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The Islander Sep 25, 1915

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Array lunftzt
\    Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
'lr.:
^gislitiiun J« biary
'.$
VOL. VI., No. 26     THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.. SATURDAY. SEPT. 25. 1915.        Subscription price, $1.50 per year
STRONGLY FORTIFIED RUSSIAN CITY IN PATH OF GERMAN ADVANCE.
General view of Grodno, the Russian stronghold whose outer defences are said to have fallen
v before the Germans.   The capture of this place would imperil the whole Russian right wing.
WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC SOCIETY
A Red Cross Tea will be given
on Tuesday next at 3.30 p.m., by
Mrs. James Stewart. A collection
will be made for the Women's
Patriotic Society. Everybody is
invited to come and enjoy some
music and light refreshments to
help provide some comforts for
the men at the front.
Tag Day collections as reported
already, $226.80; additional contribution from Denman Island,
60c; total, $227.40.
IRRESPONSIBLE UTTERANCES
A correspondent by the name
of P, Dunne some time ago sent
a communication to the Vancouver Sun informing the editor of
that paper that a series of meetings were being held in this city
to find a remedy for tbe present
depression. The Islander paid
but very little attention to this
communication, considering it to
be of little or no importance.
Knowing the aims and objects of
those who were taking the initiative in the series of meetings
referred to anil their actions towards the welfare of this city
during the past three years, needs
no repetition for local readers,
who are alone affected. The
Islander mentions this by way of
putting the real object in view,
which is too well known; further
comment is unnecessary to those
who have resided in this city for
the past five years.   -
Some of our readers have a'so
read the news item that appeared
in the Nanaimo Free Press, of
September 2nd, under the heading of " Chinese Substituted for
Austrians in Cumberland Mines."
There is no name attached to the
article and we presume that some
unknown person supplied the
Nanaimo Free Press with the
false information the article contains, which in part is as follows:
"A public meeting was called in
the Cumberland Hall on Thursday
evening, August 26th, the object
being to consider the interests of
Cumberland. Several business
men addressed a crowded house,
every speaker agreeing that l!he
employment of Asiatics underground was responsible for the
present stagnation of business."
This portion of the article is
absurd ir. the extreme, as the few
Orientals here today were working in the local mines ten years
ago and are in possession of coal
miners' certificates which gives
them the right, under the laws of
this province, to the same privileges as the white man of digging
coal underground. There is n<~t
a business man in this town, if
he tells the truth, but must admit that the real cause of thp depression of trade, as it affects j
Cumberland, is in the wholesale!
importation of fuel oi1 from Gali-J
fornia into this province absolu-
jtely free of duty, displacing900.-
'000 tons of coal per annum; that i
is the sole reason why the local
{mine,s are working from seven to
j ten days per month.
Yet these same men who are-
taking an active part in the series
of meetings referred to are aware I
of these facts anu with full know
ledge of the situation are evading
the real cause of the depression!
fbr a reason best known to them--
1 selves.    But it is neverthele- s i e-
j markable that the three or four
; wha are taking the active part
are Liberals in politics and it bas
been said that the whole affair is a
political dodge on the part of the
quartette.
The next part of the same
article says; " The company was
severely criticised for replacing
the interned Austrians and Germans, also the men enlisting for
the front, with Chinamen. The
speakers stated that the agitation
would never cease until the policy
of hiring Chinese to the exclusion
of the many white men suffering
from non - employment, was
changed. One speaker made the
charge that on the occasion of 22
Austrians being interned from
No. 7 mine, two Chinamen were
but in the place of each white
man taken out."
This is another statement which
is absolutely false, and without
any foundation whatsoever. Th<j
[slander, knowing that the same
impression prevailed at Ladysmith concerning the interned
A istrians, went to the trouble to
ascertain the facts, and interviewed Mr. Thos A. Spruston,
ihe manager of \To. 7 mine of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsm'&if),
Ltd., regarding these statements.
Iii reply Mr. Spruston said the
statement concei ningthe interned
Austrians being replaced by Chinamen was preposterous. Atth<
time the 22 Austrians were interned white men in every c'as.
were employed  iii  their places,
without a single exception. Requesting the Islander ma^ to sit
down, the manager prepared a
list of the names of the men who
were actually employed to take
the places of the interned Austrians at No. 7 mine. The list supplied is published for the information of the few at Cumberland
and Ladysmith who believe other
wise.   The list is as follows:
J. Zanoni      L. Tamasi A. Tamasi
G.Martinello Pete Yireo D. Morello
J. Ragan      W. Kinnimont J. Clark '
J, Mclnulty  E. James W.Brightwell
D. Fefrero    J. Johnston W. Monks
S, Tobacco    J. Dacrize A. Monks
M. Radovich W. Bulovich J. Westfield
J. McDonald   Pete Bobha R. James
J. Simon       C. Gregovich W. Armstrong
The next item in the Free Press
report's as follows: " In some
cases 24 Chinaman were working
on the one check number."
The Islander takes the item to
infer that there are a number of
Chinamen working here who are
not accounted for in the annual report of the Minister of Mines. In
reply to this the foremen of the
various mines  have been interviewed, and they state that each
| and every place has its own number and produces coal uuder that
number, and is paid by that num-
1 ber.    Two men usually work in a
i p'ace,   whether level, stall era
| crosscut. The number of Orientals
' employed in  the local mines as
pCioiisiied n I ie annual report of
the.Honourable the  Minister of
.-' ne's is "" rect,
It would be to the advantage ef
i the qn rt tte w do are pla? ing a
I leading pai I in thai <•: ■■ iii h they
! know verj little, if the,\   would
i devote tl,< ii1 ai tentioi-j am surplus
1 energy to th? securing of an im-
! port clutv on fuel oil.  and  com-
■   ■  . "     l       A l i
munic.ate t :e pacts to tne leader
i if the O) position in f he Federal
| House, Sir Wi frid Laifi* •>-. who
1 yould then be in a position to
i argue the ■ a i*o of the ri. pression
: in th ■ .■• Mil trade on the fioor of
be House at Ottawa. TWO
IHUi ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
St OF GOOD CHIEF,
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
Stye Mantor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Companv at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 25th, 1915.
The Basis of Peace.
The rights of nationalities
must be established, and especially the just claims of little
peoples to posses their freedom
inviolate and to make their specific contribution to the higher
wealth of mankind.
The sanctity of treaties must be
effectively reasserted as standing
safeguard against the lawless
ambitions of particular Powers.
The world must be delivered
from the standing menace and
the crushing burdens of militarism. In order to do all this means
must be devised for strengthening
international law ancl creating
some effective instrument for
maintaining its authority.
*        *        *
When you hear a man running
down his home town or any local
industry take a good look at him,
Ten to one he will have a chin like
a rail, an eye as i estless as a horse
thief, and he wi'l hitch around in
his chair as thougr he had a touch
of St. Anthony's dance. Talk
with him awhile and you will dis
cover that he has made a failure
of everything he has ever tried
(except being disagreeable), and
nine times out of ten he is dependent on the public for favors
or support; you will find him of a
meddlesome, peevish, jealous,
hateful and unreliable nature; a
man who is always complaining,
and although he has but little, if
anything of his own, one would
imagine to hear him talk that he
had a quit claim deed to the earth
and a first mortgage on heaven.
He knows everybody's business
and why shouldn't he? He has
none of his own to take up his
time, Such people, like mosquitoes, were hot created in vain,
iii i l'l 111 It 111—I'lrin T"?Tr~H^TT-rrT^TrrTr"" ti tT""i
iWJ+WJIiJJJMiy J1MLL1LLU jiWill 1:3
There are cheap corsets, but when the most graceful
and comfortable corsets cost but little more than the
cheap ones, why wear any but the best ?
Comfort and an air of refinement become
second nature to wearers of,
tgf
CORSETS
{Made in Canada)
i
Come here and see the latest models. Also let us
show you our many new styles in ladies' outer
apparel.
New Models in Fall Hats
HiilillHilllniil i inllil ihilUi llihilllllllili
1
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perhaps, but one fact remains that life is dark and full of evil
staple, they do not add materially forebodings, but you should re-
to the pleasures of conducting member that it is only the way
legitimate business. of the transgressor that is hard.
*       *       * *       *       *
Sour or sweet; that's the question, my brother, and it's not a
mean one, either, for many of us
would rather take a dose of salts
than walk with your long-as-a-rail
face. Your dyspeptic brain, torpid conscience and sour disposition make you anything but
agreeable company. You are
called a Christian, too. Well,
maybe you are, but the fact is
not believed by many on earth.
Possibly you console yourself with
the thought that tuey know it in
heaven, 1 doubt it! Why go
through the world always in a
t'og? You dishearten man, give
others the blues and  impress all
There are encouraging signs
of improvement in local conditions
The demand for island coal has
increased and large forces of men
are being put on at some of the
mines. We are informed that
more men have been taken on at
Extension, and at South Wellington development work in the
Morden shaft has again been
started, More men have also been
started at the Jingle Pot and altogether the outlook for the winter
in the local coal trade is much
brighter than it promised to be.
Not only are there more men at
work, but the mines are working
better time.    Then again we all
expect that Nanaimo will be used
as a training camp during the
winter. Arrangements are in progress for the quartering of at
least 600 men here, and it is not
anticipated that there will be any
hitch. With these men wi nter-
ing here and the coal trade slowly
but steadily improving, the prospects are very encourging for the
winter. The improvemsnt in conditions should more than offset
the effects of the war, and from
now on business should be better
all around.—Nanaimo Herald.
The future torments us, the
past holds us back. That is why
the present escapes us.
* •!• *
To do nothing is in many cases
to do a positive wrong, and,_ as
such, requires a positive punishment. 4
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on applicatien.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex  Hedetson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI PROS
Grocers and Bakers
A gents for PiiHM l, % 111
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
toriea arid in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
f 1 an acre. Not more than 2,500 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or lcqal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicant himself.
Each application must be aceompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are'
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the. coal raining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
$10.00anacre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B- Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
THE TELEPHONE SAVES PROPERTY
Ladysmith, B.C.. September 14th, 1915
Mr. A. L. CREECH,
Mgr. Telephone Co., Ltd.,
Ladysmith, B.C.
Dear Sir:- Your bill for use of telephone for last month came to hand.
I may say although bills are rather unwelcome visitors these hard times the
telephone bill is an exception to that rule. We had very good reason to
appreciate having the telephone in the house, for during the terrific bush fires
which raged around us, we surely would have lost all our buildings had we not
been able, with the use of the telephone, to get help from many miles distant.
In that connection we very much appreciate your promptness in
repairing the wires which were disconnected by burning trees falling across
them. As the wires were broken down Saturday night we did not expect
them repaired until Monday but were agreeably surprised to find our 'phone
working again early on Sunday.
For this please accept our sincere thanks.
Yours sincerely,
A. S. CHRISTIE.
Have You a Telephone in Your House Should an Emergency Arise ?
British Columbia Telephone Company, Limited
WHAT BRITAIN HAS DONE
The following article is taken
from The News Leader, Richmond
Virginia.
"A year ago Great Britain had
the largest navy and the smallest standing afmy of any of the
great European powers. Her
total military establishment was
254,000 white men, of whom 76,-
(KM) were stationed in India.
Germany had more first-line men
on the French frontier, when the
war began, than Great Britain
had all over the world. The total British force immediately
available for service on the continent was scarcely 12 per cent
of the army Germany kept with
the colors in times of most profound peace. Her field ordnance
and her reserve of small arms
were in proportion.
Yet here is what she has done:
1. She has bottled up the German navy in the Kiel Canal so
securely that not a German vessel
other than a submarine, has ventured into the North Sea since
January 24, when the Bluecher
was sunk.
2. She has completely driven
the German flag from the seas of
the world. The only German
merchantmen not now interned
or tied up in home ports are those
in the Baltic Sea.
3. She has destroyed or forced
into interment every German man
of-war absent from home waters
on the outbreak of the war.
4. She has raised, equipped and
put in the field more than 3.000.
000 men, in addition to those avail
able last August. All these troops
are amply supplied with arms,
uniforms, transport, etc.
5. She has multiplied the output
of her arms factories more than
twenty times, and she has increased by 700 per cent the aircraft available for her forces last
August.
9. She is financing the Belgian
and Serbian governments and has
loaned large sums to Russia and
to Italy.
7. She has seized, in Africa,
German colonial possessions . .
. . ; in the Orient, with the
assistance of Japan, she has hauled down the German flag from
every settlement,every island and
every coaling station that owed
allegiance to the Kaiser.
8. She landed in France a
small force, approximately 110.
000 men, at a time when these
rienforcements enabled General
Joffre to form .".n armv that took
Von Kluck in flank on the Ourcq
9. ln the battle < f the Marne
the British led the attack that
drove back the German host from
the approaches to Paris; in the
battle of the Aisne they forced
the crossings of the river and
again enabled General Joffre to
inaugurate flanking tactics.
10. Transported to the Yser,
the British took the Ypres-La-
Bassee line and held it against
continuous attacks from Octoder
16 to November 5, and again from
November 10 to the end of December. These attacks were intended to open the road to Calais
were of the most vital importance
to the Allies and cost the Germ-v
ans 200,000 men.
11. The British were entrusted
by General Joffre with the front
where the Germans were strongest, and they have been subjected
to more constant and unremmitt-
ing attacks than have been delivered by the Germans against
any of the other Western defences.
12. After nine months' fighting on the Ypres line, despite
the fact that the Germans have
have repeatedly hurled their best
troop' against the front, the Bri
tish lines today are at no point
farther to the westward than
when the Gemans began their assault. On most parts of the front
the British have gained ground,
13. The British have supplied
75 per cent of the men and ships
employed in the operations
against the Dardanelles,and they
made the landings which are ulti-
nately to open the way to Constantinople.
14. In addition, and until the
surrender of the last German
forces in Africa, Great Britain
was conducting five other overseas campaigns—on theSiniaPen-
insula, at the head of the Persian
Gulf, in the Camerons (equatorial Africa), in German Southwest Africa, and in German East
Africa. These were exclusive of
all operations in the Orient and in
the Mediterranean,
15. The British  casualties,  to
the date of last reports, were 333,
995, an average of 13,000 a week
or aimost 1.800 a day.
All this may, of course, mean
that the British have 'done nothing.' But if it does, heaven help
the Teuton allies when the British
really begin fighting."
The Krupp Company has subscribed $10,000,000 to the German
war fund, which is like lording
the other fellow chips in a poker
game.
FIRE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London tk Lancashire Fire Insurance Cor, of Liverpool.
Total Assets - 826,788.930.
W.    W I L L A R D ,
LOCAL AGENT .F01JK
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
«^pt^ri.wtr*-''rT»r**tX!%T«w.-t j«'^»(»t>^Ls*it=«.\-jrjatt-j
0'-aCT«1cn».^^»-K-»afa^^^«^oCTio»oiso!a   FINE HARBOR AT 7RFRRITr,i; SP^f/rtfR ROR ST'BM4RTKES
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Aphorisms
RemoTrse is the poison of life, and repentance its
cure.
Precipitation ruins the best plans; patience ripens the most difficult.
Let no one overload you with favours; you will
find them an insufferable burden.
No condition so low but may have hopes, and
none so high but may have fears.
A promise is a just debt which should always
be paid, for honour and honesty are its security.
The friend who hides from us our .faults is of
less service to us than the enemy that upbraid us
with them.
To enjoy to-day, stop worrying about to-morrow.
Next week will be just as capable of taking ere
of itself as this one is.
The consciousness that we have, by our own
misconduct, brought our sorrows upon ourselves,
is an immense aggravation to their misery,
If a man has right to be proud of anything it is
of a good action, done, as it ought to be, without
any base interest lurking at the back of it.
It ib the most nonsensical thing in the world
for a man to be proud, since it is in the meanest
wretch's power to mortify him.
Anger wishes that all mankind only had one
neck; love, that it had only one heart; grief, two
tear-glands; and pride, two bent knees.
Some ladies will forgive silliness, but none will
forgive ill manners; and there are few • capable of
judging of your learing or genius, but all of your
behaviour. I
i
A great mind may  change its objects, but it
cannot relinquish them; it must have something
to pursue.   Variety is its relaxation, and amusement its repose.
The knowledge of what is and what ought to be
are the two opnosed wings upon which the poetic
mind rises, and the breadth of pinion at each side
must be equal if the flight is to be sustained.
Integrity is the first moral virtue, benevolence
the second, and prudence is the third; without the
first the two latter cannot exist; and without the
third, the two former would often be rendered
useless.
When the domestic virtue display themselves in
the midst of privations, and anxieties, and sufferings, then they shine most conspicuously. They
are like the snowdrops and crocuses, which unexpectedly peep out of the frost-bound soil, to diversify the depth and dreariness of winter, and give
us a cheerful foretaste of the coining spring.
0.SK3O.;.CKSCXfi3. XStiXJr. .iO6*'J.K».}CH;-O;sffJ.K«-'«»?C»*Ot5OlJ.O{JO50
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mt*
A gentral view of Zeebrugge, the German naval base on the Belgian
coast. The extensive waterways provide an ideal haven for
submarines. British warships have repeatedly shelled the
German works and vessels at this point.
0 I' P 0 SIT E   It A1LWAY  ST A T10 N
First Class in every respect. Perfect Cuisine
Headquarters for Tourists and Sportsmen
Wines Liquors and Cigars
John N. McLeod, Proprietor
SWWJBW3: T?K3TT-y«PW
Special   Offeri
In Dry Goods and Boots and Shoes:
We are shewing a fine line of
Spring wear in Dress Goods,
White Wear, Silk Goods and
Hosiery. -
Charlie Sing Cheng,
Chinatown, V/est Cumberland. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
.*?
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7,o'clock.
Service at Bevan, 2 o'clock p.m.
Bible Study (Sunday School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 17th Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m., Holy Communion
11  a.m.,   Mattins.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M.' Forces on Wednesday at 8-30 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
When you require
anything in|the
MUSICAL LINE
It will pay you to examine our
stock before purchasing.    We
are sole agents for the following high-grade pianos:
Steinwayy
Gerhard-Heintzman,
Brinsmead,
Karn-Morris,*and
Kohler& Campbell.
A complete stock of the world-
renowned
EDISON
Diamond  Disc and  Cylinder
Phonographs and records. Also
the famous
COLUMB IA
Grafonola and Records.
Our stock of small goods was never so
complete as it is now: Violins, Guitars,
Banjos, Accordeons, and in fact everything in the music line. All the latest
music arriving daily at 15c. a copy. £
We will be pleased to have you call
any time and let us show you around.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
Deceived by Appearances.
.. John Melpolder, superintendent of the
Boys' club, is very fond of walking. Melpolder was camping recently north oi
Broad Ripple and decided to walk to
Indianapolis. The roads were dusty
and the sun beat down unrelentingly,
When Melpolder reached Broad Ripple
he had covered ten or twelve mile)
and looked like a tramp. Corning to a
fork In the road, and not being sure of
the correct route, Melpolder approached two girls and a young man sit
ting In the shade.
"Can you tell me how to get to Indianapolis?" he asked. The correct
road was pointed out and as he started
to plod on one of the girls said:
"Why you are not going to walk, are
you?"
"Why, yes," said the pedestrian, "1
thought I would."
The young man fumbled in his pocket. "Here," he said, fishing out a dime,
"you better ride the street car in. You
can catch it about a square up the
road."
Then each girl handed him a coin.
Melpolderthanked them kindy for their
proferred assistance, but declined the
offer, saying that he preferred to walk.
When he started on they looked after
him in open-eyed astonishment—Indianapolis News.
Good News!
"John. I've got a lot of things I
want to ta"k to you about!"
"Good! I'm ?lad to hear it! Usually
you want to talk to me about a lot of
things you haven't got!"
Strang*rs Yet
His Daughter: "Papa, did you know
mamma long before you irarried her?"
Her Father: "Just between you and
jn*, my dear, I don't know her yet."
Uncle Eph. Remarks:
MEMM
when every veil regulat ;d family was
run by th' bible and a almanack, an'
folks was healthy because they
couldn't afford th' luxrries of doctors
an' medicine."
A   FEW  IRONS
LEFT
AT    OUR   COST    PRICE    OF
$2.95
This is your last chance to purchase our 10 - year guaranteed
"Cumberland Special" Electric
Iron at this low price.
CumberlandElectricLighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. a 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIF1ELD, Proprietor.
O'OUSE FOR RENT ON MARYFOKT
*■-*■ Ave. House at present occuped by
W.F. Rarhs&y. Low rent to oue who v\ill
keep it in good condition. Apply Simon
Leiser & Co., Ltd.
WANTED—Large quantity of
Spruce Logs, of good size, scaling
at least 30 per cent. No. 1. Write
particulars as to /price, quantity,
and earliest delivery, to C. P.
Coles and Co., Vancouver.
P. h. Fleming, Provincial Re-
i lief officer is here on a visit. SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
BOY SCOUTS
Cumberland Troop No. 1 will
parade at 6.30 p.m. on Friday,
October 1st, in the ClubRoom for
the following practices:
Knot-tying, Ambulance, Gymnastic. Practice, Stave Drill and
Signalling.
Orderly Patrol—Bears.
Orderly Officer — Assistant
Scoutmaster W. Wlyte.
Boys between the ages of 11
and 18 years are eligible to join
the troop, accompanying a written consent by their parents.
Scouts must be in full uniform.
By order,
A. J. Taylor,
Acting Scoutmaster.
It is notable that many of the
foremost advancements in hydraulic engineering have found
their application and also their
inspiration in Canada. Several
very large power plants have been
constructed and the many hydraulic plants approaching two million horse power in aggregate
capacity, have permanently established markets, while over
eight times this amount is within
reasonable zones of commercially
economic development. The
large cities of Canada are fortunate in being liberally endowed
with adjacent water-power
sources,
"On the Field of Honor."
The publishers of The Tamily
Herald and Weekly Star, Montreal, are making a strong bid for
that beautiful picture, full of
pathos, entitled "On the Field of
Honor." It is assumed the publishers of the Family Herald have
in mind using it as a presentation
plate. If that is so there is a
great treat in store for readers of
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star this autumn. In past years
The Family Herald of Montreal
has been noted not only for the
wonderful excellence of that
journal but for many beautiful
pictures it has presented to its
readers. The Family Herald has
a name for succeeding in anything
it undertakes, and we feel sure
if it is humanly possible to secure
"On the Field of Honor" that the
publishers will succeed in getting it. * 'On the Field of Honor''
is attracting widespread attention
in Europe.
The chairman of theCape Town
Chamber of Commerce, in an address to that body, said that 80
per cent of South Africa's exports
consisted of gold, diamonds, and
articles of luxury; that only five
per cent of the land of the country
was fit for cultivation; that the
mines were a wasting asset; and
that it behooves South Africa to
turn its attention1 to agr cultural
and pastoral pursuits.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you?ll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE  1V1AY
Is
T.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,
| Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4.35
A.M.   P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4.10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.Q5
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
250
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00    3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f) Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30 |
3.30
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
1155
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY h
TrttJ   ISLANDER, CU«r5KKI *ANi>. n. i...
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C,V.O.,I.L.D.,D.C.L., President
-ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager JOHN AIRD. Aas't General Manager
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che-,
•ques and Letters of Credit issued and available in all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates. S22
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW FULLY STOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DBLIVBRY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT j TO;,CUSTOMERS:--No Orieot^s,  Agents,  or USolicitors
employed.
Chow Lee & Sons
Importers and Dealers in Silks
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Underwear
and Negligee Shirts, Whitewear,
Silk Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc.
Chow Lee & Sons,
CHINATOWN,     West Cumberland
i
*********
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
\
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
m
Adventures of Johnny Mouse
The Chronic Grouch
There was a man who grumbled at
everything.
He wasn't satisfied even when they
tried him for murder and sentenced
him to be hanged.
He grumbled about his cell by day
and about his mattress by night, and
on the morning fixed for his execution he grumbled about the way his
breakfast had been prepared.
On the scaffold at tbe final moments
be grumbled too.
"Say, guv'nor," he said, "this plank
don't seem any too pafe to me."
Real Comeback.
;rWhy do you spend so much care on
the crease of your pants, hey?"
"It is important, dad, not to wear
baggy trousers."
"Important, Is it? Why, you'young
cub, look here. Did you ever see a
statue to a man who didn't wear baggy
pants?"—Louisville Courier-Journal,
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don t you think you had better be
quick.
And call on the painter  and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Dail'y
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY  PUBLIC
FINANCIAL  AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER  430
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE..    CUMBERLAND
tf
I EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mrs. H. Hutton left for BellJ
ingham, Wash., on Friday.
James Whyte, Jr, returned
from a visit to Vancouver on
Thursday.
Mrs. Phil Rowe and child of
Nanaimo, arrived on Thursday's
train.
Miss Hannah Harrison returned
from a visit to Chicago Thursday
night.
A, R. McLean of Vancouver is
acting as relieving manager at
.the Royal Bank of Canada..
Mr and Mrs J.V.Nordgreen
returned from a visit to Vancouver and Sound Cities on Thursday.
R. Gascoyne of Bevan expects
to leave in the course of a few
days for Durban, South Africa,
his former home.
Mrs. A. Haywood, of West
Cumberland, left for South Wellington on Wednesday and expects
to leave for San Francisco in
about two weeks.
Len Herd, employed in the local mines for two years, was
killed at Butte, Montana, on
Thursday. He leaves a widow
and one child, who left for the
scene of the accident on yesterday's train.
T. B, O'Connell, manager of
the local branch of the Royal
Bank of Canada left by auto on
Wednesday for a two weeks vacation to Seattle and Portland.
Mr. O'Connell will take his auto
by steamer to Seattle.
The Wellington Colliery Railway Company will run a special
train to Courtenay to-day, leaving
at 10.45 a.m. and returning at 8
p.m.for the benefit of those desirous of attending the Courtenay
cents.
Return fare   will   be 40
The twenty third annual meeting of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd. Medical Fund
which was to have been held in
the Odd Fellows Hall this even-
ins?, has been postponed on account of the Courtenay Fa r until
Saturday. October 9th, commencing £t 8 p.m.
Special services will be held in
GraceMethodistCh'urch tomorrow
morning nt 11 a.m. It is essentially the children's day, being the
Annual Rally Day of the Sunday
School, and thu scholars will lake
an active part in the service.
Sonjis, recitations etc.,will be
given and the service will be a
bright ancl enjoyable one. Everybody welcome,
Tho secret societies occupying
too secondstorey and immediately
above the Wellington Colliery
Railway freight shed have re-
c 'ived notice from the Canadian
Co lieries (Dunsmiu.r,), Ltd., to
vacate. 'I'he Company ir.tend remodelling that portion of the
i ii Idii i?. When completed it will
be occupied by the Canadian Collieries l^i^'ineeiing Department.
r
THE   BIG   STORE
NEW MILLINERY
In ready trimmed Hats you will find some
Smart Fall Hats at $1.95.     Untrimmed
Shapes in the latest styles at very reasonable prices.
NEW UMBRELLAS
For children we have a special line of
shades suitable for the little tots.
Ladies' Umbrellas, with smart handles,
from $1.50 up.
Gentlemen's Umbrellas.    See our special
at $1.50.   It is hard to beat.
NEW KID and SUEDE GLOVES
We caary ** Perrin's Gloves."    Every pair
guaranteed to give satisfaction.
NEW CREPE CLOTHS
Although the summer is past, Crepe Cloths
will be largely used for natty underwear.
We have secured this much wanted material in pale blue, white, cream and biscuit.
Price 20c. per yard.
0-w-w.
! SIMON LEISER
&
CO.,
LIMITED.
i l IJLi
EIG   ST
'ORE
0
Phone 3-8
<7u.;m r *-*vj-M-KJSB9r
■
a
eJ

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