who had consented to
remain in Cumberland until the eon-
cert, to help in the worthy cause. His
opening song was "I'll Sing Thee
Songs of Araby," which he sang in
magnificent form, his splendid voice
giving much pleasure to the audience.
He was enthusiastically applauded and
encored again and again, his third
song, "In the Time of Roses." being
very pleasing.
Mr. D. R. Christopher, of Vancouver,
was also persuaded to remain over iu
Cumberland so that the concert would
have the benefit 0*1 his assistance. He
sang "The Mighty Deep" splendidly.
for which he was given a big ovation,
when he replied with "Drink to Me
Only With Thine Eyes."
With tlie addition of the two singers
above named, the programme was carried out as arranged, all the artists
being in good form, encores being tlie
regular thing. Tlie Cumberland City
Band, played several selections under
the leadership of Mr. Monte, all of
which were well rendered and well
received.
Mrs. R. E. Frost was accompanist
for most of the singers, Mrs. F. Oliver
and Mr. W. A. Owen also assisting.
The programme included a song by
Sir. W. G. Hasaell, "Mother Machree,"
"Scene de Ballet," was
a violin solo by Mr. Colville Graham;
song. "The Barefoot Trail," by Mrs. A.
C. Lymn; song, "Little Mother of
Mine," by Mr. Howard Macauley; a
pianoforte duel by Mrs. Frost and Mrs.
Oliver, Overture to "William Tell."
Miss Leslie sang, "I Gathered a Rose"
aud for an encore sang the ever-popular "By Kiilarney's Lakes and Dells"
very sweetly. Mr. Monte gave a trombone selection, accompanied by the
band. A trio by Mrs. Frost and Messrs.
Owen and C. Graham, enlisted much
applause, the vocal duet, "Absent,"
by Miss A. Leslie and Ml*. Macauley
likewise delighted the audience.
After a few remarks by the chairman, Mr. Charles Graham, as noted
above, the Cumberland Band brought
the concert to a close with the playing of a march.
The Geo. A. Fletcher Music Company of this city kindly lent tlie G. W.
V. A. the use of a piano for the entertainment.
Following the concert a large number attended the dance, which was
most enjoyable, it being regarded as
one of tlie most successful held here
for some time.
PROVINCIALVOTERS' LIST
ALL OLD LISTS NOW CANCELLED
All citizens of this province who are entitled to vote at any
Provincial or Dominion election will have to register on the new
Voters' List on or before July 15 next or be disfranchised, as under
the Elections Act passed at the last session of the Provincial Legislature, and assented to by the Lieutenant-Governor, all existing
Voters' Lists were automatically wiped out. This was a wise move
as the old lists contained very many names of people who have
long since died or moved out of the jurisdiction*
TOO LATE AFTER JULY 15.
At present there is no Voters' List in this province, and as names
will not automatically register themselves voters are urged to
enroll themselves early as possible. It is very little trouble to go
before a commissioner or other person authorized to receive
applications and fill in the necessary application form. But it
will be too late to do so after July 15'next, at which date the new
list closes, and the new list will be used at the Prohibition Referendum in September, as well as at the forthcoming provincial
elections, which, it is stated in high places, may take place much
sooner than the man on the street anticipates. In all probability
this list will also be used in the Domonion elections.
From all of which the voter will realize the absolute necessity
of registering—and that at once—or lose his or her vote on these
important occasions.
VANCOUVER CELTICS V.
CUMBERLAND UNITED
The Celtic football team from Vancouver are scheduled to play
the Cumberland United on the "Y" Grounds this afternoon in the
Inter-City League games. The kick-off is at 5.30. Tlie Cumberland players selected to play are: Goal—Clark; backs—Smith and
Wilkinson; half-backs—B. Brown, T. Jackson and S. Sullivan;
forwards—Bannerman, Conti, Jamej, Boothman and Harrison;
reserves—Walker, Williams and Brown.
Although the Celtics .have not won any points in the summer
league, as each week goes on they are finding out the weak places
in their team and strengthening it. Manager Davidson claims
that he has .now got'a strong aggregation together, and intends to
make Cumberland go all the way this time. However, as the local
boys have now settled down to training the Celtics will have a
tough proposition to outdo them.   A first-rate game is anticipated.
AT THE ISLANDER OFFICE
LIST ONLY OPEN UNTIL JULY IS
TO CONSIDER BYLAW
HOTELS
Citizens qualified to vote may register their names on
the new Voters' List at The Islander offlce. They are urged
to make early application as the time of enrollment is short
and unless they register on the new list they will have no
vote on either the Prohibition Referendum or Provincial
elections, and possibly not on the Dominion elections.
Applications will be received at the office of this paper
between the hours of 11 and 12 a.m. and 4 and 5 p.m.
Remember—You Have No Vote Unless You Register.
DELEGA
BOARD OF TRADE
H
ERE MONDAY
The visit of the Wholesale Bureau of the Vancouver Board of
Trade to Cumberland has been changed to Monday, instead of
Saturday, as previously announced. Mr. J. Walton, secretary of
the local Board of Trade, received a telegram yesterday to this
effect. The party of about thirty-five are making the trip from
Victoria by automobile, calling at important points on the way up.
They are due to arrive in this city around noon, and will have
luncheon at the Union Hotel.
The purpose of this visit is to enable the visitors to become better acquainted with the business men of the various districts, and
see the country and its possibilities at first hand.
NANAIMO TEAM
PLAYS IN VANCOUVER
Special  Meeting  Decides That
Schedule as First Arranged
Be Adhered To.
A special meeting of the Inter-City
League was called for Wednesday last
In Vancouver. Mr. N. Bevis, secretary
of the Cumberland Club, represented
the local club. The special business
before the meeting was tlie complaint
from the Nanaimo Club concerning tlie
schedule, as according to that the
Nanaimo team will havo to travel
three Saturdays in succession. They
clalmed it an Injustice.
Tlie meeting lusted four hours, and
it was clearly demonstrated that if
they altered any particular game now
all would require to be changed, and
it was filially decided to carry out the
schedule as it stands. It was admitted,
though, that the fault lay in the drawing up of the schedule nt the beginning
of the season, and some of the clubs
not taking enough notice of same until
it was too late. Newspapers from time
to time have published' conflicting
schedules, which have been misleading.
It is hoped that greater precaution
will be taken in the future.
STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL
The Ladles' Aid of St. George's
Presbyterian Church are boding a
Strawberry Festival and Afternoon
Tea on the afternoon of Friday, June
25. Tlle Girls' Guild will also hold a
-sale of work at the same time.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
June 4—8. C. P., Peerless, coastwise; Swell, Seattle; Swell and Scow
No. 5, Seattle; Jessie Mac, coastwise.
June 5—Aleedo. Grey, coastwise;
Fearless and Scow No. 23, Seattle;
Fearless and Scow No. 27, Seattle;
Spray, constwlse,
June G—Princess Beatrice, Vancouver.
June 7—Hofl*e. coastwise; Hulk Me-
lanope, Vancouver.
June 8—Chemainus, Vancouver;
Bantu, Portland, Ore.; Columbia,
coastwise.
June 9—Chieftain, coastwise; Re-
dondo, Alaska.
June 9—Phoenix. Storm King,
coastwise.
CAT AND DOG FANCIERS
Fanciers Intending exhibiting at
Vancouver's big dog show in September aro requested to send In their
names at once for premium lists. Address II. Rolston, Exhibition Association, Hastings St., Vancouver.
SHAMROCK HAS ARRIVED
IN AMERICAN WATERS
The 23-mctre Shamrock IV., Sir
Thomas Upton's challenger for the
cup, arrived in New York on Monday
from Dartmouth, England, under her
own sail, commanded by Capt. Alfred
Draper.
PERSON ENTITLED TO VOTE.
The Elections Act provides that every person—which, of course,
includes female—who is of the full age of 21 years and a British
subject by birth or naturalization, and who has resided in the
province for six months immediately preceding the date of application, and at least for one month of that period has resided in the
electoral district in which he or sh< desire;; to vote, is entitled to
vote, subject to disqualification oli^»$3s iu .h: Act, which disqur.'iiA
every Chinaman,. Japanese, Hindu and Indian, besides the usual
disqualifications for persons convicted of treason, etc.
Cumberland is included in the Comox Electoral District, and Mr.
John Baird is Registrar of Voters for this district. Affidavits may
be sworn or affirmed before a justice of the peace, mayor, reeve,
aldermen, councillor, commissioner for taking affidavits in British Columbia, registrar-general or district registrar of titles,
notary public, registrar of. voters, deputy registrar of voters, provincial constable, special provincial constable, government agent,
municipal clerk, municipal assessor, postmaster, postmistress,
Indian agent, or provincial elections commissioner. No fee shall
be charged for taking such affidavit.
WOMEN SHOULD NOT PUT "MRS." BEFORE NAME
Now that women have the vote they are not to register themselves as "Mrs. Mary Smith," according to an announcement issued
by Chief Registrar Mabon, who has charge of the registration of
voters for the Victoria District. "Women must remember in registering that they need no longer use the 'Mrs.' before their name
if they are married," said Mr. Mabon. "Use of this prefix by
married women who forget their new liberties complicates the
registration."
REBATE ON MUNICIPAL
TAXES EXPIRES JUNE 30
Ratepayers Must Pay Accounts
By End of Month in Order
To Secure Rebate.
Notice Is given that the rebate nn
city taxes expires this month. All
taxes should now be paid iu order to
get advantage of any rebate. City
Clerk Mordy nnd Chief of Police Bunbury will receive tnxes nnd give receipts therefor.
POLICE NEWS
Marjorie Brown nnd Mny Smith forfeited a $51) bail under the Vagrancy
Act on Friday. They wero arrested at
:i o'clock in the morning on the streets
of Cumberland.
TENT CATERPILLAR
PLAYING  HAVOC
The tent caterpillar Is working
havoc among tlie orchards of Nanaimo
and unless prompt action, is taken litis
year's crop will be destroyed. Fruit
Pest Quarantine Offtcer-A. C. Wilson
has sounded a word of warning and he
advises everybody who lias an orchard
to get busy nl once and destroy tin*
tent caterpillar. Tho best time to
make away wilh the pest Is after sundown when tbey tent up for the tilglit
on tbe limb of some tree. When the
tent Is located It is an easy matter to
saw olT tlie portion of the limb on
which the ten! Is located, put tlie tent
in the fire and tints destroy tent and
the whole caterpillar family.
The draft of tlie bylaw for governing hotels and soft drink places not
being ready lo submit to the council
at its regular meeting last nionday.
a special meeting has been culled to
deal witli tbe matter next Monday
evening.
Mayor McDonald was in the chair,
' Aldermen Parnham, Thomas, Wier,
Brown. Bannerman, Pickard and City
Clerk Mordy being also present.
Amongst the correspondence received was mnps relating to tlie rule
of the road, the change from right to
left coming into force in this part of
the province in December next. These
maps will be posted up for information
of citizens.
$611.98 for "•Tarvia."
The account for tlle supply of the
"Tarvia" for Dunsmuir Avenue was
before the council, it amounting to
$641.93, including 1 per cent, sales
tax.
Alderman Thomson reprted good
progress on tlie matter of collections
towards thc Improvement of Dunsmuir
Avenue, thc sum subscribed amounting
to about $700. much of which has
been already paid In, tlie balance be-
lofi l"f* to the oklef of nolie* to collect.
Satisfaction was expressed in this
connection, the refusals being almost
nil.
Sundry accounts were read and referred to tlie Finance Committee forf
approval.
Tho schools salary list calls for
the payment of $1534,
Spine I'lii'lcan Spots III Town.
Alderman Wier, reporting for the
Board of Health, said several places
needed cleaning up very badly, considerable ashes and oilier refuse being
left to accumulate, One of the drawbacks in this regard is tlie lack of
available teams for the work. The
city team Is now engaged on tlie avenue work.
Tbe council intends to 'eke action
soon in regard to adopting bylaws
compelling people to keep their
premises in a sanitary condition.
lie New Fire Hose.
Aldermen   Brown   and   Bannerman
reported tbat the Japanese residents
of No. Five town had subscribed tlie
sum of $117 towards tbe purchase of
additional  fire hose, tlie   cheque   for
which   was  banded  in.    The  council
passed a vote of thanks to tlie givers.
Nothing  further had  been  done  In
Chinatown, but tlie Fire Wardens Intended  vlBlltllg that  place this  week
ami endeavor to secure the necessary
funds from them,
Application having been made for an
lo   be   installed    near   the
quarter, a  committee  from
il  will make a visit  of in-
bydranl
Jnpanone
tlle coin
spection.
LEWIS CON
FR
CERT PARTY HERE
DAY EVENING, JUNE I8TH
With a ten-piece orchestra, the Lewis Concert Party of
Nanaimo are booked to come to Cumberland on Friday, June
18, when a grand concert will be given in the Ilo-llo Theatre,
followed by a dance at which the full orchestra will provide
the music. Lovers of good music should reserve that dale.
for this party has a splendid reputation. The inducement
of dancing to thc strains of a ten-piece orchestra, no doubt
will draw a large assembly for that occasion.
Will sell Three Lots.
A bylaw authorizing the council to
sell three lots tor which the city holds
indefeasible title, was put through,
and those lots arc now being advertised for Hale by lender.
".siltitf-simls" Prevalent.
Thc excessive use of sling shots by
certain boys In the town wus reported
to the council, and step*; to huve thin
nuisance abated will be taken.
I>.>i|iialili<-;ilimi Humors.
Aldermen Thomson and Pickard
were somewhat perturbed over street
rumors of their being disqualified to
hold ofiice on the council owing to
being connected with the administration of tlie Water Works Co.
The council devoted some lime to
this phase, deciding that there was absolutely nothing iu it, the consensus
uf opinion being that if ratepayers had
any kick coming, the council wtfs (he
place lo air it.
OIISTItlVTINH THE QX&E
Mr. Bevis has forwarded the Islander
a communication on the conduct ot
some of the spectators of lasi Saturday's game, which we have pleasure
in publishing. Some of the remarks
and actions of apparently respectable
citizens at tjie game on the Y grounds
Saturday lust were closely approaching the disgraceful. To hurl insulting remarks at the referee when his
decision is not in accord with the
observer's own idea, is anything but
sportsmanlike.
Hushing on the field of play when
it goal is .scored and otherwise obstructing the game calls for much
condemnation. The writer firmly believes (he local team would have had
another goal in their favor hud not the
referee's view been obstructed by
spectators crowding round the goal.
Mr. Bevis* letter follows:
Editor Islander.
Sir.—Allow me space in your paper
to make an appeal to the football enthusiasts and supporters of the Cumberland Football Club.
In our game last Saturday with the
Vancouver Rangers our supporters
became very excited, no doubt owing
to ihe ?abt game and hard luck 01 our
team. In their excitement many
seemed to lose absolute control of
themselves and entered on the field
of play to congratulate the players on
their success when the local team
scored. Now, although we. the executive of the Cumberland Football Club,
appreciate the value of our supporters
in different ways, I will endeavor to
point out that these methods of boosting the team lias many faults. Firstly,
the executive is responsible for keeping the field of play free from obstruction ; and also it has been known that
on many occasions iu football games
the home team supporters were tbe
means of their team losing points by
such obstruction of play.
I am advised that on Saturday last
our team lost a goal that was scored
but the referee's view was obstructed
by our supporters who were lined up
around the' goal.
Therefore 1 hope that our supporters
will see tlie importance of our plea
and assiat us by keeping well back
from either of the goals, also n considerable distance from the touch line.
We'urgently request all spectators
to show all visiting teams that we are
true sportsmen behind the Cumberland
Football Club by showing courtesy
towards them, and not to abuse cither
players, referee or linesmen, Let us
accept all decisions as sports, because
all lim com pi ants practically rest on
the shoulders of the executive of tho
home Irani. Therefore ['again ask our
BUpporters to consider this and assist
the executive.
Yours
in sport,
NAT   BBV1S,
Secretary Cumheratnd F. C.
Cumberland, B. C. June 11, 1920.
BASEBALL CLUB DANCE
ON WEDNESDAY NEXT
The Cumberland Baseball Club is
holding a dance iu the Ilo-llo Dance
Hull on Wednesday evening next. Thc
club advertises good music and a jolly
time for all who attend.
SALE OK CITY LOTS
Tbe city der!,
for the purchast
the city holds I
lots, aro:   Lol 2,
Lol 8, Block !■;. Mi ^^^^^
Block   1. Map '.ft.
Tenders for any of these lots should
lie In the hands of Ihe city clerk not
I later Ukui 7 p.m., Monday, June 21,
is culling for tenders
of three lots of which
defeasible tille. The
Block 15, Map 622A;
"i22A, and Lot 7, m
Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 12, 1920.
For June Brides
r   ir-n ■    ——i—ia. ■        -  - - ■'     ■       i        i      —   **••**'•     ****^*£-*-
Useful Articles that
give the recipients
REAL PLEASURE
$37,50
97-PIECE DINNER SETS-
Regular $45.00.   Special	
CHOCOLATE SETS AND TEA SETS.
FANCY PIECES OF CHINA.
OAK CHAIRS AND ROCKERS, upholstered in
Tapestry and Leather.   These are a particularly
goud line.
DRESSERS, with large plate mirror, bevelled edge, in
Fumed Oak, Walnut and Mahogany, at $60.00 and
$35.00 each.
FAWCETT'S SUPERB $80.00
MAPLE LEAF PRIZE $77.00
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
J\. McKinnon
THE   FURNITURE   STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
Former Premier and Lieutenant-
Governor Dies Very Suddenly
NANAIMO'S STATISTICS
VERY ENCOURAGING
Twenty-six births and but three
deaths Is the healthy condition of affairs shown to exist in N'anaimo district during tlie month of May, in the
records of the government offices. The
deaths, but three in number, is the
smallest number for one month recorded for years past, while the birth
rate is 26 ls above the average,
During the same period nine marriages were solemnized.
AUSTRALIAN OIL STRIKE
MELBOURNE.—Reports have baen
received here that a prospector has
discovered a large body of oil shale
east of the Klmberley gold Held in
Western Australia.
REMINDED HER
A woman was taken to see Niagara
Falls. Tor a few moments she was
fascinated. Then, suddenly, she exclaimed, In agonized accents, "and
that reminds me—I'm sure I left the
bath tap running," and made tracks
for home.
LEWIS.
CONCERT
PARTY
WILL   VISIT
Cumberland
Friday, June 18
TEN PIECE ORCHESTRA
SOLOS DUETS
Concert = 50 cents
James Dunsmuir. a former premier
ot British Columbia, and one time
lieutenant-governor of the Province,
died rather suddenly on Sunday at
Cowlchan Lake, where he had gone in
an endeavor to recuperate from falling health.
Mr. Dunsmuir suffered a seizure on
Saturday night and was attended by
Doctors H. J. Wasson and E. S. Hasell,
but passed away at an early hour Sunday morning.
Mrs. Dunsmuir was not with her
husband at the time of his death, having been on a visit to Seattle. She returned Immediately.
In addition to his wife, Mr. Dunsmuir ls survived by nine children,
Robin, the only remaining aon. who Is
at present In Buenos Aires; Bessie
(Mrs. John Hopel, May (Mrs. Bromley), wife of Commander Bromley. R.
N.; Blrdle (Mrs. Audaln); Kuthleen
(Mrs. Seldon Humphreys); Marlon
(Mrs. Stevenson), Dola, Eleanor and
Muriel, all living in Victoria.
Lieut. James Dunsmuir, another son,
lost his life in the sinking of the Lnsl-
tanla.
James Dunsmuir was born at Fort
Vancouver, Wash., July 8, 1861, the
3on of Robert Dunsmuir, one ot the
earliest pioneers of British Columbia.
The elder Dunsmuir was the son of n
Scottish eoalmaster and was born in
Ayrshire. Educated at Kilmarnock
Academy he married when a young
man and sailed for the Pacific under
the auspices of the Hudson's Bay Company to open up the coal lands in the
Fort Rupert district. This project nol
being entirely successful he returned,
In 1854, to the Nanaimo district to
assist in the development of the mines
that afterwards became the holdings
of the Vancouver Coal Company.
But Dunsmuir senior did not long
remain In the employ of others for, in
the course of his prospecting, he discovered what was afterwards the
famous Wellington coal mines. At first
Admiral Farquhar /ind other British
naval officers stationed on the coast
were Interested with him in the mines,
but later he bought them out.
The value of this property may be
realized when it Is known that the
last partner ln the Wellington, Lieut.
Diggfe. received three quarters of a
million dollars for his interest. In
those days the great market for Vancouver Island coal, outside the British Pacific fleet, was California, where
gold had been discovered a few years
previously and which had no deposits
of Its own worth mentioning. The
Dunsmuir interests entered the field
there in a large way and had their
own steamships as well as wharves
and handling facilities at the California port.
James Dunsmuir was therefore born
to great opportunity, of which he took
the fullest advantage. He was educated at Nanaimo and at Hamilton College, a military institute at Blackburg,
Va. There he met the lady who afterwards became his wife, Laura, daughter of W. B. Swales.   They were roar
ed al Fayetteville, Nortli Carolina, In
REPENTANCE
1876.
When his education had been completed Mr. Dunsmuir at once plunged
into the management of his father's
properties. The elder Dunsmuir was
by this time In politics and a member
of the provincial cabinet, and as the
years passed the control of the business passed more and more into the
hands of James, so that ultimately he
became the directing head of all the
vast Dunsmuir Interests, which included besides the coal mines, the Esquimalt and Nanaimo railway, now part
of the Canadian Pacific system, which
hla father had promoted, built and controlled; numerous logging camps, tow-
boats, steamship!!, land and colonization companies, etc.
Mr. Dunsmuir had a brief but Interesting political career. Entering public life when the affairs of the Dunsmuir compnnles bad reached such a
state of organization that be could
spare the time, he was elected for
Yule, and sat In the Legislature from
1898 to 191)2. At a critical period In
Ihe affairs of the province he was
asked by the lieutenant-governor to
form a government In succession to
Hon. Joseph Martin, who bad been
unable to command Ihe support of a
majority in the house. This he did
and held the premiership for two
years.
In 1900 Air. Dunsmuir was appointed
lieutenant-governor of British Columbia In succession to Sir Henry Joly de
Lotblnlere, but resigned in lW'fl, before
his term was expired.
Other phases of tiie former premier's
career are indtsaolubly linked with the
progress and development of British
Columbia. He built the traffic bridge
across the Fraser at New Westminster
nnd negotiated the transacioln which
ended in tlie Canadian Pacific acquiring the- Esquimalt and Nanaimo railway with Us 1,600,000 acres of land ln
1905, and was afterwards elected a
member of the board of directors of
that company. He had tromendou:
private land holdings on the Island
and also on the Mainland, which have
been estimated at from twenty to forty
thousand acres.
The Dunsmuir collieries at Wellington, Comox and Alexandria were sold
in 1910 to Mackenzie and Mann for a
consideration reported at the time to
be in the neighborhood of ten million
dollars.
Mr. and Mrs. Dunsmuir entertained
the present King and Queen at Victoria
in 1901, on their famous tour of the
Empire as Duke aud Duchess of York.
They were also at the coronation of
King Edward ln 1902, and were presented to Their Majesties at Windsor
Castle in 1908.
Mr. Dunsmuir was a. generous benefactor of all public and private movements for the public good. He contributed largely to the endowment o:
the B. C. College of McGIll Universltj
and also to the Vancouver Sanitarium
for Tuberculosis. In religion he was
a Presbyterian.
Thus said the God of Mercy
To the God of Battles, "Cease
Your hammering and your clamoring;
I would have my world at peace.
"Dismiss me now your cohorts,
Your lighting men restrain.
And turn their hot endeavor
To the ways of peace again.
"Where cities old have perished
New cities shall arise;
My people once more hearken
To the counsel of the wJse.
"I will not hold them guiltless
Who called fhee to their aid;
In sorrow they shall answer
For the sprrow they have made.
•They shall come up for judgment
And theirs shall be the loss,
Who heeded not the teaching of
My Son upon the Cross.
"For oaths they swore In mockery.
For blood and pain and--worse.
I will demand their utmost
ln sorrow und remorse.
"By all the graves In Flanders,
By other graves unknown,
They shall reap the grim red harvest
Ot the terror they have sown."
Then spake the Son of Mary:
"O Father, now I plead,
Forgive Thy contrite children
In this their hour of need.
"Hot blows they struck In anger,
Wild oaths they swore In vnln;
Father, they are but children,
Wlio turn to Thee again.
"By paths I travelled wearily,
By blows and pain More,
By death 1 suffered for their sake,
Forgive Thou them once more."
Then spake the (lod Jehovah:
My Son, 1 will forgive
Tlie sins of these, My children,
That once again they live.
"But some are unrepentant,
Hot heads ami hearts aflame,
Who turn deaf ears lowards pie,
And glory In their shame,
"My wrath shall fall upon them,
Who do My mercy spurn;
The death they dealt to others, each
Shall suffer In his turn.
"do thou, whose hearts are contrite
For the evil thou hast done,
Be merciful and I will grant
The mercy of My Son."
Japanese Subscribe
For New Fire Hose
I Residents  of  No.   5  Japanese
Town Subscribe $117.00
Towards New Hose
DA INI Lb CONCERT
Nanaimo  10 Piece Orchestra
in attendance
Gents, $1.00, Ladies, 25c.
Mantaku Yamamoto $3.0(
Ikutaro Kawaguchl  3.0i
Nobutaro Okazakl   2.50
H. Isobe   1.00
T.  Salto   3.00
T. Kato  2.0i-
S. Hayashl   2.00
T. MatBUkura   2.00
J. Sora  :  2.00
H. Isonaga  3.00
N. Shlntanl ...'  4.00
K. Abe  10.00
S. Ikegaml   5.00
J. Eto   2.00
J. Kasubuchl  ."  5.00
S. Kawata  10.00
T. Hero  7.60
T. Kadoguchl ' 5.00
M. Otani   2.00
M. Fukunaga   2.00
K. Matsumoto   3.00
C. Nlshijlma 1.00
I. Yonemura   1.00
G. Iyelra   5.00
K. yamada   4.00
M. Tsuruoka   3.00
M. Sugimori   5.00
M. Okazakl   3.00
U. Doi  -3.00
T. Izawa   3.00
T. Tateyama  6.00
H. Nishlkawa  5.00
aV*aaMaaaaaMPF*^fc#^9afc»
Another Smelter
For The Island
Entry of Consolidated Company
on Island Would Give Impetus to Development
$117.00
COULD SWEAR
You tell me," said the Judge, "that
this ls the person who knocked you
down with his motor car. Could you
swear to the man?"
Investigation of copper deposits in
ihe Jordan River district, where the
company Is already interested in the
Suulock mine, will bo made within a
short time by experts of the Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, of Trail, the big concern which
operates the Trail smelter aud ls
heavily interested In the interior sec
tion ln mining development.
Recently it was announced that the
company bad secured options on the
Sunlock properties, mining proposl
tions which have been making a most
satisfactory showing. It has secured
tho Old Sport group of copper claims
on Quntsino Sound, and Is looking to
extend its mining operations elsewhere
on Vancouver Island.
The Interest being shown by the
Consolidated In this Island lends color
to the report that It Is the Intention of
the company to ultimately erect a
smelter on Vancouver Island to treat
ores which It will secure from this
section, thus eliminating the long haul
to Trail. The coke supply for such a
plant is assured on the Island, where
the existing coal producing concerns
are In a position to produce all thnt
would be required.
"Do you think It right to profllt by
the mistakes of others?" the stranger,
who yet seemed vaguely familiar,
asked earnestly.
"Why, no, certainly not!" responded
the minister.
"Well, then," the stranger suggested,
"^dld," returned the complainant, I "perhaps you'd like to return me the
but he didn't stop to hear me." (10 I gave you for marrying me."
Cumberland, B. C.
-C. P. Bunbury.
LESSON IX Dl'SIXESS
"Pop!"
"Yes, my son."
"What is a gardener?"
"A gardener is a man who raises a
few things, my boy."
"And what Is a farmer?"
"A man who raises a lot of things."
"Well, what ls a middleman. Pop?"
"Why, he's' a fellow who raises
everything."
Gardening for City
School Children
Practical   Instruction   Successfully Carried On By Many
Public Schools in Canada
Gardening is systematically carried
out by the public schools of many
Canadian cities as a part of the educational course. Dr. J. H. Putnam,
senior Inspector for Ottawa public
schools, in the March number of the
Agricultural Gazette, published by the
Department of Agriculture at Ottawa,
describes the system under which this
work la done In the capital city.
Practical Teaching Best
The school garden Is referred to as
a big class room for outdoor Instruction In plants and plant life. It has
many of the possibilities In miniature
nf an experimental farm. It has to do
with the composition and fertility of
soils, with drainage, with seed germination and Willi Insect enemies of plant
life. It shows In a way that cannot be
questioned the effect upon plants of
too much or tuo little sunshine or
moisture nnd the bad effects of weeds
and the necessity of giving a plant
plenty of room If we wish to secure a
high state of development. Dr. Putnam points out tbat these things
would mean nothing to city children If
recited from books or told by teachers.
These things taught through a garden
where (he children prepare the soil,
sow the seeds, and care for the plants
cannot be without good results.
, 10(H) Pupils Receive Instruction.
•In addition to a central garden of
one acre the Ottawa plan involves the
organization of home garden clubs,
each representing a school. In the
three years 1917-18-19 about 1,000
pupils from second and third book
classes received1 gardening instruction. The school board paid forty
dollars to each teacher who managed
a club garden. Every pupil member
was required to keep an accurate record o/ planting, cultivating and other
activities. Tlle aim Is to grow everything possible from seed. Cold frames
nre round to be a valuable addition to
the equipment. In the central garden
instead of giving pupils very small Individual plots, a plot 22x43 feet for
vegetables and 16x20 feet for flowers
Is given to each class. This garden ls
having a permanent perennial border
established which will give a succession of bloom as well as an opportunity to show the children what they
may have ln their own home gardens.
"Tho butler was Intoxicated this afternoon, Henry. You must discharge
him." "Discharge him nothing. I'll
double his wages. Maybe he'll tell
where he got It."
PLAYS ALL MAKES
OF RECORDS
Somewhere near your home, not
many houses away, you will find an
Edison Diamond Disc Phonograph.
You will also find that the purchaser
of same is an Edison enthusiast and
booster, and in every way satisfied
with his purchase.
After all critical tests your final decision will be the Instrument that has
been chosen by your friends — an
Edison.
If you will call at our store we will
be pleased to demonstrate the blindfold test and show you a list of purchasers ln this district.
Do not ask us what we think of the
Edison but ask someone who has one.
We handle all makes and will be
pleased to arrange convenient terms
on any Instrument that you may purchase.
EDISON DIAMOND DISC
PHONOGRAPHS
RANGE IN PRICE FROM
$144
BEFORE DECIDING, HEAR THE EDISON
, t        *
THE
GEO. A. FLETCHER
MUSIC COMPANY
"EVERYTHING IN MUSIC"
CUMBERLAND, B.C. June 12, 1920.
THE
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
READ
THIS-
The warm weather is here again and with it
has also arrived a consignment of Bestov Electric
Cookers.
These little stoves are the latest thing on the
market, and will save you much discomfort this
summer by allowing you to prepare your meals
without the necessity of lighting your coal stove.
Before purchasing these stoves we considered
the question of price very carefully, and finding
the usual grill stoves way up in price and beyond
the means of the average housekeeper, we looked
around for something that was serviceable and at
the same time reasonable in price. •
We found what we were looking for in the
BESTOV, and are pleased to offer these useful
little appliances to you at the following prices:
Plain finish   $5.25 each.
Semi-nickle  $7.25 each.
Full nickle  $8.25 each.
These different finishes are all equally serviceable, the only difference being in the finish.
SEE THEM IN OUR WINDOW.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
When Custom
Interferes
The constant use of a word often makes it
standard, but custom should not be allowed to interfere
with efficiency. We say "Hello" when we answer the
telephone, not realizing that it is not the proper way.
You help your own telephone service when you give
the name of your firm and department when answering
a call.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Limited.
m
KENNEL  NEWS AND VIEWS
By Hi FtXl'H
|
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF
PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership
heretofore existing between the undersigned in respect of the "Eagle
Hotel" In Cumberland, D. C, has been
dissolved as of this date, the undersigned John Favetta having sold and
transferred all his right aud Interest
in the partnership business and property to the undersigned Joseph
Aspesi.
All debts and claims against the
partnership will be assumed and paid
by Joseph Aspesi, nnd all debts and
accounts duo or accruing due the
partnership must he paid to Joseph
Aspesi, who is solely authorized to
collect* the same and give good and
valid receipts and releases therefor.
DATED this 27th day of May, 1920.
JOHN FAVETTA.
JOSEni ASPESI,
2-25
LOST
LOST at the Y Grounds on the 24th
May, a pocket book containing in
bills one hundred and seventy-five
dollars and other valuable I tapers; a
suitable reward will be given upon
return to Lee Sam, Beautfirt House,
Cumberland, B. C. , 4-25
FOUND
FOUND—A bunch of keys at Comox
Lake. Owner can have same upon
applying to The Islandei   Offlce.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—FOUR ACRE8 OF LAND
with three-room dwelling, barn,
garage and other buildings; one and
a hall miles from Cumberland.
Price reasonable. Apply A. R. Wesley, Cumberland, B. C.
THREE BELGIAN HARE DOES—
Full grown- Apply to William Harmi-
son, Now Houses, Cumberland. 4-24
FOR SAIaE: RESTAURANT KITCHEN
range and a large connter. Apply
P.O. Box 407, or Phone i05.
SEVEN HOUSES FOB SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
Cumberland and most of the towns on the Island, according to reports, have
wonderful dogs, especially in sporting breeds, and I expect to see some good
trials for field dogs as well as bench shows take place this year or next, in
various parts of our beautiful country.
There is needed lots of patience lo train growing puppies properly uml
without losing temper. Tim first thing to do is to traip tlie dog to retrieve an
old glove to your bidding. After each time thai he does it properly, pat him
and speak kindly to him. .He wlll soon learn to understand what is needed of
him. Let no one else interfere or speak to him. Of course the dog should have
been taught to go out on the lead and to come when called. Take him for a
little walk and then learn him to go home when ordered, to his own disappointment, Take a roll of newspaper and tap him on the nose when walking
if he tries to get ahead. Keep him to heel, speak quietly; don't shout or try
and make a coward of him. Learn him to slop when walking with the Word
"Toe." Repeat it till the dog connects the word by what Is expected of bin-
Do this for two or three days, then if ho fails to obey, tie a long piece of cord
to his collar and check blm the same time as you shout "Toe." Always pel
him with kind words when he obeys your orders. So many spoil dogs In-
continued commands.
Then next, learn the dog the word "Down." IMaeo hands on shoulder and
push him down. If he offers to get up. repeat the word ami push him down
again. Then learn blm to get used to the noise of tlie gun. One can he
flrm without being cruel. He must be taught to persevere al all limes, tor
birds are often hard to And, especially dead ones.
Then In the Held learn him to range. 1 lind an older dog if coupled lo young
dog which has had a lesson or two is tlie best teacher possible anil will learn
him to point quicker than anything else.
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
TRIBUTE TO THE DOG
Button, the Great French Naturalist, Was Great Authority
On Life of the Dog
The Irish Setter
ThtB breed hns wonderful courage
and stamina and I have heard Old
Country breeders say thai it was impossible to lind a coward among them.
The color, blood red, is a favorite
wherever seen. If owners would only
brush their dogs more it would improve their coats wonderfully. Red
and white used to be a familiar color
of coat years ago. The majority of
this breed as puppieB are very wild
and lack the brains of the English
Setter, but if a breeder has a good
brainy dog or bitch he can depend
upon getting intelligent utility pups.
I like to see Irish Setters with plenty
of substance, as if poor in body they
appear high on leg and shell framed,
which gives the dog a very poor appearance.
Many of the Irish Setters of thirty
years ago threw back to a blood red
with a tinge of black, which was objectionable. Rev. La Trounce, a relation of La Trounce of Harristown, in
Ireland, bred these dogs for over 50
years. I knew the reverend gentleman
and his daughters when I was a boy
and loved to talk on dogs.
Around the year 1882 the Irish Setter was introduced iu American Held
trials.
DOGS BORN DURING
PROHIBITED PERIOD
CAN BE REGISTERED
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from |550 to $1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
FOR
SALE-
-3-ROOMED
HOUSE.
Cash
or terms.  Apply to B.
. Pearse,
nitv.
S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR
hatching after March 25; bred from
splendid laying strain of two-tar-old
hens and selected vigorous cockrels.
Setting $1.50, per 100 $9.00. B. Tow-
ler. Courtenay. B.n
WANTED
WANTED—Will purchase Toy Chinese
or Jsipanese Dogs: Chows, Pekinese,
etc. .Must be young dogs. No fancy
prices. J. V. Jones, c-o Islander
Offlce.      . U
' _£.-"».    - -
Many fanciers have sought Information lately regarding tlle importing
and registration of "Illegitimates."
most of the inquirers being of the opinion that dogs born during the prohibited period (September, 1917, to
January 24, 1919) could not be registered.
Here are the details; save them for
future guidance:
On September 7, 1917, the kennel
club (English), in consequence of
communications from the British Government, were obliged to pass a resolution that from the date of the resolution they would not register any
dogs.born after September 7, 1917.
On November 20, 1918—after tlie
signing of the armistice— it was decided that on and after November 22,
1918, breeding operations might he resumed, and that puppies born on or
after January 24, 1919, would be eligible for registration.
On February 5, 1919, the committee
of the kennel club (English) carefully
considered the question of registration
ot dogs which had not been born under the license of the kennel club, and
decided that they be registered, aud
referred the matter to the annual general meeting,  held  on  February  20,
1919. At that meeting the decision of
the committee was upheld, and It was
further decided: "That dogs born between September 7, 1917, and January
24, 1919, should be allowed to bo exhibited not for competition only.
The registering of tho dogs In ques-
tion Is made in the regular way, ami
on the regular forms, tho difference
being that the words, "This dog if exhibited in Great Britain or Ireland
must be shown as 'Not for competition
only,' are stamped across tho face of
the certificate of registration,
Therefore the only privilege now denied the "Illegitimate" is that he cannot be shown in Great Britain or Ireland for competition. But he can be
registered. ■
The many beautiful dogs on the Island—from Cumberland to Victoria
would make a splendid dog show in itself. The Nanaimo Kennel Club should
advertise Its coming show well lu advance, not only In Vancouver and Victoria, but also on the prairies ami in
Washington cities, so that exhibitors
will have ample time in which to prepare their dogs.
COCKER SPANIELS
NEED LESS CARE
EXCEPT TO EARS
There is no Ijrced that can stand
neglect better than a Cocker Spaniel,
aside from his ears. Like other long-
eareii hreeds he is subject to canker
if his ears are not kept clean inside
and out. His ears should he cleaned
at least once a week. For internal
treatment, one needs the following:
Absorbent cotton, some dean wooden
pins (the kind the butcher pins our
roast together with) a bottle of Nujol
and some boracic. Call the dog to you,
have him jump upon a bench or chair,
pet him and assure him no harm.
Home dogs, like children, are not fond
of having their ears cleaned. Look into the ear; you will probably see some
wax or brown discharge, accumulation of dirt and oil from tlie hair. Pull
off a small piece of cotton, roll around
the pointed em|of the wooden pin, dip
this into the Nujol, enter it gently into
thc ear as fas as you can go and turn
the pin slowly and pull out, getting all
the discharge you can with this piece
of cotton. Some dogs have real dirty
ears, while others are nearly always
clean. Pull off the soiled piece of cotton from the pin, and roll a clean dry
piece around the same end of the pin.
Dust .With Boracic.
Insert this cleau piece and wipe out
all the remaining Nujol and dirt left.
If the ear is now clean, dust a little
boracic iu the cavity, holding up the
end of tiie ear to be sure the powder
goes way in. If the ear ia still dirty
after inserting the dry piece of cotton,
it may be necessary to use another
piece with another dip of Nujol. Anyhow, get the ear clean; do the same
with ear number two. If this treatment is followed up, once a week, you
will have no cankered ears. A little
piece of cotton rolled over the forefinger and dipped in Nujol will clean tho
lining of the ear, the part where there
is no hair. This becomes real dirty in
most dogs.
On Feeding*
A quick way to feed a number of
dogs that have long ears is in bowls
with rather small tops so the ears
hang on the outside; or the way we
do, we break all the pups lo have, or
allow us to hold the two ears over
their head in one hand; that is, bring
tte outside of the ears together over
the top of the head. An eastern owner
claims to he able to feed two dogs in
one apartment at same time. He can
go in and set two pans of food down
on the tloor and neither dog will put
his muzzle into thc food until he has
the ears over his head in his hand.
"As the twig Is bent the tree is inclined."
If a Cocker's ears are kepi out of
the food they will grow much Ion go r
aud heavier than if the hair is all matted up witli food. It Is better to keep
the long hair trimmed, even the
leather, than to have it all food. Some
kennel owners do this where a large
number are kopt only for breeding and
not showing.
Mrs. J. A. Hawley. Kelso. P.C.. i^
going in strong for Knglish toy spaniels, aud has purchased from A. .1.
Lewis, Gray Creek, It. ('., several oi
tho King Charles variety, and boiug
Itubys as well. Ilusiness being very
good at the .Marlborough kennels.
Dr. Glendon T. Moody has placed ;m
order with one of England's bulldog
experts for a brace of the very best
that can be secured. Future classes of
this breed should be lip-top in this section of Canada.
Don't ask tiie owner of a good shnl
dog—n man who likely haa spent lib
orally of his Umo and money bringing
his dog Into ..prominence -to give you
a stud service for a puppy out ot your
obscure bitch. He probably lias given
away more puppies than you will ever
raise.
A contributor to a contemporary
in an article ou "Dog Training as a
Hobby," quotes Buffon, the great
French naturalist of thc seventeenth
century, who was a great authority
on the dog.   It is as follows:
The dog's only ambition seems the
leslre to please; he is seen to gome
crouching along to lay his force, his
courage, and all. his useful talents at
the feet of. his muster; he waits his
orders, to ..which he pays Implicit
obedience; he consults his looks, and
a single glance is sufficient to put him
■In motion; he is more faithful even
lltiin die most boasted among men. He
is constant in bis affections, friendly
without interest and grateful for the
slightest favors; much more mindful
of benefits received than injurie i offer
ed; he is not driven off by unktnduess;
he still continues humble, submissive
and imploring; his only hope is to lie
serviceable, his only terror to displease; he licks the hand that has just
been lifted to strike him, and at lasl
disarms resentment by submissive
perseverance. More docile than man,
more obedient than any oilier animal,
ho is not only instructed in a short
time, but he also conforms to the manners and dispositions of tiiose who
command him. lie takes bis tone from
the house he inhabits; like the rest of
tlie domestics he is disdainful among
the great and churlish among clowns.
Always assiduous in serving .his master, and only a friend to his friends, he
is indifferent to all the rest, aud declares himself openly against such as
seem to be dependent, like himself. He
knows a beggar by his clothes, by his
voice, or by his gestures, and forbids
his approach. When at night tiie
guard of tlie house is committed to his
care lie seems proud of thc charge; he
continues a watchful sentinel, he goes
his rounds, scents strangers at a distance, and gives them warning of his
being on duty. If they attempt to
break in upon his territories he becomes more fierce, flies at them,
threatens, lights, and either conquers
alone or alarms those who have most
interest in coming to his assistance;
however, when he has conquered, he
quietly reposes upon the spoil, and abstains from what he has deterred
others from abusing, giving thus at
once a lesson of courage, temperance
and fidelity.
Vivian Darkle, pomerian, now 11
years of age and father of many of
the best Poms living, is a perfect
specimen. He won his championship
on the bench and has proved to be the
best sire in Canada. This little black
is as active aud cheeky ns many a
younger dog, although he is being
tinged with patches of grey witli the
passing of years. Mrs. Colbeck, of
Vancouver, t.l owner of this little dog.
High-Priced Hero
Worth the Money
Babe Ruth Great Drawing (aid
For New York Yankeeis
—Good Investment -
NEW YORK.—Pabe Kuth has made
n fair start toward" reimbursing tlu'
.Vow York Yankees for the tremendous Investment that brought him to
the Polo Grounds, and if he continues
to sjflp out homers, may Refund the
whole price before the season is ovor.
Por the second time the Yanks
smashed all attendance records for tiie
I'olo Grounds one day last week, when
88,686 came out. The morning crowd
of 10,463 was the largest forenoon
gal tiering ever drawn lo the park
two records gone in one day. When
KillH is out of the lineup the turnstiles
are likely to rust from lack of exer-
clso, but whenever the fans ate assured
of his playing they pack the stands,
$20,000 n l'e'iir.
The Pabr cost the Yanks $137,600 as
tbe purchase price, and his pay is understood to be about (20,000 a year,
Add about $10,000 as I uteres I on thte
investment and you have a debt, ol
?l(iT.."ji»i for Pabe lo pay back in gali
receipts. Twice this year tbo Babe's
reputation, backed up by a performance of fifteen homers so far, has
brought out crowds iu excess of 38,-
000 ou the home lot and the club hai
enjoyed the corresponding prosperity
oil the j*oad.
Kuth is expected to be a great attraction when the Vaults take the roa<!
tor their Western lour, as indeed In.
will have to he, to repay the club own
ers at the rate ul' $1100 a game in ;■
15-1-gamo series. Should tiie Yank,
wfu the championship aud go Into ;
World's series at the Polo Ground
this fall, Kuth will havo been largeb
responsible for it, both through run
scored und by Ihe lighting fnsplratldl
he has furnished .
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MBRKIF1ELD,    Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
I'uiiMiuiii' Ave.       Cumberland, U.C.
Canada Food Board License  No. 10-4986
V
UNION .HOTEL
OPPOSITE ItAIMVAV STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
IVII,I,ItM   JONES
Cumberland. B. c.
License No. 10-1606
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
683 Hastings St, \v„ Corner nf
Qrnnvllle.     VANCOUVER, B.C.
OYSTERS
VENDOME CAFE
Tlu*  House ul'  'tuullty.
Our motto:  To  please.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops
Also Oysters. Oysler Loaves and
French Fried Potatoes to take
home.
Boxes for Ladies.
Open Oil) nml Mirlif.
Our Motto:    TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
thc shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockery ware and
General  Merchandise.
CHAHUE SING CHONO, Ci'-''erland
HONG CHONG &. CO., BcVLd
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Vlso Baby .Chick Feed and AM
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
DR.R.P.CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 11G
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CU.MI'KKLA.NIJ.  B.C.
by select uiri
hunters from coastto coast
Invc proved dependable
under all conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
nre a double nr-suivincc ol
success for the man who
prefers ballistitc powder.
Wc oho carry n full line ol
Gntiuck and .SuviTriftn Shot -
gun Sheila and Dominion
Metallic (..nririfti-* — each
backed by the bin ,*D"traiJ -
mark
('. II. TARBELL Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 12, 1920.
For June Brides
Useful Articles that
give the recipients
REAL PLEASURE
$37,50
97-PIECE DINNER SETSr-
Regular $45.00.   Special 	
CHOCOLATE SETS AND TEA SETS.
FANCY PIECES OF CHINA.
OAK CHAIRS AND ROCKERS, upholstered in
Tapestry and Leather.   These are a particularly
good line.
DRESSERS, with large plate mirror, bevelled edge, in
Fumed Oak, Walnut and Mahogany, at $60.00 and
$55.00 each.
FAWCETTS SUPERB $80.00
MAPLE LEAF PRIZE $77.00
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
A. McKinnon
THE   FURNITURE   STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
Former Premier and Lieutenant-
Governor Dies Very Suddenly
NANAIMO'S STATISTICS
VERY ENCOURAGING
Twenty-si**; births and but three
deaths is the healthy condition of affairs shown to exist In N'anaimo district during the month of May, In the
records of the government offices. The
deaths, but three in number, is the
smallest number for one month recorded for years past, while the birth
rate Is 26 is above the average.
During the same period nine marriages were solemnized.
AUSTRALIAN OIL STRIKE
MELBOURNE.—Reports have b«en
received here that a prospector haa
discovered a large body of oil shale
east of the Klmberley gold field ln
Western Australia.
REMINDED HER
A woman was taken to see Niagara
Falls. For a few moments she was
fascinated. Then, suddenly, she en-
claimed, In agonized accents, "and
that reminds me—I'm sure I left the
bath tap running," and made tracks
for home.
LEWIS.
CONCERT
PARTY
WILL   VISIT
Cumberland
Friday, June 18
TEN PIECE ORCHESTRA
SOLOS DUETS
Concert = 50 cents
James Dunsmuir, a former premier
of British Columbia, aud one time
lieutenant-governor of the Province,
died rather suddenly on Sunday at
Cowlchan Lake, where he had gone ln
an endeavor to recuperate from failing health.
Mr. Dunsmuir suffered a seizure on
Saturday night and was attended by
Doctors H. J. Wasson and E. S. Hasell,
but passed away at an early hour Sunday morning.
Mrs. Dunsmuir was not with her
husband at the time of his death, having been on a visit to Seattle. She returned Immediately.
In addition to his wife, Mr. Dunsmuir ls survived by nine children,
Robin, the only remaining son. who Is
at present ln Buenos Aires; Bessie
tMrs. John Hope), May (Mrs. Bromley), wife of Commander Bromley, It
N.; Birdie tMrs. Audaln); Kathleen
(Mrs. Seldon Humphreys); Marlon
(Mrs. Stevenson), Dola, Eleanor and
Muriel, all living In Victoria.
Lieut. James Dunsmuir, another son.
lost hla life in the sinking ot the Lusitania.
James Dunsmuir was born at Fort
Vancouver, Wash., July 8, 1851, the
eon of Robert Dunsmuir, one of the
earliest pioneers of British Columbia.
The elder Dunsmuir was the son of a
Scottish coalmaster and was born In
Ayrshire. Educated at Kilmarnock
Academy he married when a young
man and sailed for the Pacific under
the auspices of the Hudson's Bay Company to open up the coal lands in the
Fort Rupert district. This project not
being entirely successful he returned,
In 1854, to the Nanaimo district to
assist in the development of the mines
that afterwards became the holdings
of the Vancouver Coal Company.
But Dunsmuir senior did not long
remain in the employ of others for, in
the course of his prospecting, lie discovered what was afterwhrds the
famous Wellington coal mines. At first
Admiral Farqnhar fihi other British
naval officers stationed on the coast
were interested with him in the mines,
but later he bought them out.
The value of this property may be
realized when it Is known that the
last partner ln the Wellington, Lieut.
Diggie, received three quarters of a
million dollars for his interest. In
those days the great market for Vancouver Island coal, outside the British Pacific fleet, was California, where
gold had been discovered a few years
previously and which had no deposits
of Us own worth mentioning. The
Dunsmuir interests entered the field
there in a large way and had their
own steamships as well as wharves
and handling facilities at the California port.
James Dunsmuir was therefore born
to great opportunity, of which he took
the fullest advantage. He was educated at Nanaimo and at Hamilton College, a military institute at Blackburg,
Va. There he met the lady who afterwards became his wife, Laura, daughter of W. B. Swalea.   They were mar
ried at Fayetteville, Nortl) Carolina, in
ISTti.
When his education had been completed Mr. Dunsmuir at once plunged
Into the management of his father's
properties. The elder Dunsmuir was
by this time in politics and a member
of the provincial cabinet, and as the
years passed the control of the business passed more and more into the
hands of James, so that ultimately he
became the directing head of all the
vast Dunsmuir Interests, which included besides the coal mines, the Esquimau and N'anaimo railway, now part
uf the Canadian Pacific system, which
his father had promoted, built and controlled; numerous logging camps, tow-
boats, steamships, land und colonization companies, etc.
Mr. Dunsmuir had n brief but Interesting pulltlcal career. Entering public life when the affairs of the DutlB-
mulr companies had reached such a
state of organization that he could
spare the time, he wns elected for
Yale, and sat in the Legislature from
1SSS to 19n2. At a critical period In
ihe affairs of the province he wns
asked by the lieutenant-governor to
form a government in succession to
Hon. Joseph Martin, who had been
unable to command the support of a
majority In the house. This he did
and held the premiership for two
years.
In 190C Mr. Dunsmuir was appointed
lieutenant-governor of British Colum
hla in succession to Sir Henry July de
Lotblnlere, but resigned in 1909, before
his term was expired.
Other phases of the former premier's
career are inilissolubly linked wilh the
progress and development of British
Columbia. He built thc truliic bridge
across the Fraser at New Westminster
and negotiated the transacloin which
ended in the Canadian Pacific acquiring the Esquimalt and N'anaimo railway with its 1,5011,(101) acres of land In
1905, and was afterwards elected a
member of the board of directors of
that company. He had tremendous
private land holdings on the Island
and also on the Mainland, which have
been estimated at from twenty to forty-
thousand acres.        *
The Dunsmuir collieries at Wellington, Comox and Alexandria were sold
in 1910 to Mackenzie and Mann for a
consideration reported at the time to
be in the neighborhood of ten million
dollars.
Mr. and Mrs. Dunsmuir entertained
the present King and Queen at Victoria
in 1901, on their famous tour of the
Empire as Duke and Duchess of York.
They were also at the coronation of
King Edward in 1902, and were presented to Their Majesties at Windsor
Castle in 1908.
Mr. Dunsmuir was a. generous benefactor of all public and private movements for the public good. He contributed largely to the endowment o:
the B. C. College of McGill Universit>
and also to the Vancouver Sanitarium
for Tuberculosis. In religion he was
a Presbyterian.
REPENTANCE
Thus said the God of Mercy
To the Cod of Battles, "Cease
Your hammering and your clamoring;
I would have my world at peace.
"Dismiss me now your cohorts,
Your lighting men restrain,
And turn their hot endeavor
To the ways of peace again.
"Where cities old have perished
New cities shall arise;
My people once more hearken
To the counsel of the wise.
"I will not hold them guiltless
Who called thee to their aid;
In sorrow they shall answer
For the sorrow they have made.
"They shall come up for judgment
And theirs shall be the loss,
Who heeded not the teaching of
My Son upon tbe Cross.
"Fur oaths they swore In mockery.
For blood and pain and--worse.
1 will demand their utmost
ln Borrow und remorse.
"By all the graves in Flanders,
By other graves unknown,
They shall reap the grim red harvest
Of the terror they have sown."
Then spake the Son of Mary:
"O Father, now I plead.
Forgive Thy contrite children
In this their hour of need.
"Hot blows they struck In anger,
Wild oaths they swore In vain;
Father, (hey are but children,
Who turn to Thee ngnln.
"By paths I travelled wearily,
By blows and pain More,
By cleuih 1 Buffered for their sake,
Forgive Thou (hem once more."
Then spake the God Jehovah;
"My Son, 1 will forgive
The sins of these, My children,
'Unit once again thoy live.
"But some ate unrepentant,
Hot heuils and hearts ailume.
Who turn deaf ears towards pie,
And glory In their shame.
"My wrath shall fall upon them,
Who do My mercy spurn;
The death they dealt to others, each
Shall suiter In Ills turn.
"Go thou, whose hearts are contrite
For the evil thou hast done,
Be merciful and I will grant
The mercy of My Son."
Gardening for City
School Children
Practical   Instruction   Successfully Carried On By Many
Public Schools in Canada
Japanese Subscribe
For New Fire Hose
I Residents  of  No.   5   Japanese
Town Subscribe $117.00
Towards New Hose
DA IN Lb CONCERT
Nanaimo  10 Piece Orchestra
in attendance
Gents, $1.00, Ladies, 25c.
Mantaku Yamamoto ?3.0f
Ikutaro Kawaguchl   3.0(
Nobutaro Okazakl   2.50
H. Isobe   1.0c
T.  Salto   3.00
T. Kato  2.0i-
S. HayaBhi   2.00
T. Matsukura   2.00
J. Sora  ,  2.00
H. Isonaga  3.00
N. Shintanl...'  4.00
K. Abe  10.00
S. Ikegaml   5.00
J. Eto   2.00
J. KasubuchI  .'  6.00
S. Kawata  10.00
T. Hero   7.50
T. Kadoguchl ' 5.00
M. Otanl   2.00
M. Fukunaga  2.00
K. Matsumoto   3.00
C. Nlshijlma  1.00
I. Yonemura   1.00
G. Iyelra   5.00
K. Yamada  4.00
M. Tsuruoka   3.00
M. Suglmorl   5.00
M. Okazakl   3.00
U. Doi  -3.00
T. Izawa   3.00
T. Tateyama   6.00
H. Nishikawa   5.00
$117.00
Another Smelter
For The Island
Entry of Consolidated Company
on Island Would Give Impetus to Development
J!
COULD SWEAB
"You tell me," said the judge, "that
this Is tha person who knocked you
down with his motor car. Could you
swear to the man?"
"I^did," returned the complainant,
"but he didn't stop to hear me."
Investigation of copper deposits In
the Jordan River district, where the
company ls already interested in the
Suulock mine, will be made within a
short time by experts of the Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, of Trail, the big concern which
operates the Trail smelter and Is
heavily Interested ln the interior section lu mining development.
Recently it was announced that the
company had secured options on the
Sunlock properties, mining propositions which have been making a most
satisfactory showing. It has secured
the Old Sport group of copper claims
on Quatslno Sound, and Is looking to
extend its mining operations elsewhere
on Vancouver Island.
The interest being shown by the
Consolidated In this Island leuds color
to the report that it is the intention of
the company to ultimately erect a
smelter on Vancouver Island to treat
ores which it will secure from this
section, thus eliminating the long haul
to Trail. The coke supply for such a
plant is assured on the Island, where
the existing coal producing concerns
are In a position to produce all that
would be require'd.
"Do you think it right to profilt by
the mistakes of others?" the stranger,
who yet seemed vaguely familiar,
asked earnestly.
"Why, no, certainly not!" responded
the minister.
"Well, then," the stranger suggested,
"perhaps you'd like to return me the
$10 I gave you for marrying me."
Cumberland, B. C.
—C. P. Bunbury.
LESSON IN BUSINESS
"Pop!"
"Yes, my son."
"What is a gardener?"
"A gardener is a man who raises a
few things, my boy."
"And what Is n farmer?"
"A man who raises a lot of things."
"Well, what is a middleman. Pop?"
"Why, he's' a fellow who raises
everything."
Gardening is systematically carried
out by the public schools of many
Canadian cities as a part of the educational course. Dr. J. H. Putnam,
senior Inspector for Ottawa publlc
schools, in the March number of the
Agricultural Gazette, published by the
Department of Agriculture at Ottawa,
describes the system under which this
work ls done in the capital city.
1'rnrticnl Teaching Beat.
The school garden is referred to aa
a big class room for outdoor instruction In plants and plant life. It has
many of the possibilities in miniature
of nn experimental farm. It has to do
with the composition and fertility of
soils, Willi drainage, with seed germination nnd with Insect enemies of plant
life. It shows In a way that cannot be
questioned the effect upon plants ot
too much or too little sunshine or
moisture and the bad effects of weeds
and the necessity of giving a plant
plenty of room If we wish to secure a
high state of development. Dr. Putnam points out that these things
would mean nothing to city children If
recited from books or told by teachers.
These tilings taught through a garden
where the children prepare the soil,
sow the seeds, and care for the plants
cannot be without good results.
, 1000 Pupils Receive Instruction.
In addition to a central garden of
one acre the Ottawa plan Involves the
organization of home garden clubs,
eacli represent Ing a school. In the
three years 1917-1S-19 about 1,000
pupils from second and third book
classes received* gardening Instruction. Tlie school board paid forty
dollars to eacii teacher who managed
a club garden. Every pupil member
wus required to keep an accurate record o/ planting, cultivating and( other
activities. Tlle aim is to grow everything possible from seed. Cold frames
are found to be a valuable addition to
the equipment. In the central garden
instead of giving pupils very small Individual plots, a plot 22x43 feet for
vegetables and 16x20 feet for flowers
is given to each class. This garden Ib
having a permanent perennial border
established which wlll give a succession of bloom as well as an opportunity to show the children what they
may have In their own home gardens.
"The butler was Intoxicated thla afternoon, Henry. You must discharge
him." "Discharge him nothing. I'll
double his wages. Maybe he'll tell
where he got It."
PLAYS ALL MAKES
OF RECORDS
Somewhere near your home, not
many houses away, you wlll And an
Edison Diamond Disc Phonograph.
You will also find that the purchaser
of same is an Edison enthusiast and
booster, and in every way satisfied
with his purchase.
After all critical tests your final decision will be the instrument that haB
been chosen by your friends — an
Edison.
If you will call at our store we will
he pleased to demonstrate the blindfold test and show you a list of purchasers in this district.
Do not ask us what we think of the
Edison but ask someone who has one.
We handle all makes and will be
pleased to arrange convenient terms
on any Instrument that you may purchase.
EDISON DIAMOND DISC
PHONOGRAPHS
RANGE IN PRICE FROM
$144
BEFORE DECIDING, HEAR THE EDISON
THE
GEO. A. FLETCHER
MUSIC COMPANY
"EVERYTHING IN MUSIC"
CUMBERLAND, B.C. June 12, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
READ
THIS-
The warm weather is here again and with it
has also arrived a consignment of Bestov Electric
Cookers.
These little stoves are the latest thing on the
market, and will save you much discomfort this
summer by allowing you to prepare your meals
without the necessity of lighting your coal stove.
Before purchasing these stoves we considered
the question of price very carefully, and finding
the usual grill stoves way up in price and beyond
the means of the average housekeeper, we looked
around for something that was serviceable and at
the same time reasonable in price.
We found what we were looking for in the
BESTOV, and are pleased to offer these useful
little appliances to you at the following prices:
Plain finish   $5.25 each.
Semi-nickle $7.25 each.
Full nickle  $8.25 each.
These different finishes are all equally serviceable, the only difference being in the finish.
SEE THEM IN OUR WINDOW.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. 0. 314
Limited.
KENNEL  NEWS AND VIEWS
By Bt ram
When Custom
Interferes
The constant use of a word often makes it
standard, but custom should not be allowed to interfere
with efficiency. We say "Hello" when we answer the
telephone, not realizing that it is not the proper way.
You help your own telephone service when you give
the name of your firm and department when answering
a call.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF
PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership
heretofore existing between the undersigned In respect of the "Eagle
Hotel" In Cumoerland, D. C, has been
dissolved as of this date, the undersigned John Favettn having sold and
transferred all his right and Interest
ln the partnership business and property to the undersigned Joseph
Aspesi.
All debts aud claims against the
partnership will lie assumed and paid
by Joseph Aspesi, and all debts and
accounts duo or accruing due the
partnership must be paid to Joseph
Aspesi, who ls solely authorized to
collect'the Bumo and give good and
valid receipts and releases therefor.
DATED this 27th day of May, 1920.
JOHN FAVETTA.
JOSEPH ASPESA.
2-25
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—FOUR ACRES OF LAND
with three-room dwelling, barn.
garage and other buildings; one and
a halt miles from Cumberland.
Price reasonable. Apply A. R. Wesley, Cumberland, B. C.
LOST
LOST at the Y Grounds on the 24th
May, a pocket book conta/ining ln
bills one hundred and seventy-live
dollars and other valuable papers; a
suitable reward will be gt'ven upon
return to Lee Sam, Beaut*.'irt House,
Cumberland, B. C. , 4-25
FOUND
FOUND—A hunch of keys at Comox
Lake. Owner can have same upon
applying to The Islandel • Olllce.
THREE BELGIAN HARE DOES—
Full grown. Apply to William Harral-
son, New Houses, Cumberland. 4-24
FOR SALE: R-BSTAURANT KITCHEN
range and a large counter. Apply
P.O. 13o3t 407, or Pbone i05.
SEVEN HOUSES FOB SALE CHEAP.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
Cumberland and most of the towns on tlie Island, according to reports, have
wonderful dogs, especially in sporting breeds, and I expect to see some good
trials for Held dogs as well as bench shows take place this year or next, in
various parts ot our beautiful country.
There is needed lots of patience to train growing puppies*properly and
without losing temper. Tim first thing lo do is to traip the dog to retrieve an
old glove to your bidding. After each time tbat he does it properly, pat liiiu
and speak kindly to him. .He will soon learn to understand what is needed of
liim. Let no one else interfere or speak to him. Of course the dog should have
been taught to go out on tho lead and to come when called. Take hiin for a
little walk and then learn him to go home when ordered, to his own disappointment. Take a roll of newspaper and tap him on the nose when walking
it he tries to get ahead. Keep him to heel, speak quietly; don't shunt or try
and make a coward of him. Learti him to stop when walking with the word
"Toe." Repeat It till the dog connects the word by what Is expected ot him.
Do this for two or three days, then if lie fails to obey, tie u lung piece of curd
to Ills collar and check him the same time as you shunt "Toe." Always pet
him with kind words when he obeys your orders. So ninny spuil dugs hy
continued commands.
Then next, learn the dog the word "Down." Place hands on shuulder and
push him down. If he offers to get up, repeal (he word and push liim down
again. Then learn him to get used to tlie noise of tlie gun. One enn be
Iirm without being cruel, llo must he taught tn persevere nl nil times. I'm
birds are often hard to lind, especially dead ones.
Then In the field learn him to range. I find an older dog II* coupled lo young
dog which haB had a lesson or two is the best teacher possible and will learn
him to point quicker thun anything else.
The Irish Setter
This breed has wonderful courage
and stamina and 1 have heard Old
Country breeders say that it was impossible to lind a coward among them.
The color, blood red, is a favorite
wherever seen. If owners would only
brush their dogs more it would improve their coats wonderfully. Red
and white used to be a familiar color
ot coat years ago. The majority of
thiB breed as puppies are very wild
and lack the brains of the English
Setter, but If a breeder has a good
brainy dog or bitch he can depend
upon getting intelligent utility pups.
I like to see Irish Setters with plenty
of substance, as if poor iu body they
appear high on leg and shell framed,
which gives the dog a very poor appearance.
Many of the Irish Setters of thirty
yearB ago threw back to a blood red
with a tinge of black, which was objectionable. Rev. La Trounce, a relation of La Trounce of Harristowu, in
Ireland, bred these dogs for over 50
years. I knew the reverend gentleman
and his daughters when I was a boy
and loved to talk on dogs.
Around the year 1882 the Irish Setter was Introduced in American Held
trials.
DOGS BORN DURING
PROHIBITED PERIOD
CAN BE REGISTERED
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from (550 to $1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
FOR SALE—3-ROOMED HOUSE.
Cash or terms. Apply to B. Pearse,
mtv.
8? C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR
hatching nfter March 25; bred from
splendid laying strain of two-tar-old
hens and selected vigorous cockrels.
Setting $1.50, per 100 $9.00. B. Tow-
ler. Courtenay. B.O
Many fanciers have sought Information lately regarding the Importing
and registration of "Illegitimates,"
most of the inquirers being of thc opinion that dogs born during the prohibited period (September, 1917. In
January 24, 1919) could not be registered.
Here are the details; save them fur
future guidance:
On September 7, 1917, the kennel
club (English), in consequence of
communications from the British Government, were obliged to pass a resolution that from the date of the resolution they would not register any
dogs.born after September 7. 1917.
On November 20, 1918—after the
signing of thc armistice-it was decided that on and after November 22,
1918, breeding operations might be resumed, and that puppies boru on or
after January 24, 1919, would be eligible for registration.
On February 5, 1919, the committee
of the kennel club (English) carefully
considered the question of registration
of dogs which had not been born under the license of the kennel club, und
decided that they be registered, and
referred the matter to thc annual general meeting, held on  February  20,
1919. At that meeting the decision of
the committee was upheld, and it was
further decided: "That dogs horn between September 7, 1917, and January
24, 1919, should be allowed to be exhibited not for competition only.
The registering of the dogs in question Is made in the regular way, and
on the regular forms, tho difference
being that the words, "This dog It exhibited ln Great Britain or Ireland
must be shown as 'Not for competition
only,' are stamped across thc face of
the certificate ot registration.
Therefore the only privilege now denied the "Illegitimate" Is that he cannot be shown In Great Britain or Ireland for competition. But he can be
registered. •
COCKER SPANIELS
NEED LESS CAKE
EXCEPT TO EARS
WANTED
WANTED—Will purchase Toy Chinese
or Japanese Dogs: Chows, Pekinese,
etc. Must be young dogs. No fancy
prices.    J.  V.  Jones,  c-o  Islander
Offlce.
_i-*»,
The many beautiful dogs on the Island—from Cumberland to Victoria
would make a splendid dog show in Itself. The Nanaimo Kennel Club should
advertise its coming show well In advance, not only ln Vancouver and Vic
toria, but also on the prairies nml in
Washington cities, so that exhibitors
will have ample time In which to prepare their dogs.
There is ilo breed that can stand
neglect better than ;i Cocker Spaniel,
aside from his ears. Like other lung-
eared breeds he is subject tn canker
if his ears are not kept clean inside
and nut. His ears should he cleaned
at least once a week. For internal
treatment, one needs (lie following:
Absorbent cotton, some cjean wooden
pins (die kind (lie butcher pins our
roast together with! a bottle of Nujol
and some boracic. fall tlie dug to you,
have him jump upon a bench nr chair,
pel him and assure him no harm.
Some dogs, like children, are nut fond
uf having their ears cleaned. Look into tlie ear; you will probably see some
wax or brown discharge, accumulation of dirt and oil from the hair. Pull
nil* a small piece of cotton, roll around
the pointed end nl* the wuoden pin, dip
til is into tlie Nujol, enter it gently into
the ear as fas as you can go and turn
the pin slowly and pull out. getting all
tlie discharge you can with this piece
of cotton. Some dogs have real dirty
ears, while others are nearly always
clean. Pull off tlie soiled piece of cotton from (he pin, and roll a dean dry
piece around the same end of the pin.
Dust Willi Boracic.
Insert this cleau piece and wipe mil
all the remaining Nujol and dirt left.
If the ear is now clean, dust a Hide
boracic iu the cavity, holding up the
end of the ear to be sure the powder
goes way in. If the ear is still dirty-
after Inserting tlie dry piece of cotton,
ii may be necessary (o use another
piece witli another dip nf Nujol. Anyhow, get the ear clean; do tlle same
with car number two. If this treatment is followed up. once a week, you
will have no cankered ears. A little
piece of cotton rolled over the forefinger and dipped iu Nujol will clean the
lining of tlie car, tlie part where there
is no hair. This becomes rent flirty in
most dogs.
On Feeding.
A quick way to feed a number of
dugs that have long ears is in bowls
with rather small tops so the ears
liang on (he outside; or the way we
do. we break all the pups to have, or
allow us to hold the two ears over
their head in one hand; that IB**, bring
tte outside of tlie ears together over
the top of the head. An eastern owner
claims to be able to feed two dugs in
une apartment at same time, lie can
go In and set two pans uf food down
un the rtnor and neither dug will pni
his mu/./.le into the food until he lias
(he ears over his head in his hand.
"As the twig Is bent the tree i* inclined."
If a Cocker's ears are kept out of
(he fond they will grow much longer
and heavier than if (In1 hair is ail mulled up wilh food. Il Is better in keep
the long hair trimmed, even tin
leather, than tn have it all food. Some
kennel owners do iliis where a large
number arc kepi only (nr breeding and
not allowing.
Mrs. J. A. Hawloy, Kelso, B.C., Is
going in Blrong fur Ungllsli toy spuu-
lels, and has purchased from A. .1.
Lewis. Gray Creek, B, C, several ol
the lung Charles variety, and some
Itubys as well. Business being very
good at tlie Marlborough kennels.
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
TRIBUTE TO THE DOG
liufl'on. the Great French Naturalist, Was Great Authority
On Life of tlie Dog
A contributor to  a  contemporary,
n an article on "Dog Training as a
Hubby," (|ii(iies Uuftun, the great
French naturalist of the seventeenth
•eutury, who was a great authority
un the dog.   It is as follows:
The dog's only ambition seems the
desire to please; lie is seen to come
crouching along to lay his force, his
courage, and all his useful talents m
ihe feel nl* his master; he waits his
mders, to jW.hich be pays Implicit
obedience; he consults his looks, and
;i single glance is BUfncfonl tu put him
in motion; lie is mure faithful even
I hail tlie most boasted aiming men. lie
is coiiBtaut in liis affections, friendly
without luteresl ami grateful for Hie
slightest favors; much more mindful
nf benefits received than Injurle offer
ed; lie is nni driven nil by unkltulness;
lie still continues humble, submissive
and Imploring; his only hope is to lie
serviceable, his only terror to displease; he licks the hand thai has just
been lifted tu strike him, and at lust
disarms resentment by submissive
perseverance. More docile thun man.
more obedient than any other animal,
iic is not only Instructed in a short
lime, hut lie also conforms to the manners and dispositions of thoBe who
command him. lie takes his tone from
the house lie Inhabits; like (lie resi of
the domestics he is disdainful niunng
the great and churlish among clowns,
Always assiduous in serving-his master, and only a friend in bis friends, lie
is Indifferent tn all the rest, and declares himself openly against such as
leem to lie dependent, like himself, lie
knows n beggar by his clothes, hy his
voice, or hy his gestures, and forbids
his approach. When at night Ihe
guard of tlie house Is committed to his
care he seems proud of the charge; he
continues a watchful sentinel, he goes
is rounds, scents strangers at u ilis-
[aiinee, and gives tiiem warning of his
being on duty. If they attempt to
break in upon his territories he becomes more fierce, Hies at them,
threatens, lights, ami either conquers
alone or alarms llin.se who have most
interest in coming to Ills assistance;
however, when lie has conquered, he
quietly reposes upon the spuil, and ali-
slains from what lie has deterred
others from abusing, giving thus at
once a lesson of courage, temperance
and fidelity.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEHUIFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave..      Cumberland, B.O.
Canada Food Hoard License  No. 10-1986
y
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
Firs! Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity,
WII.I.IAU   JONES
Cumberland! B, C.
License No.  10-1606
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
688 Hastings St, W., Corner of
Granville.     VANCOUVER, U.C.
OYSTERS
VENDOME CAFE
The   House  ai  (Jii.il.t).
Our  motto:   To   please.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops
Also Oyiitors, OyHter Loaves ami
French Fried Potatoes to take
home.
Boxes for Ladies.
Open Day anil Ml'IiI.
Dr. Glendon T. .Moody has plated an
order with one of England's bulldog
experts for a brace of the very best
that ran he secured. Future classes of
this breed should Ik* Up-top iu this section of Canada.
Don't ask the owner of a good stud
dog—U man who likely has spent lib
orally of his time ami money bringing
his dog into.prominence -to give you
a stud service for a puppy out of your
obscure bitch. IU- probably has given
away more puppies than you will ever
raise.
Vivian Darkle, potnerian, now II
years of ago and father of many of
tho best Toms living, is a perfect
specimen. He won his championship
on the bench and has proved to be the
best sire in Canada, This little black
is as active and cheeky as many a
younger dog, although lie i^ being
tinged witli patches of grey with tlie
passing of years. Mrs. Colbeck, of
Vancouver, i.' owner of this little dog.
High-Priced Hero
Worth the Money
Babe Kuth Great Drawing Card
For New York Yankees
—Good Investment
NEW YOItK. -Italic Ruth has made
n t'nir s(nr( toward* reimbursing tlu*
Ngw York Yankees fur (lie tremendous Investment that brought him to
(lie Polo (Irouinls, nml if lie continues
In ship oul limners, may *f et'nml (lie
whole price before (lie season is over.
P*or 1 lie second time tlie Yanks
smashed ail attendance records for the
I'ulu Grounds one day last week, when
38,686 came uni. 'lite morning crowd
of ln,46:i was die largest forenoon
gathering ever drawn In the park
two records gone in one day. when
Ruth is mil uf the lineup ihe turnstiles
arc likely tn rusl from lmk m* exor*
ciso, hut whenever the fans are assured
uf in. playing they pack the standi.
V2U.0O0 il Vein.
The Millie C08l the Yllllli:, $137,606 as
the purchase price, ami his pay is un*
derstood to he about $20, ,a yoar
Add about $10,000 as Interei t un tin
investment ami you have a dobl ut
$107,600 fur Babe lu pay hack In gall
receipts. Twice lllh; year the Babe's
reputation, hacked up by a perforin
nine of fifteen homers su far. has
brought out crowds iu excess nf 1(8,-
000 mi the home lot ami (lie club hoi
enjoyed tiie corresponding prosperity
on tbe Vniiil.
Ruth is expected tn he a (,'renl attraction when tiie Yanks take the ruail
lor (heir Western lour, as Indeed be
will have lu he, to repay (lie club owners nl  Ihe rule nf $11 1 game  ill  ::
164-game series. Should tin* Yank,
win lite championship ami go Into .
world's series nt (he i'ulu Ground
this lull, Ruth' will have been largel)
responsible tor It, bnth through run
sr ui'iil and hy tlle fighting in-piratiot
be has furnished .
Om- Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
tlie shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during w*eek days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General  Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONG, O-'-crland
HONG CHONG & CO., BcVL.1
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Also Baby .Chick Feed and All
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 111!
Qfflce: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Begin Your
Trip Right
by selectinR (he shells that   a**"*
hunters from coastto coast
li ivc   piuvi d   ih jwndatil.'
under all conditions,
Regal
Shotgun Shells
nre n double nssur.mce o|
success for I he man who
prefers balltatita powder.
\     I'tso i iny .1 fu'l li*"* i
Canuck and .suvcri'icn Mum -
i*un Sheila  and   ii.niiu i
Metallic tairtrkiu."! — f., >,
.•■■..'"Ily tho trig "D',tnt* -
tn BI k
('. II. TAItllKI.I, Four
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 12, 1920.  *. * .
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland. B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE  Manager and Publisher.
BEN* H. GOWEX Editor.
SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 1920.
DEATH OK HON. JAMES DUNSMUIR
In the death of Hon. James Dunsmuir, which,
occurred at Cowichan Lake on Sunday morning
last, British Columbia has lost a pioneei: citizen
whose varied interests and activities have filled
a large part in its life and been an important
factor in its development.
As lieutenant-governor, premier •anil private
member of the Provincial Legislature, as well as
the moving spirit in many industrial concerns, and
as a philanthropic supporter of many public institutions, Mr. Dunsmuir gained the respect and
esteem of large numbers of his fellow citizens.
The name of the Dunsmuir family will always
be associated with the development of the coal
resources of this province. While gold and other
metals may have dune more to make the province
famous in distant lands, coal has been the most
important of our mineral products, not only in
commercial value but in its service to industrial
and commercial interests and to the comfort and
convenience of the people.
Two generations of the family employed their
energies and business ability in the development of
these resources. Ml*. James Dunsmuir inherited
the qualities which made Robert Dunsmuir the
leading business man of the colony and province.
He, too, applied his capital and energy to the promotion of many enterprises of vital interest to
Vancouver Island and the country,
He did not seek or enjoy public ofiice, but when
called to leadership in a time of stress he accepted
responsibility and gave the province valuable and
honorable service. Mr. Dunsmuir's business ability
and high character were recognized in the business
world by many responsible positions which he
held. He showed in many respects his kindly and
generous spirit, and preserved in all circumstances
and positions the genial and simple manners of his
Scottish ancestors.
ent instance the government's responsibility is all
the more reprehensible inasmuch as it took advantage of the ills of the community to make a 50 per
cent, profit on the medicine it sold.—Colonist.
THE HIGH COST OF SHAVES
The barbers throughout the continent having
caught the high cost of shaving and hair cutting
epidemic, are out after all the loose change in
sight. Fifty-cent shaves and dollar hair cuts are
unknown. We would advise these barber gentlemen to tread softly, else there will be a whole lot
more people get the habit of shaving themselves
says the Toronto Saturday night. Not a difficult
matter in these days of good safety razors. And
once a man has acquired the habit of taking ten
minutes off in the morning, safety razor in hand,
he is not likely to revert back to the tedious, time-
wasting process of a daily visit to a barber. As
for hair cuts one might adopt the Psyche knot, or
cultivate a queue, Chinese old style. Buffalo Bill
was a stunning looking man and never had a hair
cut in his life. Let the barbers beware how they
tread further upon the sensibilities of their cus
tomers' pocket books.
Taking advantage of the slight pause in the
general noise, the Houston Post rises to remark
that, with its splendid onion crop, Texas is the
Lord's best gift to America; and it adds: "And
Texas produces more than any state, better stuff
than any state, and can lick any state." For a
prohibition territory that's going some.
' When fishing off the south of the Island at
Makanduchi recently, a man, by name Hatibu bin
Ali, picked up a bottle containing a message to Mr.
R. N. Manson, 73 Ellesmere Street, South Shields
Durham, England. The letter merely reported all
well on board the steamship War Aconite at 2:30
p.m. on March 27,1919, the bottle being thrown in
the sea when the, ship was 940 miles from Fre-
mantle, Australia, bound for Colombo. The bottle,
which had been nearly a year on its journey to
Zanzibar, had travelled some 4,000 miles, or an
average of 11.8 miles per day.—Zanzibar Gazette.
CLEAN   UP!
The Health Department of the City Council is
anxious that all ashes and other refuse in the city
be cleared away before the hot weather arrives.
There are said to be some places in Cumberland
which closely approach an unsanitary condition.
If this is so those responsible should at once put
their place in order, for unsanitary spots are a
good breeding ground for diseases, in fact most
epidemics have their origin in some such place.
The local authorities intend to take action in
the near future towards insisting that unsanitary
and unsightly conditions be abolished. Citizens
will avoid trouble by attending to these matter
soon.
It is important that this work be attended to for
many reasons. First, there is the question of
health to be considered. The accumulation of dirt,
filth and waste material of various kinds develop
from such accumulations, but flies, the greatest
of all carriers of disease, find their chief breeding
places in filth and rubbish. A general spring
clean-up is one of the best health measures that
can be taken in any home or community.
A general clean-up is important also from the
standpoint of fire protection. Many people who
exercise care in regard to the accumulation of filth
and rubbish which might have an adverse effect
on health, and as the breeding place of insects and
germs of many kinds, neglect to collect and remove
other kinds of rubbish which, all too frequently,
result in serious conflagrations with consequent
loss of valuable property and even more valuable
lives.
"Clean-up" days or weeks have become established institutions in the cities and larger towns,
and the municipal authorities co-operate wtfh the
individual citizen in city-wide and town-wide
house-cleaning. The public health is thereby promoted, a larger measure of security from fire is
provided, and the whole community made much
ne-jter and attractive, leading inevitably to greater
civic pride and to the carrying out (tf other improvements, such as painting, laying out lawns
and gardens, and general home and civic betterment.
Are sermons indispensable? This is one of the
questions which a decision may be taken by the
bishops of the Anglican Church at their- Lambeth
meeting in July. A section of churchrten are declared to hold that if a man has not the gift of
preaching, it would be better for everyone that he
should not preach. The "two sermons each Sunday" custom, they say, imposes a great strain on
the clergy—a strain equally if not more heavily
felt by the laity.
DEEP FAITH IN MEN .
I like a man who has deep faith in men.
Who has abiding trust in each and all,
Who doubts not one, nor hesitates to call
The least and lowliest his brother.   Ten,
Yea, and a hundred, times he pardons, when
Forgetful of their higher selves they fall."
—Frederick Oakes Silvester.
LOWER PRICES COMING
Sun and New York Herald.
The lower loans and deposits do herald an inevitable readjustment of labor and other productive
costs. Lower prices are coming. They can come
through gradual deflation without shock to the
country or real hardship to individuals. In a
money market staggering tinder a mountain
weight of loans deflation paves the way for a
return to conditions where it is possible to earn a
wage on a reasonable basis and make it pay, to
do business on a reasonable basis and make it pay,
to eat, drink and live on a reasonable basis and
make both ertds meet. The worst thing that could
happen to the country would be to go on jacking
up costs and prices until all industry and all business should become frozen stiff. And the best
thing that can happen to fhe country will be for
the gradual resumption of normal costs and normal prices to make it possible for industries to do
business on a paying basis and for individuals to
meet their costs of living on the basis of a dollar
that is worth 100 cents when you get it or when
you spend it.
GOVERNMENTAL PROFITEERING
The Provincial government during the last fiscal
year made a profit of $733,000 through the sale of
alcoholic liquors in the dispensaries it controls
throughout British Columbia. The total sales of
liquor through this source approximated $1,500,-
000 in value. The operating expenses probably
came to less than 350,000. Thus tho government
made a profit of approximately 50 per cent, on its
sales, and it should be noted that such sales were
mainly for medicinal purposes, so that the ills of
the people of the province were lined to this exr
tcnt. The governnient practised profiteering and
to an excessive degree, aifd any government which
does this must expect to be regarded as insincere
when it condemns a similar practice when applied
by others.
It is somewhat amusing to read on the same day
as the government publishes its "prohibition profits" of an attempt to be made by the Minister of
Agriculture to check profiteering in potatoes.
There will be every commendation for what Mr.
Barrow is attempting to do, but it is a case of
"physician heal thyself." i The government was
morally wrong in charging exorbitant prices for
medicinal prescriptions. This was one feature of
prohibition iij which the Legislature should have
intervened and decided what profit, if any, could
be made. The Attorney-General, no doubt, congratulates himself on his astuteness in having
mulcted people of thc Province through the sale of
liquor, but in doing so he was putting his stamp of
approval on a practice which he has, before now,
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS
The Providence Journal.
Could there be a more vivid example of professional honor than that of the French doctor who
continued on his way to the bedside of a seriously
--... sick patient after he had been overtaken with the
condemned in others. A government which pro- news that his son had met with a most distressing
fiteers is every whit as guilty, in a moral sense, as laccident. The pathos of the incident is heightened
a private individual or company which engages in.by the fact that the father learned on his return
that method of accumulating wealth.  In the pres- |tjiat the boy had died in his absence.
WHY GASOLINE GOES UP
Christian Science Monitor.
The decision just reached by the Standard Oil
Company of New York to advance the wholesale
price of gasoline from 28 Vi cents to 39 cents a
gallon deserves a wide prominence. The advance
makes an increase of 22 per cent, since the beginning of the year. The net earnings of the company were $57.52 a share last year, as against,
•538.19 a share the year before; whilst the company's surplus in 1919 was $31,165,109, as against
$19,642,387 in 1918. "The company," says one
account of the matter, "gave no reasons for the
increase." But then such information would
surely have been entirely superfluous. There can
be only one reason for such an advance. It is
summed up in the words, "We can get it."
THEN AND NOW
The Ottawa Journal.
Do you really want the "good old days" when
there were no Pullmans, fast trains, anaesthetics,
telephones, bicycles, automobiles, moving pictures,
self bintlers, hay loaders, cream separators, phonographs, cold storage, plate glass, gas cooking
ranges, incandescent lights, aeroplanes, elevators,
fast ocean liners, X-ray photography, typewriters,
adding machines, cash registers, asphalt, micros-,
copes, telescopes, linotypes, high speed presses and
automatic machines in every branch of endeavor?
Think it over. Have these things not added something to the measure of human happiness?
!
SPECIAL    SHOWING
Misses' and Children's Play Suits and One-Piece Coveralls, in light and
dark blue ehambrays, striped galateas and khaki drills.
Ladies' Summer Undervests, special value at 35c, SOc and 60c each.
Summer Weight Undervests in mercerized lisle and open mesh, at 75c.
Vests and Bloomers to match.
Extra Special Value in Silk and JJsle Vests and Combinations, at $3.00
and $3.50, in white and fleslfcolors.
Ladies' Wash Skirts in duck, pique, Bedford cord and gabardines.   Also
Middies and Smocks, at popular prices.
Special Values in Figured Organdies, Voiles, Small Check and Plaid Ginghams and Galateas.      •
GENT'S DEPARTMENT
MEN'S SUMMER UNDERWEAR
In fine quality Balbriggan, in white and natural, with long sleeve and ankle
length; also short sleeves and knee length, at $1.00 and $1.25 garment.
Special Values in Men's B. V. D. Underwear at $1.50 and $1.75.
CANVAS .SHOES
' White and Brown with leather soles; also White, Tan and Black with
rubber soles.
NEWEST NOVELTIES IN MEN'S TIES,  SPORT SWEATERS.   SILK
CAPS, PANAMA AND BOATER SHAPE STRAW HATS
BOYS' WEAR
Boys' Khaki Knit Bloomers, with Shirt to match, in all sizes.
Boys' Shirts and Blouses in black sateen and striped prints, also white
cambric with striped silk collar and cud's.
Boys' Straw Hats in Panama and Boater shapes.
Boys' and Youths' Sweaters in fine wool jersey, in combination acolors of
cardinal and white; also brown, navy and grey.
SPECIAL VALUES IN BOYS* SCUFFER AND. VACATION SHOES
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
!
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
•     its every feature renders you the* utmost service, is the
>' most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of veteran moorists has proven thai
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
• These things are to be enjoyed equally In a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay June 12, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
if
Music and Photoplays
"BRAVE AND BOLD"
* TONIGHT
Woulii you like to have your breath
almost taken away? Would you like tn
see something tbat will make you forget your daily worries and your business cares? Then go to the llo-Ilo
toinght ami see George Walsh, the
William Pox athletic thunderbolt, in
his new photoplay, "Brave ami fluid."
The story has a mile-a-mi nut*'
action in ii ami a laugh and a thrill
almost every second, it ia woll lilteil
to Walsh's steam-engine way;, i.t Is
adapted from "Four-Forty ai Fort
Penn," by Parley Poore Sbeehan. It
forces George to Lrqvel mighty fast
but ho tlnishcs strong,
He captures a billion dollar war or
der from a foreign priiicy'who has
made an appointment for "Four-Forty
nt Fort Penn," with George. George's
rival tries his best to keep George
from the meeting and it is the obstacles that George overcomes that
makes for actions and thrills. Why he
even carries tlie prince from the hotel
just before the dynamite shatters the
building, and tie lias troubles of his
own keeping his sweetheart from the
power of his rival.
It is what might be called in sonw
localities "A Humdinger."
.Made Name in Baseball.
George Walsh's, the star of "Uohi
and Brave," started his professional
career at second base tor tlie Brooklyn
baseball team. I linens compelled him
to give up a career on the diamond, j
but he always remembered Mike Don-]
lin of the Giants, who gave him the
first opportunity to make a really
sensational play when he was in baseball. It was on a summer afternoon
at Ebbett's field ami Walsh was playing second base. The Giants were up
and Donlin hit out a liner that was
going with the velocity of a French 75.
Walsh made a remarkable one-handed
stop aud his play saved tlie day for
Brooklyn. Now that Walsh is a star
of the first magnitude in the moving
picture business, he has Donlin iu his
company and the famous .Mike is
demonstrating that he can make good
in other lines, than baseball.
"Brave and Bold" is as full of action as a cat with all four feet on flypaper, and will be shown at the 1,1o-IIo
this evening only.
Instead of going through tedious
and expensive lawsuits to set right
the swindle, Johnny determines- that
the good old Western way Is the shortest, cheapest and most convenient
method of saving Adele's fortune. He
finds Brysou smoking by the edge of
the lake on the Long Island estate,
ami confronts him with the telegram.
Hryson sneers and defies Johnny to
prove thnt It is a forgery. Johnny
says: "Come through with that-stock."
Bryson says: "Try and get It." "Sure,1
says Johnny, and throws him into the
lake. Johnny then gets hold of an
oar aud each time tbe promoter tries
limb out the cowpuncher gives him
another ducking. "I can't swim."
splutters Bryson. "Neither can I,"
chortles Johnny. He rolls a cigarette
and, Keeps sousing Bryson in the
water until the promoter Is thoroughly
exhausted. Then he pulls him Jo the
edge, hands him a paper and fountain
pen ami says: "Write what I tell you."
Hryson refuses, whereupon Johnny
gives him a final and thorough ducking. Eventually the promoter signs
a complete confession. Then Johnny
hauls him out, takes him by the nape
of the neck and the seat of the pants
ami walks him into the drawing room.
You can well imagine how delighted
the host and hostess and the other
guests nre.
Johnny runs Bryson . through the
house and out to his motor car, throws
him into the car and says to the
chauffeur; "Tomorrow is Friday, here
is a fish." And that is the last of
Brysou.
*   *   *
MUSIC FOR AMATEURS
Considered from one point of view,
music exists for the amateurs, for men
and women who love it, and find in it
inspiration and comfort in daily life,
or solace In affliction. From the practical point of view, to despise him is
to commit the folly of quarrelling with
one's oread and butter. By the lover
of music Is meant, of course, not the
person who prefers a royalty ballad
THE MONTH OF KOSES
Of .all the. mouths uLtho year, June
Is noted as tlie time of roses, aud to
fit the season many famous singers
have given timely selections for the
benefit of Edison phonograph owners.
The Now June Edison Disc Supplement
has a song on its list, "Love's Garden
of Roses." rendered by Cyreua Van
Gordon, whose rich contralto voice is
rapidly winning a vaal audience? Another "rose number" is by Leolo
Lucey. a favorite soprana. Her song
is called "Hoses of .Memory," aud is
a musical treat. Then there is Carolina Lagzari, the Metropolitan Opera
star, who gives "When the Koses
Bloom," a lovely classic of the simple,
appealing variety. She is also listed
to sing "Mighty Lak' a l*se," that
ever popular Xovin song; anil "Gallic,"
the happy, whimsical melody by John
Mokrejs.
Vernon Archibald anil Lewis James
are down on the list lor "Leaf by Leaf
the Roses Fall," a baritone-tenor duct
tbat ought to attract lovers of melody.
To complete the "musical roses,"
the All Star Trio renders "Just Like
a Rose," a fox trot in which the saxophone, xylophone and piano vie with
one another,to make you dance.
*    a    *
"OH JOHNNY!"
MONDAY.
"Oh Johnny!" in which Louis Beu-
nison makes his screen debut and
which will be seen here at the Ilo-llo
on Monday evening, might also be
called "Tiie Adventures of a Cow-
puncher in a l.ong bland Country
House." It is essonttally a comedy
and not to be confounded with thc
Western melodrama type of entertainment.
One of the.humorous and unusual
episodes occurs when Johnny Burke
undertakes to get back the shares of
stock in the Lost ('.imp mine that his
little ward has been swindled out of
by John Bryson, a stork promoter.
Bryson has obtained possession of
the shares, with the connivance of
Adele's snobbish and impoverished
relatives by dint of forging a telegram
from Johnny Burke himself to Adelc
which purported to state that the mine
had petered out and that she hud better sell.
Johnny recognizes in Bryson the
dishonest promoter who had attempted while on a trip out West to get
possession of tho mine. The breezy
Westerner asks Adele what Bryson is
doing at her party. Adele answers:
"Why, he is the .man who bought my
stock at the time you wired me."
Johnny la nonplussed and says: "What
wire?" Adele shows him the forged,
telegram. |
to the B Minor .Mass, but the person of
culture with a refiined taste. With
regard to the other class, It would be
better to try to Improve his taste than
to cast him forth Into the outer darkness without more ado.
From the higher point of view the
contempt of the amateur ls a deplorable exhibition of intellectual arrog-
nnce. Let some of the straiter sects of
musicians ask themselves whether the
opinion of the amateur is, save on
purely technical" things, always necessarily worthless.
*   *   *
"FIGHTING CRESSY"
WED>ESPA1'
A Brete Hai'le Tale of Feudal
Romance of the West
"Fighting Cressy," Blanche Sweet's
newest Jesse D. Hampton-Pathe production, which comes to the Ilo-llo on
Wednesday next, is an adaptation of
Ilret Harte's virile story, "Cressy." It
is a tale of the pioneer days of the
West where men and women lived according to their own code of morals.
Its chief character is Cressy, the"
daughter of Hiram McKlnstry, who
had migrated from Kentucky In search
for gold. McKlnstry Is engaged in a
feud with Old Man Harrison over a
boundary line.
Cressy, being the prettiest girl in
the community, attracts the attention
of John Ford, the school master, but
she does not respond to his attentions,
as she lias fallen in love with Joe
Masters, a cousin of the Harrisons.
This perplexed young man, however,
finds his love-making greatly handicapped by Cressy's hatred for the Harrisons and her extreme family pride.
\ McKlnstry speak to a Harrison when
they're '•feudlu'?"   Never!
A time conies when the feud reaches
the danger point and Joe is shot by
one of the McKlnstry men. Cressy
hides him In the barn and successfully
holds it until her father arrives. Then
follow some Interesting developments
in this splendid romance of the west.
*   .   *    '
PROMOTES GOODWILL
Musicians, music teachers and music
dealers have one gjeat interest in
common—the sprend of the use and
Influence of music in their community
und Ihe raising of its Importance In tlie
eyes of tho people. In promoting this
mutual aim they wlll promote In the
most effective manner their Individual
elms and their personal prosperity and
satlsfacion.
The dealer represents music on the
material side, and propagation side,
while the musician represents the finished product, and the means of public entertainment. Public Interest in
music is the llfeblood of all three.
Without public Interest, also, there
would not be public support, the prerequisite for high artistic development. Greater interest in music ln
general leads to more numerous calls
lor the services of tbe musician.   Tlle
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Continuous Show, 7 to 10
Saturday, June 12th
GEORGE WALSH
IN
Monday, June 14th
Louis Bennison
— IN —
"Brave and Bold"
Wednesday, June 16th
Blanche Sweet
"OH,   JOHNNY!"
Thursday, & Friday, June 17 & 18
— IN —
"Fighting  Cressy"
Coming June 19th—A New Serial
rags
Jack Dempsey
— IN —
"Daredevil Jack"
15  Episodes of Breathless Interest
PAULINE
FREDERICK
— IN —
The Loves of Letty*
Wednesday June 9th
FIFTH EPISODE OF
"The Terror of the
Range"
Thrills, Punches, Stunts in Every
Episode
EVERY   NIGHT
During the Month of June
growing familiarity with music which
people are getting through phonographs and player-pianos at home, In
which, of course, the dealer plays no
little pa,rt, gives rise to a keener desire
to hear the musician in the flesh. And
increasing attention to music and the
realization of the larger part it plays
lu the life of the Canadian people,
leads to a desire on the part of tlie
parents, to prepare their children to
take their share In this development
and thus there are more pupils for the
music teacher.
•    a    .
PAULINE FREDERICK
— IN —
"THE LOVES OF LETTY"
Till HSIUY AMI FRIDAY
One of t|*f greatest of all motion-
picture stars, Pauline Frederick, appears at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Thursday and Friday In the picture
which has been such a tremendous
success, "The Loves of Letty," a
Goldwyn production, written by Sir
Arthur Wing Plneo and directed by
Frank Lloyd. It ls a crowded hour of
real life, a story of men and women
met every day.
Are there any clrcumstancos under
which a woman is Justified In marrying
a mah she does not love? To Letty.
Fate has denied the luxuries and fineries that every woman craves. Then
came a proposal from a rich man, a
loathesome barbarian, and with It a
promise to surround her with everything money could buy. She loved another man, a penniless young artist.
Hut tho long grim struggle against
poverty had fanned her love for luxury and good times into an all consuming flame and she chose the rich
man. What followed was a revelation
to Letty as It will be to you when you
sec the screen's most brilliant emotional actress iu "Tlie Loves of Letty."
There nre some motion pictures so
strongly typed as to appeal only to
certain and limited classes of audiences. The same is true of many stars.
The true stamp of a well-rounded picture Is Its ability to exert a
universal appeal an appeal that
brings response from people of all
ages, tastes and fancies. Such a picture is Paulino Frederick's "The Loves
of Letty." Well rounded In every detail, logically constructed, rich In
variety of settings, and telling a
human story, "Tlie Loves of Letty"
is the kind of picture that present-day
audiences find to their liking.
.   .   .
THE CELLO
Thirty years ago cello playing was
not Included among thc accomplishments supposed to he siiitahlo for cultivated youfig women. Today the girl
cellist is everywhere accepted In the
world of music. The change is owing
partly to the Increasing popularity of
the cello and partly to the recent
growth lu ensemble playing.
That the cello is essential to thc orchestra Is proved hy its history. The
tendency of the violins to "outcry"
the rest of thc instruments In ensemble
playing was a source of trouble to the
early composers. The use of the
basses to prevent It proved unsatisfactory. So. in the seventeenth century the Italian instrument makers,
using as guides both thc violin and
the viola de ganilia-an old form of
the violin cello- gradually perfected
the form of the viollnccllo. »
Stradivarliis of Cremona, the famous maker of violins, established a
standard for size, and the cello was
made with a compass of the range of
the speaking voice, which, in orehes-
trui playing, was found greatly to enhance thi' musical quality and power
of the violin. It remained, however,
for I lay rin and Mozart to bring the
cello into prominence through their
compositions. Prom a position of subordination in the orchestra tho raised
it to an essential aud conspicuous
place. Beethoven, too, not only in his
orchestral work, but also in his trios
nd quartettes, greatly emphasized
tbo Importance of tbe cello.
If the growth of orchestral playing
iad been less rapid, and if orchestras
had not suddenly found themselves iu
need of more cellists, the girl cel-
Ists might not!* perhaps, have the opportunities (hat she has today.
IiiBtrumcnt makers have adapted
tbe instrument to her use. They have
umde  the neck of the cello smaller
and reduced the size of the Instrument
itself. Teachers, Joo, have modified
their definitions of correct positions
to adjust them to the peculiar ne ds of
a girl student.
•   *   •
JACK DEMPSEY IN
"DAREDEVIL JACK"
One of the Greatest and Most
Thrilling Serials Ever Filmed
Commencing next Saturday at the
llo-Ilo Theatre, Jack Dempsey, one nf
the best known men In tho world, will
appear In the I'nthc serial "Darodevll
Jack." an electric action play, full of
adventure.
It Is said to contain the most thrilling momenta ever put into a serial.
It portrays red-blooded manhood aud
nimble wits triumph over ever-present
evil.
Desplto the fact that the star, Jack
Hcmpsey, Is thc American champion
heavyweight pugilist. "Daredevil Jack"
is In no way a prize-fight picture nor a
picture with pugilistic ability as its
reason for existence. It is ft vjrlle,
red-blooded. American story of adventure In Ihe groat outdoors, and Its hern
Is an American college boy, athletic,
fearless and a physical giant.
ISEFll, HINT
Don't write on the fly-loaf o| the
glfthook, but on an Inserted card. This
wlll enable thc recipient to delight
somebody with It some other lime! Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 12, 1920.
THE ISLANDER
Boxing Football
Athletics
PAGE OF SPORT
SIDNEY FAILS TO HANG
UP A SECOND VICTORY
Peninsula Boys Shown  a  Few-
Tricks by World's Champions in Second Ciame
By a score of 7 to 2, Victoria showed
the Sidney lacrosse players, how to
play tlie game at Victoria on Saturday
last. The Sidney team had gone to
the capital city with a great reputation, having trimmed the champions
the previous week by a le to 2 victory, and It Is said the people on the
northern end of the peninsula began
to plan for the erection of a new town
hall In which to place tbe Mann Cup.
But after seeing the two teams in action again there is not much chance of
the silverware shifting Its anchorage,
for the present at any rate.
Victoria (lets Karl} Lead.
The suburbanites took the field with
a world of confidence. The champions
did not know exactly what to expect,
for when one runs into a gang who are
flying with their tall up, there is no
telling what might happen. Lester
Patrick advised his captain, John
Johnson, to get the Jump on the visitors, If possible. John tipped off the
home and before the game had gone
five minutes the ball was reposing in
Sidney's net. Joe Painter put it there.
He took a pass from Angle Mclnnes.
The champions* continued to press.
They  clearly outclassed   the   Sidney
boys. Painter got bis second counter
im :i pass from Alexander and Allie
McGregor beat Purdy with a close In
shot.
Sidney Steadies Down.
Sidney's defence steadied down in
the Becond period and kept the fast-
travelling home of tbe Capitals well
in check. Neither team scored In this
period. In the third period the fanners
came back strongly. Tbey buzzed
around the Victoria net like a bunch of
bees around a honeycomb. Sid Hum-
ber shot in Sidney's first goal and had
it not been for the brilliant work of
Johnson, In goal, the visitors might
hav collected a few other goals.
Champions Speed Up!
In the fourth quarter the champions
showed a little of the speed and stick-
handling which they arc capable of.
Tbe home, assisted by several fast
rushes by the defence men, swept In on
the Sidney net and Purdy lost track of
tbe elusive ball. After .Norton bad
slipped the ball past Boss Johnson
for the farmers' last count, Joe Painter sent in a long shot that beat Purdy.'
In tho melee in front of Sidney's net,
the ball, Purdy and a couple of other
players were thrown into the net for
a score. Painter got his fourth goal
of the game immediately afterwards
and Alexander slipped in a back-hand
shot for the last score.
lNTEK-UTY LEAGUE STANltlNUS
P.   W.   L.  D. Pts.
Nanaimo    4     4     U     0     S
Cumberland       3     1113
Rangers    3     1113
Celtics    .*.    4     0     4     0     0
CELTICS I'l.AV IIKHK TODAY.
Today the Vancouver Celtics are due
here, and from latest lu formation are
bringing a greatly strengthened team.
The game is scheduled to start at 5.30,
so be on hand, all you football fans,
and root for the boys.
Please Take Notice
Owing to the fact that all supplies must be paid for
cash on delivery, through credit operations being curtailed by the wholesalers, it has become absolutely
essential that all business be transacted on a
STRICTLY   CASH BASIS
Cumberland Motor Works
J. H. CAMERON, Proprietor. Cumberland, B.C.
Illllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllliiililllliiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Fred's and Joe's Place
CUMBERLAND
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
THE ATHLETIC AND SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS IN TIIE
CUMBERLAND     DISTRICT.
WAVERLEY   HOTEL
The House in' Quality.
Phone 69. Cumberland, B.C.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIl
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
CaSCade Beer   Tho Beer Without a Peer
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
STRENUOUS GAME ENDS
IN A 2 GOAL DRAW
The soccer match played on the "Y" Grounds on Saturday last
between the Vancouver Rangers and the Cumberland United produced some excellent football. A fairly good crowd turned out to
cheer the local boys to victory, but all their cheers were'of little
avail, as the game ended in a draw of two goals each. As the
score indicates, the game was very evenly fought, with the Vancouver team having the best of the opening stages, and Cumberland, after drawing level, having a slight edge on the play in the
closing period.
The teams lined up as follows: Cumberland—Goal, Clark; backs,
Smith and Wilkinson; half-backs, Brown, Jackson, Sullivan; forwards, Bannerman, Brown, James, Boothman, Harrison. Vancouver—Goal, Tapps; backs, Reid and J. Brown; half-backs, Robertson, Donaldson, Horn; forwards, Newberry, Wilson, Robertson,
Gregg and W. Brown.
The Lineup of the Opposing Teams.
The kick-oil was delayed some fifteen minutes for some unaccountable reason. Cumberland won the toss, but there was very
little advantage in that. Robertson started the game going and
immediately got his left wing working very nicely, but Smith was
safe as a bank and soon had the game transferred to the other end.
Midfleld play continued for some ten minutes, with the Rangers
having a little the better of the- exchanges. Brown and Gregg, on
the Rangers' left, put in some nice work, Brown testing Clark with
a lovely shot that had lots of "stuff" behind it. Clark made a
brilliant save, but the opposing forwards were not to be denied,
and were soon around Clark again, who had a most anxious time.
Sullivan, who was playing a great game, relieved the situation,
and got his wing moving in fine style. Boothman, by a nice piece
of work, put Harrison in possession, and he centred perfectly, but
Donaldson, centre half of the Mainland team, was "Johnny-on-
the-spot," and he soon had his forwards moving towards Clark.
J. Brown, the visitors' outside left, made a lovely run down the
wing, and drawing the half-back to him, he placed nicely to Gregg,
who just "walked" around Smith and beat Clark with a lovely shot,
the goalkeeper having no chance to save.
This reverse did not appear to put
any life into the local team at all. and
for the next ten minutes it was give
and take play, half time arriving with
the score at 1 to 0 In favor of Vancouver.
Brilliant Play in Second Half.
Rangers started tbe second half with
only ten men, owing to the fact that
Robertson, their right half, had
sprained his ankle towards the finish
of tbe first period.
Cumberland at once made tracks for
goal, and tbe way they swarmed
around Tapps certainly looked as
though tbey meant business. However,
ihe defence of the Rangers was steady
and soon had their own forwards going again, though Wilkinson was as
quick in returning.
Cumberland's right wing now got
going again, and Bannerman, who had
been playing a very fine game, centred accurately, but James was away
too slow. Cumberland again made
play on the right, and Batierman
swung straight across to the left, Sullivan recrossing, only to see his centre
handled by Andy Horn inside the
penalty   area,   Boothman   taking   the
kick, and had no difficulty in beating
Tapps.
This appeared to put new life Into
tlie Rangers, and Joe Brown on tbe
left, showing a clean pair of heels to
Brown and Smith, sent in a lovely centre, Newberry having no difficulty in
beating Clark. The Cumberland team
now started playing iu real style, and
after repeated efforts on the part of
the forwards it was left to Harrison to
score the equalizing goal.
Cumberland Played Fine—Too Lute.
For tbe last fifteen minutes of the
game there was only one team in it—
and that was not the Rangers. Still,
with only ten men, they put up a wonderful game and had not Andy Horn
given away a penalty, when there was
absolutely no need for it, Cumberland
would certainly have been on tbe short
end.
For the home team, Clark in goal,
Wilkinson at left back, and the three
half-backs, played excellent football,
whilst Bannerman was the pick of the
forwards, receiving good support from
Boothman. For the visitors, Tapps in
goal was in excellent form, Donaldson
at centre half and Gregg at inside left,
being the pick of the team.
DAVE BROWN AND WEEKS
SIGN ARTICLES FOR MATCH
Money Posted for $250 Side Bet.
Best Two Out of Three ih
Catch-as-catch-can.
Articles were signed Saturday and
the stakes posted, for the wrestling
match between Dave Brown and
Thomas Weeks, wliieh will take place
as the result of the challenge recently
thrown out by the former, in Nanaimo
on Saturday, June 20.
Under the terms of tbe articles, tlie
match is to be under Police Gazette
rules, eiitch-tis-cntch can, tlie best two
falls out of three, at catch weights
for a side bet of $2r»ll each, the winner
lo take all. The money was posted
with Mr. R. R. Hlntlmarsh. manager of
the Nanaimo Herald, Saturday night,
immediately upon the signing of the
articles, so that all Is now in trim for
tbe event, which promises to be one of
the most Interesting in the history of
the sport in Nanaimo.
Since neither of the two principals
is desirous of making money out of
what after all is a straight sporting
contest. It lias been decided that the
entire gate receipts shall be devoted to
tbe new hospital building fund.
Tlie choice of a referee will be left
until the evening of the match, after
tlie principals have entered the ring.
NANAIMO GETS AWAY
WITH ANOTHER GAME
Island Team Has Now Won Four
Straight Games, Giving it a
Big Lead Over Rivals
After leading Nanaimo by a l-o
score for the lirst half ot* tbo game at
Cambie Street on Saturday afternoon,
the Celtic defence crumbled and tbe
coal city men turned iu their fourth
straight win of the Inter-City Soccer
League series,-2 goals to 1. In spite
of tlie threatening weather a good
crowd witnessed tbe match. Tbe showing of tlie Celtics was a pleasant surprise to their many supporters. Not
until the second half did tbo Nanaimo
men play anything like their usual
game.      The teams:
Celtics—Carney, Hell, Rennle, Dry-
borough, Lee. Carle, Adrian. Itrad-
shaw, Grant, Keiupton and Pow.
Nanaimo—Routledge, Lynn, Chester, Davis, Strang, Strange, O'Brien,
McMillan, Allerton, Dickinson and R.
Husband.
NEW WESTMINSTER
DEFEATS VANCOUVER
Toor stick work on the part ot the
Vancouver home team Is said to be
responsible for the Terminals going
down to defeat before New Westminster Salnumbellles at Queen's Park on
Saturday. The final score was 7 to 3.
Tlie game was not so fast as the Empire Day game, ground conditions being one ol* the chief factors In that respect. The field was slippery and the
uncertain going slowed up the play.
SOLD WINNING DERBY
TICKET FOR ONE POUND
The man who held the $25,000 winning ticket in the Stock Exchange
sweepstakes on the Derby, sold It Just
prior to tlie race for $5, it Is learned.
The unltickiest man is H. A. Clark, an
exchange member. Clark bought live
tickets and then decided to sell three.
One of the three wns on Splon Kop,
the winning horse.
CARPENTIER TELLS OF
FRANCE'S LOVE FOR CANADA
In response to the toast of Georges
Carpentier at the Sportsmen's Patriotic Association luncheon at Toronto,
the noted Frenchman said, in part:
"It would be happy for me to be able
to speak in English the feelings which
I desire to express to all of you on
behalf of my wife and myself. But I
do not yet know your language well
enough, and I have to' say It In
French."( Cries of "En Francais" and
"Vive la France.")    '
"Thank you. I am sure you know
us well enough"—(smiling)—"to realize that our sentiment is very strong
toward our dear friends—no, I should
say our very dear and good friends,
the Canadians. I would like to be
able, In the language which you speak
and understand, to tell you of this sentiment of France to the boys from
Canada -your brave boys — whose
heroism during the cruel war made
them so beloved by the people of
France.
STRENUOUS BASEBALL
GAME AT COURTENAY
Contest Runs Into Fifteen Innings and Then Ends in a
Draw, 3 Runs Each
In the match played at Courtenay
on Sunday afternoon last, between
a team from Granby and the Courtenay boys, the game went into fifteen
innings, and then ended in a draw.
The contest, which was very strenuous, was witnessed by a goodly crowd
of spectators, many going from Cumberland for the event.
"You are good enough-^with your
good Canadian hearts—to welcome us,
to do us honor, when we come to your
country. But in our country, lu days
that sometimes seemed dark, In the
time of service, one Frenchman at
least was inspired towards the clouds
and in the clouds by the wonderful exploits of the Canadians. During some
of the time we were in Belgium I was
stationed very near the Canadians, and
know of the heroic exploits of the
brave Bishop and the brave Barker,
whose feats ln the air did so much to
bring about the downfall of the Boche.
"We will never forget. France will
never forget. All of France remembers, and all of France appreciates
What your Canadian soldiers did lu
coming to tlie rescue of our beloved
country. My words cannot tell tlie
thoughts and feelings 1 would* like to
express. For my wife nnd myself, we
thank you and assure you of our Joy
to be lu Canada, for all France loves
Canada,"
SUNDAY BASEBALL
GAME POSTPONED
Owing to the heavy rain on Sunday
last the Powell River baseball team
did not come across the channel.
Local baseball fans were deeply disappointed at the turn of the weather, bul
are looking forward to a cracker-jack
game tomorrow.
Automobiles
'    That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,-
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry tho following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize   in   REPUBLIC' TRUCKS  and
' TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
SILVER
American engineers will soon start
laying the lirst oil pipe line in France
from Havre to Paris.
SHAMROCK LOSES HER
GAFF IN SAIL TEST
America's Cup challenger, Shamrock IV., carried away her gaff Sunday
while undergoing a sail testing on*
Hempstead Harbor, Long Island. The
yacht went to City Island for repairs.
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of adhiance long deferred, but
the source of sure aud real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
■M •     June 12, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Up-to-Date Furniture
is what we carry in stock. We have just received a
complete assortment to furnish an entire apartment.
Every room can be furnished with the latest up-to-date
FURNITURE
at extraordinary low prices.
If you are not prepared to buy just now, we invite
you to call and examine our stock so that you will know
just what we have when you are in need of buying just
that article.
P. 0. Box 27!)
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
und
Workmanship
Guaranteed
Rubber Heels
Fixed While U Walt
S. DAVIS   -   Dunsmuir Avenue
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 5-1172
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
THE PRIZE LISTS
for the
COMOX AGRICULTURAL and
INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL
FALL  FAIR
are now ready tor distribution and
mny be obtained from the Secretary,
Mrs. 0. J. Hardy, Courtenay.
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and   Pay
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIALS —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
- Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
•Have you tried our {Pickled  Pork
and Corned Beef ?    It tdelicious.
Each Thursday morning from now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
SECTION «I".
VOCATIONAL   LOANS.
Regulations Re I.nnns to Vocational
Itc-Trnlning Graduates Starting In
Business—Authority: Order-ln-Oun-
cil Para, (A) V. (I. 2329.
(1) Applications for loans not exceeding $500.00 free of Interest, for five
years, for the purchase of tools and
equipment will be dealt with under the
following provisions:
(a) Loans will only be made to those
men who have satisfactorily completed
a re-trainlng course with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, aud wish to start In business ln
line with the training they have received, and who are unable to do so
without such assistance.
(b) Loans may only be made for the
actual purchase by the Department of
Tools and Equipment necessary to
establish such men • in business for
themselves, or in partnership with
some other person.
(c) Applications for loan must be
made within four months from January 1st, 1920, or two months from date
of completion vof re-trainlng course,
whichever Is the later.
(d) All applications for loans will
be forwarded to the Director of Vocational Training, marked for the attention of "Loans Officer."
(e) Men who have already received
loans from, the Soldier Settlement
will not be eligible for loan under P.C.
2329.
(f) Under no circumstances will
cash loans be made.
Under Sub-Section "B".
Those with a disability due to or
aggravated by War Service and whose
pre-war training or education has been
interrupted by War Service and who
are in need of assistance for the fur-
pose of continuing such training or
education thus Interrupted," may get
further Information upon application
to tho Loans Branch, Dept. S.C.R.,
Central Building, Victoria, B.C.
W. C. WINKBL,
 A.D.V.C-.
NOTICE re TAXES
LAST MONTH OF REBATE
TAKE NOTICE that tho Rebate on
Taxes expires end of this month.
Taxes are payable to City Clerk or
Chief of Police.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF     •
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
License No. .8-25489
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
ASSERTS GOVERNMENT
IS LOSING ITS GRIP
Mr. W. J. Bowser, K.C.,' Conservative Leader, gave a very interesting address before the Victoria Conservative Association last
week, nearly 200 members being present, many being unable to
gain admittance. Mr. Bowser was in excellent form and was
accorded an enthusiastic reception. His speech was more in the
nature of a frank, heart-to-heart-talk on the present position and
future prospects of the party in the Province. He expressed his
confidence that when the present Liberal adiministration goes to
the country it will meet defeat. At the same time he cautioned
Conservatives to spare no effort in consolidating their ranks,
asserting that in the compilation of the new voters' list now under
way, lay victory if every Conservative is placed upon the list.
Drifting Spirit of Government.
Referring to the decision of the government to close the lists on July \h
next, Mr. Bowser asserted that In this
connection the government was showing the same spirit of drifting us It has
in Its administrative efforts. Already
six weeks had boon allowed to slip by
since the end of the session before
the electors were given opportunity to
register, and now tho government suddenly awakened to the fact that the
time ls slipping by and the electors
were to be rushed, ln the outlying
sections hjuch as the Peace River, At-
lin, Fort Oeorge and other widely*
scattered sections, the six weeks being
allowed would not be sufficient, he
felt. Undoubtedly electors ln those
ridings would lind themselves disenfranchised unless further time were
granted.
Election .'lay Be Soon.
Mr. Bowser referred to the enthusiasm everwhere displayed by the Conservatives in offering their services
as election commissioners to expedite
the work of preparing the list; and he
pointed to the "restless spirit" displayed by members of the government
in rushing around the country making
speeches as indicative that, perhaps, a
general election would be forthcoming
earlier than most expected, and declared that In point of energy and
enthusiasm, the Conservatives of the
Province are excelling the government
supporters, a good omen, he felt, especially in view of the fact that the
government has funds at its disposal,
while the Opposition forces are without them.
History Repeating lteslf.
The present spectacle of the administration, with Its head floundering
amid lawsuits, harrassed by disloyalty
of followers and quite evidently becoming more and more disorganized
Injts ranks, Mr. Bowser asserted, history was repeating itself. Thc Premier
was finding himself in much the same
position ns he (Mr. Bowser) found
himself in 1916.
"While I did not like It then, I must
confess I like it now," said Mr. Bowser, amid laughter and applause. "In
1916 It came from every quarter. We
had to take it. We got It. Today the
position is reversed. Ily friend, the
Premier, is learning what It Is to have
the sentiment of an entire Province
turn against him. From every quarter
comes evidence the government is
slipping. The psychological momont
ls arriving. The record of the administration with its enormously Increased
overhead cost, a salary list between
three and four millions, millions spent
on land settlement schemes which got
no results, millions more to be borrowed with no definite programme to
follow in the interests of tho Province,
a government lacking initiative aud
apparently marking time, wondering
what will happen next, all these factors are recognized and appreciated
by the electors," Mr. Bowser believed.
People Interested.
He pointed to the Invitations he
had received from organizations In the
far distant Peace River section, that
when he made his forthcoming trip to
that section he should address them,
not of any merit In himself, but of the
fact that the people want to hear of
the real facts of the situation, that tbey
are disgusted with the present administration. He believed thc great independent vote, that element who think
for themselves, would be found with
tho Opposition at the next election;
the returned soldiers, be was convinced, would bo found supporting the
Conservative cause.. The present administration had shown Its Inability to
give an economical and businesslike
administration. That fact had been
undoubtedly impressed upon the minds
of the electors.
Financial Situation Insutlsfuctorj.
The financial administration of
British Columbia under the present
regime, Mr. Bowser declared, had been
So Inefficient and the results so startling that a research body In Toronto
had considered it necessary to go Into
the whole situation and to Issue a
pamphlet setting forth the tacts, not
alone to worn British Columbians, but
the people In the East. That organza-
tiou's findings but bore out tlie claims
made by the Opposition party In thc
Legislature.
Mr. Bowser referred to his recent
trip East, in tho course of which he
became convinced that financiers there
are closely studying the financial dealings of the British Columbia government. It was clear there would be no
money forthcoming unless, perhaps,
the funds were secured from New Vork
concerns at excessive rates, plus thc
exchange. The extravagance of the
Oliver government, its unlimited borrowings, and Its legislation providing,
at the last session alone, for additional
borrowing aggregating over ?18,000,-
000, had set the Easterners thinking.
Not that the latter underestimated
British Columbia's great natural resources, of which they are fully cognizant, but tlie reckless policies of Its
administration and its legislation pre-
judlclously affecting investment here,
has aroused serious misgivings, Mr.
Bowser averred.
Look to British Columbia.
Mr. BowoBr tiealt briefly with tho
political situation ln the East. The
Conservatives are looking to British
Columbia as the "white hope" In the
Conservative cause. That spirit manifested everywhere in the Province thc
belief In victory at the next elections,
had spread to ihe East, he said. It
was a happy augury of what the future
would bring forth in British Columbia
in a political way.
The Conservative leader referred to
the fact that so far as Victoria is concerned, the Oliver government has
done nothing for it but adopt the
policies of the former administration.
For Instance, In the case of the Johnson Street bridge. He touched upon
the land settlement plans of the administration, pointing to the fact that
at the end of the present month tho
clearing work at tho Courtenay soldier settlement scheme would cense
and the men lose their wages, while at
the same time the government was not
iu a position to give the men title to
their holdings tor the simple reason
that the Federal board would refuse
to loan on the valuation the Province
would set upon the lands, the cost of
the work so far having been excessive.
The result would be that the men. unable to borrow from the Dominion to
the amount necessary to meet the demands of the Province, would he without their homes. As he had suggested
before, there appeared to be but one
outcome—the government would have
to share this cost, charging up the excessive 'outlays to inefficient administration. The people would have to
bear the burden of the government's
ill-thought-out and Ill-executed land
policy for the soldiers, he said.
FAN THOSE TEARS
THAT WOMEN FEAR
Turn on the Electric Fan When
Peeling or Slicing Onions
In Kitchen.
The electric fan is no longer merely
a hot weather convenience. The up-
to-date dealer recommends It for various uses during the entire year. But
did you ever think of the fan In relation to the lowly hut obstreperous
onion? Preparing onions for the tabic
is a ticklish operation, as anyone who
has ever tried It knows. Tradition,
says that the way to do It is "under
water." This method, however, merely
relieves the eyes, Instead of removing
the cause of the. irritation. But by
turning tbe fan on the onions and
blowing the fumes away onions can
be made as harmless as potatoes or
apples. Housewives will appreciate
this suggestion,
NEW ZEALAND BANKS
HAVE MORE MONEY
THAN EVER BEFORE
New Zealand banks have more
money In their vaults than ever before
by eighteen million pounds, snys Mr.
Hope Gibbons, a prominent business
man of the southern dominion, In Vancouver a few days ago.
The Increased deposits nre a resuli
of tbe high prices whleii all prbducers
received during the war. At the
present time, addctl Mr. Gibbons, there
aro six million carcases nf mutton in
tbe freezing works awaiting ships to
carry them to foreign markets.
New ZenlanderH are well satisfied
with their war transactions with the
British Government for wool and dairy
produce, says Mr. Oibbqps,
Peat bogs In Eastern Canada eon
tain, the equivalent of 5,IOn,noo tons of
good coal,
Seven      C   \
A Good Opportunity to
Save   Money   on  Tea
Special Price
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY ON
Great West Teas
Red Label, 65c. per lb.
Green    ,,     75c.    ,,
Blue     ,,    90c.    ,,
OBTAINABLE ONLY AT
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
ALCOHOL AND GASOLINE
Advancing Price of Gasoline Increases Iuterest in Manufacture of Alcohol
In Great Britain, as lu Canada, efforts are being made to Interest the
authorities ln cheaper alcohol as a
necessity for industrial development
and as a substitute for gasoline In the
operation of stationary, marine and
automobile engines. When the Internal combustion engine came Into practical use as tbo power for motor boats
and automobiles, gasoline—aud of a
far better quality tiian can now be
secured—was practically a waste product. Todny tho demand for gasoline
exceeds the supply, and a world famine
is a certainty of the future unless new
sources of. supply are discovered or
use made of the substitute, nenatured
alcohol, which can everywhere be secured.
Two Companies -Dominate.
With the world's gasoline supply in
two great roncerns, the Standard Oil
and Royal Dutch Shell, it is possible
that prices are somewhat higher than
would obtain were tho distribution
through many small companies. That
Is a point on which there may be differences of opinion, but there can be
no disputing the fact that the rising
price of gasoline Is today a factor, a
very important factor, lu the advancing cost of living. Few men, perhaps,
place in their true relation the Influence of the commercial motor traffic
everywhere In evidence on the price of
the bread, the fish, the meats we eat,
the clothes we wear; but there is a
close relationship.  As gasoline prices
advance that advance muBt be reflected ln all the affairs of our dally
life.
Substitute for Gasoline Essential.
The use of the motor engine for
business, for pleasure, steadily grows,
and the climbing prices of gasoline
makes attention to the problem of a
substitute fuel a matter of practically
universal concern. Alcohol is the natural substitute, hut the production
of coiiinierci,il alcohol Is complicated
In Great Britain, ns In Canada, by
governmental regulations, which so
restrict production and increase prices
that tlie commodity Is practically beyond the reach for many manufacturing purposes as well as for use as a
substitute power. As a consequence
Canadian manufacturers find themselves at a disadvantage in competition
with American manufacturers, who
more easily secure this very important
and very necessary article of commerce.
Tho advancing price of gasoline, and'
the increasing demand for Industrial
alcohol, make practically certain the
inauguration within a comparatively '
short time, of new regulations for the
manufacture and sale of this very
necessary article of commerce.
TO THE POINT
"Fixing your car?" asked the passerby as a grimy man crawled out from
under an automobile.
"No," responded the grimy one with
a withering look, "merely dabbling in
oil."
The Standard Oil Company of New
Jersey had foreign sales ot approximately $250,000,000 last year.
ft************-****^^
HAVE YOU A
Fountain Pen?
A DANDY NEW ASSORTMENT
JUST  ARRIVED
Kodaks-
Stationery
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Phone 23.
CUMBERLAND.
W***************^
'
STAR   UVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C. Eight
TftE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANbER
June 12, 1920.
A^SASS^
•*^*f%S
"The intimate article of dress
known as the corset which
the majority of women wear
but know very little about"
IN this pertinent way the
well-known medical authority, Alice S. Cutler,
AI. D., describes the most important garment in thc wardrobe of women.
"Buy your corset carefully,"
warns Dr. Cutler. "No one
wants to be ill, and when
women realize that the constant wearing of an ill-fitting
corset helps to keep our hospitals open they will insist on
bring properly rittcd to corsets
instead of buying thetn hit or
miss."
We unreservedly recommend
Gussard Corsets, the original
front-lacing corsets, as the
complete expression of modern
corsetry. Every Gossard Corset is hygienically correct. If
properly fitted to the figure
for which it was designed, and
carefully adjusted each time it
is worn, it will  mould that
' co/?of£r%s
litcylace in //wi£
Alitt S. Cutler, M. D.
figure to the ideal proportions
of its type. It will give a
priceless all-day comfort. It
will safeguard the w»*>rer
against those bodily ailments
that are often the result of
improper corsetry. It will
render a wearing tervice that
alone is worth the price paid
for the garment.
If possible, the new Spring and
Summer Gossards are superior
to those of the past season,
which were generally acknowledged to be without equal in
meeting the needs of active
womanhood from the standpoint of comfort, hygiene,
wear and figure improvement.
Our highly specialized fitted
service reflects our sincere appreciation of the important
relation a correctly fitted corset bears to your health, and
to that perfect figure poise
that gives the elusive charm
of style.
GOSSAI        	
The- Original-Unequalled Front-Lacing Corsets
Priced at V.50 *2.75 *3P° aso H.00 $5.™ *5.so and more
DRYGOODS
& GENTS FURNISHINGS
#
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW"
1. Who chased tiie night riders,
headless horsemen n'everythlng?
2. Who's tbe best lish in town?
Su allows bait, line and all.
3. Why did tlie "Cbev" turn stubborn on Boulder Hill, and who is re-
sponslble for the missing wheel?
4. Why the city doesn't provide
benches for night birds? Standing ls
so tiresome for the heavier ones.
"*>. Who has been trying to paint
Cumberland red? We suggest a little
more paint. :> little less talk.
li. Who has and uses those wicked
brown eyes? "Oh! oh! mother, I'm
wild!"
7. Why a certain "Lizzie" would
make n pood alarm eloek?
!i we had lady eops ill town, who
! be pinched for stealing hearts?
D,    Who really saw the beari?)
10.   Why some human puzzle Is mis-
lai '1 for the garden of
At least pull down tlie blinds.
DO YOU WANT TO VOTE
ON THE REFERENDUM
Then register now. The list closes
on July 15, and only those who
register by that date can vote. It's up
to you."
A malted milk drink makes a nice
change. Kelly has installed a fine
electric mixer far making all milk
drinks. See his display of Victoria
Hand Rolls this week.
MOOSE TAKES FANCY
TO GRAZE ON LINKS
Commotion Caused on Golf Links
When Attendants Try to
Capture Big Bull
tOVINCIAL OFFICE
*    V RECEIVING TAXES
er Cent, Rebate Discount
rovincial Government
Expires .Itinc 30.
Tlie staff of the Provincial Govern-
n nl offices at Cumberland are kept
bu the • dnyB receiving taxes. As
I rebate of ten per cent, discount on
Provincial Government taxes expires
on June 30, taxpayers not yet having
their s lessments should take
advantage of tht' rebate period.
* YOU WILL LOSE YOUR *
NOTE *
* unless  you   register on  or  lie- *
* fore  July   16,    All   Provlnclal *
* Voters'   Lists   have   been   eon- *
"   celled. •
OTTAWA.—A huge bull moose
chose the Royal Ottawa Golf Club as a
grazing ground the other morning and
erealed considerable commotion while
members uf tlie club and attendants
endeavored to capture him alive. Af-
ler the attacking force had made several futile attempts to surround him,
the great animal, with springing lopes,
made oil' for the northern woods. Native rod deer have often been seen In
tills vicinity, but this Is the first time
on record that a "monarch of the
northern woods" has appeared.
NANAIMO NOTES
.Mr. Cooper lost a ..Cadillac car
by nre Sunday afternoon near the Nanaimo River bridge. It was stalled at
Ihe time for lack of gas, which had
apparently leaked out, saturating the
ear and becoming ignited from the
heated pipes. Three tires and the engine were saved, but the loss ls about
a thousand dollars.
Seven hundred employees of the city
of Vancouver Intending holding this
year's annual outing in Nanaimo on
Saturday, July 3. The S. S. Patricia
has been chartered for the occasion,
the excursionists arriving in Nanaimo
about noon and returning will leave
for home about 6 o'clock.
NANAIMO HERE
NEXT SATURDAY
Special Train Will Be Run to
Bring Crowd to Witness This
Important Match.
Great interest now prevails in Na
nalmo concerning the coming game
between Cumberland and the hub city
team, to be played here on Sat
urday next. The executive of the
Nanaimo Club has completed arrangements with the E. & N. Railway Com-
pany for a special train to carry their
supporters to Cumberland on that date.
Secretary Hart states that they estimate at least 500 people will come by
the special train. The sale of tickets
for the excursion will begin on Tuesday next.
The train leaves N'anaimo at 0.15
and is expected to arrive in Cumber
land at 12:30, returning leaving Cum
berland at 9.30 In the evening.
As the Western Fuel Company is
making a general holiday in their
mines on that day, many will make the
trip by auto, and probably about Tin
supporters wlll follow the Nanaimo
team, to root for their favorites. It is
hoped that the Cumberland Hoard of
Trade will take this matter In hand
and see that a welcome ls extended the
visitors and that all are accommodat
ed In regards to meals, etc.
THE CORNER STORE
OPENS A SHOE DEPT.
The Corner Store ls opening up a
boot and shoe department, and has
just received a large consignment of
white outing shoes for the summer.
These Include ladies' white tango
pumps, misses' fairy shoes, men's
yachting and Bowler shoes, as well o
boys' brown canvas shoes. They advertise prices that can't be beat in
town.
Personal Mention
His Honor Judge Barker arrived in
town on Tuesday and held County
Court sittings on Wednesday.
.   *   .
Mr. John Sutherland, dry goods merchant, left for Vancouver on Wednesday.
a    *    *
Charles Trawford of Nanaimo was
here on a visit "Monday.
* *   .
Conrad Reifel. manager of tlie Union
Brewery Company of Nanaimo, was
in town on a business trip on Monday.
.   *   .
Rev. and Mrs. Bischlager and young
daughter Uorls. of Duncan, were in
town Thursday visiting old acquaintances. Mr. Bischlager was formerly
rector ot Holy Trinity Church.
* *   *
Dr. R. P. Christie, local dentist,
anticipates taking a trip north ou or
about the first of July, combining business with pleasure. Those requiring
work done should see to it ut once.
.   *   *
Dr. H. Lepage, optician of Victoria,
intends visiting Cumberland on or
about tbe 26th June. Appointments
can be made with Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton or Dr. H. P. Clirlstle of
Cumberland.
.     *     s
Mr. A. Paull of N'anaimo, and his
mother-in-law, .Mrs. Michell, of England, are visiting at Mrs. King's.
Mrs. R. L. Rideout left for Victoria
on Sunday on a vacation.
a     a     a
Mr. A. Ronald left on Sunday for
Washington and returned on Thursday.
* a     a
Mr. and Mrs. T. Graham left by car
for Victoria on Thursday.
a    *     *
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Victoria on
Thursday.
* *    *
Miss J. Graham of Victoria arrived
in Cumberland on Wednesday and ls
the guest of Miss Janet Graham, her
cousin.
Mrs. Beryll of Victoria arrived in
Cumberland on Tuesday and returned
on Friday.
* .    *
Mrs. E. W. Bickle left for Vancouver
on Friday and will return on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Killuni of Victoria arrived in Cumberland on Sunday and returned on Thursday. During their visit they were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
a     *     a
Mr. W. R. Dunn arrived in Cumberland on Wednesday.
.   *   «
Mr. W. Horwood returned to Revelstoke on Monday.
.   *   *
Mr. and Mrs. R. Marshall, of the
Fletcher Music Store, motored to Na
naimo on Wednesday on business.
ARRIVAL OF THE NEW
MITHCELL CAR IN TOWN
Mr.  Pike Sells Five of These
Splendid Cars in Courtenay,
The New Mitchell Six, the latest
style touring car, is now being demonstrated In Cumberland. Mr. P. R
Pike, head of the Mitchell Sales Department, who is registered at the
Hotel Cumberland, arrived in town
Thursday evening from Courtenay,
where three of these cars are already
in service and two more to be delivered.
In its sturdy and enduring construction, beautiful appearance, superb upholstery and fine finish, the designers
of tbe New Mitchell make a bold bid
for the best car in tlie popular price
field. Don't fall to see the New
Mitchell—It will reverse all your Ideas
of what a moderate priced, up-to-date
car should be. With its 60-inch cantilever springs and (l-bcarlng full floating axle, the Mitchell Six wlll stand
up and give years of service under tlie
worst possible road conditions. Phone
24 and make appointment for demonstration.
A mysterious disease recently killed
countless cocoanut palms In the Colon
district of Panama.
Sale of City Lots
SEALED TENDERS are invited for
the purchase of:
Lot 2, Block i.l, .Hup 628A
Lot S, Block E, Map 522A
Lot 7, Block I, Map ii*!*!
ln the corporate limits of the City of
Cumberland, as authorized in the City
of Cumberland Land Sale Bylaws No.
1, 1919, and No. 2. 1920, to each of
which of the aforesaid lots the City of
Cumberland holds an Indefeasible
Title.
Tenders should he In the bands of
the City Clerk on or before 7 p.m.,
Monday, June 21, 1920.
T. MORDY,
June 10th, 1920. City Clerk.
2-25
MAYBLOOM
TEA
is the selected Small Leaves of
the first flush, first crop new season's tea, saved while the plant
is in the vigor of its freshness.
It is made from 'the delicate
outer edges of the tea leaf, free
from the leathery stalk and
tannic fibre.
Distinctly the most delicious and
most economical tea you can buy
USE LESS FOR IT
GOES FARTHER
THAN ORDINARY
TEA.
Regular   70 cents lb.,   Special
60   CENTS
Simon Leiser & Co.
Phone 38. Limited
FOR   SALE
FIVE ACRES— l»/a MILES FROM CUMBERLAND.
Good water on property.   Apply to
Jas. Scott, Cedar. B.C.
Church Notices .
HOLY TRINITY CHUItCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Holy Communion, 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC ( Hl'Itt II.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Sunday, June IS.
9 a.m., mass at Comox.
11 a.m., mass at Cumberland.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
There will be no services at Grace
Methodist Church on Sunday, but
Union Services will be held at the
Presbyterian Church.
Sunday school will be held as usual.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Prayer   meeting,   Wednesday,   7.30
Choir practice, Friday evening, 7.30.
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH NEWS
A picnic for the scholars of the
Sunday School is ueing arranged for
the end of the month.
The ladles of the Women's Auxiliary
are laying plans for the annual garden
party, which will take place in the
near future.
The Lady Maccabees have notified
the Vicar of their Intention to attend
divine service In a body on Sunday
evening.
BIRTHS
SMITH—At the Cumberland General
Hospital, on May 30, to Mr. and Mrs.
John Smith, a daughter.
THAMES—At the Cumberland General
Hospital, on June 6, to Mr. and Mrs.
O. W. Thames, a son.
SULLIVAN—On June 7, at the Cumberland General Hospital, to Mr. and
Mrs. S. Sullivan, a son.
BOFFEY—On June 8, at the Cumberland General Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs.
J. H. Boffey. a son.
THE CORNER STORE
is opening up a Shoe Department
and has just received a large
consignment of
White
Outing Shoes
including
Ladies' White Tango Pumps
Misses' Brighton Shoes
Misses' Fairy Shoes
Misses' Vacation Shoes
Men's Yachting Shoes
Men's Bowler Shoes
Boys' Brown Canvas Shoes
All sizes not in stock can be
procured on short notice.
Come and See Our Prices Before
Buying Elsewhere.
COOK STOVE, old or new, converted
Into a gas stove in a few minutes
with a Buckeye Vapor Gas Burner.
Prepaid for $22.50. Agents wanted.
Fawkes & Co., Summerland, B. C.
Corner Store
She: "Of course, he bored me awfully, but I don't think I showed it.
Every time I yawned I just hid it with
my hand."
He (trying.to be gallant): "Really I
don't see haw a hand so small could
—er—hide—er—that Is—beastly hot
weather we've loavlng, Isn't It?"
■ifiataia

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