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The Cumberland Islander May 7, 1921

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Array Provincial Librarv
-n
THE CUMBERLANUTSLANDER
With ifhlek If consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 19.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUAL
Cumberland Hospital In
Sound Financial Condition
Holds Unique Position Among B. C. Hospitals of Having No Debt
and Good Bank Balance—Much Good Work Accomplished
During Year—Has Lowest Cost Per Day for Operating Ex-
penses—All Officers and Directors Re-elected.
The annual meeting of the subscribers to the Cumberland General
Hospital was held in the Council
Chambers on Saturday night last,
there being a very good attendance.
President Charles Graham waa ln the
chair.
Following the reading and adoption
of the minutes of the previous meeting, Mr. Graham read his annual report, which shows the Hospital to be
ln a sound financial condition and
much good work accomplished during
the year.   The report follows:
President's Report.
To the Subscribers of the Cumberland
General Hospital.
I beg to submit the annual report of
the Cumberland General Hospital for
the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921.
Work of the Hospital.
During the year the following number of patients were treated:
In the Hospital April 1, 1920    22
Admitted during the year 410
Discharged during the year 400
Died      12
In Hospital, March 31, 1921    20
Number of  Hospital  days' treatment  8671
Average number of patients per
day      24
Major operations     17
Minor operations  167
Obstetrical cases    61
There has ben a considerable increase in the work of the Hospital
during the past year, there being 2438
more days treatment than the previous
year. This is doubtless due to the
arrangement with the Aledical Board
for treatment of its members for a
fixed sum.
Financial Condition.
During the year, as will be seen
from the financial statement, the receipts from all sources were $20,443.77
and the total expenditure waa $18,-
722.39, leaving a credit balance of
$1721.38 on the year's operations. The
Hospital had a balance in the bank at
the beginning of the fiscal year of
$231.84, and at the close of the year
$1953.22. Tlle Hospital has been able
to meet all Its financial obligations
when due without recourse to any
overdraft.
Repairs to Buildings.
There was no extensive repairs to
buildings during the past year. The
sum of $812.78 was spent on general
repair work around the buildings.
Considerable repair work will require to be done during the coming
year. The entire building requires to
be repainted outside and considerable
painting and kalsomlning is required
inside. The roof of the Chinese Ward
requires reshlngllng. The main verandah Is In very bad shape and must
be renewed. This and other necessary
repair work will cost approximately
$1700.
Additions to Equipment
The only additions to the general
equipment has been the Installation ot
the electric washing machines, which
have been of considerable advantage
In handling the laundry work.
Cost of Operation.
I am very pleased to be able to report a very decided reduction ln the
cost of operation. The cost per
patient per day for the year just
closed is $2.16. The cost last year
was $2.69, a reduction of 63 cents per
patient per day. This Is a splendid
showing and I believe la as low, if not
the lowest cost per patient per day In
any hospital in British Columbia.
.Medical Fund Agreement.
The agreement entered into with the
Medical Fund for. treatment of their
patients for $700 per month was not
satisfactory. It was found tbat there
was considerable deficit on these
cases, and that the amount being paid
was considerably less than the cost
per patient per day In the Hospital
A committee of the Hospital Board
discussed the matter with the Medical
Fund and a special grant of $1250 was
made by the Medical Fund to cover
this deficit. It was intimated by the
committee that the Hospital could not
continue the arrangement at $700 per
month and they requested that this be
Increased to $1000 per month.
The Medical Board called a meeting
of the employees at each mine and at
Union Bay. These meetings were addressed by the president of the Medical Board, Mr. J. L. Brown, and my
self. At each meeting a motion was
unanimously passed authorizing the
Medical Board to Increase the grant
to the Hospital to $1000 per month.
During tho year the Hospital has
received from the Medical Fund the
sum of $11,750 under this agreement.
The Hospital haa given during the
year 5637 days' treatment to Medical
Fund cases. This works out at a cost
of $2.08 per patient per day, or 8 cents
per day less than the average cost per
patient per day.
During the last seven months, since
the $1000 per month rate has been in
operation, tbe cost of treatment of
Medical Fund patients has been aa
follows:
3252 patient days at $2.16 $7024.32
Received from Medical Fund,
7 months at $1000  7000.00
Loss to Hospital $   24.32
This showing, however, is fairly
satisfactory, and I think the present
arrangement should be continued.
Collections from private patients
have been good, only $284 being outstanding, which is 1.3 per cent, of
total collections, which I consider very
fair.
The Ladles' Auxiliary have done excellent work during the year and I
wish to express the appreciation of
the Board In the furnishing of many
comforts for the patients.
In conclusion, I wish to express my
appreciation of tbe good work done
by the matron md her very able staff
during the year. The cost per patient
day shows that every economy Is being exercised by the matron ln the
operation of the hospital.
I also wish to express the thanks
of the Board to all those Who made
donations or assisted the Hospital ln
any way.
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES ORAHAM,
President.
Financial Statement.
The financial statement and report
of Auditors C. B. Wood and F. A.
McCarthy shows the Hospital to have
been ably managed during the past
yoar, closing the year with a bank
balance of nearly $2000. The statement follows:
Summary of Receipts for Tear Ending
March 31, 1981.
Patients' fees—Private  $3,116.60
Do., Workmen's Compensation Board  1,310.50
Medical Fund Contract  9,500.00
Medical Fund Special Grant.... 1,260.00
Donations—A. J. Taylor         6.00
Canadian Collieries      300.00
Government grant  4,746.46
Sundry accounts      216.22
Total    $20,443.77
Summary of Expenses.
Salaries  $6,693.56
Water, light and fuel  1,387.55
Druga and equipment  1,948.93
Furniture       630.66
Repairs       840.64
Sundries       367.86
Total   $18,722.39
The reports were adopted
President Graham then vacated tbe
(Continued on Page Seven)
"HARD TIMES" SOCIAL
The ladies of the PreBbyterian
Church are holding a "hard times"
social in the basement of tbe church
on Friday evening, May 13, at 8
o'clock. The judges will fine all
persons who attend wearing jewelry
or otherwise not dressed according to
the hard times. A varied programme,
incldlng games, has been arranged,
and refreshments will be served.
Prizes will be given for the best "hard
times" costume. Admission will be
26 cents.
SONG SERVICE
A special song service will be rendered in the Presbyterian Church oh
Sunday evening, May 8th. Sacred
solos will be rendered by Mr. Howard
Macaulay, Mr. Roberts and AIIbs
Beckwith. Several anthems will be
rendered by the choir and the evening
will be a complete musical event.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE 4
AT PUNTLEDGE MAY 13
On Friday, May 13, a whist drive
and dance will be held ln the Puntledge School, commencing at 8 o'clock
Dancing will commence at 10. A very
enjoyable time is promised all who
attend. Admission Is fifty cents.
Final Game For
McBride Shield
Steamer Charmer Will Take Ex
cursionists to Vancouver to
See Championship Game
In order to give football fans the
opportunity of witnessing the final
game in the McBride Shield aeries,
the winners of which become champions of British Columbia, an excursion will leave Cumberland tonight
(Friday) at 10 o'clock, connecting
with the S.S. Charmer at Union Bay
at 11. The same steamer will leave
Vancouver'at 11.45 Saturday nlgbt. returning to Union Bay Sunday morn
ing. The return fare has been reduced
to $5.90. A big number is expected to
take advantage of the excursion.
Cumberland United Play St. Andrews
for B. C. Championship.
Cumberland United will journey to
Vancouver to play the St. Andrews
team of that city ln the final game for
the McBride Shield, emblematic of the
soccer championship of B. C.
The locals have beel) down to hard
training and from latest reports all
players are in Al shape and ready to
play the game of their lives. There Ik
no reason to doubt the ability of the
United team to bring back to Cumberland the B. C. Championship. But
let It be said, with all sincerity, that
they have no easy game on, and will
have to step all the way, right from
the first blow of the whistle to the
finish. St. Andrews have.a fast and
young team—but we are confident the
locals are a shade better. Hop to it,
boys, and bring back that championship.   Here's hopingl
The following will do duty for the
United: Goal, W. Walker; backs, J.
Strang and J. Campbell; half-backs,
J. Irvine, H. Roberts and S. Conti;
forwards, D. Bannerman, W. Milligan,
A. Pilling, C. Hitchens and A. Home,
with G. Carle and O. Harrison as reserves. D. Wilson wlll be ln charge
of the players.
Naval Concert
Monday Night
Famous Concert Party From H.
M. C. S. Aurora Giving An
Entertainment Here.
Arrangements have been completed
for the Concert Party of the Naval
Squadron to give tbeir performance
on Monday night ln the llo-Ilo
Theatre. This is the same party
which gave such a magnificent performance at Courtenay two weeks ago,
when many people were unable to obtain admission.
The people of Cumberland are advised to get their tickets before Monday, if possible; they will be on sale
at the principal stores in town. Tbe
price for admission has been placed
within the reach of all, the charge
being 50 cents, with 75 cents for box
seats.
The performance ls a most excellent one, Including A. B. Powell, the
conjurer who ls billed as "the worst
conjurer In the world—at his worst."
His tricks are very clever, and there
Is nothing amateurish about his performance. Lieut Cossette also appears
as a lightning sketch artist; there ls
nothing labored about his pencilled
mirth—it springs out of the end of his
pencil with the most natural ease and
abandon it is possible to Imagine.
The programme also includes
Stoker Hope, billed as the noted Lancashire clog dancer. As there are a
number of Lanes In Cumberland this
turn should receive special attention.
P. T. Instructor Rees also gives a
very Impressive performance In cutlass swinging which Is little short of
marvellous. Comic and sentimental
songs by comedians said to be in the
Geo. Roby and Charlie Chaplin class,
and singers who vie with Tom Burke
and Caruso are also on the programme.
The proceeds will be devoted to
charity. Doors open at 7.30 and concert will commence at 8.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
At the meeting of the Rod and Gun
Club held last Monday night consld-
able discussion took place re the
stocking of tbe lake. Owing to the
small attendance at the meeting, however, no further action was taken.
During the week the officials of the
club have been busy rounding up the
members and a meeting is called for
Monday next in the Athletic Hall, at
7.30 o'clock.
As Courtenay is co-operating with
Cumberland in the matter of stocking
the lake, etc., and sending representatives to the meeting, a big attendance
is looked for. All sportsmen Interested are Invited to be at this important
meeting.
Masonic Lodges
To Meet Here
Re-Union of Royal Arch Chapters on May 17—About 200
Coming in Automobiles.
An event of great Masonic Importance will take place on May 17 next,
when the re-union of the Royal Arch
Chapters of Vancouver Island wlll be
held 111 Cumberland.
Word has been received that no less
than 30 automobiles will be coming up
from Victoria, bringing representatives from the Camosun and Columbia
Chapters, and about ten cars from
Nanaimo, with members of the Keystone Chapter. It Is anticipated tliat
at least 200 persons will be guests of
the local chapter.
Alany of the Masons are bringing
their wives along and a most enjoyable social time is expected. It is the
Intention of Cyrus Royal Arcli Chapter, assisted by Cumberland Lodge No.
26. to put on a whist drive in (he Anglican Hall during the time the lodges
are in session, and later having a
combined dance in tlie Ilo-llo Hall.
This will be a gala event In Cumberland and it is expected that the
citizens will assist in giving the visitors a fitting reception.
WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE FRIDAY NEXT
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the G. W.
V. A. have decided to hold another
whist drive and dance, to be held in
the Alemorial Hall on Friday evening,
May 13. The ladles are doing everything possible to make this a greater
success than previous occasions, and
advise everyone to be on time, as the
whist will commence promptly at 8
o'clock; tlie whist will be followed by
refreshments, which are well worth
the price of admission. Dancing will
follow. Admission, 50 cents.
MACCABEES SALE OF WORK
The Women's Benefit Association of
the Maccabees intend to hold a sale of
work early ln June. Particulars will
be announced later.
Corporal Cronk
Resigns Service
Leaves R. N. W. M. P. to Take
Active Interest in Vancouver
Manufacturing Concern.
Corporal E. J. Cronk, of the Royal
North West Mounted Polico, who has
had charge of this district for tho past
two years, has resigned from the service and will leave Cumberland next
week, going to Vancouver, where lie
has bought an Interest In the Koreen
Manufacturing Company.
Corporal Cronk has a lengthy record
of service, being for one year with
Prince of Wales Own 11th Middlesex
(cadets), 6 months with the city police
of Winnipeg, 11 years in the R. N. W.
M. P., three yearB of which were spent
in the Arctic regions at Ft. Churchill.
He was two years overseas as R.S.M.
of the Seventh Battalion C. R. T.
Corporal Cronk has proved himself
a very efficient and capable police
officer and his resignation will be a
distinct loss to the famous police force
of the Northwest.
Both Corporal and Mrs. Cronk are
very popular and they will be greatly
missed by a large circle of friends.
who will wish them every success in
their new sphere of life.
MEMORIAL ARCH TO BE
DEDICATED EMPIRE DAY
Work on the Memorial Arch In
front of the G. W. V. A. ball Is Hearing
completion and It is expected everything will he ready for tlie dedication
service on Umpire Day. Whoif all is
completed and the grounds put in
condition it will have a very pleasing
appearance.
During the past week memberR of
the G. W. V. A. have been erecting a
fence around the grounds. At the request of Mayor MacDonald thc mills
of the district contributed the lumber,
the men doing the work themselves,
so this Improvement Is practically free
of cost to the veterans.
BOATING  SEASON
Those who at this season of tlie year
feel the call of water pastimes, such
as rowing, sailing and fishing, will be
Interested in tlie advertisement In another column of F. Aikawa, of Koyston
Road. Boats of various sizes and designs, suitable for all purposes, are
made by Mr. Aikawa. He has had
long experience in boatbuilding and
undertakes to give every satisfaction
Mr. Aikawa was chief carpenter for
ten years at Ocean Falls.
Union Bay Will Elect
May Queen and Party
Union Bay Decides to Accept Invitation to Elect May (Jueen and
Attendants—Agreement Committee Declined to Carry Out
Request for Pithead Meetings for  Fund—Company  to Be
Asked to Allow Collections to Be Taken Up, So Children
Will Not Be Deprived of Their Annual Celebration.
At Union Bay on Wednesday evening a public meeting was held when the
question of whether the people of that
place would accept the invitation of
Cumberland to elect the May Queen
aud her attendants for (his year's Empire Day celebration, was fully discussed. The meeting was enthusiastically in favor of the proposal and a
committee was appointed for carrying
out the work.
Scliool Trustees H. Glover and
Baldwin, of Union Bay, attended tlie
meeting In Cumberland on Tuesday-
evening in this connection, and later
interviewed Mrs. Jas. Ilurns, of this
city, regarding the training of the
children. It will be remembered that
Mrs. Burns made quite a name for
herself last year by the very able way
in which she trained the Bevan girls
and boys who took part in last year's
performances. Airs. Burns promised
the delegation to train the Union Bay
children If her services were required.
Agreement Committee Against 'raking
Up Collection for Fund.
On Tuesday evening thc weekly
meeting of the Cumberland committee
was held In the Council Chambers.
Alayor AlacDonald in the chair. The
main business before the meeting was
the communication from Air. Robt. C.
Walker, representing the Agreement
Committee, In connection with the request that pithead meetings of the
miners be held, at which tbey would
he asked to contribute to the funds of
thc celebration. However, thc Agreement Committee did not accede to the
request, as wlll he seen from the following letter:
"Alay 2, 1921.
"Dear Sir.—In unswer to yours of
tlie 20 ult. re subscriptions for 24th ot
May. Tho committees of the various
mines met In the Company's ofiice on
Saturday, April 30th, when your letter
was read and discussed. It was finally
resolved, witiiout a dissenting voice,
that your committee bo informed tliat,
owing to wage cuts, income tax, poll-
tax, short time, adverse changes in
the physical condition of the mines,
and other Inroads recently made on
the miners' earnings that lo ask them
for any more contributions would not
be conducive to the continuation of
that Industrial peace which we have
all enjoyed so long, and which, let us
hope, will continue.
"I remains, yours fraternally,
"ROBT. C. WALKER."
In view of the unsatisfactory reply
the Celebration Committee decided to
adjourn to the following evening,
when the matter would be fully deult
with. It was felt that thc celebration
could not be successfully carried out
without the co-operation of the
miners, and that it would be a shame
to deprive tbe children of their annual
May celebration.
At the Wednesday meeting It was
freely stated tbat the miners were uot
at all satisfied with the decision of
the Agreement Committee, and another meeting is likely to be held.
Collections To Be Taken I'p In Mines.
It was unanimously decided that
Mayor MacDonald he requested to Interview Air. Thomas Oraham and arrange for a collection to be taken up
In the mines.
Empire Day Is n children's festival
locally, and (iiat tbey should tie deprived of their annual event was entirely out of tlie question if means
could be found to carry it through.
Owing to the Colliery Company donating tlie use of .the Athletic Grounds
for Alay 24 tlie expenses will not be
nearly as heavy as previously, as considerable money had been spent annually in lixing tiie grounds aud seats
for the occasion.
A communication was read from the
City Band, stating that their charge
would be $7 per man for the day.
Permanent Seals To Be Erected.
Mr. II. L, Kates, chairman of the
Grounds Committee, suggested Hint
the Canadian Collieries be asked to
erect permanent seats in thc Athletic
grounds, the Celebration Committee
donating their lumber for tills pur
pose. The meeting endorsed thi
suggestion.
Mr. Thomas Oraham readily consented to carry out the idea, which
will be a decided Improvement to the
sports grounds.
The meeting derided to send an Invitation to tlie Mayor and Councillors
of Courtenay to attend the celebration.
An Invitation is also being extended
to the teaching stair and children of
the Cumberland Schools to lake part
lu the annual event.
The next meeting will lie held iu
the City Hull on Tuesday at 7.30.
Rev. James Hood
Elected Moderator
Popular Pastor of SI. George's
Elected Head of Presbyterian Church in Province.
VANCOUVER.- Kev. James Hood,
minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, was elected moderator
of the Synod of British Columbia at
the opening session in Si. John's
Church, on Tuesday night.
There were three nominations for
the oilice, Kev. Wm. Stott of Armstrong, nominated hy Kev. T. R. Pea-
cook of Murrayvllle; Kev. Dr. Clay
nominated Kev. James Hood, and Rev.
Duncan Campbell nominated Kev. C.
A. McDIarmid of Mission City. Rev.
Dr. Grant of Prince Rupert was also
named, but asked that bis name be not
submitted, as lie had already had tho
honor. Air. Peacock also asked the
privilege of withdrawing his name,
but consent was not given and tbo
election resulted in Mr. Hood's appointment to tlie position, the election
being made unanimous ou (lie resolution of tlie I wo oilier nominees.
The election of Kev. James Hood to
so important a position in the Presbyterian Church of this province is
giving great pleasure to his many
friends in Cumberland, both outside
as well as Inside the congregation of
which he lias charge. To tlie genial
pastor we offer our heartiest congratulations and best wishes for a successful and prosperous administration.
COUNCIL DEALS WITH
POLL-TAX BVLAW
A special meeting of the City Council was held on Monday evening in
tlie Council Chambers to deal witli
tlie Poll-Tax Bylaw. His Worship
Mayor .MacDonald was In the chair.
The. bylaw was pul through its
Initial stages, receiving Its lirst,
second and third readings, aud will
come up for linal consideration and
adoption at tho regular meeting of
the Council on .Monday next.
The new bylaw will affect many
men in and around Cumberland, as
its jurisdiction embraces the school
area, taking In a large district. Those
exempted from tlie provisions of the
new law are all who contribute fu or
more to municipal taxes in tlie district in which they reside.
CHILDREN'S FANCY
DRESS HALL TONIGHT
There should lie a full bouse al the
Children's Fancy Dress Kali lo be
held in the Ilo-llo Hall thi:, (Friday)
evening, undel* Ihe auspices ol* tiie
Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland
General Hospital.
The children have made Bplendld
progress under capable teachers and
a very enjoyable time is expected.
The children will bold ihe floor from
7 to I", after which dancing will be
indulged iu by the grown-upa,
YOUNG NAVAL MEN
HAD ENJOYABLE PICNIC
Some ."," young naval fellows from
the warships lying al Comox were
entertained al a picnic at Koyston on
Wednesday. Ibis being in return for
tlie kindnesses shown to visitors
aboard the   hips.
The picnic took the form of sporte,
for which prizes were donated by
friends. Tea was also served, followed
hy dancing in the school.
The boys had a whale of a time, declaring it was the happiest day they
had spent in Canada, ami their only
regret was thai they were not sia-
ationed here permanently, it only to
partake of the delicious cake served
them, which they declared was equal
to any mother made.
Airs. K. S. Robertson kindly placed
her house at tlie disposal ol* tlie entertaining committee, Mr. Wm.
Marshall, of the Fletcher Music House,
lent a Vlctrola to liven the proceedings wilh music.
GARDEN  I'AKTi   LN JUNE.
Tlie Women's Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Church Intend glvlnj, a Qardon
Parly iu June. Two
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
May 1,1921.
■  TO SAVE TIME AND MONEY
Ride a Bicycle
Get There on a Bicycle
Three Principles
Of First Aid
Paper Read by Mr. Frank Bond
*   at the .Meeting of St. John's
First  Aid and  Mine  Rescue
Association on Sunday.
T.  E.  BATE
M      P. O. Box 279
Phone 31     ==
CUMBERLAND
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker j
Shoe Kepairlng a Sncclalty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
HEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLWAY.
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Thos. H. Carey
FIKE  AND 1IKE  INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
w. c.
Happy Valley
WHITE
Phone 92R
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially invited,
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; A. G.
Jones, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, B. C.
UNION HOTEL
Ol'l'OSlTE 1MILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
llritish Columbia has about 1G per
cent, of Canada's population, and
Canada has but 5 per cent, of the
world's population, yet llritish Columbia has thu greatest resources of lumber, lish and various kinds ow minerals' of any country in the world.
Boosting local industry, through the
"Made-in-B.C. campaign," means thu
development of these resources.
YOUR DUTY TO YOURSELF IS TO SAVE
The man with a Savings Account need never
worry over the future,
Saving, backed hy determination, is one of
the must satisfying habits to acquire.
A Savings Department at every branch of
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. McCarthy, Manager Cumberland Branch
Those two words "First Aid" mean
a great deal to the unfortunate sufferer, more especially when we take
into consideration the importance of
the treatment rendered to relieve pain
and prevent further Injury. In tlie
lirst place I would ask that you take
your mind from. I will say, "First Aid
Competition Work," and for the time
being centre your thoughts on a real
case of emergency.
The three esseutinls I refer to nre,
first, observation; second, conclusions;
third, treatment.
Tlie more accurate tho diagnosis tlie
groater tlie probability of appropriate
iid being supplied. In this, as in
ither directions, tin1 sphere of the
.mbulance student must, of necessity,
lie a limited one. Throughout his
work the First Aid student must on no
account take upon himself; tlie duties
and responsibilities of a medical man.
It will, however, very frequently happen that (he urgency of the cose demands that the First Alder should
observe, think and act on his own responsibility. In numerous instances,
of course—for example, a crushed
hand, cut throat, lacerated wounds,
clothes on lire, suicidal hanging and
other cases —a suflicieully correct
dingnosis can he arrived at even by
untrained persons. In such cases a
momentary glance Is quite sufllcient
to arouse, intuitively, a full grasp of
the immediate needs of the case. On
the other hand, in very many cases,
anything approaching a correct diagnosis is only possible after an examination of an excedingly delicate and ,
searching nature, such as demands'
knowledge and experience of the high-,
est standard. Between these two
limits there are many grades. Even
in the above mentioned instances, in
order to form an intelligent opinion
as to the moro remote requirements,
and how they arc to be best attended
to, clear recognition of many details
must be effected,
A further point that presents itself
to the mind is that the circumstances
surrounding the case may be of such
an urgent nature as would render any
detailed observations for Rie purpose
of diagnosis quite unpermissible.
Discrimination must be exercised.
, Diagnosis, so far as it applies to
|-ambulance workers, must be of a
more or less superficial character, If,
however, it Is .sufficiently thorough to
enable them promptly to recognize tbe
possibilities and the probabilities of
mischief in a given case of emergency,
with a view to effective protection
from the attendant risks, then their
knowledge is clearly of a valuable and
creditable high standard.
For the purpose of First Aid, it is
first necessary to exercise the powers
of observation, and from what has
been observed conclusions as to the
nature of the case and its requirements are drawn. Upon sucli conclusions treatment appropriate to the
case is afterwards based.
Observation in its complete sense is
of a very complex nature, involving in
a varying degree an intelligent use of
the various senses with which man
has been endowed, namely, the sense
of sight, of hearing, of touch, of smell
and of taste. Of these senses the first
three, are brought into action prominently in cases of emergency, the sense
of smell less frequently, taste seldom,
if ever; by their exercise much of the
greatest importance as clues to diagnosis and treatment may be gathered.
The capacity for intelligent observation varies considerably in different
individuals, but just as muscles, increase in vigor by exercise, so the
powers of observation and of effective
reasoning are capable of development
by practice. To this, great credit must
be given to well conducted, practical
work when attending the lectures *and
to First Aid competitions.
In cases of real accident or illne.-s,
however,, there is frequently no authority at hand to indicate that thc
patient is suffering from this or that
disability. Neither is the patient able
to give what is to be recognized as an
absolutely correct statement of the
nature of thc trouble he is suffering
from. Discretion on the part of the
First Aider must be exercised, otherwise harm, great harm, may result.
It is In the varying powers of observation, tact, and discrimination that,
individuals will so much differ from
one another. These are the points
that are of such immense practical
importance in cases of danger ami
emergency. The more these import"
ant principles are developed by painstaking care and attention lo details
so much the more valuable will be the
help that is Forthcoming when danger
or disaster threatens or overwhelms.
Cont-luslons are arrived at intuitively or by thc process or reasoning
In either case the history of the case
and the signs and symptoms presented
by the patient are of much importance.
There are two ways of reasoning.
Firstly, when a cause is known a conclusion more or less accurate may lie
drawn as to its eifects; but it must
be remembered—
(1) That a cause may have moro
than one effect.
(2) That such effect or effects may
lie direct or indirect, immediate or remote.
(IS) That thc cause may be still active; that is, it is still going on doing
something Unit its removal will partlj
or wholly check**.
(4) Tliat the cause may be latent,
i.e., for the time being it is inactive,
but there is a possibility of its coming into activity wilh perhaps disastrous results.
Second reasoning: Where an effect
is known it may be possible to judge
from it what has been tlie cause and
Trom such a basis other information
may be gleaned. It must be remembered, however—
(a) That a given effect mny have
been produced by more than one
en use.
(2) That because one eveut happen..
The   Opportunity  is Yours
to save money on the purchase of your New Suit
We have only a few Suits left of a Special Buy in
Hobberlin Ready Mades at  $35.00
Regularly sold at $50 and upward.   Come in and look at them.
WE HAVE ALSO A LINE OF
Crescent Make Clothing for Men
at Prices Ranging as Low as
$25.00 per Suit
that cannot be duplicated anywhere.
Boys' Bloomer Pants
50 FAIRS BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS, in Navy (f»rt PA
Blue Serge, at prices ranging upwards iron) ....  f\f£d»tu**J
50 PAIRS BOYS' TWEED BLOOMER PANTS. Regular
$3.00 and $3.50 per pair. Special price for d»0 CA
Saturday, Monday and Tuesday, per pair  <y)«fcrf*»tll/
BOYS' SUMMER SWEATERS—Button on "Si <j»-| AA
shoulder; in shades of maroon and brown; each *P *■ •""
Shoe Specials for Men
50 PAIRS MEN'S BLACK CALFSKIN SHOES, djr AA
Regular $6.50 and $7.50.   On sale at  vO *)*)
LECKIE SHOES, TO  FIT ALL  FEET,
AT    OWEST PRICES.
THE MODEL
CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
CUMBERLAND
OPPOSITE POST OFFICE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
after another it by no means follows
that the second is the result of the
first.
The history of a case must be considered trustworthy in proportion to
the reliability of the source whence
it is obtained. Thus: the narrative of
a well trained ambulance man will
naturally carry more weight than that
derived from an untrained and probably excited bystander; whilst the information personally gained by a
skilled observer may justly be rcgard-
T<as still more reliable. The history
of a case is by no means necessarily
limited to the actual disability itself.
The term has a very much wider significance, and according to circumstances may involve a consideration of
sex, age, occupation, or previous condition of health.
Symptoms. — For example, pain,
numbness, giddiness, hunger, differ
from signs, inasmuch as they are not
apparent to the direct observer of the
senses, and can only be ascertained
with more or less certainty from the
statement of the patient or from inference from what has been observed.
Signs.—For example, pallor, congestion, swelling, discoloration, on the
other hand, are directly perceptible
through the senses, admit of precise
determination, and therefore are of
considerably greater practical importance. The following points should be
noted:
(1) Symptoms, taken alone, are not
of much value for diagnosis.
(2) Symptoms, when considered in
conjunction with a history of the case,
are distinctly enhanced in diagnostic
value.
(U) When to the above there is
super-added information gained by the
information of definite signs, the diagnosis rests mioii a solid basis.
Now just a few words on conclusions. Conclusions are arrived at or
based upon the results of observation,
or In other words, objects to be ob-
lained, whereby the First Aider can
render the best treatment to thu
patient to prevent further injury in
iu case of emergency, until the arrival
of a doctor or treatment.
The needs of a case becoming
known, for the effective rendering of
skilled assistance in emergency, other
fundamental principles of First Aid
must be brought into prominence in
addition to a further development of
those principles of observation and
tact. These principles are "resourcefulness," "explicitness" and "discrimination." Further observation is
necessary as to the surroundings of
the patient with a view to the exercise of resourcefulness. Tact is
necessary in order that the sympathy
and help of bystanders may be obtained, and passive submission or active co-operation on Ihe part of the
patient assured. Explicitness in order
that confusion should he avoided and
chaos more readily converted into that
order and quietness so essential for
the patient's welfare. And lastly, discrimination and an unpresumptuous
bearing are necessary in order that
such steps (preventive and curative)
shall lie promptly taken as to lessen,
so far as is possible, the development
of further mischief.
A great deal can be said as regard
treatment, hut for me to go into sucji
, details I consider that I would be en
crouching upon the conclusions of the
First Aider, arrived at from observations of the case he has been called
upon to give First Aid.
"Father!"
"Well, what is it?"
"It says here, 'A man is known by
the company he keeps.' Is that so,
father?"
"Yes, yes."
"Well, father, if a good man keeps
company with a bad man, is the good
man bad because he keeps company
with the bad man, or is the bad man
good because he keeps company with
the good man?"
Mistress: "I don't want you to have
so much company. You have more
callers in a day than I do in a week."
Domestic: "Well, mum, perhaps if
you'd try to be a little more agreeable you'd have as many friends as I
have."
"Say, Frank, you're the finest
looking man I ever saw,"
Frank: "Sorry I can't return the
compliment."
Mike: "You could if you told as big
a lie as I did."
Must Havo Keen a Chicken.
"Some novelists don't know what
they're talking about. Here's one who
speaks of a girl's 'raven hair.'"
"What's wrong with it?"
"All wrong. Havens don't wear hair
—they wear feathers!"
Inspector: "Do you teach observation?"
Teacher: "Yes."
Inspector: "Then I will test the
class. Now, children, shut your eyes
and sit still." Following this the inspector made a slow whistling noise,
and then asked: "Now, children, what
did I do?"
For some time there was no answer,
but ultimately one little boy piped
out, "Kissed teacher!"
He: "Witty people made me tired."
She: "Trying to keep up with them,
I suppose."
"But father," said the pretty heiress,
"if you refuse Jack will die of a
broken heart."
"You are a poor diagnostician, my
child," returned her parent. "The
trouble he is more likely to die of is
starvation."
The Black anc/Tans
HAVE ARRIVED IN CUMBERLAND
I have just received a shipment of Black and Tan
Shoes for Children.
Also White Outing Shoes, including Vacation, Tango
Pumps, Yachting, Dorothy Slippers, Elaine Slippers,
Regatta, Brighton and Fairy Shoes. My prices on
these goods are lower than the mail order houses.
SPECIAL IN MEN'S SOLID        <£/£ fjr
LEATHER WORK SHOE AT -iPO* I D
I Can Save You Money
Compare my prices with what you are paying elsewhere and
you will be surprised how tlie 5 cents and 10 cents nn every
article mounts up. Why nut save euough un >our moiillily
account to pay tor your trip to Vancouver?
I SELL THE SAME GOODS FOR LESS MONEY
PURITY FLOUR—49-lb. sack   $3.(10
20-LB. SACK SUGAR   $2.«5
No. 1 YELLOW NEWTON APPLES-Box   $4.50
No. 1 WINESAP APPLES—Box   $4.50
FRESH DATES—New stock   2 lbs. tor 85c
FRESH CREAMERY BUTTER—Per lb  60c
BRAID'S IDEAL TEA   2U lbs. Cor $1.00
This Tea Is sold tor 60c lb. right in town.
The Corner Store
WM. GORDON
Phone 133 May ?, 1921.
ffffi CtrtOfiRLAND  ISLANDER
11
•Ih
ree
Less Troublesome
Adjustments1
As a rule the adjustment you get on a
defective tire, dosen't quite satisfy you.
Mainly, we suppose, because we are all
human and want a little more than wc
are entitled to.
But even our most private opinions on
the fairness of an adjustment, can find
no fault with the method of settling
claims on Ames Holden "Auto-Shoes."
You are always right with ourselves and the
manufacturer. We personally look after your
interests. There is no needless red-tape, delay or
argument in fixing our measure of responsibility
and your compensation. Ames Holden"Auto-
Shoes" are guaranteed against any defect in
material or workmanship without time or mileage
limit. They are adjusted on that basis without
quibble or evasion.
Come to ih for
AMES HOLDEN
•'AUTO-SHOES'*
Cord end Fabric Tlre&JIn all Standard Site*
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
TASTE is the TEST ■
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST .
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,  LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer  The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water &!lfcf Pure
Cascade Beer
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO. B.C
HOME IS NO FURTHER AWAY THAN THE
NEAREST TELEPHONE
The man who is frequently on the road realizes the
value of the telephone. "Weighed against the comfort
and help the assurance from home that all's well gives
me," says one, "the small sum of the toll charge
doesn't count at all."
The telephone highway is always the shortest way
home.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small sums, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End End End
Deposits oft IstYr.       2ndYr.       Slu-Yr.
t 1.00 Weekly      i 52.69        $106.95        J162.84
10.00 Monthly        121.65 246.92 376.98
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
•     $15,000,000
-     $15,000,000
GRAINGER, Manager.
STUDMARKS
Yes, I met him trailing the rest ot
the bunch. Tbey bad gone down to
the "Y" to put ln a couple of hours
hard training tor the big game. But
his legs were so sadly in need of
assistance on account of the shortness thereof, that he lagged behind
considerably.
"Can you tell me where the Y. M
C. A. Is?" he asked, sheepishly.
Then I knew he was a stranger ln
town. Yet I was glad to ttsslst him
In a way, because he had come to live
amongst us.
I chanced to pass the "Y" ground
and found the boys thore. Some were
basking iu the sun. The trainer was
knocking a few flies with a broken
railing and a tennis ball, whilst several were chasing^, after the ball.
Strang occupied his time less strenuously; he walked over an Imaginary
golf course. Irvine and Milligan were
settling a dispute as to who could run
two laps In the shortest time—whilst
the little stranger I met earlier on
was practising hurdle jumping. I
learned later that he had come to play
centre-forward. Thus I found them
and thus I left them.
It was pretty near time for eating,
so I strolled up to the Union Hotel
for supper. I had been there before,
and how well I remembered the waitress who used to run for the tinned
milk as soon as she saw me enter the
doorway. I learned afterwards that
she had quit the Job. I was sorry,
for we had become good friends. The
first time I ever went into the place
she bid me good morning and asked
very kindly, "What would you like?"
I looked In vain for a menu paper.
She continued, "I have frog's legs, sir,
and pig's feet."
"Stop!" I exclaimed, disgustedly.
"I am not in the least way concerned
with your physical disabilities. I
came for something eo eat." I don't
think she heard me, though. But still
we are good friends. She's lett now
—and I only see her at the games.
jlllllllllIllllllllllllllllllillllllllB
I 1
[Milk Consumers 1
| Notice the Cream Line on the
| Comox Creamery Milk Bottles
( THAT TELLS THE TALE I
jl OUR MILK IS CAREFULLY SELECTED FROM COMOX JERSEY
m HERDS KNOWN TO BE ABSOLUTELY  HEALTHY  AND  KEPT A
U UNDER THE BEST HYGIENIC CONDITIONS
H You are taking no risk on Comox Creamery Milk §j
H Milk is now being delivered daily in Cumberland and Courtenay
§§§ Phone 8, Courtenay, for Representative to Call. i==
1 Comox Creamery Assn. |
COURTENAY, B. C.
Well, upon my word, if that ain't
"Cockney" up the main drag. I hurried up after the splcey little Londoner, and when he turned Into the
Pool Room I followed. I heard htm
singing some popular air as I approached blm; this was the refrain:
Ka-bages and Ka-beans and Ka-bages,
Sweetest of flowers that I love so;
I love to sit there and watch 'em grow.
Some people like Rhododendrons
And some forget-me-nots,
But I'd rather 'ave a nice plate of Ko-
Beef wlv Ka-beegs, Ka-beans and
Kar-rots.
"Bravo! Cock me-ole-stlck-in-the-
mud. I didn't know as 'ow yer could
sing." Cock strutted forward towards
the pool table and gravely answered',
"There are more pebbles on the beach
than 'as ever bin caught." Next day
the inside-left was looking for pebbles
down by the lake.
I myself am not really acquainted
with this town, and occasionally have
to be directed about the various
avenuse and main thoroughfares. I
met.Sacki later on and we had quite
a nice little chat about Cumberland.
He seemed to know the place fairly
well, so I asked as nicely as I could,
"Have you lived all your life here,
Sacki?" He looked at me with a
wicked light in his eye and replied
"Not yet!" Perhaps I should not have
asked such a foolish question. But
I'm not used to the place yet.
It commenced to rain hard and I
was In need of some amusement, so
I consulted the columns of The Islander to find where would be the
best place to go. I found that the
"Jolly Fellows' Dance" and Jim English's Pool Room were the only places
to go to, so I chose the Pool Room
In there I met the Mayor of Bevan
and the Manager ot the Football Team
hotly debating the best mode of pro
cedure—satisfactory to the Inner man
—when the bar-rooms close down.
The Mayor won the debate, I fancy,
because I heard him say something
about converting the basement ot his
house into a barroom.   Then I left for
P.O. Box I
Established 1907
Does Your  House
Need Repairs?
WHEN SUNSHINE APPEARS
IT MAKES US FEEL BRIGHT
Look around the house and see
if it needs repairs.
Now after the winter
Your house with dirt appears thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
Call ln the Painter and have your
house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter Cumberland, B. C.
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY.
ESTIMATES GIVEN.
home. I took to the wet street like
a duck takes to a pool, and in ragged
garments soaked to the skin—my
teetli chattering—numbed with cold
forlorn aud hopeless, I dragged my
weary feet on past the G. P. O. There
I heard the voice of a young woman
remark to her mate, "Ily word, the
people of this town seem to be going
back since the missionaries left." It
made me feel sore, because I knew she
was married and her husband was on
the night shift, and she had no right
to be there with that guy. However,
being a stranger I took no notice.
I arrived at my place of abode. Oh,
but If you could only see me. Where
I live it's all line on a fine night, but
when it rains I have no shelter. Still,
for a stranger, I must not grumble.
Maybe when another war breaks out
I'll get a good home.
Next day the sun shone. Someone's
son was staggering up-towu to the
game. "Hie—hello, mister; going ter
—-hie—the game?" "Who's playing?"
I enquired. "The Navy's up here,"
said my new-found friend. "Oh," said
I. "Whore are they anchored?" He
looked at me suspiciously and replied,
"Some In the Waverley—and the rest
in Old Bill Jones' place." Well, I
could hardly refrain from laughing,
for I knew he had mistaken my question. With a parting wink 1 replied,
"I hope it keeps fine for them."
So I trudged on up the slope aud
approached the pay-gate. Thero I
found a well-known football fan waiting at tlie gate. I asked him why he
was standing there. "Sli!" he whispered; "the guy at the gate will hi
going soon and we can get in for
nothing." True to his Judgment the
money collector had left his lair—and
thur, we entered the arena. My eyes
took in several rather unique sights.
I found a woman—yes, a woman-
throwing stones at "Tarzan," who was
watching the game with one eye and
picking someone out of the group of
loung ladies with the other. In some
future Issue I will tell you how he
got his name. Well, the game was not
what we expected, but It cost me nothing to go in, so I did not pas Bany
remarks.
I heard someone passing very rude
remarks about the different players
ln fact yelllug Instructions from the
aide line as to what they ought to do
and how they ought to do It. I would
like to Inform them of a friend of
mine ls reaping in a salary ot $500
per month for doing exactly what they
were doing. Of course, this Is In California, not Cumberland. But as I say,
I am a stranger, so I Ignored them,
I did not enjoy the game as much
as I have enjoyed some, and was on
the point of leaving when I heard a
young gentleman on tho line telling a
group of young ladleB his experience
in thc first and only game he played.
It seems he must have stepped in the
way of someone's boot, and the result
was he could not sit down for three
weeks. Just then the Navy scored
the third goal and I did not heBr any
more of his conversation. I hope he
has fully recovered, because it muBt
be awful not to be able to sit down
for such a long time.
The wblBlIe blew, the game slopped
and some poor fellow went down for
the count. Then I noticed a fair-
haired young fellow with a sympathetic eye spring like a hunted deer
out of the crowd and dashed over towards thc scene of the accident, when
a hand was laid on his shoulder, and
a voice shouted, "Never mind, Dick,
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
It's only the "B" team!" I was filled
with delight when the young fellow
broke away to help the helpless one.
Later on in the evening I saw him
helping somo more helpless. Hut It's
none of my business, so I Just Ignored
the Incident and coullnued helping
myself.
I had to pass tho cemetery on my
way back to town and I wancred Inside for a few moments. There 1 overheard a man asking somo woman to
become his wife. "Oh." said the she.
you have only Juat burled your wife.
and   I   see  on   the  gravestone   the
passage, 'I  love her still. Well,'
replied the he, "she could never keep
still while she was alive." He won.
But what an awful place In which to
propose.
I had very little time left before
supper, ao I strayed back lo town pant
the Hospital. 1 heard someone inside
trying over that latest song, "A noisy'
noise annoys an oyster." I think old
Hugh had something to do wilh it,
because he's awfully musical,
Just a word or two before I quit,
Mr. Islander. I have chosen your
weekly paper oul of all the papers
that are published (In Cumberland).
It is not a lind paper. Hut BOtne nt
your writers get fresh OltOS In n
while. Of courBC, ns I have Bald. I
am a stranger here, and It's none of
my business. But I see Boms guy
writing for information. He says
what we want to know Is "Who got
McClnty's goat?" Well, he tied 11outside while lie was In the Union. And
speaking of tho Mayor, one should
have a little more respect than talking
of Mayors and corralling and what
not. Anybody would think ho wbh
running a horse ranch Instead of an
automobile. "Who swallowed the most
confetti at the Carnival?" Well, I
noticed a bunch of paper-weights coming out when It was ovcr. But what
you expect for a dollar, a full course
dinner? Aunt Liza Bays as 'how
yer too hlnsultln 'about her ability to
drink senna. That was proscribed by
the sheroperdlst what was at the Cumberland the other week. An' besides,
she don't care a hang -'cause Cumberland beat Nanaimo—and Bhe says as
'ow every dog 'bb Its day.
FLAPPER.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phono 86
('iiiiil-i'i'Iiiiiil
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled I'ork
and Corned llecfi It k deli. I-■:<<.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIA!,      ft\\
itilt WORKMANSHIP     (l\Z  A
GUARANTEED    Q\^'A
1—        (Mri-)
RUUUER  HEELS    >AV:->.
Fixed Willie IJ Wall     OS^fJri
/• .Vv-"* a
•SV^.il
PHILLIPS' MILITARY   "
SOI.K8 AND IIKKI.S.     VkhlTWlfl
S. DAVIS, DAuruueir
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$6.00 "FoUtf
THB  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
May •?, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, .MAY 7. 1921.
CUMBERLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL
Thu annual report of the president of the Cumberland
General Hospital is worthy of more than passing notice,
aa it discloses fuels of a very interesting nature regarding
tbat Institution. When practically ull the publlc hospitals
in the Province are having a hard struggle to carry on
financially, many going deeply into debt, we learn that the
Cumberland General Hospital is not only paying its way,
but is entirely free from debt aud has a bank balance of
nearly $2U0U.
Another very pleasing feature is the fact thut it bas
probably the lowest per day operating expense of any
hospital in Die province, the ligure being $2.16, against
other hospitals' figures of $2.75 to $3.1!0. This state of
affairs reflects great credit on the staff of the hospital as
well as the oflicers and directors of the institution.
One of the principal reasons for this very satisfactory
state of affairs is the contract with the Medical Fund, this
Fund at present contributing $1000 per month to the hospital. The employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited each contribute $1.83 per month to thc
Medical Fund and receive free medical and hospital treatment tor themselves and resident dependents when necessary. This is a great boon to those who need medical aid
in sickness or accidents; those who do not benefit from it
directly are fortunate in that they are free from sickness
and accidents. The monthly contribution is a small sum
for medical and hospital treatment for a man and his
family, and relieves those afflicted of the financial worry
when illness overtakes them.
It seems a pity that this system could not be extended
to people at present outside the range of the Medical Fund."
Almost everyone would be more than willing to join in
paying the small monthly sum for the benefit* to be
derived when needed.
In this so-called enlightened age the time should not be
far-distant—In fact is long overdue—when the hospitals
will be run by the government and the operating expenses
paid out of ordinary taxation. Then everyone could get
free treatment whenever needed. It would mean a large
increase in the number of hospitals, but would go far
towards improving the health of the community. Under
the present system many people with slight ailments often
hesitate to get medical attention owing to the cost, with
the result they have impaired health, and the ailment may
develop into serious illness.
There seems to be a good opportunity for some public-
spirited man to try and inaugurate such a scheme in
Cumberland.
CAUSE FOR OPTIMISM
Those who appear to be alarmed by happenings during I ='"
tlie period o£ deflation upon which the world has now
definitely entered would do well to study history. It took
Great Britain more than twenty years to recover from the
inflation which accompanied the Napoleonic wars. It \<
not until twelve years after the Civil War thut the United
States had returned to a stable commercial footing. The
panic of 18711 showed what slow progress had been made
up to that time. We are moving very much faster toward
complete readjustment today, without any of the violent
disturbances which marked the experience of both Great
Britain and the United States.
A drop of 45 per cent, has already occurred In the Index
number which shows tlie cost of living. England had not
readied half that distance live years after the Buttle of
Waterloo. The drop ln prices In the United States was
only 28 per cent, six years after the close of thc Civil War.
Of course, our neighbors had to contend against a greatly
inflated currency. We aro free from that difficulty and
the fuct Is distinctly In our favor. Prices ate falling
! apldly, und yet failures are few in number and tlie general
effect has not thus far suggested the slightest cause for
alarm. Our banking system is sound and elastic. We
were prepared for u strain which lias not really been
seriously felt.—Ottawa Journal.
A PRODUCT SMALL BUT COSTLY
When tiie total product of a manufacturing plant for a
whole year weighs only eighteen grams, its output cannot
he described as large, but neither, when tlie eighteen
grams sell for $2,160,000, can It be called exactly small.
This Is the record for 1920 of the Standard Chemical Company of Pittsburg, all the energies of which are devoted to
the extracting of radium from the carnotlte ore of Colorado.
The demand for radium, it seems, is what the market
reporters call "steady." Host of the precious stuff is used
in medicine, but a little goes to the giving of luminosity
to the hands of watches and clocks. For tlie latter purpose the process of concentration Is not carried anything
like as far as it must be for the doctors, and the cost is
much less.
As a curative agent, especially in cancerous conditions,
radium has not yet justified all of the hopes it at first
..'xcited, but its efficacy Is slowly Increasing with added
knowledge and experience. It is by far the most wonderful as well as the moat expensive of all the known elements
—to employ a word now viewed a bit askance in scientific
circles—and none other ls anything like as interesting.
We do not believe that a Japanese can be thoroughly
Americanized, and without that qualification no individual
has any business to aspire to citizenship in this country
nor to own its land. This Is just as true of a Jap as of a
native of any other country who is unwilling to deny the
supremacy of the country of his birth or ancestry. Throw
the hyphen into tho discard and burn the pack.—Oregon
City Enterprise.
St. Andrews Win
From Metropolis
Cumberland United Should Re-
lain B. C Championship if
They Play Their Best
CUT IN MINERS' WAGES
After witnessing the game played
between the Metropolis of Victoria and
St. Andrews of Vancouver, our correspondent came away with the absolute
conviction that Cumberland could
boat the Saints in the final game Saturday. This does not mean to Infer
that the local team have any easy
mark on, but, providing the team plays
the game, as we know they ca nplay
it, there Is no reason why tlie championship of B. C. should not come to
Cumberland once more.
The locals are training hard and if
they go on tiie field determined to win
the Saints will he a downcast bunch
as they have a rooted idea tliat they
can take the measure ot Cumberlond
and are willing to chance a few dollars—but they want odds of 10 to 8.
Tiie Scml-r'imil Struggle.
The -Mets won the toss and took advantage of a good stiff cross breeze.
Forgle set the hall rolling, putting his
right in possession; they carried the
ball to tlie .Mets' goal and were as
promptly returned. Thc Mets, assisted by the breeze, kept tlie ball in the
Saints' half for practically the whole
of the first half, and with a little luck
would have had a comfortable lead.
Borland at right hack and Shant in
goal giving a fine exhibition, the Mets'
forwards were unable to score. Half-
time arrived with no score.
Mets Score First Goul.
The Mets started the second half ln
great style, carrying the ball right up
Ihe field, and after some beautiful
combination by the right inside and
Ills partner, Cummins, the inside left
scored a pretty goal.
Tliis reverse put some life into the
Saints, and big Jim Wilson, tricking
several opponents, sent a lovely cross
from the right, Flnlayson having no
difficulty In converting. Full time
arrived with the score 1-1.
After some wrangling amongst the
players and referee about playing extra time, the ball was eventually centred and play started faster than ever
-lint only for a few minutes, as tbe
eavy state of the field began to tell
on the players.   Jim and Fred Wilson
were the outstanding players in thc
overtime period.   A hard drive by F.
Wilson  was  well  saved  by Fleming.
A few minutes later Taylor, the visiting back, gave away a penalty, Borland scoring with a hard drive.   Fred
Wilson a few minutes later sent ln a
beauty, which  Fleming just touched
but wns not able to save.   This ended
tlie scoring, tho  Salnta running out
winners of a hard game by 3 goals to
NANAIMO—Tho Fair Wage Board,
of which Mr. D. T. Bulger is chairman,
Mr. Tully Boyce representing the operators, and Mr. M, Guinness representing the employees, met in Nanaimo
over tlie week-end. The function of
the board is to regulate tlie wages of
the miners on the Island in accordance witli the ascertained cost of living. The board meets every three
months, and at this meeting ordered
a reduction of 27*14 cents a day for the
present quarter.
VICTORIA WESTS LOST
TO NANAIMO SATURDAY
The Victoria Wests came up to Nanaimo ou Saturday and sustained a
defeat of 2 goalB to- nil, but not without a struggle. There was a hurricane blowing and tlie miners had the
use of this iu tlie lirst half. Right
from the start they began to press, and
for the first ten minutes kept Shandley busy, but could not get past him.
Tlie West started their lirst raid.
Youson was clean through when Stobbart whipped Frank's feet from under
him und from the foul, which was just
outside the penalty, Whyte placed to
Sherrit, who came nearly doing the
trick.
The miners, aided by tlie wind, were
having a little the best of the play, but
could not shoot. Whyte and Copas
were playing stellar fotoball, as was
Dickson, full-back for Nanaimo.
Archie Muir got a neat pass out to
Mulcahy, and right away O'Brien for
the miners tried another long shot
which Shandley passed over the bar.
Copas repeatedly stopped O'Brien and
half-time arrived with no score.
Rain commenced to fall, and with
the rain the wind went, and the game
was more even, Mulcahy grazed the
post in a fine effort to secure a goal.
The game commenced to get rough
and the referee let the game completely go. Both sides were going
hammer and tongs to get the deciding
goal. Fifteen minutes from the close
of the game tlle ball hit Whyte on the
arm, the referee awarding a penalty.
The crowd did not appreciate it, and
when Dickson missed the crowd
cheered, but in a melee McMillan got
his boot to the ball and scored. The
game livened up and the Wests went
down; Hughes was hard pressed and
a penalty was given against the Wests
and Robinson made no mistake this
time. Time was called with no further score.
MAY   DAY   SPECIALS
Children's Play Suits, in Cotton Jerseys,
in Rose, Navy and Copen. Special at,
per suit $2.00
Ladies' Fine Black Mercerized Lisle Hose;
regular 75c; special price, paiv 50c
Ladies' White Lisle Gloves; special value,
pair   25c
Wool Special—Heavy Black Fingering
Wool, put up in Vi-lb. skeins, each 50c
Shoe  Specials
Child's Black Patent Strap Slippers, per
pair   $1.75
Ladies' Black Patent Pumps, low heel;
special value at   $4.75
Ladies' Vici Kid Theo Tie Slipper, white
kid lined, with Louis heels. Special, per
pair ..„.  $7.50
Ladies' Chocolate Vici Kid Oxfords, newest lasts, with medium Cuban heels.
Special, per pair $7.50
Sole Agents for the district for Invictus
Shoes, "The Best Good Shoe for Ladies."
Just received, a large shipment of "Mon- =
arch" Floss and "Monarch" Down Knit- §§
ting Wools, in all the popular shades. H
Gent's Department j|
Special Sale  of Men's  Black Chambray |g
Shirts; regular $2.25; sale price $1.25 =
• 3
Special Sale of Men's Worsted and Tweed j§§
Pants; regular $8.50; sale price.... $5.50 g
Special Sale of Boys' Bloomer Pants; reg. js
$3.00 to $3.50; sale price, pair $2.25 8
Special Sale of Boys' All-Wool Button-on- j||
Shoulder Jerseys; regular $2.50 to $3.00 §§
value; sale price $1.95 j|
The balance of our stock of Football Boots, 3
regular $7.50 a pair, to clear at.... $5.50 =
Sole Agents for the district for Invictus il
Shoes, "The Best Good Shoe for Men." H
5=
Men's Tape-Neck and Sport Stripe AU-
Wool Jerseys; special price $6.00
Men's One-Piece Auto Combination Overalls, in khaki shade, at special values.
Just received, a large shipment of Men's
Ready-to-Wear Clothing, in brown, navy
and grey, from $27.50 to $45.00
WM. R. POTTER DIES
AFTER SHORT ILLNESS
Following a brief illness, Mr. Wm.
R. Potter, of this city, passed to his
rest on Friday, April 211. He was
taken ill on Tuesday and later underwent an operation, but did not recover. The deceased was 47 years of
age at thc time of his deatli and was SI
well known in Cumberland. Besides
his widow he leaves three brothers,
James, of Cumberland, Joseph of San
Francisco, and David, of Bauel Lake,
Alberta.
Tlie funeral took place from his late
residence, Maryport Avenue, on Monday afternoon, and was largely attended, the interment taking place In
the Cumberland Cemetery. Rev. Jas.
Hood conducted the burial service.
The pall-bearers were Messrs. Wm. 15J
McMillan,    Patrick    McMillan,    Jos.
Horbury,  P.  McNiven,   Thos.   Ripley
and Jno. Slant.
t Many floral tribues were received
from friends and relatives, including
a wreath from Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Potter; spray, Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Potter;
wreath, Mr. and Mrs. C. DeCouer;
anchor, Mr. and Mrs. T. Treloar;
spray, W. B. O. A. of thc Maccabees;
cross, Ladles' Aid of St. George's
Presbyterian Church; wreath. Mrs. J.
Bruce; wreath, W. B. A. of the Maccabees; wreath, Mr. alld Mrs. Jas.
Baird; spray, Mr. and Mrs. S. Davis;
wreath, Mr. and .Mrs. J. Dueca.
Ill
lllllllllllllllllll
"How long," asked the man accused
of burglary, "wlll It take to get
through with this case?' '
His  lawyer  looked  thoughtful.
"Well," he said, "personally I expect to get through it in two days,
but—er—I'm afraid it's going to take
you about live years."
The Studebaker
Light-Six
Now let some genius give us a new
song, entitled "I Didn't Raise My Hoy
to Bo a Taxpayer."
It appears that the smaller fellows who are taking part in the concert of nations will be permitted to
hold the music.
1. Thc Mets played a hard game and
should have cinched the game in the
first period.
Church Notices
HOLT TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
May 8—Sunday After Ascension.
11 a.m., Holy Communion.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHUKCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Mny 8—Sunday After Ascension.
Mass, 9 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SEBVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
ORACE METHODIST CHURCH
Her. G. B. Kinney, B.A, F.H.fi.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
1   The World's Greatest  Light-Weight  Automobile
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
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LIMITED
■     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C. /
.  Vayl.Mi.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Five
ARE FEMININE MORALS
GOING BACKWARD?
Dr. Eugene Leyman Fisk, head of
the Life Extension Institute, writes on
this Interesting, modern subject in
May Good Housekeeping.   He says;
"Customs have varied but there ls
only one, standard of womanhood that
Intelligent people could subscribe to
in this age or any other age, and that
Is not a standard Including lack of
womanly reserve or reckless, promiscuous fraternizing on a basis of
caressing intimacy with comparative
strangers. We have the right in this
age as In any other age to expect our
womankind to make a high spiritual
appeal. We have the right to expect
that they will stem the tide of materialism that ls always set against us
and not convey the Invitations to lax-
ness and decadence.
"There is no surer test of the trend
of a civilization than the standards
established by its womankind.
"As a corrective, therefore, for much
that Is disintegrating and discouraging ln this present age, we suggest a
rallying of tho forces of true womanhood—of our girls and womeu who are
wholesome and healthy at heart, however they may lend themselves temporarily to the mob psychology of the
hour and assume a superficial recklessness wholly foreign to their true
character. Healthy activity automatically excludes unhealthy activity.
"Perhaps there could be no better
expression of the principle Involved
In cultivating and giving play to wholesome    and    healthful   activities    in
woman's sphere than the programme
of the Camp Fire Girls.   The slogans
used   by   that   organization   are,   in
themselves, an inspiring appeal to the
healthy-minded,  aud  the   mind   and
character of an individual must be
sick indeed if it can decry or contemn
the call of such a programme. These
slogans are as follows:
Seek Beauty
Give Service
Purusue Knowledge
Be Trustworthy
Hold on to Health
Glorify Work
Be Happy."
MOTHER WISH
If I could only follow,
Little son, little son,
Your way by hill and hollow
Till your long road's done!
You have so many miles to go,
So many things to meet
Where I can never, never guide
Your careless feet   .   .   .
Wlll they know you true and kind,
Thc stranger-girls you find
When you journey from your mother
Where the world's roads wind?
But I can only strive to build you
strong and wise
Before your path leads from me and
childhood dies.
I
If I could only lind you,
Baby-girl, baby-girl,
When colored world-lights blind you
And world-dances whirl!
But you will only laugh to stand
And greet the careless bour
When love shall take your willing hand
And show the world ln flower .
Will the man you love that day
Keep you safe and glad and gay
When you journey from your mother
Down the old, new way?
But I can only strive to build you fair
and true
Before you pass too far to heed my
love for you.
Margaret Wlddemer, ln May Good
Housekeeping.
Music and Photoplays
A KING WITHOUT LOVE
IS A BEGGAR IN PURPLE
A   Powerful   Drama   of   Wall
Street, Home Life and the
Bonds of Mother-Love.
King Solomon, famed for bis wisdom, his wealth, his magnificence and
his multiplicity of wives, said, "Even
a king without love is only a beggar
in purple."
Out of his wisdom and experience
Solomon said these words, and it was
out of experience that John Hargrave
quoted them. Hargrave is the hero of
"A Beggar In Purple," the Edgar
Lewls-Pathe feature photoplay showing at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Wednesday next.
Hargrave was rich. He was a self-
made man and enjoyed the price that
comes with achievement and success.
He had worked his way up from obscurity to the point where he could
crush men he hated—the men who
had been responsible for his mother's
death because in their bounty they
had refused him the little help he
wanted to work for to save his mother's life.
But with the fulfillment of his ambition came the revelation that the
girl he loved was marrying him for
his money and had given her heart to
another—to hla enemy! Success,
wealth and power were his but, without love, he was only a beggar In
purple. But once to every man comes
love, and Hargrave found It where
least expected.
"Fatty" Arbuckle Impersonates a
two-year old baby In the film version
of "Brewster's Millions." He slta In a
huge high chair, dressed in a white
frock and a close-fitting bonnet. In
spite of his avoirdupois, he creates
the illusion of being of ordinary baby
size on the screen. The Illusion is
brought about by the use of gigantic
furniture and properties, which dwarf
Fatty by the sheer force of contrast.
Of course, the baby grows up. He ls
the adult Brewster through the main
part ot the story.
A Swedish engineer, after experimenting for ten years, claims, according to a London paper, to have perfected a machine which projects
sounds simultaneously with pictures.
It is possible that the "speaking film"
will be with us shortly.
• •   ♦
Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks
and Charlie Chaplin are not included
on the "white list" of motion picture
players published by the Methodist
Episcopal Church, but William S.
Hart, Wallace Reid, Dorothy Gish,
Charles Ray, Lillian Gish, Mary Miles
Minter and Forbes Robertson are all
among the players thought worthy of
mention.
• *   »
Yale University has honored Rex
Ingram with the degree of Bachelor
of Fine Arts in recognition of his remarkable work In directing "The Four
Horsemen of the Apocalypse." This
production, which Is one of the high
pointe of the cinema, ia to be shown
only as a road attraction.
• *   *
"Rip Van Winkle," the famous old
play which for a quarter of a century
piled up a fortune for Joseph Jefferson, Is to be made Into a photoplay.
Tbe title role Is to be played by Thos.
Jefferson, son of the original Rip.
• ■*   •
The film verson of "Black Beauty,"
soon to be seen ln Canada, la said to
be a fine depiction of probably tbe
most famous animal story of history.
More than 2,000,000 copies were distributed by Dr. Angell, founder of the
Massachusetts S. P. C. A.
• •   •
"The Kid," Charlie Chaplin's "little
pal" in his latest comedy, is going Into vaudeville, having accepted an oiler
from the Keith circuit at a figure, it is
rumored, of 12500 a week. A year ago
Jackie was an unknown Infant on bis
mother's knee.
• •   *
"I understand your daughter ls
taking great palna with her singing."
" 'Taking' Ib not the word. 'Giving'
would bo better."
GRAND MASTER OF
ODD FELLOWS PAYS
OFFICIAL VISIT HERE
Manufacturers in Great Britain are
studying the possibilities of British
Columbia as a likely spot for the
establishment of textile factories.
They, are gathering statistics regarding raw materials, power available,
and other information. British capital
will Invest far more quickly in a
province where it knows the people
are one hundred per cent, strong behind local Industry.
Grand Master Fooke, of the Grand
Lodge of British Columbia, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, paid his
official visit to Union Lodge No. 11 oh
Tuesday night. He gave very encouraging data on tbe progress of tbe
order In the province. B. C. has now
7000 members, and the Grand Master
instituted two new lodges during the
past year.
The next meeting of tbe Grand
Lodge will be held on June 8, at Nanaimo.
Following the session ot the Union
Lodge a very enjoyable social was
held ln the Fraternity Hall, given by
the sisters of Rebecca Lodge.
BADMINTON CLUB SOCIAL
TENDERS FOR COAL
SEALED tenders addressed to the
undersigned and endorsed "Quotation
for Coal, Dominion Buildings, British
Columbia," wlll be received until 12
o'clock noon, Monday, May 16, 1921,
for the supply of coal for the public
buildings throughout the province of
British Columbia.
Combined specification and form of
tender can be obtained from the Pur
chasing Agent, Department of Public
Works, Ottawa, aud from tbe Caretakers of the different Dominion
Buildings.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on tbe forms supplied by
the Department and in accordance
with the conditions set forth therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Mln-
iBtei of Publlc Works, equal to 10 p.c.
of the amount of the tender. War Loan
Bonds of the Dominion will also be
accepted as security, or war bonds and
cheques if required to make up an odd
amount.
By order.
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, Ont., April 15, 1921,
The Badminton Club held a most
enjoyable whist drive and dance on
Friday last, about 40 couples being
present. Advantage was taken ot the
occasion to present the prizes to the
winners in the recent tournament.
This tournament was tbe first one
that the club has held and judging
from the number ot entries and the
enthusiasm shown by the members,
there is no reason to doubt the success of similar events in the future.
The whist drive started at 8 and
continued until 9.30, Mrs. Mumford
winning tbe ladles' first prize and Miss
Weldon tbe consolation prize. Owing
to tbe shortage of gentlemen at the
whist tables several ladles took the
positions—and secured the prizes, Mrs,
W. A. Owen receiving first prize and
Miss P. Partridge the consolation.
Whilst refreshments were being
prepared, Mr. F. J. Dalby, aa president of the club, called upon Rev. W,
Leversedge to present the badminton
prizes. The successful competitors
In their respective classes were as
follows: Ladies' Singles, Mrs. J,
Spicer i Ladies' Doubles, Mrs. W,
Leversedge and Mrs. W. A. Owen;
Mixed Doubles, Miss Weldon and Mr.
Allan Nunns; Gents' Singles, Mr. Allan
Nunns; Gents' Doubles, Mr. W. Rodger and Mr. Allan Nunns.
Mr. Dalby addressed the gathering,
thanking all the ollicials of the club
for assitlng in making the tournament
such a pronounced success.
One more pleasing function he had
to perform, said Mr. Dalby, and that
was to present to Mrs. Owen a beautiful bouquet of tulips. Tbe floor was
then cleared and dancing Indulged ln
until 12.30. Mrs. Ralph E. Frost, at
tbe piano, and Mr. C. Graham, violin,
provided the music.
BILLIONS OF HERRING
FROZEN IN" HARBOR
The great fish tragedy tbat occurred
oil Alaska has been told by tbe cap.
tain of the steamer "Northwestern."
Millions of herring swarmed Into the
narrow necked harbor of Klawack
Bay. They were in such vast numbers that those on top were almost
forced out of the water. Then the
frost came and about six Inches of Ice
formed in the harbor. Millions of herring at the entrance could be seen
fighting to get out to sea before the
Ice enclosed the waters. When the
"Northwestern" arrived the tide had
receded, and for twenty to fifty feet
on the beach and several hundred feet
out Into the water for three and a half
miles around the harbor lay frozen
herring. The fish were tightly packed
for an average depth of three feet.
For a few days some people tried to
put some of tbe fish away for the summer, but they were unable to make
any impression on the vast number.
It was estimated that 2,000,000,000
fish were frozen.
Illllli
WHAT HE SAW
"He had known her for years. He
had seen a good deal of ber—ln more
ways than one.
"He had sat across the parlor from
her; she had, of course, crossed her
legs; he had seen her trim ankles, her
"He had seen her at tbe seashore,
wearing her tantalizing, silky bathing
suit, with its short dress, with its cute
little slippers, with Its   .   .   .
"He had seen her ln her traveling
suit; ln her cape; In her housedrcss;
in her   .   .   .
"He had seen her at full dress
affairs, and considering that these
are as they are, he had, of course,
seen   .   .   .
"But It was not until a long, long
while that he approximated the ultimate. It was just a parlor date—one
ot many—which did not give promise
of being any different from all the
others. But one thing will lead to
another! Finally, by a little slip of
the arm, by a little jerk ot tbe head,
a little this, and a little that, some
hairpins came slightly out; ber hair
hung a little loosely at the sides; and
—essence of compromise—he saw her
ears! I !
SOUND BUSINESS SENSE
A little chap, whose father is
prominent merchant, and as such
never loses an opportunity to descant
upon the virtues ot advertising, one
day asked his motber:
"May Lucy and I play at keeping a
sttre In the front room?"
■'Yes," assented  the  mother,  "but
you must be very quiet."
"All right," said   the   boy;  "we'll
2-19 pretend we don't advertise."
THE NUISANCE OF WRITING
He might have made her, oh, so glad
By writing to her now and then;
But there was much he had to do,
And writing's such a nuisance, too
He had no liking for the pen!
The good excuses that he bad
Have long been serving many men.
He knelt beside her bed and wept,
When Bhe had ceased to watch aud
wait;
His tears tell hot upon her hand,
But if she still could understand
He saw no sign who came too late;
No smile came to her lips who slept,
Because his grieving was so great.
—Good Housekeeping.
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, May 7th
A Special 8 Reel Feature
ONE OF THE
BLOOD
Monday, May 9th
The Event of the Season
Naval Squadron
CONCERT
The Concert Party consists of sixteen, all
from the ships now lying at anchor in Comox
Harbour. Don't miss this great show. Prices
within the reach of all; 50c. and 75c.
Lancashire Clog Dancing - Cutlass
Swinging      -      Conjuring Tricks
Lightning Pencil Sketches, etc.
Wednesday, May 11th
A Beggar in
Purple
If you have wealth, but no love, you are but "A Beggar in Purple." See this different
drama glowing with emotion and action. A Message to the Money Mad. A Drama
to the Heart. A Play for Everyone. A Revelation of Men and Morals. A virile
drama of the whirlpool of Wall Street,,a man's faith, a woman's trust and a revelation,
startling and heart-stirring.
COMING, SATURDAY, MAY 14th
MACK SENNETTS
Five Beel Comedu Sensation*
'DOWiJ ON .THE FARM" Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   {SLANDER
May ?,1921.
I
MAKE YOURSELF
COMFORTABLE!
SEAGRASS FURNITURE
LARGE ARM CHAIRS
at	
LARGE ARM ROCKERS
at	
$11.50
$12.00
Round and Oblong Tables
$10.50 and $11.50  each
We Invite Your Inspection of Our Lines of
Beds, Springs and Mattresses
IRON AND BRASS BEDS—A full range of prices up
to S50.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE AND COIL SPRINGS.
SANITARY FELT MATTRESSES
at  	
OSTERMOOR AND RESTMORE
MATTRESSES at	
S16.00
$25.00
SEE  OUR  NEW  LINES
OF   WALLPAPERS
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
WHEN YOU WANT A SATISFYING, HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS AND BARS
WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open liny nnd Night.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Offlce:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 110 Cumberland, B. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • ■  B. C.
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
u
Leaves Vancouver 7.16 p. ni. Dally,
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON PORT ARTHUR
.SASKATOON OTTAWA
WINNIPEG MONTREAL
Connections for all points tn Cnnada nnd United States.
Compartment Observnllon Cars, Standard and Tonrlst Sleepers.
Canadian NaNonal Railwaus
EDWARD W. BICKLE, District Agent
B. C.
LEADS CANADA
IN VALUE OF LANDS
Increase From  1910   Is   More
Than 136 Per Cent.—Figures
For Other Provinces.
The Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics issued by tlie Dominion Government publishes a table
which shows British Columbia as having greatly increased the value per
acre of its, occupied farm lands during the last ten years, in comparison
with other provinces. An extract
from the table is here quoted:
1910       1920
Canada  $88.01)     $48.00
British Columbia  74.00     175.00
Nova Scotia   25.00      43.00
New  Brunswick   19.00       35.00
P. E. Island  : 31.00       49.00
Quebec   43.00       70.00
Ontario     48.00       70.00
Manitoba    29.00       39.00
Saskatchewan     22.00       32.00
Alberta     24.00       32.00
The advance of British Columbia in
this respect, evidently due to Intensive production per acre, is very
marked. It will be noted that while
tbe average for Canada has increased
only 45 per cent since 1910. B. C.
shows an increase of over 130 per
cent.
ROLL ALONG YOUR
OWN WAYSIDE INN
An automobile luncheon outlit described and illustrated in the April
issue of Motor combines to a high degree utility and compactness. Contained in. a box 2%xS%xl9% inches
high, which is attachable to tlie running board, are a folding tabic and six
camp stools, thermos bottles, knives,
forks, plates, cups and spoons and
metal food compartment. Waterproof
fabric and metal are used throughout, and all parts are durable and
sanitary.
ANTELOPE CARCASES
PILED LIKE CORDWOOD
Of Canada's Millions of Antelope
But Few Remain—Special
Preserves Provided
Half a century ago countless antelope roamed the prairies of Canada,
the United States and Mexico; today
It ls doubtful whether there are 150,-
000 of these graceful little animals in
all this vast area, though in past yours
reliable observers have seen several
thousand lu a single day.
Mr. Thompson-Seton has estimated
that, at the time of first settlement of
tbe west, the range of the antelope
covered two million square miles, and
that there were no less than twenty
million of these animals..
The rifle and the advance of agriculture have done their work. One
writer, in describing the antelope
herds of the "seventies," says "the
prairie seemed to vibrate with the
galloping of these swift little creatures, and they were slaughtered to
such an extent that their outstretched
carcases were piled in heaps like
cordwood."
The antelope is one of our most
graceful animals; it is scarcely more
than three feet high at the shoulder,
and is fleeter than tbe swifost greyhound. It is feared, however, that,
while the antelope is absolutely protected In the western provinces, it is
too late for the species to recover.
The Dominion Parks Branch is endeavoring to save the antelope in preserves. In but one of these, however,
is success reported. A herd of the
little animals was discovered near
Momiskam, Alta., and these were surrounded by a wire fence enclosing
eight sections. As the land was emt
neatly suited to tbe purpose, and unlit
for agriculture, it 1ms been created a
national preserve for the preservation
of tlie antelope. At the time of capture the herd consisted of forty-two
animals, and tills number lias now increased to about one hundred. This
unfortunately, Is the only record of
increase of antelope in enpivity, and is
undoubtedly due to tho fact that they
are enclosed In their natural range.
Dr. W. T. Hornaday says: "The
chief difficulty encountered in trying
to afford protection to the antelope is
ln Its own nature. It is decilate,
capricious and easily upset. It Is so
sensitive to shock that it literally 'dies
at the drop of the hat.' Owing to tlie
extreme difficulty In maintaining this
species in captivity, its total extinction at an early date seems absolutely
certain, unless It is fully nnd permanently protected in Its wild state,
on its native range, for a long period."
Service At One Price
NO matter where yo#buy a Ford Car it is always the same
price. It is the same with Ford Service. Spare parts are
always sold at fixed prices. Charge for repairs made by
our skilled mechanics are made according to rates which do not
vary.
If your Ford naeds repairs you can learn from us exactly
what the cost will bo before you tell us to proceed with the work.
Our contract with the Ford organization requires us to keep
a complete stock of genuine Ford parts. Ford owners never have
to wait for us.
Ford service bep-ins by giving you the greatest car value ever
offered. Afterwards we see to it that your satisfaction is continuous.
E. C. EMDE, Ford "Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C.
R. G. LAVER, SALESMAN, CUMBERLAND.
PHONE 115.
a
The Order of Elks plan to erect a
magnificent home for their members
In Vancouver.
The Job printing trade in British
Columbia supports thousands of persons, and represents an Investment of
$1,000,000, and yet many persons send
out of the Province for their printing.
One of the big linns of this town sends
East for its printing.
The local newspaper ls the show
window of a community. The pro-
gressiveness ot its citizens is judged
by the manner in which they support
their home paper.
The City of Vancouver lost approximately $1,000,000 in revenue last year
through the citizens buying goods imported from the United States.
Tlie manufacture of trunks aud
suitcases has been added to the list of
industries in British Columbia.
Efforts are now being made to establish a factory In British Columbia
for the manufacture of fur garments
on a large scale. It Is possible, if the
plans under way are carried to maturity, that this province may ln time
become the fur centre of the continent.
Every dollar spent over the counter
for merchandise pays 18 cents In
municipal, provincial and Dominion
taxes—if It is made in Canada. If not,
then it pays taxes to some foreign
country.
When three years old, and able to
talk plainly, a child was carried from
a warm room to a cold room and lost
his power of speech. Several years
later he began to talk agnln but has
never been able to do so plainly.
Got a Kodak  and  keep a  picture
story. Frost's for Kodaks,
The fruit season is starting. British Columbia fruits, which are equal
in quality to similar varieties grown
in any part of the world, are two or
three weeks behind those of California. By waiting for the local products
assistance is being given to the B. C.
farmer, and no exchange is paid on
the money spent with him.
EXTENSION
OF REBATE
PERIOD
Commencing from February 15, the
rebate period on current Electric Light
accounts will be extended to the end of
the month.
Thus the period in which discount will
be allowed in future will be from the
15th to end of each month
PAY YOUR ACCOUNTS PROMPTLY AND SAVE
THE DISCOUNT
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
Carrying out their policy of attempting to learn the problems of
every portion of the province, and
assist, If possible, in the solution of
dijculties, the Vancouver, Victoria and
other Boards of Trade of the Island
and Mainland, are planning an excursion to Prince Rupert, Anyox, Stewart,
Ocean Falls and other Const points.
Falconer's   Golden   Compound -
Frost's.
■at
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It Is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law. n
May 1, Ml
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
11
The 24th of May
will soon be here and you will want a new pair of
shoes then. Buy them now at Cavin's Shoe Store—
and save no less than 50 per cent.
CHILDREN'S RED STITCH LECKIE'S.   <J»Q  A r
Sizes 8 to IOI/2; per pair  tDO*4t)
BOYS' RED STITCH LECKIE'S— &A ftE
Sizes 1 to 514; per pair  ^P^tOO
BOYS' SCHOOL LAST, LECKIE'S   d»>|   PA
Sizes 1 to 51/2; per pair  V^TeOU
MINERS' WHITE RUBBERS— d»r A A
Per pair  «J)O.UU
See our Bargain Counter
for Real Bargains in Shoes
THAT WE ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEE TO GIVE
SATISFACTION
I Cavin's
I Cash Shoe Store [
=    Remember that we have a device for every foot trouble     j§|
FRESH
VEGETABLES
To Arrive Saturday Morning
LARGE CAULIFLOWERS
CABBAGE
HEAD LETTUCE
LEAF LETTUCE
VANCOUVER ISLAND ASPARAGUS
GREEN ONIONS
ONIONS
VANCOUVER ISLAND TOMATOES
CUCUMBERS
STRAWBERRIES
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR TEETH
RACE DEGENERATION
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
As we read history and we notice
the rise and tall of nations, we realize
that at certain periods ot their greatness, when their governments have
had the greatest vigor and their
foreign commerce has been pushed to
the ends of the known world, and
when the armies have stood victorious
in the capitols of their enemies, It
would seem that no power would ever
be able to rise and overthrow them.
In many cases the fall of a nation
has been caused by a powerful enemy,
but more frequently has been the result of a gradual degeneration In the
physical and mental qualifications of
the people who constitute the country.
If you consider the glories of ancient Greece and their marvelous
physical development, and their wonderful energy, their active minds and
their artistic Instincts, and then wonder what brought them to the low
level that they have occupied for the
last thousand years, you wlll And that
it was not the Invading .hosts of the
enemy and tbat tt was not the violation of our present standards of morality, and it was not any of those
things that are usually held up as
vices. It was a new kind of disease
that did the business for the old.
Greeks; it was simply malaria. So
you see that if a nation showns signs
of decay, one of the first things to do
ls see if there is any extremely active disease that is attacking the inhabitants in great numbers, and it*
there is, there you will find the reason for a lowering of the national
tone.
On this continent today nearly every
child that goes to the public schools,
and nearly every child that does not
go to the public schools, Is suffering
from decay ot the teeth. It would seem
that the bacteria of tooth decay, which
is just as much a disease as malaria
ever was, is a widespread attack upon the people of our race. And If we
are unable to check It then we must
conform to the physical regulations
that have been in force since the world
began. Every type of animal tbat has
disappeared from the globe has done
so because the change or climate or
environment bad been so rapid that
the development of the teeth could not
keep pace with the change in food,
and consequently these animals that
are now extinct became so because
their dental apparatus could no longer
do the business. And if our dental
apparatus is allowed to become a total
wreck we are doomed as a people.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
KEEPING SHORT CIRCUITS
OUT OF FORD TIMER
Every Ford owner knows the inconvenience caused by short-circuiting ot tbe timer wires, tbe common
practice of running them across to the
right side of the motor making them
particularly subject to wear and oil-
saturation. There Is a better way of
connecting them which reduces the
liability of short-circuiting.
Remove the timer wires, and with
a knife carefully cut off the braided
covering which eucloses them. Fasten
them to the timer terminals in their
respective positions, and carry all the
wires up to the radiator support rod
over the loose connection, running
those from contacts three and four
on the left side and those from con-
tasts one and two on the right side.
Bind the wires to the rod" in this position, leaving just enough slack to
allow for the movement of the timer,
and make the wires fast to the coii
box terminal, cutting them off If too
long.
The advantage is at once evident.
You may inspect each wire separately
throughout Its entire length. No
wires cross the timer or touch It except at the terminals, and there Is no
possibility of their becoming worn or
oil-soaked.—Motor Magazine.
CUMBERLAND GENERAL
HOSPITAL IN SOUND
FINANCIAL CONDITION
(Continued from Page One)
ROD AND GUN
Among the other interesting stories
and articles of outdoor lite ln Canada
that appear In "Rod and Gun in Canada" tor May, is one entitled "A Wonderful Salmon Expedition." This describes an expedition after the "big
fellows" ln Newfoundland. For the
fisherman there are two other stories,
"Falling From Grace" and "The Heart
Cure" ln this issue of Canada's outdoor magazine. "Hunting the Black
Duck" and "The Parson Goes Hunting," as the titles Indicate, are hunting stories that will appeal to the devotee of rifle and shot gun. Great Interest Is being shown in the big game
bunting articles written by A. Bryan
Williams; an instalment of his splendid series of articles appears in this
Issue. Fishing Notes and Guns and
Ammunition Department, as well as
the other departments, are up to their
usual high standards. Rod and Gun
in Canada Is published monthly by
W. J. Taylor, Ltd., Woodstock, Ont
The bride of a Chinaman jumped in-
to the river Usk at Newport and committed suicide. In was another tragedy of the mixed marriage. The girl
was English and had only been married ten months. She told her friends
that she was disgraced by marrying a
celestial. She also said that she could
not live on rice, which was the staple
food of the Chinaman.
Rheumatism
Neuritis, Sciatica, Neuralgia
Templeton's
Rheumatic
Capsules
Have brought good
health to half-a-million
sufferers.
A healthful, money-saving remedy
well known for fifteen years, pre
scribed by doctors, sold by druggists, $1.00 a box. Ask our agents
or write for a free trial package.
Templetons, 142 King W., Toronto.
Sold by
R. E. FROST
charge of the meeting as temporary
chairman,   Mr.  A.   R.   Stacey  being
temporary secretary during the election of oflicers and directors.
AH Oflicers and Directors Re-elected.
Mr. J. C. Brown moved that Mr.
Charles Graham be re-elected to the
position of president, saying'he had
taken a great deal of Interest in the
work of the hospital, and the satisfactory condition of the Institution
was largely due to his efforts In its
behalf. He knew of no one so well
qualified to fill the position.
.Mr. Graham rcmrfrked that he had
been president for three years and
would like some one else to take a
turn, but his request was unavailing
-and he was unanimously and enthusiastically re-elected as president.
Mr. R. H. Robertson was re-elected
as vice-president; Mr. Thos. Mordy
as secretary, and Mr. C. J. Parnham
as treasurer.
Messrs. Collin Campbell, J. L. Brown
and A. Nunns were nominated as
directors, but all declined, and the old
board, comprising the following, were
declared re-elected: Messrs. J. C.
Brown, F. a Pickard, Thos. Beunett,
A. J. Taylor and Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton.
Mr. J. L. Brown endeavored to have
thc directors re-elected en bloc, giving his reasons tliat tlie hospital was
in a very prosperous condition, had
never been so well managed, and had
not such a good bank balance as at
the present time. His motion was
ruled 6*flt of order.
Mr. O'Brien having declared the
officers duly elected, Mr. Graham resumed the chair. He said it was very
flattering to himself and the members
of the board to be re-elected for the
coming year. But it was not altogether an unmixed blessing. During
the three years be had been president
he had done his best to make the
hospital a credit to Cumberland. He
did not know of any other hospital In
the province tllat had a bank balance.
They had not had an overdraft during
the past three years.
The Medical Fund agreement was of
considerable benefit to the hospital,
said Mr. Graham, but It was* of even
more benefit to the men. It had been
mooted for the Medical Fund to pay
the money into its own fund and pay
hospital bills as they accrued, but this
would have meant more revenue for
the "hospital. Under the present arrangement, during the past year the
cost per day per patient to the Medical
Fund had worked out at $2.08, whereas
the cost for other patients had been
$2.50.
They were endeavoring to make the
cost as low as possible. Other hospitals' operating expenses ran from
$2.75 to $3.25 per day. The speaker
said Cumberland could be congratulated ou Its operating cost of $2.50.
He Isolation Hospital.
Mr. Graham said he had taken up
with the late member for Comox the
matter of the Isolation Hospital. Dr.
McLean had asked for and received
full particulars, together with details
of Intended operation. But they had
never received a reply. He thought
the board would have to go after the
government more strenuously.
Tbe idea was to make a small hospital with accommodation for six beds,
for contagious cases only, but the
matter had been dropped, as there
was not much hope of getting anything done by the government.
A deputation had mot the government in regard to an increased grant
for the hospital. This was tllc same
today as ln 1914—Ihey had received
no increase whatever. They had asked
for an increase of 100 per cent. The
superintendent of the Vancouver Gen
eral Hospital waB quoted as saying
that he had reason to believe that tllc
hospitals would get an Increase of 25
cents a day, which would be a great
help to the hospitals of tlie province.
In conclusion, Mr. Graham said be
would continue to his best to keep up
the hospital, and improve thc standard
If at all possible.
Mr. O'Brien asked for estimated cost
of the Isolation Hospital. The reply
was $6,500 for a seven-roomed cottage
at tbat time.
Mr. J. L. Brown said the Isoliuion
hospital was a very necessary Institu
tion, and thc matter should be again
taken up witli tlie government, who
should be shown tliat Cumberland wai
endeavoring to put up two-tihrds ol
the cost.
Mr. J. C. Brown Informed the meeting of the improvements to the present   isolation   building,   which   will
make It much better ln future.
Voles of Thanks.
A vote of thanks to all who niadt
donations to tlie hospital or who
assisted in uny way. was passed.
A vote of thanks was also pased to
all directors and officers for Ihelr
services during the past year.
Thqy work J
naturally 1
andfonn.
no hatit
©
Theywoik
naturally
and form
no:habit»
\=
They work
naturally
and form
no. habit****
uuuf
Keep a Kodak Story of the
Children
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a larg*
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
bills.
Send us your specifications
and we will give you a close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
Cumberland  Frosts.
Falconer's   Golden   Compound — al
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Ktt^mnXrTXSin
I'OIl
windows, noons, frames,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY WORK
write for prices lo
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offlco 8630 Bridge Street) Vlcl >ri.*i, Ii.c. Eight
TH8  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
May 1,1921.
REAL   VALUE
LADIES' HATS—Another shipment, comprising some very smart models, marked
at very reasonable prices. See the
special line (J»Q QP
at     *\}Q%VO
CHILDREN'S STRAW HATS—Just arrived.    Prices are very much reduced.
UNTRIMMED SUN HATS— 'JlXp
Extra special value at     • *■'*•'
A SPECIAL SNAP—Ladies' and Children's Fibre Silk Tarns. P»n/»
Price, each   tlU-L
LADIES' LARGE SIZE APRONS—
Good quality prints. fl»"|   PA
Price     «Pl.«JU
LADIES' COAT HANGERS—Padded and
lined with sateen; shades of pink, blue,
purple, gold and figured de- Of'.
signs. Only a limited quantity. ■Wv
HEAVY BLACK KNITTING WOOLS—
An extra special. P\ft/»
Per half-pound  <JU*L
SATEENS—In all colorings. AT
Reduced from 60c a yard to w«
STRIPED GALATEAS—Also in plain
blue shades; give great satisfaction for
ladies' and children's wear. A *T _
Price, per yard Titll/
SPORT COATS—See these extra values at
$19.50, $21 u/o $29
EXTRA SPECIAL SPORTS d»1 A
COAT—In Rose Serge; price... «pJ-U
PILLOW SPECIAL—50 Pillows, splendid
quality, good covering. fl»1 QC
Price     «Pl.DO
NEW D. & A. BRASSIERES— QCp
In white and pink; price t/tl-L
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. William R. Potter wishes
to thank her many friends for
their kindnesses . and sympathy
shown towards tier during her
sad bereavement.
Airs. Daniel Stewart, delegate from
the Cumberland branch of the Pythian
Sisters, lias gone to Kamloops to attend tlie annual meeting of that order
to be held next week.
Births
WHITE—At thc Cumberland General
Hospital,  May  4,  to Mr.  and   Mrs.
White, a daughler.
WATSON—May 6. at the Cumberland
General Hospital, to Mr. and  Mrs.
Fraser Watson, a daughter.
Miss M. Browne, matron of the General Hospital, thanks the following
for gifts: Mrs. J. It. Grey, preserves;
Mrs. F. J. Dalby, Ilowers, and A Friend
for reading matter.
F. AIKAWA
Boat Builder and General
Carpenter
Boats built to order.    All sizes
of Boats for Sale
-'■" ■■   ' -        i "" ■ "■*■*■■" •*■
F. AIKAWA     -    Royston Rd. 1
Sacrifice
SALE
THIS OFFER IS GOOD UNTIL
MONDAY, MAY 9th, ONLY
1 Congoleum Rug. size 9x10.6 .... SII.IK)
1 Solid Oak Bullet, fumed finish, W7.M
1 Solid Oak Magazine Table  iflUHl
1 Arm Chair, solid oak frame, Xo. 1
Spanish leather upholstered, tfiiSM
1 Rocker, solid oak frame, No. 1 Spanish leather upholstered   $28.50
1 Seagrass Arm Chair   $S„*i(l
1 White Enamel Bureau   $*.1I.(HI
1 Box Couch   $*>II.IMI
With new Couch Cover and Window
Hangings   **>.*i.(KI
1 Kitchen Baking Table, 2 bins and 2
drawers    $1'I.'MI
1 Singer Sewing Machine, new, I'llUH)
1 Toilet Set $5.00
1 Rifle, .303 calibre  $25.(10
1 Pr. Football Boots, size 10, nearly
new, and 1 Football Shirt (blue and
white stripe  - $5.00
li>20 Model 4 Overland, newly over-
hauled, with all worn parts re
placed; cord tires on back, Dunlop
Specials in front; spare tire aud
rim; set of tire chains, etc. A real
snup at   $750,110
For further Information nnd inspection
see
D, J. CRONK CUMBERLAND
Phone 12S h.
Public Notice
I take this opportunity of informing the general
public and my customers in particular that there is no
truth whatsoever in certain rumors regarding any of
my cows being infected with tuberculosis. My solicitor
has interviewed Mr. R. Machin of the Comox Creamery
Association in reference to such rumors, and Mr.
Machin emphatically denies that he ever asserted or
insinuated that my cows were so infected.
I might add that my cows are properly and duly
tested and inspected, and are now and always have
been, in perfect health.
Dated, April 22, 1921.
H.   LEIGHTON
8    DAIRYMAN
ill
ROYSTON, B. C.     |
FOR SALE
FORD CAR, 1919, GOOD CONDITION
Demountable rims, shock absorbers
Call and see at Chas. McMillan's,
53, Camp. 3-20
CHEVROLET CAR  FOR SALE—19
model; run only 1500 miles;   is   In
splendid condition.   Will sell cheap
for quick sale.   Apply A. R. Wesley,
It. It. No. 1. Cumberland, B.C.   4-22
LOOSE OAT HAY, FROM ONE TON
upwards; cheap for cash.   Apply R,
Waddell,  R.  M.  D.  1, Cumberland
4-20
THREE ACRES GOOD LAND, partly
cleared; house, barn and garage;
one cow, two dozen chickens; mile
and a halt from town. For further
particulars apply Islander Ofllce.
3-17
Personal Mention
Mrs. T. Mordy will not receive on
Monday.
Miss Gladys Dando returned from
Victoria on Wednesday after spending
two week's vacation in that city.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Nanaimo and
Ladysmith ou Tuesday and returned
on Friday.
Mr. James M. Savage, General Man
tiger of tlie Canadian Collieries (Duns-
niuir) Ltd., arrived from Victoria on
Thursday.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction En
gitieer of the Canadian Collieries
I Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied by
Mrs. Owen, left for Nanaimo Wednesday and returned Thursday. Mrs.
Owen went on to Vancouver and Is not
expected to return until Tuesday next.
Mr. Geo. und Miss Marjorie Mordy,
who have been attending the University In Vancouver, arc home spending
(he vacation with their parents, Mr.
and MrB. Thomas Mordy.
.Mr. J. G. Millichamp, representing
the John W^Peck Co. of Vancouver,
was in town recently.
Mrs. Darker, of the Cumberland
Publlc School, accompanied by her
daughter, spent last week-end iu Vic
toria.
Mr. and Mrs. John Furbow left for
Summerland Saturday morning, where
they will take up their future residence.
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., returned from Ladysmith on Sunday last.
Mr. G. C. Baker, cashier of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., Victoria, arrived in town Friday night.
Mrs. Burrell, of Victoria, arrived on
.Monday on a visit to her daughter,
Mrs. A. C. Lymn, of Derwent Avenue.
Mr. George W. Clinton, American
Consul, accompanied by Mrs. Clinton,
left for Seattle, Wnsh., Thursday
morning.
Mr, Walter Robinson, formerly
timekeeper of No. 5 Mille here, arrived
in town Sunday and returned to Vancouver Tuesday morning.
Mr. John Sutherland, of Sutherland's
Dry Goods,, left for Vancouver and
Victoria on Monday and returned on
Wednesday.
Mr. John May, of Nanaimo, was in
town during tlie week.
Mr. Alex. Henderson, of Nanaimo
Marble Works, arrived on Wednesday
Rev. W. Leversedge left for Vancouver on Tuesday to attend the meeting
of the Social Service Council. He returned Thursday.
Our readers will be pleased to know
that the children of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Shortt, who have been seriously ill,
arc nicely on the way to recovery.
Mr. John Thomson left Friday for
Kamloops, where he will represent
the Cumberland lodge at the session
of tlie Grand Lodge of the Knights of
Pythias to be held at that place on
Wednesday next.
HOUSE AND LOT FOR SALE—
House contains six rooms with a
concrete foundation; garage nnd
necessary outhouses.    Also a
GRAY-DORT SPECIAL AUTOMO-
bile, ln llrst-class condition. For
further particulars apply to R.
Adamson, Cumberland.
G.W.VA Notes
The next meting of the local will
be held on Tuesday, May 10, at 7 p.m.
There will he a special meeting held
in the Memorial Hall on Sunday, May
15, at 3 p.m. Very important business,
A full attendance of members Is requested.
Don't forget this date—Smoker on
Saturday, May 21. Full particulars
later.
Tlie Comrades wish to publicly
thank the Ladies' Auxillnry for their
recent donation of two dozen chairs
to Ihe Memorial Hall.
Whist Drive
and Dance
wil be held in the
Puntledge School
on
Friday, May 13
Whist commences at 8.
Dancing at 10.
Admission, 50 Cents.
Acreage for Sale
GV!> acres of Land for sale,
2V4 acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
CHEVROLET G-PASSENGER CAR,
1919 model, In first-class condition;
fully equipped, five new tires, live
spare tubes. A snap, $650 cash.
Apply Ben Evans, Camp, Cumberland. 4-17
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
' The meetings of the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Hall.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
FOR
Service        Quality Value
CROCKERY
Just Arrived, in Assorted Sizes and Designs.
TEA POTS
CUPS AND SAUCERS
PLATES
OATMEALS
FKUIT DISHES
SUGABS
CREAM JUGS
WATER JVGS
SCALLOPS
BAKERS
BOWLS
EGG-CUPS
PLATTEBS
SALT AND PEPPEBS
TUMBLEBS
GROCERY SPECIALS
Dates, new stock, fresh and clean, per lb 20c
Netted Gem Potatoes, 100-lb. sack $1.00
Oranges  3 dozen $1.00
Lemons, dozen 35c
Grape-Fruit, dozen  75c
American Sodas 35c pkg.; 3 pkgs. $1.00
6-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each 40c
7-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each 50c
20-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each $1.35
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 1 55c lb.; No. 2, lb. 45c
Bulk Tea No. 1, 50c per lb.; No. 2, lb. 40c
Quaker Pork and Beans, flats 5 tins for 50c
Aylmer or Libby's Pork and Beans, 2-lb. tins, 4 for 90c
Pineapple, 1-lb. tins 2 for 45c
Pineapple, 2-lb. tins 35c tin; 3 for $1.00
4-lb. tin Wagstaffe's Pure Strawberry Jam, each $1.15
4-lb. tin Pure Cherry Jam, each - 95c
4-lb. tin Pure Plum Jam, each 90c
4-lb. tin Libby's Pure Marmalade, each 90c
10-lb. sacks Snowflake Pastry Flour, sack  80c
50-lb. sacks Snowflake Pastry Flour, each $3.50
7-lb. sack Whole Wheat Flour SOc
Cream of the West Flour, 49-lb. sacks $3.10
24-lb. sacks $1.65
ALSO A FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUIT AND
VEGETABLES
Local Rhubarb, Local Asparagus, Cabbage, Cauliflower,
Head Lettuce, Onions,  Carrots, Turnips,
Beets and Parsnips.
ASPARAGUS
TOMATOES
CUCUMBERS
Apples,   Oranges,   Lemons,   Grape-Fruit,   Bananas,
Strawberries and Cocoanuts.
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the office at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at once.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
For Week Ending May 5.
Dauntless, coastwise; Charmer, Comox; Tyee, coastwise; Toyama Maru,
Japan; Peerless, coastwise; Joyful,
Comox; Peerless, Vancouver; P. W.,
Vancouver; WlrelesB, Vancouver; Progressive, coastwise; Mount Berwyn,
Portland, Ore.; Moresby, Vancouver;
Jessie Mac, coastwise; C. P. R. Hulk,
Victoria; Alcedo, coastwise; Thoru
Maru, Japan; Oregon and Scows,
Seattle; J. C. Potter, Anyox; Tartar,
coastwise.
BASEBALL DANCE
ON MONDAY NIGHT
Our readers are reminded of the
dance to be given in the Ilo-llo hall
on Monday night, following the concert by the party from the Naval
Squadron.
It Is expected a big crowd will turn
out for this dance, as a number of men
from the warships have signified their
Intention of being present. The dance
Is being given by the members of the
Intermediate and Junior Baseball
Club.
Get a Kodak and keep a picture
story. Frost's for Kodaks.
_

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