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The Cumberland Islander Jun 2, 1923

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Array CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
<ti
s*.
With which It coneoUdated the Cumberland Newt,
FORTY-SECOND YEAR—No. 22.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
To Adopt Drastic Measures
Re Soldiers' Housing Scheme
CITY COUNCIL IN IMPORTANT MEETING DEBATE SOLDIERS HOUSING SCHEME—SPEED ARTISTES TO BE
PROCECUTED.
Two communications were reud at
the City Council Meeting on Monday
evening last. One from Mr. Fraser
Watson and tlle other from Mr. Robert Halcrow stating that the Cumberland Electric Lighting Co. had
sent an employee to cut the branches
from the ornamental trees in front of
their residence without asking permission or giving any notification
whatsoever. The two correspondents
evidently considered it an outrage,
and requested the City Council to
take drastic measures to prevent a
similar occurrence. They also asked
for compensation for damage already
done. The Mayor and aldermen '■
gave the matter careful considers-
lion nnd decided that the correspon-
dents should seek redress .from the
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
It appears  that  the    matter    had j
been taken up by the City authorities
at some recent date, as the Managing !
Director of the Cumberland Electric
Lighting  Co.   writes  the  Mayor  and
Aldermen as follows:—
May   17th.   1923.
Gentlemen:
Replying to your communication
of complaints being made to your
Council from property owners regarding cutting off limbs from trees,
likely to cause short circuiting of
our lines and thereby endangering
lives of our patrons, wo wish to Inform the Mayor and Council that no
more limbs will be cut from trees until the Managing Director personally
Interviews the owner of thc trees
and pruning done to their satisfaction.
It Is not the desire of the Company to destroy property neither will
they countenance any employee doing so.
Owners will convey a favor by
phoning the light office and the
Managing Director will personally
see whether it is necessary to hip the
trees.
Yours truly,
Cumblerlnnd  Elect. Lighting Co.
(Signed) G. W. Clinton
Man. Director.
Accounts amounting to Ii79.1ii were
passed for payment. Thc Finance
Committee took exception to some of
•the charges on the statements of the
'Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.,
Ltd. His Worship the Mayor and Aldermen thought some of lhe items
were very exorbnnt and as on illustration cited lhe question of a Oiic
charge for the' installation of a 15c
fUBe. Payment of the account was
held up. The Mayor and Finance
Committee will Interview the Managing Director of the Cumberland
Electric Lighting Co. Ltd.
Alderman Pnrtrldge, Chairman of
the Fire Warden's reported progress
on the renovating and reconstruction of the Fire Hall.
Alderman Maxwell, Chairman of
the Finance Committee brought up
the question of a Trade License by
law without any definite action being
taken.
Will Cheek Motorists
The collision of two Ford Cars on
Dunsmuir Ave. on thc morning of
May 24th occupied tho attention ot
the Mayor and Aldermen with the
result that the Police Commissioners
will he asked to Instruct the Chief
of Pollco to cheek up motorists who
exceed the spccetl limit within the
city of Cumberland. Signs warning
auto owners will be displayed on Intersections of Dunsmuir Ave. Tho
Council sny speeding must stop.
Will Take Steps to Collect.
The six houses recently built on
lhe Bettor Housing Scheme and occupied by thc returned soldiers Is
causing the City Council a great deal
of worry. The monthly payments
are not made promptly and one of
the houses Is empty. One alderman
who was very excited at the present
financial state of affairs said thoy
should be made to pay up or get out
and suggested that thc City introduce a Money By Low to borrow tho
money, pay the government off and
thus make the houses an asset to the
City. It was finally decided to adopt
some drastic measure to collect the
arrears on the Houses In question.
DOUBLE DAILY
BOAT SERVICE
The double dally bont service
between Nanaimo and Vancouver is now in effect. For
the benefit of those Interested,
tlle following schedule, taken
from the C.P.R. advertisement
ls published: .
S.S. Princess Patricia leave
Nanaimo 7 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
Arrive Nanaimo 12.15 p.m. and
8   p.m.
Leave Vancouver 10 a.m. and.
5.45  p.m..
Arrive Vancouver 9.15 n.m.
and 4.45 p.m.
COURTENAY BALL TEAM
DEFEATS CUMBERLAND
On Sunday, May 27th, on the recreation Grounds on Sunday, the
Courtenay baseball team met the
Cumberland senior team. The score
was 8-5 In favor of Courtenay. Thc
game was very interesting and a
good crowd gathered. Tiie line-up
for Cumberland was: Catcher, D. Richards; pitcher, E. King; 1st base, T.
Plump; 2nd base, I. James; shortstop, D. Bnnnerman; 3rd base J. Mnr-
rochl; right field, J. Dangerfield;
centre field, C. Hitchens; left field. J.
McKay. The line-up for Courtenay:
Catcher, M. Mitchell; pitcher, fi.
Smith; 1st base, Brown; 2nd base,
Pettigrew; shortstop, J. Cummings;
3rd base, R. Robinson; left field, G.
Millard; centre field, A. Robinson;
right field, G. McLean.
MINES MINISTER
PREDICTS BOOM
FOR THIS YEAR
SPECIAL MATINEE
AT ILO-ILO THEATRE
For the benefit of those working
afternoon shift, Mr. James Hay-
worth wllf run a special mntlncc on
Tuesday nt 10 A.M.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Miss Brown, matron of lhe Cumberland General Hospital acknowledges with thanks the following donations:
Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., one
ton of potatoes; Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association, Reading
Matter. Donations of old linen would
he greatly appreciated. What have
you to spare?
SPOKANE, Wn„ May 25.—"Never
since I assumed office seven years
ago have mining conditions In British Columbia been better, or the outlook brighter," said Hon. William
Sloan, minister of mines for British
Columbia in an address before the
North-west Mining Convention here
on Thursday. The day was set apart
as 11. C. day In honor of the Canadian
delegates who; celebrated Victoria
Day here.
The v/ar years' boom In mining
had been followed by a reaction, the
minister said, but present conditions
pointed to a revival, not of "unhealthy prosperity," but of "progress and
prosperity built upon the solid foundation ot developed resources and
the normal demands ot the markets
of the world."
The great need of British Columbia and of the whole northwest, Mr.
Sloan declared, was capital. Fortunately capitalists were turning more
nnd more to western America and to
those few other countries where there
appeared to be staple goverment. To
secure this capital, mining men must,
first of all, be good and reliable sales
agents.
"If we adopt this principle, there
Is no doubt that the-. Northwest will
be opened up In the next decade on
n scale unprecedented In any similar
period,'' the speaker declared.
Mr. Sloan gave three reasons for
his optimism in regard to the mining
industry iu British Columbia. First
was the wonderful promise of the
newly opened up mining district in
the Portland Canal; second, the
marked advance that had been made
in solving the metallurgical problem
of the economic treatment of the
complex ores of the Kootenays; and,
third, that the copper market ls now
in a healthy condition.
Referring to coal mining, which
has been at a standstill in point of
production In the province for the
last thirteen years, the minister
hoped that this industry would be
stabilised and assisted to a large extent by the establishment of an iron
and steel Industry. Expert Investigations were now being made, he
said; ■'.:> u result of which he was very
hopeful that the capital necessary
for the establishment of the industry
would be forthcoming.
British Columbia Day was ushered in with the announcement that the
ore exhibits from the province had
been awarded a special first plize.
The Chamber of Mines, of Vancouver,
has on exhibit more than 200 samples
representative of mines in all portions of the province.
LADIES AID MEETING
UNION OIL SERVICE
With the object In view of giving
the public Uie best possible service,
BLUNT & EWART LTD. have Installed another five gallon Bowser pump
ln front of their premises on Uuion
street, and will thus be able to supply both Imperial and Union gasoline. They have also increased their
service staff, so there will be no delay In having customers needs tn respect to gas, air and water, attended
to.
JUNE 4TH TO BE PUBLIC
HOLIDAY IN HONOR OF
BIRTHDAY OF THE KING
An ordcr-ln-councll fixes June 4th
us a Public Holiday when the King's
birthday will be celebrated. The motion was passed In order to have thc
King's birthday, which falls on Sunday, June 3, celebrated on Monday,
In keeping with tho plan to be followed by the other provinces. All
stores in Cumberland will therefore
he closed Monday. Shoppers are
hereby reminded to lay their stock
of supplies in to day.
BENEFIT WHIST DRIVE
A benefit Whist Drive nnd Dance
will be held in thc 0. W. V. A. Hall
on Saturday, June 2nd under the
auspices o fthe Womens Beneiit Association of Cumberland. Whist from
a lo 10 p.m. Dancing from 10 to 12.
Admission .10 cents.
Thc Ladles' Aid of Grace Methodist
Church held their regular meeting
at  the  home of Mrs.  Stevenson on
. Wednesday evening last.    Final ar-
' rangements were made for the Gar-
j den Party to be held on Mrs. Moun-
] ce's lawn on June 6th.
Mesdames Cunliffe and Brownsey
will be In charge of the home-cooking stall; Novelty Trees. Mesdames
Whltehouse and Banks; candy stall,
Miss Haywood and Miss Hughes; Ice
cream will be served by Miss Henderson, and  strawberries'    and    cream,
I Mrs, A. Henderson. Afternoon ten
will be In charge of Mesdames Partridge, Glen, Fouracre, Mounce, and
Richardson. Activities will commence nt 3:00 p.m. The admission
will he free.
Presentation to Hev. und .Mrs. (I. B.
Kinney
After thc business of the meeting
j had been transacted, the President,
Mrs.  Richardson  on   behalf of    the
1 Ladles Aid presented Mr. and Mrs.
Kinney with a beautiful silver tea pot
! and sugar shell as a token of appreciation and high esteem. Mr. Kinney
very feelingly replied thanking the
ladles for their great kindness, and
said that both Mrs. Kinney and him
self had enjoyed a very pleasant time
during their stay ln Cumberland and
that it was with much regret they
were departing from their many
friends. Mr. and Mrs. Kinney will
leave for Ocean Falls next week.
Dainty refreshments were served
during the evening. Mrs. Cunliffe and
Mrs. Fouracre assisting Mrs. Stovon-
REPRESENTS LOCAL
WOMEN'S BENEFIT
ASSOCIATION
BASEBALL GAME SUNDAY
Bont forget t'lremens' Dance on
Monday, June 4th, In the Ilo-llo Hall.
Reception and opening of the new
wing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Comox,
Wednesday, June 13th. Everybody
welcome. Keep this date open.
Cumberland's first league game ln
the Comox District Baseball League
will be played with Powell River on
lhe Recreation Grounds, Sunday at
1 p.m.
Los Angeles ls prepared for one of i
the greatest gatherings that has ever
taken place on this continent. Today ■
10,000 members of the Women's Bene-
fit Association aie scheduled to assemble here from every state. Hawaii
and the provinces of Canada to par-
tlctpate In a gorgeous Grecian mara-
thon. |
The occasion is the quadrennial
meeting of the association, at which
election of officers for the next four
years will be held, and other national business nt the organisation dls-
cusssed.
Miss Ulna W. West ot Port Huron
Mich,, founder and supreme commander of the association, ls credited with having planned every detail of the pageant. She has been
working on the plans for this event
ever since the last meet four years
ago. The result will be a cereinoni-
al with 3000 costumed participants
In all colors of the rainbow, presenting the history of the club movement among women, alongside Important historic events of the past 30
years. I
Every state and province will have
Its own trumpeter In the grand processional and 1000 massed uniformed
guards will give a specially designed
drill. One thousand children have
been trained to give a joy revel in
pantonine.
At the convention. Miss West will
free summer camps open to all mem-
announce completion of plans for
hers of the association. This, with
free health centres for its members
is the task the association has set
for itself.
The organisation has a membership
ot 275.000, according to Miss West. It
started out 30 years ago ln debt of
$150 for office furnishing. Now the
members boast beautiful offices at
Port Huron, Mich., and a reserve fund
of $19,000,000. Benefits totaling
$24,000,000 have been paid out.
Mrs. Eccleston is representing the
local order.
May Celebration Held At
Courtenay Brilliant Success
HUGE CROWD VIEWS BEST CELEBRATION EVER HELD IN
COMOX VALLEY.—MANY BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED
CARS IN PARADE.
NOTICE
. A Mass Meeting of Employees of the Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir, Ltd., will be held in
the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association on Sunday next,
June 3rd, at 10.30 a.m. sharp.
Business: Election of officers
and Organization of Committees for the Annual Picnic.
Ed. Hughes, President.
Chas. O'Brien, Secretary.
FIRST ROUND OF
CONNAUGHT CUP
PLAYED TO DAY
In the first game in the Connaught
Cup series Nanaimo City has been
drawn against Ladysmlth, and the
game will be played on the Central
Sports Grounds Today (Saturday)
next, commencing at 4.30.
The draw for the first round, follows:
Nanaimo City vs. Ladysmlth at Nanaimo, next Saturday.
Byes: 1. L. A. Vancouver; Cumberland and  Davenport.
The draw for the second round
reads:
I.L.A., Vancouver, versus Nanaimo
City or Ladysmlth.
Cumberland versus Davenport.
SOCIAL EVENING
GREAT SUCCESS
MAY DAY CELEBRATION
I COLLECTION LIST
The whist drive and dance given in
the G. W. V. A. hall under the auspices of the St. John's Ambulance Association on Saturday evening was
the usual success, a large number attending. The prize winners were
MrB. Covert, and Mrs. Waterfield,
first prizes, the consolations going
to Mrs. Watson and Mrs. McNeil. After whlst, refreshments were served
and dancing continued until raid-
night.
TO   PURCHASE   PROPERTY
Courtenay, May 30.—At a meeting
ot the Courtenay Golf Club held last
night it was decided to make arrangements for the purchase of the property the club is now on lease. A
committee comprised of Messrs. John
Aitken, William Kennedy, F. C.
Brock, George Tarbell and M. B.
Tribe was appointed to deal with
the matter. The property consists ot
nearly ninety acres, four and a halt
miles from Courtenay, directly adjoining the Campbell River road and
can be purchased for $8,500. There in
an excellent nine hole course and thc
membership of the club Is growing
rapidly.
PLEASANT SOCIAL EVE.
A Social and dance was held at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sara Robertson, Cumberland, on Saturday
last. A very enjoyable evening was
spent ln singing and dancing. Those
rendering vocal selections were:
Mrs. J. Irvine, Mrs. Win. Weir, Mrs.
R. K. Walker and Messrs. A. Williams, Tim Walker and J. Drummond.
Refreshments were served at midnight and the party broke up In the
wee small hours of the morning.
Among those present were:
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Cameron, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Ivrine, Mr. and Mrs. W.
Vale, Mr. and Mrs. F. Vale, Mr. and
Mrs. David Aitken, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Buchanan, Mrs.
A. Aitken, Mrs. R. K. Walker, Mrs. E.
Thomas. Mrs. W. Weir, Misses Nettle,
and Katie Robertson Carrie Buchanan, Master David Robertson, Messrs.
J. Drummond, Tim Walker, J. Boag
James Weir, R. Aitken, A. Boothmnn.
A. Williams and James Robertson.
Name Amount
Employees Canadian Collieries
Cumberland 413.00
Employees Can. Collieries
Union Bay C2.00
Managenement   Canadian  Col.-
Ilerles    (D) Ltd.
City of Cumberland
Cumberland Water Works
Cumberland Elec. Light Co.
Campbell Bros.
Teachers  Cumberland  School
Mumford ft Walton
J. M. Sutherland
Robert C. Lang
Burns ft Brown
C. H. Tarbell ft Son
Employees of Royston Lumber
Company
Alex. McKlnnon
W. P. Symons
Frank Dallos
J. M. Kent
F. A. McCarthy
T. E. Banks
Frank Partridge
Harllng ft  Ledingham
W. Merrilleld
J. Halllday
C. Mussatto
K. Nakanlshl
Y.  Nakagami
K.   Tcrakiifrn
S. Davis
James  T.   Brown
Win. Gordon
Charlie Sing Chung
Marocchi  Bros.
T. Rickson
U. Watanabe
G. K. Uchlyama
R. A. Walls
Leen Yeng
M.  Iwasa
J. V. Jones
P. C. McLean
V.  Bonora
T. H. Carey
Robert J. Splttal
Robert Thomson
John Balrd
Jno. J. Wler
A. Aitken
K. Mtnnto
I. Mlnato
(Continued on page S)
50.00
$25.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
9.50
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
4.00
4.00
3.00
2.60
2.60
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.50
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
STRAWBERRY
FESTIVAL JUNE 20TH
LIQUOR STORE
CLOSED MONDAY
Monday being a holiday the Government Liquor Store will be closed
all day.
The Ladles' Aid of St. George's
Presbyterian Church are holding a
Strawberry Festival June 20th, on
Mrs. Parnham's I«iwn. Keep this
date open.
i    The fourth annual May Day Gambols of the children of the Courtenay
Public   School   took  place  on   Wednesday last under Ihe most auspicious conditions.     The weather which
had been anything but pleasant for
the previous  week broke clear and
the sun Bhonc brightly throwing out
Just enough warmth to make all participants In the festival feel jubilant.
Great preparations had been made
for the big event and those who had
taken   Interest  enough  to    decorate
their cars or construct    floats    for
participation In the mammoth parade
can   congratulate    themselves    that
their efforts were crowned with success, making the procession the most
imposing that has yet been held within the boundaries of the Valley Hub.
Tbe parade was a real feature, in the
lineup being not less than fifty cars
nearly all wearing gala attire, some
Indeed being works of art, creating
among the long line   of   spectators
who elbowed  each other along  the
full length of Union Street a most
favorable   Impression.    Congratulatory remarks were heard on all sides.
A great deal of Interest centred on
tho two floats of local fraternal organizations,   that of the  Benevolent
Protective Order of Elks having been
borrowed  by the local lodge    from
tbelr brethren at Nanaimo.   The color scheme on this Immense vehicle
was the lodge colors,   purple    and
white.   On the front was a large elk
head, symbolic of the order lt represented.   On the deck of the car a may
pole had been erected and around this
twelve  little    girls,    all    ln    white
danced'and entwined the varicolored
ribbons.    Regret was expressed that
this float was so massive    that    it
could  not    reach    the    terminating
point of the parade because It was too
large to negotiate the turn in the road
jit the (ondensory bridge.   The float
of the Native Sons of Canada was a
patriotic conception having been designed by Mr. Charles Shannon and
its   construction    superintended    by
that  gentleman, assisted  by several
members of the local Assembly.    In
thc centre was Miss Canada, represented by Miss Honor Fechner, surrounded by eight other girls, a young
Canadian  stationed at each  of    six
pillars and with Mrs. W. M. Moore at
the piano while this party of young
Canucks   chorused   songs    of    their
home land.    In thc Industrial class
there was keen competition, the float
calling  forth   the     most    generous
praise   being   that  representing  the
Comox Creamery.   This was a magnificent speclment of the car decorator's art, the whole being designed
and   constructed  by  Mr.  and    Mrs.
Stuart Baker. Cow bells jangled and
milk bottles were ln evidence scattered here and there through trellises
of evergreens.   The effect was magnificent. 4]
The Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department   was   represented   by   their
truck manned by lhe members fully
equipped for fighting fire. King Tut
rode ln  a golden chariot in all his
glory and a wag has said that    he
found  out  where  Schotchmen originally lived for he said that Tut spoke
wilh   a  decided   accent.    Mr.    John
Thomson played his part well.
The Imperial Oil Company had
three cars In this division and It was
probably due to their extensive exhibit ihift Ilrst prize was awarded tn
them. The Union Oil Company was
represented hy two cars and the
Whistle Soda Water Company had a
nice display. In the decorated cur
class some very excellent displays
were to be seen, notable among them
being thc car of Mrs. David Motti-
shaw, which no doubt was entitled tn
Ilrst honors which she received. Mrs.
Millard with a nicely ornamented car
won second place and other cars
seen were those of Mra. W. J. Ilngar-
ty, Alderman F. W. Kerton, Mr. George Pldcock and several others, Including One from Cumberland driven
by Mr. Webb. There was only one
feature that might have had a tendency to mar the occasion and that
was thc fact that the old bridge was
not open to vehicular traffic, necessitating a long detour by way of Sand-
(Contliiued on page 2)
Don't  forget  Klremens'  Dance on
Monday, June llh, In lhe llo-lle Hall. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1923.
News  of Courtenay and  Surrounding  District
BY  OUR  SPECIAL  CORRESPONDENT
i m t ii I in in in 111!!!!!!!
"DUNLOP
II
The World's Most
Envied Tire
Record Mileage-Faultless Anti-skid
li I n III I m Ml I m ! I!!!! !
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY PHONE 154 TEA ROOMS
WHITE  COAL
Use White Coal during the hot months—
— We Stock —
RANGES, PLATES, TOASTERS, FANS, IRONS, ETC.
RADIO PARTS
FIXTURES, WIRING, ESTIMATES
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
'hone 161
Courtenay
Prevent=
Forest Fires
The fires that start each summer might have come
from YOUR cigarette-stub.
The Forest charred and burned might have been thc
result of YOUR camp-fire.
The wooded hillsides might have been blackened by
YOUR lighted matches.
The burned farms might be thc wages paid by YOUR
thoughtlessness.
Idle logging camps might be the result of YOUR momentary carelessness.
If forest fires annually destroy our natural wealth, if
money is to be spent in fighting fires instead of
building up the Province, then the loss is YOURS
and that of the generations to come. Be careful.
IT   PAYS
The Cumberland  Maiden's Prayer
"Dear Lord, I auk nothing for myself! Only give mother a non.ln-
law."
Miss Isidore Sutton, who has re-
eontly returned from Normal School
has gone lo Headquarters where she
will have eharge o fthe aehool until
lhe summer holidays.
MAY CELEBRATION
AT COURTENAY IS
BRILLIANT SUCCESS
(Continued from page 1)
wick to the Agricultural Grounds
where the crowning of the Queen of
the May took place on thc ruis, placed
In the shadows of the brahces of a
giant maple tree with the Courtenay
River and the glacier for a background. At two-thirty Queen Muriel
abdicated and passed the reins ot
her roynl office over to Queen-elect
Marjorie amid the tumult of much
cheering by the little people of her
realm and thc adults who had come
from all parts of the district to witness the prettty ceremony. In connection with this ceremony' were six
maids of honor: Misses Honor Fech-
ner, Kitty Williams, Agnes Williams,
Nellie Taylor, Dorothy Fletcher and
Thelma Walker. The pages were
Master Dick Lucas and Master Mel-
vln McLean. Flower girls were
Misses Alice Pldcock, Evelyn Black-
hall, Proebe Walls, Elspeth C'.reeu.
Mary Clarkson and Audrey Booth.
After the crowning ceremony the
children carried out on unique programme of dances and Athletic drill,
all of whicli was most interesting anil
thoroughly enjoyable. The Peascods.
Czardas and Ribbon dances were par
ticipated In by Christine Millard.
Audrey Hannay, Annie Crawford, Dorothy Fletcher, Honor Fechner, Clara
Tippet, Catharine Beatty, Gladys Perez, Mary Morrison. Laura Bateman,
Marjorie Rigler, Dorothy Hames, Dorothy Hayman, Thelma Walker. Ber-
nadlne Shannon, Kathleen Moore.
Ann Alice Moncrieff. Violet Trotter.
Kitty Williams, May Moncrieff. Nona
McNeil, Barbara McBryde, Agnes Sutherland, Muriel Lelghton. Annie
Rushton and Nina Lloyd.
Clap Dunce:—
Ruth Pldcock, Daisy Kerton, Nina
Lloyd. Alice Hurford. Lola Quinn,
Mabel Dack, Mary Bell, Evelyn Me
Kenzle, Helen Lcc, Beth Mutrie.
Smith, Evelyn Catchpole, Jean Dingwall, Jack Hames Thomas Hughes.
Wilfred Anderton, Michuslki Ashika-
wa, Lloyd Quinn, John Green. Arthur
Pigott, John Morrison, David Smith.
Jack McKenzie, John Perez. Mii-ron
Thomas, and Harold Herd.
Flower Dance:—
Beatrice Chase, Sheilah Allan], Audrey Collins, Annie Cudmore, Kathleen Hagarly, Irene Logie, Lucy Piket, Saxon Sutherland. Mabel McKenzie, Catherine Capes, Hilda Robertson and Jenny Egan.
Indian Dnnee:—
Bill Piket, Jack McLean, Tommy
Nisbet, Charlie Nisbet, Roy Morrison,
Frank Hurford, Harry Kerton, Roy
Embleton, Jack Maclntyre, Gordon
Dlackhall, Howard Suiton, Harry Perez, Stuart Wood, Jim Webb, Ray
McQuillan, Clarence Heric. James
Heric  Cotton Hagarty.
A class of boys who had been tutored by Mr. A. Attrec gave a splendid display of physical drill, winding
up with a blindfold boxing match anil
pillow fight. The boys who took part
in this were Masters Auslin McLeod.
Oral McNeil, Cameron McPherson.
Jack McPhee, Jim Perez, Aubrey
Hames, Maurice Smart, E. Cowle, Gerald Gerow, Sidney Williams, Fred.
Stephens, Harold Hames. Willie Bill.
Jim Hurford, Maurlt Rovlo, George
Hutchings. Charlie Smart.
Al the conclusion of the entertainment on the green. Queen Margaret
nnd lier retinue made their exit trom
lhe grounds and ended their way to
Coniox hospital hy way of the upper
road, passing the memorial calm at
the base of which the May Queen
placed n floral wreath on behalf of
the subjects of her realm. On the
return of Ihe royal party to Courte-
iisy. a sumptuous banquet, participated in by the teaching staff of the
Courtenay Public Cchool and the
Mayor and city council. Guests of the
day were Queen Olga, of Cumberland
unci her maids of honor. A community sing under the leadership of Mr.
.1. I!. Maclntyre was held In the Ag-
l'liuliiiral hall in the evening and
entered Into with much zest by n full
hall, nfier which an hour's dancing
by tho young folks brought to n close
the most meritorious May Day programme that has been presented
since Ihe interception of the ehtld-
i en's revels in Courtenay.
COURTENAY DEFEATS
POWELL RIVER
Larson Pitches his Last Game
For Courtenay.
Last Sunday on the local baseball
lot the boys of the Courtenay nino
defeated the, Powell niver team in
I ho Ilrst league fixture of the 1023
season in the recently organized Comox District Amateur Baseball
League. There was not a large
crowd present, owing principally to
the inclement state of the weather,
rain falling during the greater part
of the time play was on. The moist
condition of the weather no doubt
spoiled what would probalily viave
been a real good game. The score
wns 14 to 3. Larson pitched Ills last
game for Courtenay and Garneau
was on the mound for the visitors.
Rah Robinson was back on the line
up of the Cowboys after an absence
of. a year. Johnny Cummings, was
had; at shortstop and George Millard
was in his usual place in the outfield. All three have added considerable strength lei the team and in a
week or so the management expects
with thc return of Halley Dixon from
school thai the Cowboy's nine will be
striking on all cylinders. At present
they aro one up In thc league standing and intend to stay 111 that position. Lefty Larson who has been with
Courtenay for the past three years
has defected, going over to Cumber-
Inund where ho will in future do his
heaving. He will be with the conl
town buys next Sunday and will most
likely twirl against his former team
mates, when the two teams clash at
Courtenay at 3.30 p.m.
!r—
hi
 '--■ * - - 	
"""l
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Summer Vacation
j
^
^^*\      ^^    B^^      1^^      w^*\
WE STOCK
ft
J      CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
I        AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
||      We can also outfit adults and our Prices Are Right
Open
Saturday Night till .10 o'clock
h
H
W     W   W     H     W
to
J.
McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
	
.   .,
A NARROW ESCAPE
One of the pleasant surprises for
Miss Marjorie Fletcher on Wednesday
shortly after her crowning as May
Queen was the presentation to her ot
a handsome boquet of flowers by Mr.
William Stubbs, principal of the public scshool, on behalf o fthe members
of the Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars ln for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at thc Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
Courtenay. May 31.—Yesterday afternoon two boys, James Webb and
Gray went boating on the Courtenay
Itiver. They were about a quarter of
a mile above the bridge when, their
boat capsized after a swift ride in the
current and a collision with a snag.
They both managed lo clamber on to
the snag and had been there tor some
time when they were rescued by
Messrs. Len D. Piket and John Robinson. A good ducking and a nasty scare were the results of their adventure.
VUCOMUNrMMRMHHMDn,
SIT DOWN
When you get tired and thirsty during the summer's warmth.
At
Lang's Drug Store
Cumberland
Where delightfully, comfortable booths have been
installed for your convenience
IN OUR
Ice Cream and Candy Department
Tennis Rackets
From $3.50 up
BICYCLE NEW and 2nd HAND
FOR SALE
FRENCH BULL DOG. PUP—CHAM-
plonshlp Blood. Registered. Apply
J. Vernon-Jones, Islander office.
FOR SALE:—HOUSE IN FIRST
Class condition, containing Ave
rooms, parlor, etc. For further particulars, apply P.O. Box 326, or
phone 164, Cumberland, B. C.
FOR SALE:—One 20 ft. Torpedo
Steam Launch with a Seven Horse
Power Fairbanks Morse motor In
Ilrst class condition. Price 1325.00.
Apply D. Tasso, Dunsmuir Ave.
J.2
FOR SALE—BARRED ROCK HATCH
Ing Eggs, from good layers. 10c each.
Apply Stalkers Ranch, Happy Valley. Phone 93 M.
FOR SALE—ONE KITCHEN RANGE
and Two Heaters. Apply to Mra. J.
Dando, Derwent Avenue.
J. 9.
HOUSE AND FURNITURE.-APPLY
to Mrs. Edward    Jones,    Penrith
Avenue.
J. 9.
REPAIRING of all Description
E. T. ELLISON
Gunsmith and Locksmith
McBride old Store    Courtenay
Speaking
of Service
—Do you know that we not only make Delicious Chocolates
and all sort of Delicious Candy.
-—But likewise we serve Light
Lunches and Ice Cream.
—BUT. This is a Confectionery
Store. That is a Joy to all,
who know it.
Busy Bee
Confectionery
COURTONAY, B. C.
Next to Malpas & Wilson
FOR SALE.—A GOOD SECOND
hand piano, made by Fisher, New
York. Tuned and delivered to your
house. 1150.00. Terms arranged.
Marshall Music Co., Cumberland
and Courtenay, O. C. J 16.
FARM TO RENT.—70 ACRES GO-
ing concern, 12 cleared and tenced
and ln crop this year. Over an
acre ln bearing Orchard, owner
took more than $200 last year. Four
roomed house, two large barns, 9
cows, team, chickens, etc.—$350 per
annum for two or Ave years.
—FARM FOR SALE, COMOX.—
Ono Acre, Vi cleared and all fenced
spring water and buildings (or
quick sale at Kye Bay. $1100. cash.
Apply F. R. Fraser, Blscoe, Courtenay, B. C. T.f.n.
WHO TOOK THE WRONG COAT?
The party who lifted an overcoat
from the Ball Grounds last Sunday would do well to return Bame
to the Islander office without delay and thus avoid further trouble.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with bast
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. O. SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1023.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
?'
Attractive
Time •
Modern Golf
^^(jjwnk^hompson
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS ^
MORE FUNDAMENTALS
LAVS CHUZENJI- JAPAN'S LAKE 1X3UISE
JAPAN haa so distinctly put herself "on the map" that the well
travelled person is now compelled to
put the "Land of the Rising Sun"
into hla life's Itinerary. Improved
trade relations and growing Interest
ln things belonging te the other aide
of tbe globe, make a closer study of
the countries there of prime Importance.
Transportation, trans-continental
and trans-Pacific, has become so
highly developed tbat it is as easy
to get to Japan as to Italy. Ninety-
two hours from Montreal to Vancouver, trans-Canada, and the fastest time across the Pacific—a trifle
more than nine days—puts the
traveller into Yokohama, the chief
port of the Land of Nippon,
Here the sights are unusual. Jin-
rtckashas jostle one another in their
competition to get tht few cents
charge for running the traveller In
and out among the narrow street*
JAWWESE BEAUTIES r v r CHERRY BlOSSOHS
amid' crowds ol strangely garbed
people, curious shops, street hawkers, endless numbers of brilliant
kimono-clad children, and carts
drawn by men and beasts.
Adding to the- natural beauty of
Japan Is ths cultivation. Japanese
ars the best agriculturists and gardeners in the world, Tomes have
bees written about Mount Fuji and
ths mountains, lakes and streams of
the country. Lske Chuzenjl Is the
Lake Louise of Japan and Mount
Fuji, Its Mount Rainier, although not
so high. The cherry blossoms are
not so wonderful as those of this
country—tf one remembers the hundred miles of orchards In Not*
Scotia's Evangeline Land and Ann-
spoils Valley.
Those who are contemplating sn
early summer holiday might well
select Evangeline's Land, Nova
Scotia, for s trip. For miles tnd
miles along th* Dominion Atlantic
Railway tht land is on* mass of
apple blossoms.   Cherry  blossoms,
too, dot th* seen*, making a sight
that is wonderful tnd refreshing.
The bulk of th* Nov* Scotia *pphj
crop goes to Great Britain, but great
quantities of British Columbia apples
are exported to the Orient.
The cherry trees   In   Japan   are
raised for their flowers and not for -
their  fruit,   as,  strangely enough,
they bear no fruit.
Although the voyage from Van*
couver to Yokohama it longer thari
the tour days at set from tne Eastern seaboard via the St Lawrenc*
River Rout* to Europe, the Canadian Pacific Empress steamers,
largest and fastest on th* Pacific,
art so thoroughly comfortable that
th* Urn* slips twty quickly. All of
these steamers are to equipped that
most all of the amusements to b*
had on land are also to be found oo
board
April marks, the beginning of th*
bast season In Jtpsn tnd *v*n fur.
thei down th* Chines* coast t«
Manila. ,-.•• —
How should one grip the club? One
cun not lie loo dogmatic in this, for
good players hold their clubs In many different ways. The overlapping
grip is used by most of the stars and
certainly helps the hands to co-operate lienor. If one does not care to
overlap, lie should hold the club with
lhe fingers and should keep the hand*
an close together as possible. Some
.players who have played since childhood with Improper grips do exceedingly well, but the experience of
most of lhe stars Is overwhelmingly
in favor of the over-lapping Anger
grip, which is Illustrated In almost
every golf work.
In regard to the stance the tendency Is to revert to the square one.
and this seems to be the most logical one for the straight ball, for when
the feet are parallel to tlle line of
flight ihe hips and shoulders naturally arc so. /When the right foot Is
nearer the line of flight than the
left, or one stands open as this is
called, tho tendency ls to push the
club out across the extended line of
flight anil also upwards, which is the
way to produce u slice, and when the
right foot is drawn hack so that the
loft foot is nearer to the line of
flight, one is Inclined to swing lower
and 111 Hum the line of flight, witch
if exaggerated will produce a pall.
The right foot should bo. turned out I
slightly, ns this 'will permit an ea3l- ;
called the tripod of success. The
three words are: Co-ordination,
which will be further amplified In the
discussion ot balance; Relaxation,
which will be treated specifically in
an article on "Ease not Effort," and
Concentration, which has more to do
with the so-called mental aspect of
thc game and which I hope to deal
with somewhat In an article on "Golf
Couelsm."
Next  article GOLF  COUEISM.
STRAWBERRY CROP
PROSPECTS IN B. C.
Reports from British Columbia Indicate that there will be plenty of
berries to supply all possible markets and demands. The season Ib
considerably earlier than last year
and excellent spring weather has
prevailed in general. Strawberry
plantB came through the winter with
very little heaving and are showing
every indication ot a fair yield. There
Is au estimated total bearing acreage
of 2,000 acres as compared with 1.600
acres last year.
The present condition of the
strawberry plants ls generally fair
with some in exceptionally good condition. A number of the plants however, bloomed last fall and are consequently weak. Owing to the dry
season laBt year the plants are
neither of a size nor in a condition
lo produce heavy crops. The weather during April has been    excep-
Do You Want
to Marry
Conflldental details. No trifling.
Highest references. Honorable. Helpful. Only bureau in B. C. Use assumed name nt first, if desired, lo save
embbarrassmenl. Write The Ruth
Foster Syndicate, Box 340 Vancouver, B. C. jjj,
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 a.m.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • •  B. C.
er pivot on the back swing, and tlio
left foot should he turned out a little | "ouaily   dry   with   only  three   light
as this  will allow an  easier foil iw j »"™crs.   A heavy rain on May Mb.
through.    It  should  be remembered   However, did considerable good, but
that tho ball and club adhere for a
space perhaps not greater than half
(Jo To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. .1. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Car   For  Hire
A l Reasonable Rates
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
m
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Phone Ihfi Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
an Inch ami an infinitesimal point of
I time.    Do  not exaggerate  the after
: follow through, for If a rifle bullet
1 wore to sever the club head, say any-
! where beyond an Inch after Impact,
I lhe stroke would not bo affected In
| the least. The follow through proper is only while the club and ball
are together. What Is usually meant
by follow through is better cnlled the
"after follow through", or the particular way each one has of relaxing
after the blow has taken place. One
should, of course, see that his feet
aro comfortable and natural. One
nuiBt also be carefnl not to confUBC
novel with artificial movements. The 	
former   with   practice   become   com- j        .    Spray|ng 0f the Orchard
fortable and natural, but the latter   """J "•""'    B
seldom do, if ever. Important
A great deal of confusion exists
about the Initial movements of the
golf swing. Beginners are often advised to start the back swing solely
it lhe weather continues dry the
crop will be reduced. The total prospective yield Is about 325,000 crates
of which about one.thlrd will be
shipping stock. MarBhalls, Magoons
and Dunlops were in lull bloom on
May 9th and the later varieties wero
showing slight bloom. There should
he some berries on the market by
May 24th and carload shipments early ln June.
ln the Okanagan Valley the plants
are in good condition and it is generally expected that there will be a
heavy crop.
PREVENTION
OF APPLE CRAB
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
How many times to spray the apple
orchard  Is a matter of concern  to
most orchandists.    From the results
with the wrists.   This is quite wrong I of experiments carried on by the Di-
UNION   HOTEL
C11IBF.RI.AM), B. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
20   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
It. VATKS, Manager.
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort nnd Service —
 PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES	
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars Fur Hire Phone 25
We Have Moved, and Are Now Situated Opposite tho
Gaiety Theatre
Light Lunches and Refreshments After the Show.
Mrs. Corbett's Home Cookery
COURTENAY, B.C.        OPPOSITE THE THEATRE
Nervousness
REMOVED 111   CHIROPRACTIC
Al Clurlte'N Residence.
Hours! Any liny Between 4 nnd 5 p.m.
E. o. iiackedai„ Chiropractor.
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAR
Dainty Creations nt Most Reasonable
Prices
lluy Here and Save Money
ARMSTROMi'S-Cumlierlnnd, R. C.
10(116 Dnnamulr Street
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
t'oul, Wood aud Hoods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts vf District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
as the pictures of the stars will illustrate. This misconception of the
golf stroke results, 1 think, because
the movements of the waggle and
swing proper are confused.
Preliminary to the swing proper
every good player Indulges ln a
waggle, which, among other things,
vision of Horticulture of the Domini
on Experimental Farms, as outlined
In a recently Issued bulletin on "Modern Orchard Practices," it appears
absolutely necessary to make at least
five spraying to control apple scab
effectively in bad seasons. In the
opinion of the author, Mr. M. B. Dn-
Cumberland
TAILORS
SI1TS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •     Cleaning    -    Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     P. O. Box 17
(IMBERI AMI, B. C.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIEI,!),   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISTNE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
NURSING HOME
enables the player to relax his muse- , v|Si w|,0 |H chief assistant horticult-
les. The movements of the ..waggle j urlsti tt,e Importance of early sprays
consist, In so for as the left arm Is | as an Insurance against the loss of
TELEPHONE
TELEPHONE
53
or Leave Orders at Vendome
Hotel.
concerned..In a slight turning of the
forearm at the elbow joint with no
wrist movement whatever. At the
samo time the right hand Is extended
at tho wrist joint. The reversing of
theso two movements complete the
movements ot the waggle.
In tho swing proper, although the
movements of the waggle take place,
they aro distributed more evenly over
the whole arc. In the Initial stages
ot lhe swing the left nrm goes back
nlniost straight, and thore Is no roll
nt the elbow Joint as Is the case ln
the waggle. Any player who attempts to commence the golf swing
by lhe wrists, or by rolling or pronat-
Ing lhe forearm, as this Is sometimes
called, Is certainly mnkiug the game
more difficult than It need be. 1
don't say It is impossible to play golf
this way, but lt cannot be gainsaid
that such a procedure docs not make
for consistency and length. Apart
from the force altogether that one ls
able to put In thc blow with the correct method, the face of the club Is
kept square to the ball for a number
of inches. Whereas when the wrist
stnrts the movements, or again where
the forearms are rolled, the face of
thc club turns away sharply from the
ball, and unless the face of the club
In the down swing gets square to the
ball at thc appropriate moment, some
inaccuracy or other will result.
For amusement and the snke of bre
vity lt Is sometimes useful to think ot
the fundamentals In three words
which form a triangle, which may be
crop has been neglected and overlooked too much in the past. It Is
the early sprays, he says, which save
the crop. The wise man sprays from
the early spring to make his crop
set.
Apple scab Is a disease that
spreads or reproduces Itself by spores
bo minute that they cannot be discerned with thc naked cyo. When
the weather becomes sufficiently
mild to start the trees, thoso spores
arc liberated from thc old leaves and
Infest tho young leaves, reproducing
new spores ln a very few days. By
the tlmo blOBsoniB arc ready to burst
there may he many millions of these
spores ready to Infect them. At this
stage the pistil, which will ultimate-;
ly ripen Into an apple, Is very tender
and It attacked by a germinating
spore, which sends out roots lo penetrate the ,skln, will be killed and the
chances of a crop ruined. Ravages
of scab are often attributed to Imperfect pollination or frost when In
reality black spot or scab Is the cause
of the loss. Cool, moist weather,
such as wc have in spring, Is, the
most favourable for the development
of scab, which spreads but little during the summer. Thus the important
sprays are the early ones. Spraying
ls a preventive, and cannot repair
damage already done. It prevents the
development of thc germinating
spore. The bulletin here referred to
goes very thoroughly into the details
of Ihe cultivation, spraying and management of the apple orchard.
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
• Call or   'phone   for   appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
IH YEARS' EXPEHIENCE
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Courtenay, B.C.
gg/gigE|gjaaBMiIS®SiaaiMa'aMaSIBH31SJ
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office-.   Cor.   ut   Dunsmuir   Ave.
Opposite   Ilo-llo  Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. ('. KOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY. JUNE  2nd, 1923.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1923.
If you are inclined sometimes to
vonder whether life is worth the
price in toll, and care, and disappointments, and lost Illusions, go down
along the stream In springtime and
i let it lure you back to thc golden
Jand of dreams where youth abides
and brave new hopes are born.
DO HOGS PAY?
TELL IT TO JANE
A leading agricultural journal is
carrying a series of articles on "Do
Hogs Pay?"
Our experience with hogs in the
newspaper business is that they do
not pay. They usually sponge the
paper from some neighbor or sneak
around to some store and read it and
then kick because the editor did not
waste n lol of good white space 111
telling what n prominent citizen the
ling is. The sumo kind of n hog hns
been known to hrlng In a column olil-
iiuiry about Ills wife when she passed away and an elaborate card of
thanks, Although he never spent a
nickel to help keep the paper alive
lie wants a lot of publicity when some
member ot his family dies. Wc have
also known the hog to run large advertisements in tb'e papervind then
refuse to pay his bills. One particularly mean, low-down species of the
)Mig will take the paper for several
years and then chuck it hack into the
poslofflce, marked "refused" and
Imagines that he paid the bill. This
species is fast becoming extinct, however, because most editors do not
send the paper without payment In
advance. The same class of hog that
infests the newspaper office often belongs to church and lets the poor widow pay more on the preacher's salary than he does.
Study the home life of most men
who have money and have made a
: succesB   in   business,   and   you   will
find   their   wives   have   been   thrifty
! women.
Look over tiie list of the men who
have -shone  in  society, and  the list
i will reveal that their wives were social climbers, but they slipped on the
ladder of success and struck bottom.
More men nre made or marred by
their wives than by any other human
agency, (live a man a gadding butterfly for a wife and he will be a worm
1 In business, nine times out of let).
Then, there ls the other side Some
, men are slaves to their business, und
If it were not for thc Influence   of
their sensible wives they would sleep
In the stock  room, and that means
' premature  planting.
Back of every successful ,111011 you
will mid a sensible woman.
The empty milk bottles, washed
and waiting for the milkman, on thc
front step every morning, Is a sure
sign that the queen in that home Is
standing back of her knight who goes
forth to battle each day.
With The
Churches
CUMBERLAND, SUNDAY, JUNE
HOJ* TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Eversong, 7 p.m.
ST. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIA
Rev. James Hood
Services 11 n.m. and 7 p.m.
Illble Class 1.30. Sunday School I
Evening Service 7  p.m.
Why He is Crabbed
I went fishing In the Warrior
With  a  tnckle  newly  bought,
\
Bul
( 1
( )
NOT LEARNED
FROM BOOKS
THE LURE OF THE BROOK
If in the spring the young man's
inncy lightly turns to thoughts of
lnvo there are otlhers whose fancies
turn to more material things. Some
men's fancies turn to golf, othei-B
lake advantage of the ethereal mildness of springtime to wander In the
peaceful places where one may think
nnd dream nnd forget that existence
demands a continuous struggle.
Have you ever, when the day was
fair in spring, lingered beside an old
mill and listened to the water splashing.over the dam? Have you ever
followed a peaceful stream through
grassy fields, past greening slopes,
and down Into the woodland hollows
where at every turn some wonder recalled, forgotten pleasure waa displayed? There is something about a
small stream that is found In no
other of Nature's miracles. It is
friendly and companionable. It
seems to he animate; it laughs and It
murmurs; no extraordinary imagination is needed by him who hears it
singing. It chatters as it flows on
iis way to join the brimming river.
The brook ill springtime Ib a thing
of Infinite variety. How carefully It
selects its course, turning and tumbling, narrowing and widening, creeping under overhanging ledges, finding its way out of rocky clefts, and
keeping ceaselessly, cheerfully on
ils way. Out of silent thickets, Into
broad meadows, under patient bridges
and clown past the yellow willows,
where you pause awhile to pipe upon the whistle you have made from
a golden branch, ns you did In thc
long ago when all the world was new,
Hie brook flows on and beckons you
to follow.
All over this land the oratory of
commencements is being heard, sermons are being preached to graduates
and commencement addresses are being delivered. All the advice, which
the graduate is expected to absorb
may or may not be good advice, but
the following simple hints we know
to be helpful:
He must he honest above all things,
nnd allow nothing to convince him
there is a compromise between honesty and dishonesty.
He must bo an out-and-out believer that a man cannot drink whisky
and succeed.
He must, too, decide between being
a society man or a business mnn; he
cannot be both.
He must make his life outside the
office the Bame as in it and not be
possessed with the idea that his employer has no business to question
his movements after business hours.
An employer has the right to oxpect
his employecB to be respectable at all
times.
He must respect other people's opln
ions, always remembering that a
young man has much to learn.
And he must never forget that, being bom of woman, he owes an obligation to his mother's box which, as
a loyal son and gentleman, forbids
him from listening without protest,
to offensive stories in which she Is
concerned. A young man cannot listen to some of the stories which a
certain class of young men are
fond of telling without offending his
mother, his sister, or the girl, who
a little later will teach him through
her own sweet life that whatever Is
said to the moral detriment of her
sex ls a He and a reflection npon thc
two women who will prove IiIb best
his truest, his most loving friends--
his mother and his wife.
(I ( ) (1
Were the only things I cnught.
* *     #
Walton says you can't make a smile
stick If you don't mean lt.
When a woman doesn't come down
town for a week, what a lot of things
she has lo attend to.
• <•     ^
The hook of etiquette doesn't mention it, but it is good form (o offer
your plug before taking n chew yourself.
CITY MEAT
MARKET "
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
McMullen
Dorothy Dare and
Billy Burke Dresses
in SILKS, CANTON CREPES and CERPE
with PAISLY SILK WAISTS
Gingham and Organdie Combinations
Newest Styles Arriving Weekly
FRENCH LINGERIE
Gowns in Fine Nainsook Hand Embroidered
BLOOJMERS, BOUDOIR PYJAMAS,    UNDERSKIRTS STEP-INS ENVELOPE
CHEMISE
SILK LINGERIE in Camisoles, Envelope
Chemise Step-ins
•, Undervests and Bloomers
SILK HOSE—
Special Bargains in odd lines of Ladies Silk Hose
Values to $2.75, to clear, per pair 	
BHJEHHsiriffl^ 3
$1.25
MENS' DEPARTMENT
New arrivals in Mens' and Boys' SUITS, HATS, CAPS, SHIRTS   and
SHIRTS.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
SPORT
Pure Strawberry Jam, 4 lb. tins .... 90c
Raisins, seeded and seedless, 15 oz
pkts. 2 for   35c
Greengage Plums, in heavy syrup
2Ui's tins 2 for   55c
Nice juicy Oranges, 3 doz. for....$1.00
Rolled and Boned Shoulder Hams
in pieee per lb  28c
Royal Crown Cleanser, 2 tins ;.. 25c
Sesqui Matches, per pkt  40c
Camouson Sour Chow and   Mixed
Pickles, per bot  25c
Fresh   Tomatoes,   Cucumbers,   Head
Lettuce, Bananas, Grape Fruit,
Cherries, Rhubarb, Green Cabbage, Picnic Plates, etc.
W. P. Symons
Proprletoi
FORESHORE LEASE
* Nimiilmo Lund  District
District   ol Newcastle,    Vancouver
Island, B. C.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, It. C.
"The Superior Grocers"
Where   Most  People  Trade
FREE
For one week only commencing Tuesday, June fUh with every purchase of 2 small
tins Nabob Coffee, sold at the same price as
the 1 lb. tins, wc will Give Free
One packet Nabob
Custard Powder or
One Packet Nabob
Quick Tapioca
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. II. Mumford
TAKE  notice  that  the    Canadian
Collieries   (Dunsmuir)     Limited   of
Victoria,    B.  C,    occupation    Mine i
Owners, intend to apply for permls- j
slon to lease the following described
land:—
Commencing at a post planted 374 I
feet  North   (Ast.)   from<.the    South !
West corner of Lot 1, Newcastle Dl- !
strict, Vancouver Island, B, C. at the
approximate high  water mark    and
point of   beginning,    thence   North
(AstJ to low water mark, an approximate distance of 752 feet more or
less,  thence meandering  along    the
said  low water mark, northeasterly,
northerly,  northwesterly  and  south- J
westerly to the Intersection of a line |
produced North (Ast.) from the West
boundary of sold ix>t l, thonco North
(Ast.) to approximate high waler
mark, a distance of 108 feel more or j
less, thonco northeasterly, caslarly,
southeasterly nud southwesterly
along said approximate high wilier
mark to point of beginning, and containing in nil -12 acres more or loss, i
CANADIAN    COLLIERIES     (IIUNS-
Ml.'llt)  LIMITED,
nolo, May Ittli, 11)23.
Albert  Crompton   Lymn.  Agent.
Jy, 21,
The Largest and .Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. Wo Cleau or
Dye all kinds nf Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in nnd see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work y»u wish
to have done.
Our   Work   nnd   Service
Will  I'lensu Von   ::   ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, It, ('.       :      IMione IWII'J
THE INCREASING VALUE OF YOUR
TELEPHONE
YOUR TELEPHONE is of greater value
as each month goes by. With a steady
increase* in the^number of new telephones
you are constantly able to talk with a
larger number of people. This applies
to different parts of the province.
It means to the business man that he is in close
touch with more people. As every telephone is a long
distance telephone, anyone on the Lower Mainland or
Vancouver Island may be reached at a moment's notice.   The conversation is direct the reply instant.
Don't overlook the cheaper night rates. Between
7 p.m. and 8 a.m., you get three times the day period
at the same price.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
/
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Turn
Hack They Go Looking
Like New The Next Movn.
t From Thc
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, DAur„ueir
"FULLY EQUIPPED"
The Ford Car is "fully equipped".
With the Ford Motor Company "fully
equipped" does not mean unnecessarily
equipped at high price:;, with non-essentials
to motoring satisfaction.
Seventy out of every one hundred people
who bought cars in Canada last year
bought Ford cars and placed their stamp
of approval upon this policy.
Corfield Motors Ltd.1 o,,rt™n>.B-(-
9993
FORD   MOTOR   COMPANY   OF   CANADA.    LIMITED,    FORD.   ONTARIO
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
lltltl IU'. Permanent Loan Bldir.
CHUNK 28111      VICTORIA, B.C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Oflice and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
RHEUMATISM
BANISHED m CHIROPRACTIC
Hee Me at Clarke'* Residence) Near
Union Hall, Any Day Between
i and fi p.m.
K. O. HAUKEDAI., Chiropractor.
Difficulties are things that show
whnt men are.
Man's Match
A eturdy match, big enough
tt handle wilh your mitts on.
Strong enough to strike on
rough surfaces. Made to
withstand more moisture.
A safe match, free from
pelson and free from glow
when blown out.
Their added length gives
longer light In the dark.
HM ll
li
MAPLE LEAF
MATCHES
Ufjxmlandtdlei .
!*• Cmdw MUA C Uettti SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd,  11123.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Ctl
FIVEt
Ask this **•**
When you are urged to boy
another baking powder because it costs less than Royal,
ask—"Is it made from
Cream of Tartar? "
ROYAL
Baking Powder
Made from Cream of Tartar
derived from grapes
Contains No Alum—Leaves
No Bitter Taste
MADE IN CANADA
BARTHELMESS' NEW
PICTURE PARALLELS
"TOL'ABLE DAVID"
Impossible For You to Get More
Tire Value—Needless to Get Less
DUNLOP
TIRES
Matchless
aaa
Non-Skid
3=
TheCost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical installation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires/ In these-cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified, electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the REST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered with Hie valves of thc mains nf this Company, therehy
allowing ii cnnxiderahle amount ot water to run to waste, we
therefore wish lo point out thai It Is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parlies he apprehended, they will he prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Another picture to parallel "Tol-
'ahle David" may sound almost Impossible, yet Richard Barthelmess
has created just that in "The Bond
Boy," his newest -production for Inspiration Pictures, Inc... coming to
Ilo-llo Theatre Friday and Saturday.
Henry King, who has directed all
Barthelmess' starring vehicles, helps
him do it again.
With George W. Ogden's story as a
guide, this production has the Virginian hills locale, the people for characters, the  old  practice of bonding
out children to masters until    they
reach twenty-one for    theme.    And,
in this case, Dick Barthelmess Is the
boy.    He is cast as    Joe    Newbolt,
young son of an Impoverished widow
who, to save his mother from    the
poor house, accepts (denture to Isom
| Chase, farmer and taskmaster. Chase,
< nn old man, hns taken a young wife
J —n mere girl who found another Job.
These two young people are thrown
together In a common bond of servitude, but the girl, after failing In an
attempt to win Joe's    Interest,    becomes infatuated with a gaudy book
agent and plans an elopement with
him.    Overhearing   this,  Joe   Intercepts and also accepts    the    blame
when Chase returns.    In a fight the
farmer Is accidentally killed but Joe
, is culled upon for silence to save the
! young wife's honor and he stumbled
1 to the very shadow of the gallows—
| having saved another, hut unable to
j save himself.
I    The story is a magnificent one, but
more striking still is the star's portrayal.  There  are   moments    which
I should not be told here; their enjoy-
I ment must be left to the   audience
and there are other moments about
i which one should remain silent yet
' cannot.   They are bo good they must
i be rovcnled. A Bnatch of cell, a hope-
' less buy, beyond the window  gaunt
, gallows standing and a noose swinging in the moonlight.    Its reflection
pours through the cell window and
■ strikes  the  wall.    Its  omen  numbs
lhe boy.   Only one eye moves—from
right to left,   from     left   to   right
throughout thc hours, following the
. shadow of the  rope.  It's wonderful
work.    And on top of lt comes an
| escape and a man hunt with bloodhounds which stand high In the year's
Scale of dramatic thrills.
will make you weak from laughing!
Look Extra to be screened with
"SAFETY LAST"
Along with Lloyd's comedy Doug-
Ins McLean will be seen in "Bell Boy
13" a dandy five reel comedy. This
will make a twelve reel show for
these two days.   Don't miss It.
james McGregor
resigns chief
inspectorship
I
HAIR-ABLE HAIR-RAISING
SCENES IN LtOYD'S
SENSATIONAL COMEDY
The location is twelve stories above
the street. Clinging to the side ot the
building, two-thirds of the way up,
with a dozen pigeons roosting on his
head is Harold Lloyd. The crowd below, amused but frightened, watch
breathlessly while the spectacled comedian continues his upward climb,
overcoming the most difficult and
hilarious obstacles.
This is just one of the Impressions
you get after seeing Lloyd's new
seven reel comedy which comes to
the Ilo-llo Monday and Tuesday.
How Harold Lloyd performs his
thrill stunts Is a mystery. It Ib certain that he did them himself, for his
face is seen plainly in every hazardous predicament he encounters. When
a young man attempts to climb the
side ot a twelve story building in the
place of a real "human fly," and
meets hilarious trouble every foot ot
tlle way up the result is a continuous
run of uproarious laughter.
But the comedy Is not all thrills.
Thore Is a real story—n delightful
story wilh pretty little Mildred Dovls
—now Mrs. Harold Lloyd—the young
lady In the case. We don't lik.i to
tell too much of It, but Mildred Is thc
causo of everything—ns hns been with
Woman through the Ages.
The Ilrst scenes of the comedy lake
place 111 ii department store 111 lhe
111k City, where Harold has gone to
make his fortune. Ills trouble
commences when the girl, thlnkii'-K
he has acquired a fortune already,
comes to town to marry him. And
what a time Harold has! The haughty
floor-walker In thc store glares while
Harold tries to get his lady love out
ot the building and nt thc same time
pretend to her that he is the general
manager. But I must not give away
too many secrets!
As The Boy, Harold Lloyd is at his
best. He has a huge bag of new
tricks up his sleeve and a reckleBB-
ncss In facing danger that Is amazing.
Mildred is sweetness personified.
Then "there is Noah Young, well remembered as the hard-boiled gob In
"A Sailor Made Man." Bill Strothers,
a real "human-fly" makes his screen
debut and gets Into the spirit ot the
fun splendidly. Westcott B. Clarke is
tho floor-walker, and Anna town-
send, remembered aB "Grandma," is
also seen. And there Is the funniest
"drunk" we have ever seen In films.
You really cannot afford to miss
"Safety Last." It's Harold's most
hair-able   hair-raising  comedy   that
Victoria.—Mr. James McGregor,
who has been Chief Inspector of
Mines for British Columbia since the
10th May, 1920, has resigned the position because of ill health. The duties of the office will be taken over
on thc first of June next by George
Wilkinson, who was chief Inspector
from thc year 1917 to 1920 and resigned to become general superintendent or thc Paclllc Const Coal
Mines, Ltd.
In making this announcement Hon.
Wm. Sloan, Minister of Mines, staled
that it was a matter of sincere regret, not only to himself but to all officials of the Department ot Mines,
that Mr. McGregor should be compelled to relinquish office on account
of poor health. He had been In the
service of the Department for about
twenty-five years and hod a record
throughout that period of efficiency
and conscientious attention to duty.
From the age of fourteen years up
to the date of his entry to the civil
service he had been prominently connected with the coal mining Industry
ot Vancouver Island. It was Mr.
Sloan's hope and that of all Mr. McGregor's associates, that he would be
restored to complete health.
Mr. Wilkinson, who takes over the
office, has had many experiences as
a mine operator and engineer In this
province. Prior to becoming chief Inspector in 1917 he was manager of
the Western Fuel Co.'s Reserve mine
at Nanaimo. Born in Cumberland,
England, May 27, 1875, he was at
work in the mines there for five
years before coming to Vancouver
Island In 1896, since which time he
has been engaged, practically without
cession, in and around the coal and
metalliferous mines. His techni-cal
qualifications are the highest, as he
holds a first class mine manager's
certificate both 111 British Columbia
and Alberta and is a member ot the
association of professional engineers
of the province of B. C.
REVISION OF VOTERS LIST
Comox   Electoral   District
NOTICE is hereby given that I
shall, on Monday, the 18th day of
June, 1923, hold a Court ot Revision,
for the purpose of hearing and determining any and all ' objections
against the retention of any name or
names on the Register of Voters for
the Comox Electoral District. Such
Court will be open at the Court
House, Cumberland, at 10 o'clock In
the forenoon.
Dated nt Cumberland. B. C. May
7th, 1028.
JOHN   BAIRD,
Registrar   of   Voters.
ir
Ladies Dresses
In Jersey Cloth, Green with $1/1   f\(\
Fawn trimmings       «PJ-TT»OU
Henna and (£"11   K.(\
Fawn       *j)AJ.»t)U
lTmd $14.50
Ladies Pullover Sweaters in different styles and ef-
Pure wool                        <p4«4c)     & {pO.DU
 : JUST    ARRIVED :	
Another shipment of Swiss Organdies 7P»/»
at per yard           • *»v
LADIES MILLINERY
The balance of our Millinery will be disposed of
at 25 per cent reduction.
GORDON'S
Phone 133
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
I *
New Goods to
Hand this Week
Voiles in Paisley patterns Qf>/»
per yard          Owt
Voiles in colors ftCvn
per yard          OOC
Ratine cloth in variety of colors d» -|   AA
Per yard    «pl*UU
A new lot of Ginghams A C "
Per yard          40C
Ladies. Belts in an assortment of colors. Ladies collars
i Hosiery and Vests.
Ladies Sweater Coats d»p» QR
Each     fpD.uD
Ladies Sweater Coats (fi A  AA
Each         ejyi.UU
Laces, Valencines and New Torchon ff'
per yard, from  Ov
Artsyl Rope Silk, Princess Pat Hair Nets, and Lingerie Ribbons, Mens Caps anil Belts, Penman Underwear
Khaki and Sport Shirts.
A~fu!l line of Furniture, Housefurnishings, Wall
Papers and Linoleums.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
i
Palm and olive oils
—nothing else—give
nature's green color
lo Palmolive Soap.
Made From The
Mildest Cleansers
Pal nit> live contains Palm and Olive oils.
These oils were thc cosmetic cleansers
used by Cleopatra and kept her skill
fresh, smooth and youthful.
Today their scientific combination in
Palmolive produces the most perfect of
all facial cleansers. Science lias discovered
nothing finer, milder or more beneficial
for the toilet than Palm and Olive oils.
Artful applications of rouge and powder may lend your skin the appearance of
smooth freshness. But unless you cleanse
the pores thoroughly every day with soap
and water, blackheads, pimples and other
blemishes are sure to result.
Some persons imagine that soap is too
harsh for the face. They should try Palmolive. Its mild, smooth, creamy lather,
when massaged into thc skin, cleanses
without thc slightest irritation.
You can buy Palmolive Soap at alt
first-class dealers.
Mad.' in Canada
Volume and Efficiency
Produce 25-cent
Quality for
10c SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY. JUNE 2nd, 1923.
News Of British Columbia
One million shcop In 11. C. In 193H,
is lhe goal aimed at by Hon, T. 1).
Pattullo, minister ol hinds, who
states tliat the government is undertaking an educational campaign to
increase the number of sheep raised
in thc province. At present, he suys,
there nre only 50,000 sheep In British Columbia, on the Hi,000 (arms of
the province, There is room for
100,000 farms, but if only twenty
head of sheep were carried on eaeii
of the lli.OOo farms, there would be
a total of 320,000. The minister
points oul Hull every farmer should
carry a few sheep. The coat of their
keep is small, while Hie profits are
large. Furthermore, there Is a
splendid home market for both mutton, lamb ami wool. At nreeent British Columbia brings In 60,000 sheep
annually for home consumption, as
well as 3,000,000 pounds id' dressed
mutton and products. British Columbia is an ideal sheep country and tlio
farmer lias lieeu passing up a sure
thing.
.More faith in lhe natural wealth
of their own country instead of blind
investment In foreign securities
peddled by glib salesmen, would
have meant a saving of millions of
dollars to the people of British Columbia during the past three or four
years. Attorney-General A. 11.
.Manson declared when addressing a
meeting of the Retail Merchants Association. "British Columbia is lhe
last country iu the world than can
afford to lack business initiative," be
said. "We aro commencing to experience a period of widespread industrial readjustment and yet we find thai
many of our most promising enterprises, bused on Hie natural wealth
of lhe country, arc passing into thc
control of foreigners. Ilnve we no
wealthy business men, or do they
simply lack initiative and n pioneering spirit?"
.     .     .
A source of income for lhe government will be the coming sale of
building lots at Point Grey, Part of
the 30(d) acres of government property, comprising the University lands,
Is being cleared and will be placed
on the market ibis summer and fall,
slates Hon. W. II. Sutherland, minister of public works. It is understood that the proceeds from Ihe sale
of these valuable lands will go a long
way towards paying for lhe university.
*     >*     *
Premier Oliver and liis cabinet
have commenced tho heavy task of
redistribution of seats iu the Legislature of British Columbia, and it is
expected that at the next session of
tiie House, which must commence by
December 15 and probably wdll start
in October, a bill will lie introduced
providing for a re-arrangement of
provincial representation, ai the
last general election there were less
than 1000 votes cast In several rid- ■
ings, while large electoral districts
' in some Instances have only one
member. No decision can be given
oui as to what changes will lie made
but Premier Oliver declares he is
determined to solve tho problem in
such a manner us to provide the
fairest representation possible for
every part of the province.
*     +     *
Hon. William Sloan, minister of
mines, has returned from the International Mining Convention, held at
Spokane, where he delivered nn address on mining in British Columbia,
past and present, a special mineral
display was taken lo Spokane and no
Utile Interest was thus created III lhe
great mineral wealth of tliis province.
Tho minister claims thai ibis will he
Hie banner mining year in British
Columbia, with a total production of
from I'orly in filly million dollars.
liiiilsh uud American capital is bo-
coming Interested, while local investors nre realizing that the finest
Investment opportunities on Hie continent are found within Hie borders
of their own province
NOT ENOUGH LUMBER
IN B. C. FOR THIS FIRM
! SUGGESTIONS
FOR PLANTING
HOME GROUNDS
Written for the Canadian Horticultural Council by J. E.
Carter, Guelph.
As one result of the wide-sprend
movements for outdoor improvement that have swept the country,
awakening the latent civic pride of
individuals and in many cases, of en
lire communities, considerable progress has been made toward making
our country more beautiful,
Tiie neglected grounds of many
school houses and public play
grounds have been beautified, waste
places reclaimed, vacant tots redeemed, hack yards tidied and Hie
homo grounds generally mnde more
attractive and livable.
As landscape gardening is an art
not widely understood or appreciated, it is nol at all surprising that
mistakes have been made In som; of
these ntlempts to beautify. But If
Uiese efforts have been Instrumental
in removing the untidy, tell-tale
signs from pleasing and orderly In
appearance, they have siirely nol
been iu vain.
li is much easier to criticise than
to rectify, but a few simple suggestions as to what constitutes artistic
planting, may be of some assistance
In correcting, or at least modifying,
tho poor effecls of most flagrant errors. Haphazard planting and
crowding, cause most of the troubles.
To set out quantifies of trees, shrubs
plants at random without a well de-
bound to produce a "crazy quilt" effect that is confusing and disquieting.
As an arlisl drst makes a study or
sketch of a painting he desires to
create, so the amateur landscape
gardener should study carefully the
possibilities of lhe area lo bo beautified, and compose a planting
scheme Ihat will be harmonious. In
this working plan, aim to Bccure as
large uud unbroken a vista of velvety lawn as is possible as this'gives
a restful effect of speclousness. Effectively grouped shrubs nnd plants
may be used to round out angles,
screen off undesirable objects and to
form a kind of frnino nlong the boundaries or division walls of fences.
They should never, for good effect,
be dotted promlscouBly on the lawn
proper, as such a method tends to
dwarf or decrease the apparent size
of the plot.
Plants graduated as to height—the
tallest in tbe back ground—planted
along the foundation of buildings
soften the harsh outlines nnd serve
as a sort of connecting link in the
correlation of buildings and grounds.
Stiff, formal lines in the border may
be avoided by skilfully mussing appropriate varieties, so that the
groups dovetail ln nn Irregular fash-
Ion. Trees, If used nl all, on places
of limited areas, are usually boiler
in thc background. Those that attain a lurgc size are decidedly out
of place In n planting scheme for
small yards.
Kven the diminutive city yard has
its planting possibilities. If the small
patch is well sodded or sown witli a
high grado of lawn mixture, the resulting green sward, bordered with
flowering plnnts and graceful vines
trained to drape and screen the fence
of the enclosure, will form an oasis
thut will prove pleasing to the eye,
rest to the nerves und a fitting recompense for all the effort put forth and
for the faith implyicd.
D. M. CARLEY PASSED
AWAY IN VICTORIA
The death occurred on May 23rd.
1923. ill Victoria, ot David Murk Car-
ley, aged 64 years; born in Frank-
town, Ont. He ls survived by, besides
his widow, one daughter, Miss Maureen Carley, ln Victoria, and two
sons, Cordon, In Ladysmith, and David. In Victoria. The funeral was
held this afternoon nt 2 o'clock. Thc
late Mr. f'nrlcy had many friends in
Nanaimo and Lndytmlth, where for
a number of years he was tho publisher of the Ladysmith Chronicle.
If your job looks too big for you,
take It apart and look nt it piece by
pleeo.    lt won't seem so formidable.
Directors of lhe Penticton Co-operative Growers have placed an order for 50,1100 apple boxes
Calgary lirm.
Willi
Positively, Mr. Gnllnglior
Going out of business, will sell
baby buggy and baby bed, phone 204
(Want ud in Pulton, Mo.. Sun.
Several Courtenay grown-ups are
foregoing the pleasure of radio because they are too proud to ask Hie
little boy next door bow to fix up un
outfit.
(fy&fa*
Cascade
OR
U. B. C. Beer
PURE FULL-STRENGTH BEERS
They Wear Well
On the Market as long as thc Oldest, inhabitants remember antl still thc most
POPULAR BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Old Friends Are Best
Leave Your Order at any Government Store
WE   DO  THE   REST
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, June 1st and 2nd
RICHARD BARTHELMESS
—in—
"The Bond
Boy"
Richard Barthelmess
wdMaiyThuraan
/»"The Bond Boy'
WHAT A PICTURE!
The story of a boy who
passed through slavery
and to the shadow ot the
gallows to save a woman.
An escape and bloodhound chase as exciting
as the screen can give.
Straight  From
The Farm
A St. John Comedy-also
A Neely Edwards Comedy
Matinee Saturday 2.30
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Harold Lloyd in
In his Latest Special 7—Big Reels of Joy—7
Chairs anchored to the floor, straps for hysterical
patrons, Doctor in attendance.
You'll hold your breath as Lloyd climbs the 12 storey building and
only one way to fall-
Dedicated to the cause of laughter and thrills, containing all the
laughs and thrills of filmdom and as many roars as the Atlantic only
louder.
LOOK—EXTRA—LOOK
Douglas McLean in
"BELL BOY 13"
5 Reels and every one a scream
12—Reels of Comedy and Thrills—12
"SAFETY
LAST"
CHILDREN, 25c.
ADULTS, 50c.
SPECIAL MATINEES TUESDAY, 10 A.M. and 3:30 p.m. Children 15c,     Adults 35c
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
T.WHERRY
KIDHM6T(VttNNER
imfm.   Ma.
lUt .<
tlm
M Pandora Ave..
Victoria, ». O. ,
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Clothes Pressing
Cleaning and Repairing
 0	
We will cull for und deliver work
of any  kind.
Satisfaction   Guaranteed.
A. KINGSBERRY
II MIlKItl.AM), B. t.
Adjoining II. & It.
EASTBOUND
SUMMER EXCURSIONS
FROM VANCOUVER, VICTORIA AND NANAIMO
WINNIPEG
MINNEAPOLIS
$72.00
ST. PAUL
nilLUTH
CHICAGO   $1*011 LONDON   $113.75
DETROIT $105.82 TORONTO  $118.",
NIAGARA FALLS. $120.62
MONTREAL   $1(2.75 QUEBEC   $141.80
ST. JOHN $1«0»10 HALIFAX   $I0«.I».!>
BOSTON, $153.50
NEW YORK, $147.40
113.00 additional for oceon trip between Vancouver-Prince Rupert on sale daily to Sept. 15th. Final return limit, October
31st.    Choice of routes—stop-overs and side trips
VISIT JASPER NATIONAL PARK
$40.25 Return from Victoria
E. W.  BICKLE, Agent ' C. F. EARLE, D.P.A.
Cumberland, B. C. Victoria, B. 0.
Canadian National Railujaqs
Veteran's Wood
Supply
t^ $6.oo
Any length required.
MONK YOUR 0KI1KHH TO 5.8.
A. A. BROWN,
Royston Road
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT  LOWEST  PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone l!>9 : Night—134-X  Courtenay SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1923.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
Our   Shoe   Sale
Is Still On
Your attention is invited to a few of the many
BARGAINS that are being slaughtered.
BOYS Strong ALL Leather School Shoes 11.12
$2.90
and 13
reduced to
Boys Solid Leather do. l's to 5's. Regular price $5.00.
?,nS* $3.50 * $3.90
$4.90
Mens Heavy Work Shoes, Solid
Leather, reg. price $7.50 now selling at
Many other lines of Shoes on our Bargain Counter at
sale prices.
LOWEST PRICES ON OVERALLS—
Boys Bib, blue with white stripe and black per pair
$1.00and     1.25
Mens Overalls in black, and blue without bib at
(bl.f U and tpZ.ZO
Mens Overalls with Bib, in blue and white and black at
tpZ.ZO    andtpZ.DU
NOW SHOWING LADIES SWEATERS, (in Pullover
and with Collar) in Pure Wool in the newest colorings
at
$3.50 and $4.75
Less than Vancouver Prices
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND
OFFICE CAT
BY JUNIUS
When a liner arrives from Europe
and passes through the rum fleet off
New York Harbor the band plays,
"Comin' Through the Rye."
* - •     «
Since the war there's only two
kinds of men left, majors and minors,
the majors can't do any work, and
the minors won't.
* *     *
The Shock of his Life
"Take care of this man," said the
sergeant to the warden, aB he went
to lock him up. "Give him a nice dry
cell. Ile used to make batteries."
* •     *
Kennedy says about the most important thing going on now Is light
underwear.
Wretchedness usually ls self-inflicted.
Persons searching for the fountain
of youth may find It in friendliness,
sagely offers R. C. Lang.
* *     *
An open fireplace openly arrived
at is the dream of every dear sweet
girl.
* *     *
"Jesse James and his band of
buccaneers took your money, all
right," explodes Murray. "But they
didn't force you to HU out income
blanks."
* *     *
A Royston girl says she expects to
knock the Main Street hounds cold
when she blooms this spring In King
Tut costume.
* *     *
In a certain drug store there is a
glass bowl ou a stand with single
goldfish In it. On the outside of the
bowl Is a placard bearing the following answers to questions which the
druggist has become tired of answering ln person:
This is a goldfish. It Is alive.
There is only one of It. We got It
from a boy.
We do not know where the boy got
it. It has never died. We do not
know how old It is. We feed it when
we want to.   ln eats what we give it.
That is water it is ln.
We got the water from the faucet.
We have had the first even since we
got lt.
BREAD!
We could not get along without it.
It's the old "Standby"—
Why? Because it is all substance and nourishment.
Because   it   satisfies   when
other foods do not.
Ours has a real bread flavor
and a good substantial slice.
Call up your grocer. He has
it.
Bread is your  Best  Food-
Eat more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The Bread that Builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Wood for Sale
KBLEL0AD $6.00
The Eye
Exclusively
Refraction and Muscular
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES, i
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK1
Write For Prices to
THE MOOREWHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Ofnre 2<K0 Bridge Street, Vlotnrln, B.O.
R. Kaplansky, O.D.
OPTOMETRIST and OPTICIAN
EYESIGHT SPECIALIST
Graduate Canadian Opthomo-
| lie College. Registered by Exa-
j mination in B. C. Government
[ Board of Examiners. — Con-
; sulfations and office hours 1—
; 5.30 and 7 to 9.30 p.m., or by
, special appointment.
| Phone to Cumberland Hotel or
B. Forcimmer
NANAIMO, B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tucs-
duy of every month at
Cumberland
Hotel
Parlors
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of thai, hlgh-
grail* confections arrlv* av.rt
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
alt the time.
Henderson's
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Saturday
CUT RATE DRUGS
25c Carter's Liver Pills   19c
25c Nalco Health Salts (Tins)   18c
25c Tooth Powder (Zymol)   18c
50c Face Cream (Vanishing)    34c
35c Charcoal Tooth Paste   21c
25c Talcum Powders (Assorted Odors)  15c
50c Emulsified Cocoanut Oil  38c
Wilson's Invalid   Port Wine $1-21
50c A. B. S. & C. Laxative Tablets (Bottles of
100)      36c
75c Abbey's Salts    63c
35c Electric Oil     28c
Candy Specials
We have just received a FRESH shipment of
Ligget's and Guths Chocolates and Candy
Guths  1 lb. Box
ORIGINAL  Saturday  CANDY
A Pleasant combination of Fruit, Cream,   and
Chewy centres, chocolate covered    SPECIAL
PRICE per box 69c
Jelly Beans (Best quality ( per lb 38c
Burnt Peanuts (Sugar Covered) per lb  13c
Peppermint Patties  (Chocolate covered large
creamy) per lb.   75c
Peppermint Patties  (chocolate covered    large
creamy) 2\U lb. pox $1.50
Chocolate LIQUORS (Guths). Try these, per lb. $1.00
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Lang's Drug Store
Send Us Your Mail Orders
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
Ub
A man who la always itching to
get somewhere isn't necessarily ambitious. He may have fleaa, thinks
H. Murray.
* •     *
D. R. McDonnell says: give some
men a fair start and they will take an
unfair advantage.
An Artiste
The way of a rtis long,
The restless clocks keep thicking;
Her art has made her strong;
With those who do the picking;
She has no voice for song,
But she haa legs for kicking.
.     .     .
You nearly always find a prospect
In the mental attitude you expected
to And him in.
The reason it took centuries to
build the Pyramids Is because It was
a government job.
* •    •
Cameron says, just because a girl
wears clocks o nher hose, you can't
tell how fast she Is.
* *     •
The loudest barkers are always wilh
the side show.
Any man who marries for money,
cams it.
* *    *
Accidents will happen in the best
families, and if the divorce reports
are correct, that's where most of
them to happen.
* *    *
Nature is very beautiful tf you can
find a spot where nobody has had u
picnic.
* «     *
Makes  you  Strong  like  Onions
"My tonic Alls you full of hope,
It's marvelous," says Dr. Snltcher,
"There's gold and silver In the dope,
And that will make your blood much
richer."
* •     *
Dalton says another very good memory test is the drip pan under the
Ice box.
* ♦     *
When a girl wishes a man to save
his money lt Ib a sure sign he is going to need it.
* *     *
Taxpayers will be glad to learn that
modernizing a battleship doesn't cost
any more than building a new one.
* *     *
There was a man in Cumberland,
and he was most unwise. He Introduced his sweetheart to a lot ot other
guys.
* *     »
Dave Richards says he can't decide
If fat men get rich or rich meii get
tat.
* *     *
We have discovered that most
people work because they have to.
* »     •
And we can have nt eaeh other
The radio's the nicest thing;
It's sure beyond compare.
More folks, nn doubt, will  want  to
sing
With music In the air.
* •    *
Grover Cleveland Bergdoll Is said
to be worth 1200,000, but mdst
people wouldn't give a nickel for
him.
* «    *
A Walla Walla, Wash., wireless
fan has heard Java on the Radio. But
we're content to hear Java on the
percolator these tine Spring mornings.
* •     *
Los Angeles messenger company
advertises "Instantaneous service on
one hour's notice."
* •     •
Old Man Jewhopsockey has got It
ln for the editor of thc Inlander. He
read an editorial claiming lt paid to
be courteous, and in trying It out thc
next day, a book agent sold him (40.
worth of encyclopedias.
* *     *
Men who try laying down the law
to their wives probably wonder how
Solomon  lived so long.
»     •     ♦
Statistics show Ihat nearly two
thousand persons died during 1022 us
a result nf sleeping sickness. Jepson
knows of a number of telephone ope.
rutors who survived the epidemic.
It didn't take the New Jersey
couple who spent their honeymoon
In a taxlcab very long to discover
that married life ls full of bumps.
•     «     •
It ts comparatively safe to strike
the average American without warning nowadays. He either Is wearing
thick glasses or has his hands in
his pocketa—frequently he Ib doing
both.
SYNOPSIS OF
L4NDAGTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price ot first-class land
reduced to (5 an acre; second-class
to (2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary Improvements ou
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy clalma
for five years and make Improvements
to value of (10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivation of at least 0
acres before receiving Crown Orant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation
not less than 3 yearB, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate of
Improvement and transfer Ills claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent
of (360 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than !> years, and improvements ot (10.00 per acre, including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at leant 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, it
he requires land in conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory improvements
made and residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as homesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or Industrial sites ou
timber laud not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment, of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction ot a
road lo them. Rebate of one-halt ot
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase price, Is made.
Pre-Emptors' Free  Grants Act.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heiis or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended from for one year from the death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege Is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1018. Taxes are remitted for live
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1014, on account of payments,
fees or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1020.
Nub-Purchasers of Crown Lands
Provision made for Issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchuse. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, Interest and nixes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole nf original parcel, purchase price due und
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
must be made hy May 1, 1020.
G ruing
Crazing Art. 1819, for systematic
development ot livestock Industry
provides tor grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner, Annual grazing permits Issued based on number! ranged; priority for oslabllihed owners, Stock-
owners may form Associations for
range management, Free, or partial-
ly free, permits for settlers, camper*
or travellers, up lo len bend.
TIRES AND SERVICE
See
BOOL AND WILSON
We stock all sizes.
VULCANIZING GAS OILS
COURTENAY and NANAIMO
Sa EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd, 1923.
FOR   BEAUTY'S   SAKE
By JANE HILL
Every real woman
wants to be beautiful,
so those who are not
born so must use
whatever menus and
artistry aro at hand.
Complexions, are. of
course, of primary importance. But the woman whose skin isn't in
good condition, and
who refuses to deny
herself sweets or meats
or whatever it Is that
experience proves is
not kind to her—that
woman has disqualified herself for instruction at the very start.
Drinking water might
clear her complexion—
glasses and glasses of
water, one every time she thinks of it. But this, too, takes patience in keeping it up. Exercise will work wonders, particularly If taken under a trained Instructor. But some women
have so little will-power, even in pursuit of their own ends.
Hint a course of action of any kind seems impossible to them.
And yet, nothing in tlle way of cosmetics, colors, or well chosen
clothes will disguise fundamentally unhealthy skin conditions.
Do, for beauty's sake, attack your problem strenuously, If
strenuous     methods are needed!
Little Things About Hie Complexion
Cold cream at night, well massaged in (a' thin film In the
daytime us a basis for powder) rouge of the right shade, well
placed, so as not to spoil the curve o fthe cheek by coming too
lar forward of emphasize high cheek bones by o spot at thc top
—the right powder to blend with the natural tint of the skin
—tiiese tuny all he worked out individually, and are well worth
the effort.
Thc powder question, by the way, Is not only very important, but much neglected. Half the women who use white
powder should substitute brunette; almost all of thc remainder should declare for flesh color unless, in individual cases, it
is found better to blend one's own powder, using a little of
this and a little of tbat unlil Ihe exact shade ofone's skin
is attained.
Ilon'l Forget Your Figure
There now! We've spent hours over our complexions.
But. If we're past twenty-five (or even if wc aren't but weren't
horn slim Vcnuses), isn't there an ugly bit of padding somewhere tbat Nature hns treacherously given us while wc wern't
looking? Our hips—are they too prominent? (Truthfully, now!)
Or have wc escaped that tragedy only to grow unnecessarily—
side view, please—somewhere else? Or does our problem lie
above the equator rather than below?
What I sthe use of a beautiful face If it can't be seen for
noticing the ugly, billowy curve from armpit to ankle? A worldly-wise corset Is the best friend of most of us; but when you
buy this necessary heauty aid, use at least the discretion you
do In buying your face powder. In this day of corsets exactly
designed to different llgurc needs there is no more reason for
you to wear an obvious, uncomfortable, unbecoming corset than
I here Is need of making a caricature of your face by using a
deadly white powder Instead of one tinted to the natural color
of your skin. Corsetry isn't what it wns In thc old days -thank
Venus.
If you have any corset problem, write to Miss Jane Hill,
In care of this paper, and your letter (unopened) will bo forwarded direct to her for answer.
J. Sutherland
Dry Goods and Gents'Furnishings
Chevrolet-—
82 per cent, of the cost of this ear represents money actually spent in Canada for labor, material, and
parts, purchased from Canadian parts manufacturers.
This is a much higher percentage than exists with
the average Canadian-built car, and represents all that
can be possibly produced in Canada at the present
time.
The annual pay roll of The General Motors of
Canada Ltd., is estimated to run over six millions of
dollars, actually paid to Canadian labor.
Before deciding on a car, consider these facts, and
remember that the CHEVROLET SUPERIOR is more
than holding it's own in the light car market today,
due to public appreciation of these three outstanding
features:
1 ECONOMY OF OPERATION
2 RELIABILITY AND POWER
8    QUALITY AND APPEARANCE
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
Agents
Phone fil Phone 61
THHE COURTENAY GARAGE
Local Briefs
Mr. Thomas Oraham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries
(I)) Ltd. accompanied by Miss Janet
Graham and Mr. Colville Graham
motored to Victoria on Friday morning.
iraifl
mo ~~
Mr. Cenrgo O'Brien, Safety Engineer. Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
left for Ladysmith on Monday morn-
ning on his usual tour of inspection.
Mrs. David Hunden and son motored
to Victoria last week to attend the
Maytlme Frolic held ill thai city.
They returned on Tuesday accompanied hy Miss Pearl Hunden who
has successfully completed lier
course at tlie Provincial Normal
School.
Mrs. Earl  Fletcher of Nanaimo  is
visiting relatives in town.
Mr. Charles Graham, accompanied
by Mrs. J. .11 Graham left for Victoria on  Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Farmer and
Leslie motored to Nanaimo on Saturday last.
CI. H. Clarke. Post Office Inspector
of Vancouver, arrived on tuesdny on
his usual tour of lnspocton and on
Wednesday Mr. Clarke examined the
Fourteen applicants for the position
of Postmaster. Il is not known who
will secure the appointment. The inspector will forward his decision In
the Post Office Department.
William Henderson, resilient architect of lhe Public Works Department was here on nn official visit
during the week in connection with
thc contract for tbe repairs to the
Cumberland Post office, Wc understand there Is about $2,000.00 to bo
spent on interior and exterior repairs.
Howdy  folks.   If   the  other   fellow
can, you can.  Because, to the other
' fellow, you are the other fellow.
H. *
Says a. reformer: "Gold Is unequalled a- 11 cause for provoking men to
! swear   and   curse."   But   Jones   Isn't
so sine about that! how about hunting a place n park?
*      *      *
If lhe Old  Cut curd  Yon
"Tliis   is   the  cat's   pajamas,"  said
the old gentleman, as be picked up
some of bis wol'e's lingerie.
.     *     *
An eight day clock In a Certain
Cumberland home, gains five minutes
a day tor the first three days, after
it i'< wound. From that time on It
loses three minutes a day, A never
ending source of speculation Is guessing what time it Is.
Cameron says let me live in n
house by lhe side of thc road and sell
gasoline lo man.
Miss Viola Campbell wbo has been
training at the Vancouver General
Hospital is In town visiting her
mother Mrs. Colin Campbell.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd. left for Ladysmlth on Monday
morning.
.Miss Vivian Aspect who has been
attending the Provincial Normal
School in Victoria returned on Saturday having been successful in
procuring her teacher's certificate.
Mr. F. Oliver spent last week etui
in Cumberland and returned lo Cbb-
sidys on Monday morning.
Tho Misses Olive and Edith Bickle
left on Friday morning's train en
route for California, where they will
reside In future.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
Thc Church Comm. of Holy Tritlly
Church are giving a Whist Drive and
Dance in the Anglican Church Hall
on Friday, Juno 8th. Cards al 8.00.
Dancing at 10.00. Refreshments.
If you enjoyed the Men's Club
Dances and Drives como lo the Hall
next Friday at 8.00 p.m. Admission
50 cents.
OPENS ICE CREAM PARLOR
Mrs. II. Yntos of the Union Hotel
announces the opening of an up-lo-
dote Ice Cream Parlor in this well-
known Hostelry. Soft Drinks, Candy.
Hand Boiled Chocolates are also I'or
sale.
Lots of women who claim In have
como from fine families appear lo be
a long wny from home.
IN MEMORIAM
lu   loving  memory of    Our    Dear
Little  Son   Ronald   Wm.   Derbyshire,
who fell asleep May 31st 1022.
Absence cannot take awny, what In
our hearts ls Dear
Ills Memory sweetens every day, and
keeps him ever near.
"Sadly missed, but lovingly remembered  by  Mother,  Daddy  and  Little
Sister Norma.
Snap In
Millinery
Trimmed and untrimmed Hats
to be sold at cost prices.
Stamped linen pillow cases   in
various designs
Mrs. Franceschini
DUNSMUIR AVENUE.
Ci'MBERI.ANIl B.C.
MAY DAY CELEBRATION
COLLECTION LIST
(Continued from page 1)
T. Klmuro l.on
N. Nlshimurn f.OO
I. llori 1.00
T. Nnknno 1.00
l.ai Vuen 1.00
lio lice 1.00
Quong Moo Lung 1.00
Sung cluing Cheh 1.00
i Sung Chung Cheh 1.00
[ Chow   Lee _ 1.00
Fop   Yuen .75
Sain  Woo .75
Keljl  Mlnnto .50
Wong Ding .50
I 7. Ilatnno .50
j Q. Minnlo .50
j K. Naknshima .50
i T. Tntelshl .50
| Roy .50
Den .50
('I'. Minnlo .50
S. Kohnynshi .50
K.  1 lama                     '^ .50
Soto Long .50
II. Kobayshi .50
D. Morila .50
Chon Siyon .5°
II. Yaniada • .50
C. Mlchell . .50
S. Tomlhlro .50
K. Fukakusa .50
N. Onngl .50
I T.  Tsuchihaslfl .50
j Y.  Hlrokndo .50
i ('.  Kaklno .50
J T. Araki .50
! s. Dol -f'O
| C. Nishlhata .50
T.  Fujlmoto .50
T. Fujlki .50
T.  Yeiri .50
T.  Mnliininto .50
I s. Jlltomurn .50
P. Alknwn .50
C.  Yanakila .50
[Cam   I.ling  Low .50
Lnl Fung .50
Tom   Kee .ru
ChflW  Kee .25
Mnh Klin Wong .50
Kee  Fung .50
Weg   Why .50
Wong Yicii uing .50
Hong Wah .25
Wong Cluing .50
Yoo Yuen .50
Kwong On .25
Qwong Quon -50
Lung   Kee .25
Kong   Sluing .25
Mon   Chong   Lung .25
Wall  Sang .25
W. R. Aymnnd .25
M. Nisiuiura .25
Ynn On Tong .25
$733.00
The Cumberland May Day Celebration Committees wish to tnke this
opportunity to express their thanks
and appreciation to the subscribers
of the May Day Fund for Cumberland
certainly did have one of tho best celebrations ever seen in the town and
i; Is to be hoped tliat (lie people will
respond as willingly next year, both
in Btlbscrlblug and their hearty cooperation.
Financial statement will appear In
our next issue.
When in Need of
Fresh Fruits and
Vegetables
Phone 38
Strawberries, Cherries, Cantelopes, Apple, Bananas,
Lemons, Oranges, California Grape Fruit and Florida
Grape Fruit.
Head Lettuce and Leaf Lettuce, Hot House Tomatoes,
Cucumbers, Cauliflower. Cabbage, Rhubarb,
Radish, Green Onions, New California
Onions, Potatoes
Week End Specials
Oranges, 35c doz. 3 doz. for  95c
Sugar Chrisp Corn Flakes, 2 pkgs. for   25c
Squirrel Peanut Butter, 1 lb. tins  25c
Bulk Cocoa, per lb  25c
Fresh Ground Coffee, per lb 60c & 70c
Sliced Pineapple 2's, 4 tins for 85c
Horse Shoe Salmon Flats, per tin   25c
Burns  & Brown
SERVICE
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38
QUALITY
The Things The
Motorist Needs
Are The Things
We Have—
And the prices are right!
Luggage Carriers to fit (fir Of
any car        $0.£iO
Sun-Beam Spot (fir  CA
Lights     «P«J OXf
Ford Steering Column d»1   OC
Supports         OlLtilO
Nonolio Body Polish (I»i   AA
Per can        (pl.VV
Liquid Gloss Body Polish (%r\n
Per can   veil*
Hulton's Hood Clip for Chevrolet (fiS) AA
Per pair        *V£du\J\f
C..& M. Oil retainers for Ford rear wheels (fin nr
the latest and best in the market per wheeltyLiiUO
Badger Gear Compound 7^»tf»
Per quart    • *J\,
600 W. Transmission Oil ^tflf*
Per quart    tlvrv
Pure filtered Gasoline: Moboil and Polarine oils
Open 8 a.m. till 8 p.m. Week Dais
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday
Cumberland
Motor Works
For Results Advertise in The Islander

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