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The Cumberland Islander Jan 19, 1924

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Array y
.
Provinoial Library     Ju.,.,23
"/-
r< ri
i
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Witli which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR, No. 3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY,   JANUARY   19,   1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
SUCCESSFUL SMOKER
HELD AT G.W.V.A. HALL
ON SATURDAY LAST
The meeting of the Coal Section of
the Vancouver Island Branch of the
Canadian Institute of Mining and
.Metallurgy held at the G.W.V.A. Hall
on Saturday evening last which took
tiie form of a smoker, was an outstanding success. Mr. Chas. Graham,
District Superintendent of the Cunii-
illnn Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited,
and who is the President of the Vancouver Island Branch of the C.I.MM.
was In thc chair.
.Many men, prominent In the mining:
affairs of tlle province addressed the
meeting. Dean Brock, after delivering an excellent address at the Lecture Hall on "Earthquakes," Joined the
members of the Institute and gave a
short tulk which the members thoroughly enjoyed. Other speakers included Mr. Thomas Oraham, General
Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (bunsmuir), Limited, who Is
also the President of the II.C. Division
of the C.I.M.M.; Mr. Mortimer Lamb,
Secretary of the Western Division
C.I.M.M., and Mr. Nichol Thomson, of
Vancouver.
A paper, read by Mr. Geo. O'Brien.
Safety Engineer of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, entitled
"Ancient and Modern Means of Testing for Gas in Coal Mines," was listened to with a great deal of attention
by the large crowd present. A very
Interesting and. instructive discussion
followed the reading of the paper.
During the evening an excellent program of vocal and Instrumental music
was rendered, the following well'
known artists contributing:—Messrs.
W. A Owen, Colville Graham, ft,
Strachan. J. 0, Quinn, W. Morris and
11. Jackson.
The meeting closed about midnight
lifter one of the most successful gatherings of the local members of the Institute.
All men holding certificates of competency in Coal Mining were invited
to be guests of the members of tin
Institute (or the evening.
Locals Maintain      MRS. ELIZA BANKS AGAIN [Dean Brock Heard
LeadAtExpenae |HEADS SCHOOL TRUSTEES!   «" Interesting
Of Champions
Maaalmo City, Dob. Soccer Champions
Easily    Defeated    by    Locals—
Craham Stars for Home Team
CHAMPIONSHIP BOUT
TO BE STAGED
AT COURTENAY
Arrangements have been completed
:for a boxing contest, for the Light
Heavyweight championship of Vancouver Island, to be staged at Courr-
■ enay on St. Valentine's Day, Thursday, February 14, between Roy Cliffe,
■u( Courtenay und Tommy Tappella,
iof Cumberland.
Several preliminaries lo the main
fevent will be held for amateurs, when
medals will be put up for competition.
The Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association intends sending a few
iof their amateurs along on this occasion.
WOMEN'S
HOSWTAL AUXILIARY
A meeting of the Women's Hospital Auxiliary will be held In thc
Anglican Hall, Friday afternoon.
January 25, at 3 o'clock.
Ail women Interested In the institution where the sick and afflicted ore
• cared for, are requested to attend.
No meetings have been held since
January 1923; hut the Executive func-
.Honed throughout thc year and
(fought all supplies needed for tho
comforts of patients. Ill January
1983, when meetings ceased, thc Bank
Account was $300.96 and after a year's
supplying, the Treasury now contains $136.02.
S.  M.  MacKinnon, Acting Secty.
HARMONY REBEKAH
LODGE HELD
INSTALLATION MONDAY
Monday evening, January Nth, the
Harmony Rebekah Lodge held their
regular meeting at which their District Deputy President, Mrs, Ellen
Walker, Installed the following officers for the next term:
Noble Grand, MrH. Florence Parkinson ; Vice Grand, Mrs. I.jla Potter;
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Jennie
Whyte; Financial Secretory. Mrs.
Mary Frelone; Treasurer. Mrs. Kale
Bobba; Chaplain, Mrs. Maxwell Sr.;
Warden, Mrs. Emma Aspesy; Conductor, Mrs. Mary Marlnelll; R.S.N.G.,
Miss Josie Balano; L.S.N.O. Mrs. Isabel Rickson; RS.V.O., Mrs. Josie
Balagno; L.S.V.G., Mrs. Margaret
Mitchell; Inside Guardian, Mrs. Marlon Yarrow; Outside Guardian, Mrs.
Lena Francescini.
C. J. Parnham Mayor By Acclamation1
Lecture Saturday
Hall   Parked   to   Capacity— Lecturer
Delights   With   Very   Interesting
Instructive Address
Whist DriveTo Be
Held Tonight
The welcome announcement is made
that the Ladies' Auxiliary of Hoi..
Trinity intend holding another of their
popular Whist Drives and Dances hi
the Anglican Hall, Friday. January 18.
Whist 8-10. Dancing 10-12. Refresh-
served. First-class prizes. Admission 75c.
A. MAXWELL POLICE COMMISSIONER BY ACCLAMATION'   The Lecture Hall of the Cumberland
  I Literary and Athletic Association was
packed to capacity on Tuesday evening last on the occasion of the visit
of Dean Brock, of the University of
British Columbia, to deliver his famous   lecture,  "Earthquakes."
The lecturer approached his subject in a very easy manner; so much
so that all present could easily follow the lecturer during the whole
course of his address. Reading from
an account of an earthquake which
occurred in Canada in 1063. and which
was reported to have covered an area
of 200 leagues in length by 100 leagues in width, the speaker goes on to
describe the result of this great tremor and the panic of the people.
It is only during the last century
that the study and theory of earthquakes has been attempted to an;.'
real extent.
By means of numerous illustrations
the nudiencc was fully able to understand the subject of eachqunkos as a
whole,
Tlle recent big Japanese disaster
was also dealt with, the lecturer giving to bis audience many tnles of
heroism und devotion of thc natives
| to their European masters, in spite
of the many rumors to the contrary.
At the conclusion of his very nlile
address. Mr. Thomas Graham. Gene1"!!
Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir). Limited, proposed a hearty vote of thanks for the
very interesting and instructive address, which was seconded by Mr. T.
Mordy.
After a hard-fought forty-live nilc-
■tiis, ill which Nanaimo United had
the advantage of the breaks, the local boys broke away, and from bc-
f ginning to end of the second half, th?
former team were left completely out
of the picture and had to admit defeat to Blair and Co., to the tune of 3
goals to nil in the Up-Inland League
soccer game which took place on the
Recreation Grounds on Sunday. By
virtue of this win Cumberland stills
heads the league with 23 points .which,
if nothing unexpected happens ln their
remaining games, virtually leisure*
them of lirst place.
Exactly at 2.30 p.m, reteree A. S.
Jones called the teams together and
ns soon as captain McDougall deeded to defend the Camp-end goal, the
ball was set rolling. Nanaimo Im-J
mediately made tor their opponent's
goal and for several minutes tiie local
halves and full hacks had a warm
time. Gdugh and Stewart let nothing get by j them but they had a tendency to kick high iu Uie air instead
of sending the ball up lo their forwards. However, they finally managed to do so and when once the forwards did secure, nothing stopped
them until they reached the Nanaimo
goal, where either they kicked past
or Koutlettge saved with spectacular
plays. Milligan and ifcyland both
had hard lines in not scoring, the ball
just grazing the top of the bar with
the goalie in no position to save. Graham and Turner followed up with
some hot ones, but Routledge seemed
open to all engagements and re.
peatedly relieved the pressure. Not
long after this, Cumberland's right
wing, lkeluce, made u pretty run from
centre, passed the half backs and the
full backs aud shot oyer tbe bar.from
a difficult position. Nanaimo ' then
took the situation in, hand and from
then on to the end of the first halt
they had the advantage of the play
but were only. dangerous once 'when
Foster shot high over the goal with
oiily Blair to beat. Half time name
with neither team having scored.
On the, resumption of play lt was.)
clearly seen that the" home team was1]
out for goals.     Their forwards broke
through the Nanaimo defence time and
time again with the result tlmt Milligan scored the  first goal    from    ai
scrimmage in the U yd Hi* with a.
low shot.     Routledge made a grcn-
try for it but was a traction of a seo-
oud lute, the ball slipping ukuler Ills
outstretched   arms.      Far  Hie |tvexL
fifteen minutes the visiting backs were I
given a hard task, that of breaking
up tbe combination of Oraham and
company,  bul although    they    mad.
great efforts to do so, Oraham managed to put his team two up wilh a
well aimed shot.     However, fate hfid
ordained  tliat   the   same  player  get
one more and after forciug repeatetl
comers he secured the ball near mid-
field,  where  with  one of the  finest
plays ever seen on the local grounds,
Ile eluded practically the whole Nanaimo  team  and  scored 'his  second
goal of the day. with exactly one-half .™.ss.™..—........«—..........—
minute  to  go.      Immediately    after |'Searching l|ucslloiis Asked—Licences fserviHf to
When tbe nominations closed on
Holiday returning officer, A. J. Merry,
declared Charles Joseph Parnham,
elected Mayor by acclamation and Alexander Maxwell, Police Commissioner, by acclamation, there were seven
candidates for Aldermen and ten for
School Trustees.
The Municipal Elections are over
for another year. While they are
highly satisfactory to some of i thc
Electors, they are disappointing t>
others. In all probability there would
have been no contest for School
Trustee if tlle retiring members of
Uie Hoard had declared themselves
out tar re-election, but on the contrary, «ta.ted tluit they had done -thai.'
duty, one bad served faithfully and
dllllgenlty iter so many years, giving
the Citizens awl Ratepayer of his best.
Other reusing members said lt was
time for a cbur.tge and tlmt others
should come forward and become
iVtstees of the Public School and
that there wtere plenty of able men
nnd women within Die City limits
who'could represent tbe City of Cumberland, so the ordinary nan on tho
street came to the conclusion the four
of t%ie 1923 Board would retire tor a
rest, and then the cry went out that
there were four vacancies on the
Board of Trustees. When there Is
an emergency, you can always,d-
pend upon some of our live wires he-
Ing an the alert.
On Monday, Returning Officer, A. J.
Merry was present at Che City Hall
to rece|ve aomtuatlons and to the sur-
Burprise of the Electorate, the retiring
candidates   were  seeking re-elctlcxi.
Ten candidates were nominated on
Monday ror School Trustee!., witii four
required. The election on Thursday
gave   the   following  results:
Nauics Votes Cast
Banks, Eifea F„ elected     92
McKlnnon; Alexander, elected ...   74
McFadyery Nell, elected    62 !
Maxwell, Alexander, elected     61
Partridge. Margaret II    5"
Walton, -S|)hn    47
Mordy, T4*praas       4:!
Ledingham, John     41
Potter, John Janes 41
Horwood. Emmie    22
Eliza F. Banks and Alex. McKInwm
are elected for a. term of two years.
Nell McFadyen ait)l Alex. Maxwell ire
elected for a terra of one year.
Seven Aldermen, were dominated on
'Monday and the Ejection on Thursday
returned five of the 1923 Bound. Thonv
as Mordy defeating Frank Dallos, a
member of last year's Council by- 10
*>tes
Aldermen elected for 1924 are:
JilUues Votes I'ust
Muinford,  Thomas  Henry      116
Maxwell.  Alexander      114
Ledingham, John 	
Potter, .lohn James ....
Jeffrey. Allied Edwin
Mordy. Thomas 	
DiUlos, Frank 	
11-1
105
99
84
74
Results   of   Lad) smith   Klecllnns
Mayor, W. W. Walkem.
Aldermen: Sam Jones. Jamns
Strang. ('. Hrlnnt, Mrs. Marshall. Geo.
Held.
Police Commissioner: Geo. Reid.
School Trustees: Marshall and Reid.
Results of (iMirlcnaj Klectlons
Mayor: F. McPherson, acclamation
Aldermen: W. T. Fielders 134, W. G.
Hnggerly    120.    C.    Simnis    107,   C.
Pejt.rse 104, Herbert Cooke 82, Dalton
Cuifcuaore 72,     Henry Bramley 56.
Sflhopl Trustees:    George   Pldcock
131, TV. Mines 114. H. V. Collins Ml.
Results «■' NniiaiiiKP Klectlftlis
Out of a voters' list of 1685. hut 1065
cast their votes yesterday In the Municipal Elections which decided tho
fate of two by-laws und lhe personnel
of the Council for 1924. Both the
athletic clubs by-law which is u bylaw tw transfer the ownership of file
city owned athletic club premises tn
the G.W.V.A. for a nominal sum, and
the Public Library by-law passed Villi
the requisite three-fifths majority.
The results were,as follows:
Mayor:  Bushy 601, Harrison 446.
Alderman.    Southward:    Smith    191,
Cavalsky 159. Dixon St.
Aldermen, .Northward: Handle 194.
I'lanta  137. Inkstcr IIS. Frier 110.
Aldermen, Middleware1: Harshy 217.
Jenkins -206, McKenzie 166, Rowan
ill.
Police Commissioner; J. K. Hick
mnn, elected by acclamation.
T. Mordy Elected
As President Of
Badminton Club
Special   .Meeting  Held   Tuesday—Arrangements   Made   Fur   Whlst
Drive nnd   Dunce
Clubs Must Bare Secrets
To Liquor Control Board
centering the ball the whistle blew
lor lull time, the game ending with
Cumberland 3 und Nanaimo 0.
'or the visitors, Stobbart played a
hard game and although the fans do
not give him due credit while playing, they certainly must admit thut
he Is one of the best half backs In
B.C. Faulds and Linn and Bell also
showed up well while Routledge showed thut he Is a real goal-keeper ,eveu
though he had three goals scored on
him. it Is hard to pick out any one
brilliant player on the home team, for
everyone was at the top of his form
and could be relied on at all times.
Oraham .especially, should receive
praise; he is a real centre forward
Musi. V .lllilnlniil If Clubs
Kemiilli Open
heer allowed on club
dub
members?     If so. approximate ttl'Vibcr of meals served daily.
1     Is liqutV
| promises?
' Want a club licence under lhe now      If aJlowen.  on   what   part
regulations   «f   -the   Liquor   Control   promises is :)«,unr kept?
Board? Is there a ,.ii»r ou club premises?
If so, is liiiiiNf or  beer kept 111 or
man- auld bar'/
Arc    there   any
Here's u few of the particulars you
will bave to give:
Full name of club.
Date of Incorporation, if Incorporated.        ■
If aninonrporated, so state, ami
give full Christian names, surnames,
addresses nnd occupations of proprietors.
Stole purpose for whicli thc club li
carried on.
State premises on which club is now
The special meeting of the Cumber,
land Badminton Club, held In the
Anglican Hall on Tuesday evening
lust was exceptionally well attended.
The Vice-President, Mr. T. Mordy, occupied the chair, Willi the Rev. E. H.
Nunns as Secretary.
After the minutes of the previous
meeting had been read, adopted and
communication dealt witli, the eloe-
-ion of a president for the club caused
vacant by the resignation of Mr. V
H. Webb, who has left the district,
was proceeded with. The unanimous
choice of the meeting for this position was the Vice-President, Mr.
Thomas Mordy. This caused a vac-
■ancy' for the Vice-Presidentship, to
which Mrs. W. A. Owen was elected.
It was decided at this meeting to
run a whist drive and dance in the
I near future, lhe date to lie sunouueed
in the columns of The Islander, it
is the Intention of the club to stage
another tournament iu the near
future, details which wlll probably bo
winked nut by the committee.
New members to the Badminton
Club will he made Svelcome at lhc
court In the Anglican Hall on Tuesday or Saturday evenings, after 6.30.
ST. JOHNS
AMBULANCE CLASSES
n    said
are  ai.
and that final run of his was worth)carrlcd on-
going many miles to see.     Tommy)    Are Preml»eB owned .lit fee simple,
Heyland substituted  for Bannemnan.,by tt* cl,b?
ou lhe left wing, and showed up re- ,  " n6t< *lve I*"'"™1"™ "' "M"""'y;
markably   well   considering  that  ttt.L°wner of pretih.es; lease date; name.
has been out of practice tor so long,'0' l»»11ord;  name of tatfent;  rental
A. S. Jones made a fair reteree a«l: »el- mmth' ',urat,on 0( fcaw' ,  ,
gave complete satisfaction    to.   bo>h!    What othfcr business is carried on
t : In  the  buldlng  it)   wbieji   the   clul»
premies are contained?   ,
Particular* of memberfhip; honorary members;    privileges!  members;'
ordinary member in good: standing.
Particulars of club .pr/jralsifc;: Nnni-
ANNOIM E.MEXT
The 'Jolly Bachelors' Club, of
Courtenay, wlll hold another of their
popular dances on February the li'Ui,
1924, ln the Oalety Theatre.
ber of-rooms;   number'of'fornisWid
bedrooms.     HM the cflub a dining-
lockers
promises in' which -members
lowed to keep liquor or heer?
If so, slate number,ot lockers.
Are (iucb lock*rs ustv,! by more than
one memlwr?
Does tht iilu'b derive any revenue
from serving liquor or beer?
If so state revenue derived iu 1923
from (11 rental of lackers, (21 serving
liquor or beer.
State methods by w'hich this revenue;
Is derived.
ln addition the regulatings call for
a full list ot officers of lhe club and
a copy of the last balance sheet, together with the constitution and bylaws under which the club is conducted, i - ,
The application Is in the form of n
statutory declaration and all clubs
nperntlng after February 1 will havo
to make application and close down
if the application for a license is not
granted, as after that date full control of the clubs is takipn over hy the
First Aid Looture Sunday morning
al   11  o'clock for males only.      The
Junior Boys wlll also be welcomo at
this  lecture, as they  will  take tholr I
lecture with the Senior.
The First Aid Lecture for the femn'.o
class will lie held on Tuesday, Die
2!uh, at 7.30 p.m. All Junior (litis
will also take (heir lectures with tho
Senior   Ladies.
SIX HUNDRED ATTEND
PIONEERS' RE-UNION
HELD AT COURTENAY
Six hundred people crowded Into the
Gaiety Theatre last Friday night. Of
this number one hundred and fifty
were Pioneer guests of Courtenay Assembly No. 3, Native Sons ot Canada,
who had Invited them to u reception.
The other four hundred and fifty odd
came to pay homage to the hardy men
and women of the early days. It
was Ihe gayest throng that ever attended a social event In Comox Valley,
far surpassing the event of a similar
nature held last year under the sant'i
auspices, and which will now positively become an annual event. The
Sons ure tickled pink at the results
of their efforts to give tlielr elders a
good time. The pioneers showed
Ihelr appreciation of being given the
opportunity of gathering tn social
conclave hy tendering from the stage
of the theatre a hearty vote of thanks
to the Native Sous for their Interest In
their well being and pleasure. During the first part of the night Jazz
was out of question, thc floor being
given over to the pioneers who tripped the light fantastic as ln days of
yore to music aB it used to be. Joviality was rampant and the honored
guests of the evening certainly enjoyed themselves to the full. Such
tunes as "The Olrl 1 Left Behind Me."
"Just One Girl,'' "Listen to the Mocking Bird, riiere be a Hot Time in
the Old Town Tonight," "Two Lltlle
Girls in Blue," were served up by that
orchestra that was so popular In tbe
Valley a quarter of a century ago.
Jack Baird tickled the ivories as he
used to, Dave Roy pulled the bow on
his fiddle In the old time way, Paolo
Monte worked his arm sore with a
trombone und Harry Murdock sweetened the air with his cornet. All
these old time musicians did their
hit to bring back to their years old
companions memories of by-gone
days. When dancing began It was
with a grand march led by Mrs. Flo.
rence Cliffe, first white woman |n the
Valley, who was celebrating her seventieth birthday, and Mr. Robert
Swan, of Denman Island, another person who has -lived here for over half
a century. After lhe grand march
old time dances, Including the lancers, minuettes, quadrilles, waltzes, and
Highland Schottisches were Indulged
iu until the banquet hour, after which
the floor woa given to the younger
members of the party, hut many of the
pioneers stayed on until the wee small
hours so reluctant were they to leave
for home.
During the time supper was being
served speeches were made and reminiscent stories told by Mr. William
Duncan, .Mr. Alexander Urquhart,
Mrs. Florence Cliffe, Mrs. William
Lewis, and Joe Nlm Nlm, chief of the
Puntledge Indian reservation. Another Interesting feature was the step
dancing by Harry Blackball, the
Native SonB entertainer, Clay Welsh,
Jack Crockett and Jock McKeniie of
Comox. Mr. Alexander Cleland,
president of the Native Sons, acted
as chairman ot this part of the proceedings. After suPPer which was
certainly a bounteous one, served hy
a ladles' committee, the young folks
danced until four o'clock. During
the Intermission Mr. J. W, dell. Farrii,
ex-Attorney General, delivered a short
address which was full of good
| thoughts .especially for the Sons.
W. B. A. INSTALL
OFFICERS FOR 1921
Thursday evening lust, the Wo-
1 men's Benefit Association of the
i Macabees   held   ihelr   Installation   of
Officers tor the year 1924. which arc
as follows:
Commander, Hannah Watson; Lieut.
C'oinm..    Gertrude  Somorville;     Past
Comm., Lonn Francescini; Collector,
! Jessie  Gray;   Record   Keeper,   Annie
Davis; Chaplain, Jennie Maxwell;
] Sergeant, Ada   Davis;   Lady-At-Arnis,
Annie Whltehouso; Sentinel, Chrls-
! tine Robertson; Picket, Bertha Davis;
; Color Bearers,  1  and 2, Martha Cue
_^^_ and Jane Walker; Ensigns, 1 and 2.
OPaT.rtAl   uunw Mary Frelone nnd Clara Taylor; Mu-
hl M IAL hHUW iKMn, Bertha Walker; Captain Susan
TUESDAY  MORNING Covert     Mra. Mary Hudson acted ns
 — Installation Officer and Mrs. Mary Bo-
The  management    of    the    llo-Ilo cleston as Mistress of Ceremonies.
Theatre    announce    that    a    special After the meeting a very pleasant
showing of the superb picture "Hu- social evening was spent.     The re-
room  In   which, meals   are  regularly,'Liquor Control Boord
man Wreckage" will be held on i
Tuesday morning at 10.30; also a
matinee thc same day at 3.15 p.m.
The usual matinee prices will prevail, children 15c. ndults 35c.
Thc prices for the Monday and
Tuesday evening shows ot this super
special will be: Children 25c, Adults
50c.
tiring Commander, Mrs. Lena Fran-
cescini. was presented with a beautiful upholstered rocking chair and a
fountain pen, as a mark of the esteem
and appreciation the members havo
for her. Although taken completely by aurprise, Mrs. Francescini
thanked the ladles ln a few well-
I chosen words. PAGE TWO
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY.   JANUARY   19,   1924.
VALUABLE PANTHER
DOGS ARE LOST
Mr. Cecil Smith, hunter and guide,
has lost two ot his most valuable
panther dogs. They are in the Buttles Lake district and Mr. Smith is
now in tlmt country looking for them.
They are probably the most valuable
panther dogs on the Island.
no place for unskilled labor though,
as a big percentage of the work ls
done hy machinery.
LIQUOR CHARGE
AGAINST R. D. DIXON
IS DISMISSED
FORMER COURTENAIANS
ARE DOING WELL
IN CALIFORNIA
In a letter to a friend In Courtenay,
a former resident of this district, now
in California, mentions some ers1-
while Cmirteiialans, among whom are
Mr. and Mrs. Hicks Beach, Mr. and
Mrs. Mutlow and Mr. and Mrs. W. G.
Robertson, and Mr. Robert Duncan.
The letter states that all ure apparently doing well and thai a big year Is
expected iu the southern BLate.     It i.i
A crowded court room greeted the
principals iu the case ot the Crown
versus it. II. Dixon, proprietor of the
Itiversiile Hotel and Samuel Arthu",
clerk in the employ of the hotel,
charged with Belling liquor. Tho
only witnesses against thu defendants
were two secret service men whoso
evidence on certain Important points
wns so contradictory that after the
summing up by counsel on eliher Bide,
and weighing the evidence adduced,
Magistrate Hames dismissed the case.
Mr. J. w. dcB. Karris. ex-Attorney-
General appeared for the accused and
Mr. P. 1'. Harrison prosecuted. '
PORTABLE HEATERS
«p7.5U "Polar Cub" tPl.Ol)
RADIO SETS AND PARTS
 APPLIANCES	
Featuring—Curling Irons (marcelle wave attachment)
Boudoir Seta, Percolaters, Heating Pads, Irons, 6 and 3
lbs., etc.
LAMPS
Piano—Bed—Floor and Portable
We have in stock one of the Famous "Laundryettes".
It dries without a wringer.
A demonstration will satisfy the most critical.
THE
Piket Electric
L_
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars ln tor an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
(mil II.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONE 2813      VICTORIA, B.C
DR.  R.   B.   DIER  AND  DR
W   .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Olllce;   Cor.  of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
IMAM) TCNBR
Kuiao.j Experience
l.navc Orders at Marsha:! Music Co
Cumberland  and Courtenay.
T.WHERRY
TMUMRMBIfiTANNER
t»ad tm vests. ■>•» »'
w»f§—•»•«»«•• «
iMim.   MC
121 Pandora^ Ave.,
STEAMSHIP
TICKET AGENCY
TICKETS^oTlL PARTS
OF THE WORLD
AI.KNT FOR ALL STEAMSHIP
COMPANIES
Drop in and let us talk It over.
K. W. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
Ciiiiiiilliin National Hall wins
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  llo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical   Barber,   and   Hairdresser,  Shnmpooing,  Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
GEORGE KIRBY
IS BADLY CRUSHED
BY TON-HAMMER
On Monday afternoon, Mr. George
Klrby, one of the crew of men work-
lug on repairs to the breakwater along
the Tsolum River, between Courtenay
and Sandwick, met with a serious accident. He was doing some work
near the pile driver, when ln Borne
accidental manner the one-ton hammer struck blm. Fortunately the
river bank at the place ot accident is
rather soft, otherwise Mr. Klrby might
have been killed. He is at Comox
Hospital where, at latest reports, he
Is recovering after the severe crushing.
Mrs. 0. II. Mutrie, who has been ill
with pneumonia, at her home on ths
Lake Trail, is, her many friends will
be pleased to learn, progressing towards recovery .
TSOLUM LODGE NO. 52
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
On Tuesday night Tsolum Lodge,
No. 52, Knights of Pythias, met and
elected officers to serve during the
year 1924. The following were elected: Chancellor Commander, William Shilcock; Vice Chacellor. Walter
Woodhus; Master of Work, Frank
Movltz; Keeper of Records and Seal
James Hornby; Master at Arms, William Sutliff; Master of Finance, Percy
Sadler; Master of Exchequer, James
Mathewson; Inner Guard, Jerry Klu-
tera; Outer Guard, Henry Ganilen.
After the business of the meeting a
social waa held, being thoroughly enjoyed by the largest meeting the lodge
has held for a long time.
COURTENAY FIRE
DEPT. ELECT OFFICERS
MONDAY NIGHT
On Monday night the members of
Courtenay Volunteer Fire Department
gathered at the city hall tor their
annual meeting and election of officers, which resulted as follows;
Chief, Leonard D. Picket; Deputy
Chief, Frank Dack; Captains, Percy
Booth and Samuel Watson; Secretary-
Treasurer, Lome Cleland; Entertainment Committee, William Hayman,
Hugh McLean and William Lelghton;
Finance Committee, J. H. Maclntyre.
Flunk Dack and William Cook.
Satisfactory reports were submitted
showing that there had been little activity in regard to fires in the city
during the year but that the brigade
had rendered useful service on several occasions at fires without the
boundaries of the city. The new
siren fire call wus reported as working satisfactorily and a great improvement over the old alarm.
Some further development work is
planned for the year 1924 that will
add to the already strong efficiency of
the brigade.
IF YOU WANT TO GET ATTENTION—DO SOMETHING WORTH ATTRACTING ATTENTION.
Nature ls kind to those who have
taken pains to understand her.
Under New Management
Hotel Douglas
When In Victoria, why not make
this hotel your home?   It la in
every way a strictly modern fireproof building
and you wlll like
the service.
RATES
Outside rooms  with private bath
—per day 12.00—
—per week $10.00—
Nice airy rooms without bath from
—per day 11.00—
—per week |400—
Free Bus meets all boats and trains
PHONE 6600
1-j. II. KILLICK,  Proprietor-.
second-hand
furniture
Comox Exchange
Ctnirtenay, B.C
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • •  B. C.
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tabid
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Pricea to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office MM Bridge Street, Victoria, BX.
WILLIAM J. CAIRNES
CRUSHED TO DEATH
BY FALLING LOGS
An Inquest was held ou Monday
niuht last to enquire into the cause of
death of William J. Cairnes, who met
death In an accident at the logging
camp of Bloedel, Stewart & Welsh
last Saturday afternoon.
The jury Impanelled waa H. Held,
foreman, Chas. Bool, Fred Smith, A.
W. Orr, E. T. Ellison and Fred McLean.
Three witnesses were called. Otto
Dlllmau, Peter Bogart and Fred Cahe,
all members of the loading crew.
They testified that they were at work
and after the train had gone down the
road they noticed something wrong.
They went to the spot and found one
of the cars had become derailed. The
wrecking crew was called and preparations made to return the car to
the track. Dillman and Cairnes were
preparing a line to assist In the work
of removing the logs from the cur
when the load suddenly shifted. Bo-
gaert, who was at one end ot the car,
shouted "watch out" but it was too
late .the logs falling on Cairnes and
Just grazing Dillman's hat In doing
so.
The jury, without retiring, rendered a verdict ot accidental death, attaching no blame to anybody. Dr.
Butters, coroner, conducted the Inquest.
HIS HEAIIIM1 RESTORED
The Invisible ear drum Invented by
A. O. Leonard, which is a manlature
megaphone, titling inside the ear entirely out of sight, Is restoring the
hearing of hundreds of people lu New
York  City.      Mr.   Leonard  Invented
this drum to relieve himself of deafness and head noises, aud it does this
so successfully that no one could tell
he was a deaf man.     It ls effective
when deafness Is caused by catarrai
or by perforated or wholly destroy, d
natural  drums.     A request for Information to
A. O.  LEONARD,
Suite 436. 70 Fifth Ave'..
NEW YORK CITY,
will be given prompt reply.
with hla concert troupe, presenting a
most enjoyable program Including
Sailor's Hornpipe, by the Misses H.
Fechner, K. Moore, G. Perez and B.
Shannon, songs by Mlsa Kitty Williams, recitalon, Master Sidney Williams and chorus the hornpipe girls
and Misses Violet Trotter and K. Williams.
Songs were pleasantly rendered by
Mrs. Jot). Thompson and Mr. .Geo.
Plercy recited and Mr. A .H. Herd
gave an exhibition on club swinging.
After the program a dance was held
for an hour.
COURTENAY GOLF
; CLUB HELD
A BIG MEETING
Courtenay Golf Club held a big
meeting lu the city hall, President
Geo. Pldcock In the chair. The
.Mutrie Cup waa presented to Mr. Jos.
Idlens and the Souvenir Cup to Mr.
Mitchell Moncrieff. Tbe club bas
made great advancements and with
improvements contemplated to the
course carried out, golf in this district should receive a great stimulus.
PRESENTATION TO
RETIRING OFFICERS
On Thursday night a meeting of the
Assembly No. 3, Native Sons of Canada was held at Courtenay, with a
large attendance and reports ot the
pioneer dance was satisfactory.
The presentation of gold cuff links
was made to the retiring president,
Bro. P. L. Anderson and Ihe retiring
Secretary Bro. Hope Herd, who resigned at the last meeting.
At the conclusion HI the meeting a
large number of ladles came Into the
hall and asked the Sons for assistance
In organizing the Canadian Daughters
League in Courtenay, auxiliary to the
Assembly of the Sons ot Canada.
Another meeting wlll bo held on
Monday next 21 Inst, to complete organization.
Mr. W. G. Stubbs, Principal of
Courtenay Public School, was present
Canadian Briefs
INCREASED BANK
CLEARINGS
Wlnnpeg bank clearings (or the
week ending December 27, showed an
Increase of (0,000,000, as compared
with the corresponding week of last
year. The 1823 clearings tor the
same week mentioned were 150.777,441
and for 1,922 144,436,710.
REFUTES TALES
OF HARVESTERS
IS IT WORTH WHILE BORROWING THE TELEPHONE TO SAVE A FEW CENTS A DAY?
Of course no one enjoys having to use a neighbor's
telephone. Yet the phone has become such a necessity that, if one hasn't a phone, it can't be helped now
and then.
Good neighbors don't say anything but it must
annoy them. Naturally your neighbor says she
doesn't care, but she does. It would annoy you if the
conditions were reversed.
A party line is $1.S0 net a month. It's a popular
service.    Get particulars at the office.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
In a recent issue ot tbe Toronto
Globe, a statement appears from a
Scottish Immigrant to Canada in the
form of a letter to the "Edinburgh
Scotsman," taking exception to the
action of British harvesters who have
returned to the Old Country With
tales of hardship and suffering endured this year while Id the Dominion
He emphasizes the tact thut of 12,000
Britishers who came to Canada tor
the 1923 harvest, only COO to 1.000 bad
gone back and these tew had made
noise and trouble so out of proportion
to their Dumber that many must Save
been led to believe that they Were
voicing the feelings of the harvesters
In general.
CANADIAN WHEAT
GOES TO BRAZIL
For the first time la the history of
the Canadian grain trade, wheat was
exported trom Canada to South America, one ot the Dominion's largest
export tirms having the honor ot
working this first shipment from Winnipeg ts Rio de Janeiro, capital of
Brazil. Brazil has always been an
Importer of both wheat and flour, doing a large trade tn the Utter commodity especially, but naturally she
bas always secured her requirements
from the. nearby Argentine. The
present time, however, ia between
seasons it) Uie south and tbe Brazilian
millers required Canadian wheat for
blending 'purposes. The shipment
waa mad* from Vancouver via the
Panama Canal.
LOW FARES FOR SPORTS
Excursion rates from Bt. Paul.and
Minneapolis wlll prevail over the Minneapolis and Sault Ste. Maria railway
to Winnipeg for sports week, begin-
Ing February 11, according to Information Just received by the Winnipeg
Board of Trade, lt is understood the
same rate, namely a fare aud one
third, will also apply on Canadian
National lines from all points ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, for
Winnipeg! Sports Week.
NEW LAKE RECORD
Creating a new lake navigation re.
cord, the 8.8. C. O. Jenkins cleared
Fort William od December 24 and arrived at Midland December 28. This
voyage marked the close of lake navigation for the season, and broke the
record Bet two years ago by the C. O.
Jenkins when she cleared Fort Wll-
| Ham on December 21 with a cargo of
I grain.
EXPECT MANY
IMMIGRANTS
A great demand for Alberta, land
from Immigrants la anticipated by
James Colley, secretary of the Immigration Council of that province, who
la on hla way to Europe In connection with Immigration worlt. fi
8ATUKDAY,   JANUARY   19,   1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
She remembers how she had
te wait for the tea kettle to
boil, and then did not have
enough hot water. This is
better!
AU the hot water you want-
Ay simply turning a switch !
Any woman knows what
hot water means to the housewife. Plenty of hot water cuts
her labor in half.
Plenty of hot water for dishes,
plenty for clothes, and to bathe
the children, llenty, too, for
her husband to shave with in
themorning. A hot water l.orr.e
ii a real home to live in.
Just tu. n a switch in kitchen
and in a few minutes you ha\ e
boiling hot water—with the
Thermo-Electric Heater. It
costs little to run and will last
for years without trouble or repairs. Ask us about the
Thermo-Electric. You owe
yourself the joy of hot water.
Northern Electric Appliances
Curney
Electric
flange
Made   by   the
famoua   stove
maker.-- In CO-
\    operatic witli
V   Northern Kle. -
trie.
Th.
Gainaday
W.ther
Simple and
strong.   Makes
wash day easy.
Cumberland Electric Light Co.
'TIS EITHER RIGHT OR
IT IS WRONG!
It must be either one or the other.
ALL ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS
are governed by the National Electrical Code of Fire
Underwriters and Supplementary Regulations of the
State or Province in which the work is done.
These are plain and explicit and if a job is in accordance
with them no one can And any fault with it—That fact
Cannot be gainsaid.    We periodically request
Provincial Inspection of our Work
and of all inspections made there have been
NO CONDEMNATIONS
That is the record of which we are justly proud and do
not think it can be beaten.
OUR MOTTO
PERMANENCE  and   QUALITY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
WARNING
During the cold weather, householders should see that
all water pipes are well protected.    It Ls a good idea
to wrap all pipes with sacking, or better still, have
them boxed.
ARE YOUR WATER PIPES PROTECTED?
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
Highest Quality Job Printing at
The Islander Office
suras of
UfflilffMMNTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may b. pre-empted by
British subjects ov.r 11 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Kuil information concerning regnal lout, regarding pre-emptions ' le
siven in Bulletin No. 1, Lend Series.
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
tvlilch can be obtained free uf charge
•>.v ttddi-eaeing the Department of
.amis. Victoria, B.C.. or to any Gov
. nment Agent.
Kocords wlll be grained covering
.inly land •tillable for agricultural
purposes, and which le not timber-
land, i.e., carrylnt over u.uuu board
reel per acre west of the!'oast Rang*
ami s,uuli~reei per acre .net uf thai
Range.
Application.; for pi-e-empiione are
ti t.e uddreseed to the Land Coni-
nlsslnnei- of the Land Recording Dl
,-lalon, iu which the lund applied foi
!n .Hunted, and are made on prlntail
I'mnie, copies uf which can be ub
-niiied from the Land Commissioner
Pre-emptiaria must be occupied foi
five year, and impi'ovementfl made
io value oi im per acre, meludln.
clearing and cu tltaitiig at leaet Ave
acrt.s, before a I'ruwn Grant  can l»
■ectlveil
For more deulled Information mm.
tin- Huheiiii "How lo I'r.-empt
Und"
PURCHASE
Application*- ere received for pur-
chute of vacant and unreeerved
Crown lande, nut being ilmberland,
fur agricultural purpurea; minimum
price uf ftrnt-clasa (arable) land la ft
per acre, and eecond-claaa (graslng)
wild ti'Ju per acre. Further Information regarding purcbae* or leas.
of i'ruwn land, la given In Bulletin
No. 10. Land Series, "Purchaae and
l.earre of Crown  Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial alt.a on
'imber land, not exceeding 40 acre*,
may be purchased or leaaed, the condition. Including payment of
c i.eipage.
HOMESITE LEASES
t'liaurveyed area., nut exceeding 10
acre*, may be leaned aa nomealte*.
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In lhe drat year, title being
obtaiitab'e after residence and Improvement condition, are fulfilled
and land ha* been surveyed.
LEASES
Fur graxlug and Industrial pur-
pu.e. area, not exceeding 140 aoree
may be leaaed by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under ihe Oraxlng Act the Province le divided Into grating dlatrlct*
and the range administered under a
Oraxlng Commissioner. Annual
grating permit, are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may fonn associations fur range
management. Free, or partially free,
permit* are available for settler*,
campers end travellers, up tu len
keaef.
COFFEE  IN  MANITOBA
The proposal to make coffee from
Manitoba grain has been put forward
by C. E. Ferh, of rtosenfleld, .Man.,
who has asked the Winnipeg board of
Trade to help him patent his idea.
HEAVY GRAIN LOADINGS
An Increase of more than 25.000.0o0
bushels is shown In the amount of
grain louded over the Canadian National Railways throughout the west
since the opening of the season on
September 1, as compared with the
corresponding period of last season.
DOG DERBY PLANS
Teams are In training and extensive
preparations are being made for the
holding on March 11 of the seventh
annual Dog Derby at The Pas. Man.
Special carnival features are being
arranged and accommodation will he
provided for the visitors. A carnival queen contest is adding to the Interest In this event.
CAPITAL FOR
COAL DEVELOPMENT
Proposals to Interest German capital iu the development ot the Saskatchewan lignite coal industry are being made at present and options on
large acreage are stated to have been
secured by a representative of Thys-
sen anil Company, of Mannheim. Ger-
nianv.
BUFFALO MEATS
ON TRAINS
Ilufl'alo tongues, tails and steaks
are to he served on Canadian National diners on transcontinental trains
on anil alter January 16, the company
having contracted for the entire supply of tongues and tails from the
animals slaughtered at Wainwright
Buffalo Park this fall. Buffalo
steaks anil roasls are being served in
hotels of the Canadian National system.
OFFICIAL PROMOTED
Following the resignation of D. H.
Mulligan as superintendent of hotels
lor the Canadian National Railways,
announcement comes from company
headquarters of the promotion of
Walter Pratt to general miinugcr of
all Canadian National hotels In addition to his present duties as superintendent of dining, sleeping and parlor
cars for the system .
SWEDISH IMMIGRANTS
ARE COMING
According to A. Hallonquist. Winnipeg representatives of the Swedish
Steamship Company, lhc influx of
Swedish immigration to this country
will be very heavy during the next
lew months. It wlll begin when the
S;S. Stockholm docks at Halifax ahoui
January 13, and more than 150 of her
passengers proceed west over Canadian National lines to make their
homes In the farming districts or
Western Canada.
Canadian tourists for the winter are
exceedingly bright, .Mr. Nicholl added.
OPERATING
REVENUE GAINS
Official figures covering Canadian
railway operations from January to
the end of October. 1923, show that
Canadian National lines have Increased Ihelr operating revenues by
$5,117.741 and the entire system, Including the lines in the I'nited States,
increased the net operating revenue
from $.1,S23,0O7 to $12,021,285. Canadian lines of the C.N.R. converted a
deficit or $315,952 Into a net operating
revenue of $4,8(11,788 during the time
reviewed and thc net earnings of tli.i
American lines of the Canadian National Railways jumped from $3,823,-
007 to $7,219,496.
HARVESTERS REMAIN
IN CANADA
Of the 11,383 harvesters who came
from llritaiti during 1923, more than
T.iiiio arc remaining In the Dominion,
according to a report to the Winnipeg
Prebylery by Rev. G. F. McCuUough.
immigration chaplain for the Methodist and Presbyterian churches.
GOOD BUSINESS AT COAST
Conditions in Vancouver following
the holiday season look unusually
promising. G. A. McNicholI, of Vancouver, general passenger agent of the
Canadian National Railways, stated
on his way to Montreal a few days
ago. Merchants claim to have don,'
the largest holiday business ever
transacted in Vancouver and prospects for the coming of American ami
GRAIN FROM VANCOUVER
Vancouver grain men are endeavoring to send more than 14.000.000 bushels of grain out of that port this
month. Deliveries at the Pacific
coast port by the Canadian Nations!
Railways during the present grain
movement season are eclipsing all
former records.
GOLD STRIKE
Prospectors working north of Sudbury. Ontario, have struck a rich vein
or gold ore close to the line of the
Canadian National Railways. At a
depth of 30 feet, to which distance a
shaft has been driven, the vein has
widened out to 14 Inches and assays
of thc ore show values averaging $28
per ton.' Specimens of the ore exhibited at Sudbury show small nuggets embedded In the rock.
NOW REVENUE
PRODUCING
From an expensive burden on the
Dominion Government, the W|aln-
wright Buffalo Park is now producing
a substantial revenue for Canada, according to A. S. Duclos, of Edmonton,
who had the contract for the slaughter of the 2,000 surplus animals in the
pork this fall. Good prices are being received by the government from
thc sale of meat, hides and heads and
old timers all over thc country are
enjoying the opportunity to eat real
buffalo steaks and pemmican once
again.
REBATE TO IMMIGRANTS
It has been announced by Hon. J. A.
Robb. minister of Immigration and
colonization, that an arrangement has
Ijoen completed wilh thc British government whereby a 20 per cent, preference rate on Atlantic passengers
for all British Immigrants settling in
Canada will be put into operation on
.March 1 ot Ihls year. This prefer,
once will he paid by the shipping companies and will amount to $15 per
passage.
JRYTHE
/ATCM
TEST
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 14.1. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
^ao You Hear?
rpt.es watch to aarthart draw^
If awa*.   You ahould h.ar tick as^
756 inchee.  Does a rinsins in youiV
| eors prevent your proper neerint'   l
. LEONARD EAR OIL '
J relieve* both Head Noises ond Deal-'
mm. Just rub it back el oars and j
insert in nostrils. Price $1.19
For Sale   Everywhere.
Int.retttnt d..crtfttiv. fctld.r^
».nt upon reguear,
A.O.LEONARD, la..
T# »IW Av*.
Now York
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
|    HOTELS AND CAMPS   T
! SPECIALLY CATERED TO
r  w
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   19.   1824.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
I'utillshed every Saturday morning at
Cumberland. U. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   19,   1924.
<e-        --        ■   ■
BUILDERS
Isn't it strange tha
Princes and
Kings
And clowns that c
a pel
iu Baw-
dust  rings,
And common folks
like
vou and
me.
Arc Builders I'or
3ternity?
To each is given a
bag Of tools.
A shapeless mass
iiul
i hook of
rules;
And each must ma
lie, ere life is
llown,
A stumbling block
or a
stepping
stone.
_
Selected.
i>	
tabic man has made to humanity, or
the advantages to be derived by meu
anil women in the passing of a law.
V'p saitl choose a good newspaper, and
wo do not believe in the good newspaper there is anything to he avoided
by the girls, and certainly very much
can be learned from it.
OH, WHAT A DIFFERENCE!
Sometimes, when tha editor's mail
receipts have consisted principally or
those ominous cauls which the department permits postmasters to shy
at defenseless newspaper men, postage free, hearing the name of some
subscriber a yeur In arrears, stating
that the said subscriber's paper is not
taken oul, but remains undelivered In
that ofilce, ami giving as a reason
therefor that it has been refused, the
editor feels that his labors have been
in vain, unappreciated and unremun-
eratetl. 'Tis then he longs to Hie
himself away to some tleep. sequestered spot where ink. type and print
paper are unknown, ami there iu the
unbroken solitude of pristine nature
forget for a time the weekly struggle
to make ends meet and silently mediate upon the Ingratitude of man.
lint when he is just ready to do tht
"hieing" act—when the printers are
clamoring for their last week's wages
—the grocoryman insisting that he
comes through for the groceries he
has eaten—the coal pile vanishing,
and only thirty-five1 cents in sight with
which to buy another load—then
comes along the broad-guaged, whole-
souled, big-hearted, prompt-paying
subscriber, plunks down Ills crisp
new bill, and joy and gladness once
more dispel the gloom. The prompt-
paying subscriber—long may he live
and liis kind multiply.
WHAT DO THEY WANT?
Ii is a big thing when a woman has
learned how to make a man happy,
though married; how to bring up
children so that they will he as much
comfort as possible to their families
nnd as little nuisance as feasible to
the neighbors. It is a big thing to
keep house so that no one but the
house would suspect it did not keep
itself, to manage a servant so thut
she will not look upon the mistress
as her natural enemy, to he ready in
hospitality without making It a burden, to he on gootl terms with the
neighbors near or fnr, without condescending lo pettiness. Il is a big
tiling to he a member of a Woman's
Club without leaving the stockings un-
danied. lo attend church without losing her temper on Sunday morning,
to post herself upon current events
without taking the newspaper from
her husband when he wants it most,
tn read a new book' occasionally, to
practice outdoor exercise enough to
keep herself in gootl bodily trim, to
dress herself tastefully without forming colossal bills, tn bestow sufficient
attention upon her ligure and face to
preserve her good looks and having
(lone all this to save herself from nervous prostration by the system and
moderation she brings to them all.
Ami .vet there are women who maintain that tiie domestic career does not
give full scope to their powers! in
the name of the great Cotldcss Common Sense, what more do they want?
ing, und commercial classes. It Is
gratifying to note in the domestic
classes, how carefully even the juniors
prepare the vegetables for the soup
and how neatly the smallest child
can sew a plain seam!
We have not been able to build our
much needed second storey, but In one
of our very small wash-rooms may be
seen every day, one who teaches the
principles of physical cleanliness to
our children . Each child is examined and if necessary is bathed, combed,
and the teeth cared for. The task is
an arduous one .but the results encouraging.
Our "Home Teacher" visits our
children who must remain at home for
any length of time, after operations,
or with limbs encased ln fresh plaster.
This teacher encourages the parents
to co-operate with the school tn Its
efforts for their children. Five motor
busses bring from 100 to 110 children
to the school each morning ,and take
them home each afternoon, covering
over 350 miles each day. The children arc served with a morning lunch
and a hot dinner daily.
All this is being accomplished
through the kind help of a sympathetic public, and we pray you, friends
to continue your help, It is worth
while.
Yours very truly,
Sarah A. Tyndale,
Hon'y Sec'y Treas, and Prln.
LAST CHANCE
Now that leap year is really here
at last, the girls should nol hesitate
We know the unmarried men In Cum.
berland don't amount to a whole lot,
but a pretty fair stick may he found
here and there throughout the bunch,
llesides. it never was intended tliat u
woman should become an old maid; it
never was Intended that man should
develop into a crusty old bachelor,
wasting his life sewing on buttons,
getting up cold winter mornings to
build the fire ,etc. So sail in and
take your choice of what's left, girls.
THE GIRL AND THE
NEWSPAPER
Should girls read the newspaper?
That's a question that is short, sweei
ond to the point, and we arc Inclined
to answer the girls in one word—
"Yes." And yet, after tliat one word
wc want lo add a little warning.
First of all. a good newspaper;
read what la going on in the world
of literature, science, art, and. possibly, if it interests you, politics. Read
so that you may talk well on the subjects most Interesting to men and
women. Don't read descriptions of
nwful murders; don't road details of
vile Intrigues, and don't road silly personalities. The girl who reads a
dally newspaper properly is very apt
to be the girl quick of wit and fully
Informed of what tlle world Is doing.
You see. we want to know that, because wc arc in the world and of It.
There would be no life and no animation in us if w- were not. Tho
woman whose world Is a narrow one
makes it for herself. She enlarges
It when, Instead of Idle gossip, she
can talk about the Inst new picture,
lhc criticism on the book or the play,
the wonderful  gift  that some  ehari-
I UK   SCHOOL   101!   ( IIII'I'I.Kl)
CHILDREN
Incorporated
45 Cedar Ave., Montreal, Que.
Edward W. Dickie. Esq.
Cumberland, B. ('.
As Thanksgiving Festivities merge
into Christmas Preparations, perchance some grateful intention has
escaped our memory. Do we always
remember to lie thankful that we aud
our Ititle ones are sound ill body and
mind; that we are not helpless like
the dear young people who fill The
School For Crippled Children?
in gratitude for our more fortunate condition wlll we help these helpless ones; will we do as the King of
Bethlehem did—He Blessed the little
children—He loved them—He placed
His Hands upon them—He was their
Personal Friend. Will you be a
Personal Friend tn our Helpless
Young Charges?
Could each one Im: know of the
brave henrts embodied in those disabled forms—the courageous young
souls laughing, studying, playing,
pel-serving, conquering, where normal people woultl oftlmes repine, and
become discouraged, deep pity for
their frailty would influence every
heart.
Whether your offering he one cent
or one hundred dollars—every copper,
every good wish will serve to swell
lhe amount needed to operate this
school, which is endeavoring to lead
these Crippled Children lo lives ot
usefulness and true citizenship .Many
of our graduates are engaged as office
istants, some are earning wages
in printing shops ami various places
of business.
We follow the Public School Curriculum, and have printing, multlgraph-
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Service is our Motto
Phone IS Union Hotel
II	
Bigger Better
„ Gardens^
ptm M9KENZIE SEED
THE BEST SEED Is cheapest for it produces moLt.
McKenzie Seed has been
tiroven of the highest quality
for over a quarter century.
Every home needs a garden —
planted with  McKenzie high
citciliiy Seed for ECONOMY
and HEALTH.   Solddirectoi
Ly your local merchant.
7 V jure to buy
McKF.NZIES
\. E. McKcnsie Co., Ltd.
Urand.m S.ak.tuoa
Moose Jaw        Calgary
Sr^ecATAi_
Special Stock-Taking Sale
SPECIAL I'BICES ON ALL WINTER OOODS TO CLEAR.
1 COOK ASSORTMENT OF LADIES' AND GIRLS' DKESSES
AT VERY SPECIAL PRICES-SEE OCR WINDOW
AN OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE FROM TWENTY TO TWENTY.
FIVE  PER  CENT. ON  WINTER GOODS.
Ladies' Wool Hose, in colors, Reg. $1.25.    On sale at
t/OC Per Pair Per Pair t/DC
Ladies' Black Fleece Hose, All sizes.
Per Pair ODC Per Pair
OR THREE PAIRS FOR ONE DOLLAR.
A good quality Serge, in Black and Brown, very suit-
drXf* aD,e t°r school dresses. £JC«
OtlL Per Yard Per Yard DOC
ONE QUARTER OFF ON ALL LADIES' SHOES AND SLIPPERS
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
Special   Stock-Taking   Sale
At CAMPBELL'S
LADIES' COATS, DRESSES & FURS
AT  GREATLY  REDUCED  PRICES.
THE BALANCE OF OUR STOCK OF
MILLINERY  AT  $2.75  &  $3.75
WHITE FLANNELETTE WEAR—At less than half price to clear.      Nightgowns,
Skirts, Drawers and Bloomers and Pyjamas.
LADIES' BUNGALOW APRONS—In Chambrays and unbleached Cottons     d»-|   fjf*
Special Value   «pJL» I U
Extra Special Bargains in Ladies' All Wool St. "Margaret" Black Casmere HoBe /»P
Per pair  OOC
BOYS' ALL WOOL SWEATERS—Coats and Plain, in Combination colors, sizes 24 to 32
Regular price $2.75 d»fj   FA
Sale Price, each         «pl«9U
BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS—Boys' Tweed Bloomer Pants, in Grey and Brown Mixture.
Regular $2.50 d»fj   /»t
Special  tPl.Ot)
BOYS' LONG TWEED PANTS—Boys' first long pants, Brown Check Tweed, Cuff Bottom.     Regular $4.50 (J»Q  A fT
REMNANTS-REMNANTS
Special Bargains in Remnants of all Kinds
Grocery Department
Sliced Pineapple, broken slices, 2>//s 40c.
Canned Pumpkin, 2'/a's, 2 for  45c.
Canned Spinach, 2'//s  _  25c.
Canned Sour Kraut, 21/a's,   25c.
Canned Dill Pickles, 2>/»'s   30c.
Beef Steak and Onions, l's, 3 for      $1.00
Davies' Cambridge Sausage, l's  30c.
Empress Jams—Greengage and Red
Currant, 1-lb. tins, 5 for $1.00
Regal Shaker Salt, pkts  15c.
Red Arrow Soda Crackers, pkts  25c.
FRESH GROUND COFFEE, LB  50c.
B.C. Gran. Sugar, 20 lbs. for $2.15
Bulk Tea, extra fine quality, 2 lbs ....$1.15
Empress Pure Jams, 4-lb tins, in
Peach, Greengage, Blackberry,   90c.
GRAPES, GRAPE FRUIT, LEMONS, BANANAS,   HEAD   LETTUCE   SAVOY   CABBAGE,
CELERY, BRUSSELS SPROUTS, CAULIFLOWER AND FRESH TOMATOES.
Norwegian Sardines, 7 tins for $1.00
King Oscar Kippered Snacks, 3 tins 25c.
Chicken Haddie, tins  25c.
Black Cooking Figs, 2 lbs  35c.
White Cooking Figs, 2 lbs   35c.
Evaporated Prunes, 2 lbs  25c.
Rogers Golden Syrup, 2's  25c.
Van Camps Pork & Beans, 3 tins .... 45c.
Campbells Soups, asstd., 2 tins 25c.
Pure Lard, tins 3's-65c. 5's-$1.10 10's-$2.10
Broom Special, 4 string   60c.
Not-A-Seed Raisins, 3 pkts for  50c.
Small White Beans, 3 lbs  25c
Lima Beans, 2 lbs  25c.
Tillson's Oats, Aluminum pkts 40c.
White Swan Soap Cartons  30c.
Lux, 2 pkts for 25e.
Classic Cleanser, 3 tins ! 25c.
Oatmeal Toilet Soap, 2 cartons  45c.
Naval Oranges, 5 doz. for $1
SKJEiaKEISElBElBEEJSIrM^
aeasBBBiasr
CAMPBELL'S
CUMBERLAND
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    ■    Cleaning    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.    •    P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
New Car Service
Oar for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting with Boot nt Union Bay
every Sunduy Morning. Leave Cum-
berland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort and Homelike  eervlce.
26 rooms, electrically heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 16.
R. YATES, Manager.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and Residence:   Willard
Block.   •   'Phone 116.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS.  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS.
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM.MEHRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:  From  9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   23
From U p.m. to   9 a.m.   22
Ask for Geo. Mason. K
SAT' RDAY,   JANUARY   19,   192-1.
THE CUMRERLAND ISLANDER
FIVE
1
I
§ ii j liiiiiiiiliia
CAVIN'S January SHOE SALE
Prices have been cut and
we have cut them again.
Ends January 26th
Prices have been cut and
we have cut them again.
WE ARE DETERMINED TO CLEAR OUR SHELVES TO MAKE ROOM FOR SPRING SHIPMENTS.     FOR CASH WE WILL SELL FOR COST ANY PAIR OF SHOES ON OUR
SHELVES AND MANY LINES WE ARE SACRIFICING.
LOOK  WHAT $1.50  WILL  DO  FOR  YOU!
PATENT AND KID TIES
LADIES' PATENT AND KID TIES, LONDON LADY
MAKE
A PAIR
AIR $1.50
A PAIR
LADIES' PUMPS AND OXFORDS
LADIES' PATENT AND KID PIMPS
LADIES' PATENT AND KM) OXFORDS
A PAIR
$1.50
A PAIR
LADIES' TAILORED SPATS
LADIES'    TAILORED    SPATS,    A    NUMBER    OF
COLORS
A PAIR
tpl.OO.v
PAIR
ALL LADIES' HI-CUT SHOES, HIGH OR LOW HEELS, FOR LESS THAN COST. GET OUR PRICES! SAVE MONEY! WE HAVE A NUMBER OF LINES OF LOW HEEL,
STRAP SLIPPERS AND OXFORDS, ALL SIZES, GOOD MAKES, AND ALL WE ASK IS OUR MONEY BACK. WE HAVEN'T ROOM TO DISPLAY ALL THESE DIFFERENT
LINES, BUT IF YOU WILL COME IN WE WILL GLADLY SHOW YOU THEM.
LADIES' SLIPPERS
LADIES' FELT BEDROOM SLIPPERS, THREE COLORS
$1.50
LADIES' RUBBERS
LADIES'  HIGH  HEELED  RUBBERS
50c
LADIES* SLIPPERS
LADIES' JULIET SLIPPERS, FOUR COLORS. REG. $3.60
$2.25
MEN'S SHOES - Prices cut to the bone
BROKEN LINES IN MEN'S SHOES
A group of broken lines in Men's Shoes, all good
makes, not all sizes in each kind, but all sizes in
the group.     To clear at
A PAIR &5.UU A PAIR
Here's your chance to get a good pair of shoes
cheap.
DR. SPECIALS' AND DR. HAMMOND'S SHOES
Dr. Specials' Black or Brown
Dr. Hammond's Cushion Soled Shoes,
Slater's Make, $12.00 value for
A PAIR
$7.75
A PAIR
MEN'S WORK SHOES AT COST
We have reduced all lines of Men's Work Shoes to
cost, as we intend to stock "Paris" Boots only
An example of what we are offering—Amherst
12 inch top Miner—A splendid boot, $15.50 value
for
A PAIR
$11.00
A PAIR
CHILDRENS' SHOES
WE WILL FORGET ABOUT PROFIT IF YOU WANT SHOES THIS COMING WEEK. WE INTEND TO STOCK PARIS HAND MADE SHOES FOR THE CHILDREN IN THE
FUTURE, AND WE WILL SELL OUR PRESENT STOCK FOR COST. WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK TO CHOOSE FROM. COME IN AND WE WILL GLADLY SHOW YOU
THESE SHOES.    WE MAY HAVE WHAT YOU WANT.
RUBBERS!
RUBBERS!       RUBBERS!
ALL LINES GREATLY REDUCED.
WE CARRY AMES HOLDEN BRAND, ABSOLUTELY THE BEST ON THE MARKET TODAY.
BjasEEEfajaaiaaiHsra
Men's Rolled Edge     f     Boys' Rolled Edge     |    Youth's Rolled Edge   1 Children's Rolled Edge
CROWDS HAVE VISITED THIS SALE AND PROFITED BY IT—WHY NOT YOU?    ALL THE PROFIT WE ARE MAKING IS BY CLEANING UP OUR STOCK AND MAKING
ROOM FOR NEW SHIPMENTS.     TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS SALE AND BUY SHOES AT MANUFACTURERS COST.
CAVIN SHOE STORE, CUMBERLAND
A CAPABLE CAST
IN ALLAN DWAN'S
"BIG BROTHER"
Tom   Moure, ..Raymond .lliitlim ..ami
Edith RiiImtIs Are Featured
The Allan Dwan Paramount production of "Big Brother," a Rex
Beach novel which will lie shown at
the Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday anil
Saturday, Is supplemented hy a cast
of worthiness and repute.
Heading the list of popular players,
who bring the famous story to  the
allver sheet, ls Tom .Moore ill the rolo
of Jimmy Donovan, lhe lender of the
Car Bam gang on New York's lower
East side.      Il   Is doubtful  If Moore
ever   had   a   more  appropriate   role.
Edith   Roberts,   whose  recent  return
to the studios after an Illness  Hilda'
her in greater popularity than ever. I
pla.i-8 the feminine lend.     Then there
is Raymond Hiilton, also featured in
the role of a dope fiend; Mickey Bennett, the talentcd'seven-yenr-old plny-j
er,   Charles    Henderson,   Joe   King, j
Paul Panzer,    Neill Kelley,   William j
Black, Milton Hcrmon, Florence Ash.
brook and Yvonne Hughes   play   In
support. |
"Big   Brother"   is   a   penetrating
story of the lower East side, realist- j
ically and adroitly done.     In Jimmy
Donovan the author, Kex Beach has i
painted a character humane and lov-,
able.     The story concerns the resolu-1
tloiiB ol. the gang leader to correct Ills
ways  after  his   lieutenant  had   been t
killed by thc bullet from the gun of
a leader of a rival gang.     In dying
the lieutenant hud asked his chief to
take care of his little brother and to
bring him up 'different.'
The elements working against the
gang leader, the depth and sincerity
of his love for Kitty, the angel of thc
district, the machinations of Cokey
Joe, tiie dope fiend, and the final triumph of Jimmy Oonovan provide
sympathetic and convincing entertainment and true testimony of the
genius of Mr. Dwan and Mr. Beach.
It  Is  here  thai
to    his    greate il
MRS. WALLACE REID
IN "HUMAN WRECKAGE"
HERE MONDAY-TUESDAY
On a level with Stevenson's immortal conception ot the struggle for
supremacy between a man's good and
bad natures, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Hyde," Is James Klrkwood's performance In "Human Wreckage," cleplctii.,;
the tremndous combat of a man's wlll
power with a body that Insistent.')'
craves for relief through submission
to the curse of drugs.
With Infinite skill and delicacy.
Klrkwood, through repression rather
than elaborate physical demonstration
delineates the emotions of the brilliant criminal lawyer who, while energetically prosecuting weaklings who
stoop to Indulgence In harmful narcotics, breaks down from overwork,
nnd becomes himself addicted to their
use.
Once snared in the tolls of the dope
ring, he sinks down and down until,
in a tense climax, he realizes the
depths to which the habit has brought
him, and makes a valiant stand.
Willi all lhc will-power he can muster,
he squarely faces   his   enemy,   tho
demon Narcotics.
Klrkwood rises
height.
His Innate culture, which resents
bitterly a surrender to involuntary
servitude, opposed to the overwhelming desire to slip hack peacefully Into
the old groove, brings him to Gelh-
semane. A gruelling, nervewracklnrj
battle, outwardly evidenced only by
the drawn muscles, thc twitching
nerves, the staring eyes, takes place
on an Isolated, wind-swept beach,
where tiie wretched victim wanders
tn make a lust stand, or die fighting.
Slowly, with super-human effort,
he forces the burning desire out of
himself, and In doing so collapses in
the wet sand a mere shell of his former self. There, a new man is horn,
a man of finer metal, filled with new
convictions.
For blm remains hut one life work
—to aid other unfortunates to throw I
off the evil curse.    The lawyer, played by  Klrkwood, sees    plainly    his I
former shortcoming in handling (ho i
narcotic   problem.      With   returning
health and vigor, his drawn face llll.i
out, but the gleam of determination
In his eye deepens anil Ills jnw sots
firmly.    A new clement of sympathy
tempers bis idea of justice,     in time
he supersedes even his own  fnrmci
prominence as  an  attorney, through
his greater understanding of tho addict's viewpoint.
Klrkwood, after thc  severe strain
involved In lhc portrayal of his pari
In "Human Wreckage," wan forced to
retire to  the mountains  tor a  long;
rest,     while     "Human     Wreckage" I
launched on Its triumphant way, wlll
be shown at the Ilo-llo Theatre on
.Monday and Tuesday.
NOTICE TO coxTinnoits
llovo Creek School
SEALED TENDERS, endorsed "Tender for Dove Creek School," will bo
received hy the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to 12 o'clock
noun of Tuesday thc 29th day of January 1924, for the erection of a One j
room Schoolhouse at Dove Creek, i
Sandwlck, In the Comox Elecloral
District.
Plans, Specifications, Contract and
Forms of Tender may he seen on and
otter thc 14th dny ot January, 1921, j
ami further Information obtained at
the Department of Public Works, Parliament Buildings and at the Offices
of the Government Agents nt Van- i
couver and Cumberland.
Copies of plans, specifications, etc.,
can be obtained from the Department
on payment of a deposit of Ten Dollars (Ito.oo), which wlll be refunded]
on their return in good condition.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepled.
P. PHILLIP,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works.
Victoria, B. C.
January 10th, 1924. J 20
Biggest Sales in B.C.
JheBeerWthoutaPter
and
U.B.C
BEER
The popular verdict is overwhelmingly in favor of these pure, palatable, appetizing beverages — the
products of British Columbia's
most elaborately equipped brewery.
Place Your Order Today and tret
free home delivery
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
ndvtirtiBomont is not published or displayed by the L-iquor Control
Hmii'ii or by the Government of British Columbia, PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   JANUARY   19.   1824.
Secret History Of The Day
MASSEY GREEN'S LUCKY N OMINATION—LATEST CONFIDENCE TALE-A USEFUL PRESSMAN—NAY OFFICER'S WINE BILL—ZIFF WEARNE, CENSOR—M.L.A.'S
DEAL IN "TROPHIES"
| charges too high. The proprietor saw
the case, and gave the head waiter
certain Instructions. The host duly
I received his bill, and was horrified to
j read the following item: "To corkage
j—12 bottles at 10/- . . .£6." The
i business-like proprietor had charged
j 10/- tor opening each bottle and pour-
! ing the contents !
A Sydney Judge will be careful in
future before ho accepts anybody's
word that an accused who has not
appeared for trial lias really absconded from justice, and issues a bench
warrant for the absconder's arrest.
The Judge on one occasion ordered a
warrant to issue for the arrest of a
man whose name had been called six
times outside the court, and had not
answered, The man who did not appear at the time was safely In custody out nt Long Bay, He is still
there. The same judge scut him
there.
A N.S.W, country C.P.S. posted his
resignation to the Department one
day witli a covering letter stating his
salary wns too small to live on, so he
was going rabbiting. Throe months
Inter he wns back in the Service as a
temporary, with n substantial rise.
Quite recently he resigned tn go into
the estate agency business.
I Tiie energies ot the police have been
| devoted lo stopping lhe illicit traffic
1 for months past, and they have made
dozens of unsuccessful raids.     In despair, they recently picketed a traffic
bridge tliat provided the only access
to the camp, and searched every vehicle that passed.      The surveillance
lasted n month, but grog on the job
'. was as plentiful ns ever.     Thc police
: still regard it impossible to solve the
j mystery, but they have never bothered
, to probe the sand carried hy n train
of motor lorries for the concrete work.
One Australian University profes-
fessor Is a glutton for work. When
he tended the University In the morning and conducted a class; ut midday he went down to the wharf, met
his blushing bride to be and married
her. He then returned to Uie University and delivered a profound lecture.
The department will not allow ;
| N.S.W. Government Crown Lands j
| Agents to keep any change on hand. !
j Even ln Goulbum when n farmer calls |
: to pay his instalments or buy a map I
he has to go out and have a drink to
get tiie correct change.
The publicans of n N.S.W. country
town is In progress, nre bitter about
sly-grog selling at the navvies' camii.
An Australian Navy Officer gave a.
dinner to some friends at a fashion-
able Sidney Hotel recently. Of an j
economical turn of mind, he had a j
case nf champangne sent along to the ;
hotel,   as    he    thought    the    iatter's',
The Ministerial head ot a Federal
Department has not been in office very
long, but he has made his presence
left. He has at times endeavoured
to expedite the completion of various
works, and has made himself obnoxious to officers. "Don't bother so much
about specifications, etc," ia the burden of his song; "get the work done."
The harrassed officers are still trying
to Bolve the puzzle of getting the
work put through without seeing that
the necessary specifications and conditions are completed by the contractor,
The cloak room staff at the Central
Railway Station (Sydney) have dealt
with 8,000,000 people and mado only
one mistake.
When the "Australia was ordered
to leave Sydney ln October, 1914, she
was waiting for a load of fire-bricks,
without which she could not sail and
which the naval authorities could not
find. To solve the mystery, Albert
J. Merry, of the naval dockyard police,
%as called in, given a launch and told
to go to It. He assured the worried
officials that he would have the
bricks aboard in time tor the "Australia" to Bail. With a subordinate
he went to Darling Harbour, left his
sergeant to interrogate the railway
people, while he toured the yard examining tracks until he came across
the missing bricks. A few words- -
official and personal—to the railway
representatives and the bricks were
shunted into the daylight, hurriedly
delivered to a waiting pontoon, and the
"Australia" left on time. Merry's
success was due to Ihe fact that ho
had been employed by the railway department as a detective before he
'joined the naval dockyard police, and
he know axnetly webere to look for
the missing bricks.
books of a Sydney firm, the auditors
could not account for a shortage of
a penny.    Looking tor the error, they
discovered another discrepancy of 4d.,
| then one of several shillings.     Later
! the shortage grew to £5, and eventually to several hundreds.     The out'
| come was when a series of clever em-
| bezzleiucnts, extending over a period
: ot years, was uncovered, and the person who had been practising them -
one of the firm's most trusted employees—accused of the thefts.     He
admitted them, but as his family, a
wealthy and widely-known one, made
restitution, there was no prosecution.
aMwiaftSwtedSis^ite.:
sWBbafig H-.-.iSr^K.-'.
The New
Ford Touring Car
For tbe motorist who requires a good-looking car ol
unusual serviceability, tbe new Ford Touring Car is a
splendid investment.
To the sturdiness and endurance for which the Ford it
universally famous have been added new features which
materially enhance the appearance of the car and add to
the comfort ol the passengers.
The new radiator is higher.givinggreatei cooling efficiency
—the hood and cowl are larger affording increased leg-
room, and the steering-post is braced for easier driving.
With roomy accommodations for five passengers, the
new Ford Touring Cai is undoubtedly the most practical
general utility car en the market.
New Ford Prices
Touring Car $445        Runabout, $405       Truck $495
Ekcttk Starting one I lyAlYnf Equipment $85 00 e-xlni.
Coupe, $065 Fordor Sedan. $895
I'luh c SiWn*.' and ' ■ftiltr.it t'ntfvttieitt Siandara or '/hi. ittotittt
AJJ prices ' c  h Ford, Omario     Government Taxes extra.
A il F'ot d models con be .tblomtd through
the Fsid  Wtnk y Pu.J'ase Plan
Corfield  Motors Ltd.
The New Runabout
Thu new Ford Runabout is as
smart and business like a car as
you w'H find on the road today
This >3 the logical air loi those
who require a good looking,
■lurdy and economical cm ai iht
lowwt DOisib'e :ost.
POND    MOTOR    COMPANY    OF    CANADA.    LIMITED.    FORD.    ONTARIO
MANN'S
BAKERY
TIIE HOME OF HIGH CLASS CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection See Our Window
Hot Pies Every Saturday
Once you try them, you always prefer them.
Phone 18 CUMBERLAND, B.C.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
A Tramway strike in tipped for
Brisbane. The last one took place in
1922, when over 40 unions participated
ln a sympathetic hold-up ot the community, with rather disastrous results
politically to the Labour cause. Badger succeeded ln excluding from tits
employment all the active strikers
and In breaking the union. Since then
union has been reformed and tbe
l rams have passed to the control of a
Trust, though the terms of the transfer are still a matter of legal interpretation. The Trust has admitted
many of the old bands, and they are
gingering up things. Waiting time Is
the chief cause of dissatisfaction, and
unless some change Is made the tramways will be laid idle.
During the annual audit    of    the
A certain N.S.W. politician deserves
a V.C. for the courage and resource
he displayed recently ln most distressing circumstances. He was chatting
with a lady friend over a cup of col-
fee in one of tbe private rooms at
the House, when a messenger entered
bearing the disconcerting news thai
bis wife had just arrived, and wished
to see blm. Before the discomfited
member could escape, his wife hurst
upon the scene. With great presence
of mind he introduced his guest as the
wife ot a distinguished political personage then staying in Sydney. Then,
leaving the ladles together he dashed
out of the refreshment rooms ostensibly to order an extra coffee and
sandwich. On his return live minutes later his wife informed him that
during his temporary absence the
Premier had 'phoned him. She had
answered .she said, and was Informed
that her husband was required to go
at once to the room of his leader, to
discuss an important piece of projected legislation. Hubby appeared
surprised at the message, and prepared to do his duty. Hurriedly explaining that the discussion with the
Premier would occupy several hours,
and that It was w'lth regret he would
have to ask them to leave he succeeded In adroitly conducting each lady
to Macquarie Street by separate exits,
the wife returning to her home entirely unsuspicious. Then, with a
sigh of relief, he returned to the refreshment room to reward, with liquid gifts, the pressman whom he had
Induced to put tbe fictitious 'phono
message through for him.
It Theodore ever resigns the leadership ot the Labour party ln Queensland it looks odds on Big Bill McCor-
mack taking hla place. As Minister
for Lands he handled all the big proposals of the recent session, particularly the Irrigation and land settlement schemes, and greatly Impressed
those who watch these things closely.
Bill's stock Is certainly on the ascending scale, and he Is also personally popular with members of the parly
—and Incidentally with pressmen,
which Is -not a thlug to be despised
when a man aspires to a big position.
Sydney police are listening to a
confidence man who ls telling a new
tale. The magsman loiters ln a w?ll
patronized telegraph office until the
mug walks to the slanting desk to
write his telegram. Then the crook
bustles up excidedly, seizes a form
and a pen and attempts to write also.
His hand trembles and the pen spatters blots over the paper. His efforts attract the attention of the men
next to him and the appeal is made.
"Will you write a telegram out for
me? It's a bit too much for me." A
ready consent is usually forthcoming,
and the message ls dictated. Invariably It ls to some woman In Denllquln
or Hay, informing her that the sender, her son, has drawn first prize la
Tatl.'s. This explains to the mug the
natural excitement of the other, and
((oiiHiiued ou Page J)
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
TWO OF THE YEAR'S GREATEST PICTURES
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JAN. 18 ■ 19
REX BEACH'S LATEST STORY
"BIG BROTHER"
Not since "The Miracle Man" and "Humoresque"
has there been a picture that tugs at your heart like
"BIG BROTHER." It has a big theme that digs right
into your soul,- its thrills rush upon you with bewilder-
ing frequency. Its dramatic force never slackens for
a second, it's a perfect picture—one of the best stories
this famous author ever wrote—a picture you'll never
forget.
-EXTRA-
SOME SHOW
4 REELS OF COMEDY
MATINEE
SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
SOME SHOW
MATINEE
SATURDAY
LOOK'    M0NDAY AND TUESDAY--
***** ^*W   ^mW am ^at# will'   DIPWfTDV   nis.i>   U'UAf tr   WATfin   ft,   rns.vnsc,    .nn.'n,
THE PICTURE THE WHOLE WOULD IS TALKING ABOIT
Mrs. Wallace Reid
in
"Human
Wreckage"
CHILDREN 25c.
Carved out of the very tout and tissue of
quivering human life, "Hutu Wreckage" pierces
through Buperflclallty and plunges deep Into the
pulsing heart of humanity Itself!
It tears away with ruthless grasp the black
veil of secrecy. It drags Into the merciless light
of day that inslduous monster that spreads its
colls Into every corner of Uje. world. In gripping
scenes of tremendous drama it burls into your
consciousness a shattering thunderbolt such as no
man, woman or child who sees it can forget.
ADULTS 50c.
Special show TUESDAY MORNING at 10.30 a.m.
Matinee ■ - - TUESDAY - - - 3.15 p.m.
CHILDREN 16c.
-MATINEE PRICES	
ADULTS14V. 2/
SATURDAY,   JANUAIIY   19,   1021.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
COMOX JAM
Ask your grocer for COMOX JAM it is made from pure fresh fruit and
B.C. Cane Sugar, nothing added by way of filler or preservative.
STRAWBERRY — LOGANBERRY — RASPBERRY and a limited am
ount of ITALIAN PRUNE — GREENGAGE and PLUM.
COMOX POTATOES
"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Your are entitled to a graded potato. If it's a Comox Creamery Sack with
the tag it is graded and better value. Demand no other.
HI
l
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN THE HEAD.
AND NASAL CATARRH.
The new Continental remedy called
■LARMALENE" (Kegd.)
Is a staple harmless home-treatment
which absolutely cures deafness, noises In the head, eta, No Expensive Appliances Needed for this new Ointment, Instantly operates upon the affected parts with complete and permanent success. Scores of Wonderful
Cares Reported.
Actual Fact
A TWENTY-YEAR ENDOWMENT RESULT
IN
THE DOMINION LIFE
TAKEN AT AOB 34
Cash Settlement   $1,446.25
Total premiums paid  $ 967.00
Gain   *  479.25
In addition the Assured had $1,000 Insurance protection for 29 years.
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
Head Office, Waterloo, Ontario.
Offices for Vancouver Island,
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B.C.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, ef Slad Road,
Strond, writes:-"Please could 1
trouble job to send me another box of
the Ointment. It Is not for myself, but
for a friend of mine who Is as bad as
I was, and cannot ret any rest for the
noises In the head. I feel It new woman, and can go to bed now and get a
good night's rest, which I had not
been able to do for many months. II
Is a wonderful remedy and am most
delighted to recommend* It."
Mrs. E. Crowe, of IVhttchurse Road,
Croydon, writes i—«1 am pleased to
tell yon that the small tin of ointment
you seat to ate at Ventnvr, has proved
a complete success, my hearing Is
now quite normal, and the horrible
head noises hare ceased. The action
of this new remedy mast be very remarkable, for I hare been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years, aad have had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instruments all
to ao purpose. 1 need hardly say how
renr grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an eatlre change."
Try one box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for 11.00. There Is
Nothing Better at any Price.
Address orders to:—
"LARMALENE" CO.   (11. Thomas)
"Wooolands"
Beaa Dartford,
Kent, England.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
DellTsred to All Part* of District
leal, Wood and Goods of Any Had
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
Moil's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAY8
.  ON HAND
New shipment* of these hlgh-
grad* confections arrlr* *T*ry
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
aril th* Urn*.
Henderson's
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Oonts'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnish
Ings, etc. Drop In and see Mr. Suther.
land, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
wlll advise you nn any work you wish
to have done.
Oar   Work  and   Service
WUI Pleas* You : i     it
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, EC.      -      Phone 110*
Secret History
Of The Day
(Continued From Page 0)
congratulations are offered. The
crook, seedy and shabby, informs hla
new-found friend that he had been uut
of work for eight months, and the
lucky ticket was purchased with a 10/-
note picked up In the gutter. Then.
to prove his bona-fldes, the con. nan
produces an urgent wire, BUpposcdl..
sent from Hobort, announcing his
good fortune. After this, and a ilrinli
or two, for which the mug pays, It Is
tbe easiest tiling for him to borrow
anything from £10 on the seurity ol
a "dud" Tntl.s ticket.
In order to get a verdict out of one
country Jury, which had stood out for
20 hours, the judge sent them word
that n circus had arrived in the town.
Thc sleuthing of the N.S.W. C.I.D.
convinced Sir George Fuller that the
confidential documents concerning the
Immigration and land settlement
policy alleged to have been unlawfully
obtained from the Premier's Department, were not tampered with by any
of the officials employed there. The
staff was unfelnedly relieved when
suspicion was lifted from its collective shoulders. A few know the reason for the abrupt cessation of the
investigation .It wns when a member
of the Cabinet, whom wily pressmen
frequently encourage to loquacity for
their own ends, took a hand. As he
Is hotly opposed to Carruthers' land
scheme. It ia not unlikely that he recollected certain occasions when, in
voicing his antagonism to the proposals to Inqulstorial pressmen, he Innocently used arguments that one of
his colleagues had committed to paper
ami quoted the authority as extra emphasis.
—Smith's Weekly, Sydney, Australia.
NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Esary Timber Company Limited Intend to apply
io the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies, Victoria, B.C., to change Its
name to Thomson & Clark Timber
Company Limited.
Dated at Vancouver. D.C., this itn
day ot December, A.D. 1923.
LAURA  L.   JlcGHKE.
Assistant-Secretary.
NEW C. N. R. STATION        A   Polyglot    Porter
A splendid new addition to the build
Ings In the town of Emerson. Man., Is
ihe new Canadian National Hallways
station recently opened to the public
there. The building is 50 feet by 25
feel, heated with hot air, electrically
lighted, and has a large waiting room,
ticket office, express room and full-
sized basement.
WESTERN TURKEYS
The Western turkey is 111 solid with
Montreal.     Five turkeys out of every
six  which  came  into  that city  from
outside points  this  year came  from
Manitoba, Saskatchewan or Alliens.
und  60.0110  birds   were consumed  on j
Christmas   Day   .according  to   Mon-
ileal dealers, or three times as man. i
as ever before.     Had it not been for !
the western supply, Christmas turkey
in Montreal would have cost tio cents
per pound, instead of around 35 cents.
C. N. EARNINGS
The gross earnings of the Canadian
National Railways for the week ending December 21, 1923, were $5,455,-
793, being an increase of $778,084, or '
14 per cent, as compared with the
corresponding week of 1922. The
gross earnings from January 1 to
December 21, 1923, were $248,547,-!
527,87, being au Increase of $20,967,-
521.18 us compared with the corres-
ponding period of 1922.
SEEING CANADA
The trip from Portland, Oregon, to |
Toledo, Ohio, for the Scott High |
School Football team ot tlle latter
city, will be taken as far as possible
over the Canadian National Railways
in order to give the boys an oppriuu-
lty to view Western Canada and see
as much as possible of the Canadian
Rockies on their way home.
NEW LAMP
BURNS94% AIRj
Ileitis Klectrlc or Gas
	
A new oil lamp that gives an amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the II, S. Government
and 35 leading universities and found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps.
It burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, is simple, clean,
safe. Burns 94% air and Ct common kerosene (coal oil.)
The Inventor, J. II. Johnson, 579 Mc-
Dermot Ave, Winnipeg, is offering io
send a lump on 10 days' FREE trial,
or even lo give one FREE lo the rirsi
user in each locality who will help
him introduce it. Write him to-day
tor particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
$250 to $500 per month. --39-47.-192H
PROMINENT VISITORS
Premier Mossey, of Now Zealand,
spent New Year's Eve ln Winnipeg en '
route from the recent conference of
premiers in England. Mr. Massey '
had just a short time iu lhe city, during the stay of the Canadian National
"Continental Limited", and his stay
was spent at the Fort Garry hotel
seeing friends resident In Winnipeg.
B. C. MINERAL OUTPUT
The mineral production of British
Columbia for 1923 shows an Increase
of 12.8 per cent. In monetary value
over thai of the previous year. Tbe
output for 1923 was valued at $39,- j
699,758. as against $35,158,843 for'
1922. an Increase of $4,540,915. Tlio
1921 production was valued at $2f,-
066.641.
LOST
LOST-WICKER   ROCKER,  ON   December 22nd, on  the    way    from
Cumberland to Bowser.     Please in-'
form  Ben   Pearse, Bowser,  for re-1
ward.
FOR SALE
BARRED   ROCK   COCKERELS—AG-
asslz and Agasslz-Goldlng strain.
$4.00 eoch. R. Waddell, R.R. No. 1,
Cumberland. F.16
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
Try our 100 P.C. Whole Wheat Bread, made by special
process which enables the body to assimilate the full    <§
nutrition of the Wheat Berry.     Our local doctor eats
no other and highly recommends it. <«
&&§ ###
Y     First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for
Bread   Making   guarantee*   the   quality.
The Courtenay Tea Room
-:': -£.'£$'-'     >
John   Coi,   matter   uf   maii>   la.iguaim.
THE smooth-working organism of
a great railway which prides
Itself on being able tu me.*. .,
situation in an equable manner, te-
ceived a rude jolt ono day when
two picturesquely garbed strangers
sLroIIed into the VVIndsor Dopol uf
the Canadian Pacific Railway s
Montreal, and, despite the most *ia-
borate and vociferous linguistic contortions, failed in a most deplorable
manner to make anyone understand
what they wanted.
Someone who had travelled in
the east ventured the opinion that
they were Arabs, and the polyglot
bombardment yvhich had been in
progress ceased in hopeless despair,
for the stock of available languages
did not g« into Kipling's country
"east of Suez." Then a "red cap,"
one of tbe colored porters who make
themselves useful about the station
handling baggage between the train
and taxicab, stepped up. He relieved himself of what sounded like
a combination of a badly-running
Ford and a -Sarcee war chant, and
had the situation straightened out
in no time at all.
Investigation revealed that the
railway had on its staff of baggage
hustlers a veritable Mezzofanti, a
student who for sheer love of the
acquisition picks up languages in
the easy manner he does suitcases.
He is known about the station as
Number Eighteen, though this has
no reference to his lingual accomplishments. His name is John Cox
and his country of origin is British
Guiana, though Lo satisfy his voracious thirst for tongues that other
people employ he has strayed far
from his native sugar plantations.
Spanish, Italian, English, French,
Greek, Hindustani and Arabic he can
call into requisition at a moment's
notice, while he writes most of them
with equal facility. He admits not
being as yet equally at home with
German, though he has substantial
grasp of the language.
Hindustani is his native tongue.
Facile English he acquired in England in the employ of a British railway magnate. In the same employ
lie went to Brazil and Panama,
acquiring Spanish in an effortless
manner en route. Returning to England with merely his appetite whetted, he took lessons in Italian und
French and speedily added them to
his linguistic list. The outbreak of
the war opened up possibilities of
yet more interesting and extensive
travel, and he joined the navy as being less likely to remain confined to
an area where they spoke the same
language all of the time.
Fate played into his hands when
be became stationed ut Mudros, in
the Grecian Archipelago, near tha
entrance to the Dardanelles. It was
not tong before he hud qualified to
keep a fruit store und was looking
round for more languages to conquer He bethought himself of the
horde.- of Turkish prisoners coming
in to the depot, and after hobnobbing with them tor a few months,
was reading the "Arabian Nights"
in the original
He was demobilized in May, 1921,
his one regret being that the part
he had played in the war had never
given him the opportunity of seeing
the Interim of Germany, but this
lost opportunity he has since made
up for by diligent study. He rame
from England to Canada and has
since been in 'he employ of the
Ca« dian Pacific Railway at Wind-
soi Statim Montreal Now, when
picturesquely gnrhfld strangers from
unk' "wi> land- appeal at the depot,
and general efforts to interpret
thei: 'iiouthlngfl of weir,' sounds are
inert'., hull officials <**nd an S.O.S.
for NuinLwi  Eighteen.
LIVE MARKET FOR CANADA
A live market for Canadian lumber,
cured meats, livestock and other produce is being developed In the orient,
according to Mr. A. Broatedt, oriental
representative of the Canadian National Hallways and Canadian Government Merchant Marine ,who was In
Winnipeg recently on his way back
from conferences In Montreal. China
and Japan are both buying considerably more Canadian produce than
heretofore, Mr. Broatedt stated, and
there Is room for much greot development If Canadian manufactures and
exporters will study the needs of the
oriental market nnd arrange for representation iu the orient by business
men who know those countries.
RECORD OAT YIELD
A yield of 140 bushels per acre ot
oats Is reported from I.loydmlnstrr,
Alberto., The crop was grown by Ft.
S. Hymonds, a farmer ot tbat district
who threshed 1.050 bushels from "Vi
acroH. Ills olhor oots ran 120 buah-
tU par aore. EIGHT
TOE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY:   JANUARY   19.   1024.
COMPLETE CLEARANCE
of all
Coats and Hats
FOR EXTRA SPECIAL PRICES
See Window
Any Hat in the Store for
$2.95
(OATS REDUCED TO THE LOWEST-IT HILL PAY YOU TO
Secure One Now
Local Briefs
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Parnham left
Tueaday morning for Vancouver.
* *   •
Ask for "Flax-o-lene" at Lang's
Drug Store.     See Advt. elsewhere.
.   •   .
A. H. Webb, supervisor of the Nanaimo Schools, was in town on Saturday accompanied by Mr. Murray of
the N.P.9. staff.
* *   *
Some Cumberland people are so
generous they throw pennies around
as if they were live dollar bills.
* *   *
Miss l.oosly has returned from Victoria and has Joined the staff ot Ihe
Cumberland Hospital.
.   .   .
Mr. and Mrs. William Davidson, of
Victoria, and Mrs. James Halloran,
of Nanaimo, spent the week end as
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Oraham.
* *   •
Mrs. Walter Normand of Victoria,
is here on a visit to her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Hughes.
* •   »
Mrs. J. S. Oraham and Miss Jem
Oraham, of Victoria, are spending a
week's vacation here, as the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Oraham.
* •   *
Thomas Oraham, General Supt.
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, left for Victoria and Vancouver on Monday. He ls expected
to return on Saturday.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
OFFICE CAT
TRADE MARK
BY JUNIUS
COMPTON COMPANY
AGAIN SCORE IN
"TBE  HOTTENTOT."
Only a few more shopping months
before bathing suits.
FROM   TWO   TOMBSTONES
John'Smith   lies  here   without  his
shoes,
He  drove  his  car   while   filled   with
booze.
Here's Mary Jane—hut not alive.
She  made her Ford do thirty-live.
A married man doesn't have lo go
into court to have his objections overruled.
Delilah was not such a bad lady
barber. She gave Samson an awful
haircut, but at least she didn't try to
talk blm Into a shampoo, singe, facial
massage and a manicure.
He who runs may read, and she who
walks may powder her nose, and does.
SO SAY IVE
One sign I'd like to see on every mall
box
Throughout these vales aud hills;
A sign  reading something like Ihls:
"Kindly post no bills."
Nothing left to reduce but I ho taxes.
The taxpayers are already reduced.
DEFINITION
Mis-tle-toe. noun. An ever-green
plant hung over-head so men can hnve
an excuse to kiss n Miss.
A friend of ours was making a visit
to a girl who lived In the country, and
they were walking through the fleld
when they noticed n cow and a calf
rubbing noses In bovine love. He
spoke up. "Tho sight of Ihat makes me
want to do the same thing." "(lo
ahead," she replied. "It Is father's
cow."
The Compton Comedy Company
scored another decided hit ln the Hollo Theatre Thursday night when they
presented William Collier's successful
play "The Hottentot," to a crowded
house. If the enthusiasm of the
audience was genuine then there is
no doubt that the company Is gaining in popularity aud will continue
lo play lo capacity houses in Cumber-
laud.
The first scene opened at the home
of the Gilford's where Miss Peggy
Coucher assumed the role of the
hostess in fine style and Sam Harrington (Mr. Compton), who Is mistaken for a famous steeple-chase rider
kepi the audience in roars of laughter. Sam is desperately in love with
Peggy Fairfax (Miss Peggy Dundas),
and although he hated horses, he rode
the 'Hottentot" in the last scene and
romped home a winner in more ways
than one for the race also won
Peggy  for him.
Altogether it was one of the best
and most amusing plays ever staged
in this city and everyone is looking
forward to Thursday. January 31st,
when lhe company will again play
here. On this occasion "Grumpy,"
the famous stage and screen success
will be presented.
LET'S  MAKE  MERRY   (MARY)
Mary wus a little flapper
She didn't do so well!
Hut since Mnry has bobbed her hair.
Now she looks like	
The Dickens!  !  !
One ot the things that make the old-
timers snort, is lu see the Iceman delivering Ice In a snowstorm.
Knocking Is rapidly coming to bo
recognized ns a disreputable occupation instead of a bad habit.
If one is to bellve all one hears,
one will gather that three-fourths of
the men in this country over the age
of 21 bave at one time or nnother been
newspaper men.
Jit:
"Aha," cried our hero, fearlessly.
He then opened the window anil threw
nut his chest.
Almost every lime a witness on the
stand attempts to tell tho truth, some
lawyer objects. Ain't lawyers awful
Immoral.
In the gloaming, oh my darling,
When the llghls are dim and low.
That your face Is powder painted,
How am I. sweetheart to know?
Twice this month I've hnd to bundle
Every coat that I possess
To the cleaners-won't you durling.
Love mo more and powder less?
SHE
In the gloaming, oh my darling,
When the lights arc dim and low,
That   your   cheeks   are   sharp   with
whiskers,
You can bet your boots, I know,
If I powder. I must do lt.
Or olso Buffer great distress;
Buy a razor, won't you darling,
Luther more—I'll powder less.
George Wilkinson, Chief Inspector
of Mines, arrived on Tuesday, on a
tour of inspection of the local mines.
He was accompanied by T. R. Jackson, local inspector.
•   ♦   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Parnham
left for Vancouver on Tuesday and are
expected to return on Saturday.
MR. AND MRS. THOS.
GRAHAM CLEBRATE
SILVER WEDDING
laraiaiag
|
I
The hunting season for game Is E
closed, but will remain open for
colds, coughs aud sore throats
until April. You don't require
a license to carry
FLAX-O-LENE
whlcb ls most effective at close
range.
m
CARD OF THANKS
To the ELECTORS of CUMBERLAND
Ladles and Gentlemen; — ,
I beg to express to you my sincere
thanks and appreciation for the hearty-
support given me in the recent Aldermanlc and School Elections, and
to assure you tliat I will do my utmost in the coming year to justify
your confidence.
Wishing you all a Bright and Prosperous New Year,
I am,
Your obedient servant,
T .MORDY.
CARD OF THANKS
To the ELECTORS ef CUMBERLAND
I take this means of tendering my
sincere thanks lo those who showed
their confidence in me by returning
me at the head of the polls In the recent Aldermanlc Elections and I will
endeavor to serve you to the best of
my ability in tbe coming year.
T. H. MUMFORD.
CARD OF THANKS
To the ELECTORS of CUMBERLAND
Although not elected as School
Trustee, I wish to thank those who
nominated me as a candidate and also those wbo showed faith In me by
giving me the good position in the
polls that  I  received.
JOHN WALTON.
CARD OF 1HANKN
To tbe Ratepayers and Electors of
the City of Cumberland, please accept
my sincere thanks for your able support In the recent Municipal Election
I will serve your Interests honestly
and faithfully and to the best of niv
ability .
A.   E.   JEFFREY.
CARD OF DHANKS
1 take this opportunity of thanking
the Ratepayers and Electors of this
City ln electing me as Alderman for
the second term. Rest assured I
shall study carefully the Interests of
the Municipality that I represent.
Yours sincerely
JOHN LEDINGHAM
CHAIRMAN BOARD OF TRUSTEES
APPRECUTE8  RESULTS  OF
ELECTION
I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude and pleasure at the
confidence of the Ratepayers In reelecting Uie old School Trustees to
office. I assure you, your confidence
will not be misplaced, and the present standard of efficiency will be
maintained.
Ably assisted by Trustee Maxwell,
we  stand  for  progress,    bearing  In
miud the best interest of the Ratepayers, efficiency with economy.
Sincerely yours
ELIZA.   F.   BANKS.
The General Superintendent and
Mrs. Graham entertained a number of
relatives and friends on Friday evening. January 11, at a dinner at lleau-
for House lii celebration of their Silver  wedding anniversary.
Mr. and Mrs. Graham were the
recipients of many beautiful gifts,
among them being a handsome chest
of sliver given by the officials of the
Canadian Colliers (Dunsmuir), Limited, ot Victoria, Ladysmlth, Union
Bay and Cumberland.
They were sealed on a cozy settee
in her parlor. The fire In the grate
was getting low. The room was
nearly dark. All at once the girl
timidly Bald, "Jack, dear, I can't understand why you lavish your affections on me above all the other girls
iu the world. Why is lt? "Hanged
If I know." he replied, "and all ihe
other fellows down at the house say
that they can't make It out either."
THE MAN ON THE LEVEL NEVER
GOES DOWN HILL.
With The
Churches
HOLY TRINITY  ANULICAN
Sunday, January 20, 1924.
Sunday School 2.1)0 p.m.
Evensong 7.30 p.m.
—Rev. W. Leversedge
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday, January 20, 1924.
Morning Service 11 a.m.   Subject—
"The Brand of Ownership."
Sabbath School 11.45 a.m.
Evening Service 7 p.m.   Subject--
'The Divine Proposal."
Everybody welcome.
Rev. J. R. Butler, Pastor.
USED
CARS
*
Real Bargains
$350.00
Chevrolet Touring 1920 Model,
new top, all Cord tires.    In first
class running order.
$325.00
Ford   Touring   1920.      Newly
overhauled, in excellent running
order.
$750.00
Dodge  Coupe   1920  Model,   in
good condition throughout, new
tires, runs like new.
$250.00
Ford Touring 1919 Model.   De
mountable   rims,   good   tires,
shock absorbers, A.l through'
out.
$350.00
Ford Touring 1920 Model. All
good tires, recently overhauled.
A SNAP AT THIS PRICE
$275.00
Beeman Tractor and all attachments, including plows, harrows
etc. This has only been used
for demonstration a short time.
SEVERAL OTHER (IOOD BUYS  IN
USED CARS
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone 61 Phone 61
Week-end
Specials
King Beach Apricot, 4-lb. tin, each  65c.
Sliced Pineapple, 2-lb. tins 35c. 3 for $1.00
Dried Green Peas, 21/2 lbs. for •.  25c.
Small White Beans, 3"/a lbs. for   25c.
Kippered Herrings, 1-lb. tins, 3 tins for  50c.
Tiger Salmon, Red, li-lb. tins, 20c. 2 for  35c.
Tiger Salmon, Red, 1-lb. tins, 35c. 3 for $1.00
Potted Meats, 3 tin's 25c. 2 tins for  25c.
SUNKIST ORANGES
5 DOZEN FOR $1.00
4 DOZEN FOR $1.00 3 DOZEN FOR $1.0«
Sunkist Lemons, large size, doz. 35c. 3 doz. for....$1.00
Florida Grape Fruit, 3 for 25c. 2 for  25c.
FULL STOCK  OF  VEGETABLES  AND  FRUITS   IN  SEASON
HEAD LETTUCE—HOT HOUSE RHUBARB
Beach-Eakins' Plum Jam, 4 lbs  65c.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Auction Sale
I
CUMBERLAND
O. J. Hardy has received Instructions from Mr. A. II. Webb, who
ls leaving, to sell by Auction, at his Residence, 303 Windermere
Avenue, Cumberland
SATURDAY, JANUARY 26
Commencing at - o'clock Prompt
Dwelllng-House, Household Furniture and Effects, Including Oak
Extension Dining Table; Six Oak Dining Chairs, Leather Seats;
Occasional Table; Oak llocker. upholstered in Tapestry; Well
Sprung Couch, upholstered in Tapestry; China Cupboard; Cabinet Vlctrola No. 8; Oak Record Box; Quantity of Records; Oalf
and oilier Plant Stands; Quantity of Framed Water Colors nnd
Prints; Brussels Carpet 9'xl2'; Four large and three small Rugs;
Quantity of Linoleum; 2 Door Mats; Empress Heater No. 20;
Standard Design Dinner Service, aboul fin pieces; Quantity of
China, Crockery, Glass, Etc.; E.P. Cruet; 2 Silver Trays; Lamps;
3 China PlaqueB;; Hammock; 12-Uuagc Shot Oun; Electric Llgl.t
Bulbs; Three-quarter and Single Beds, Springs and Mattresses;
Tall DreBser, with Mirror; Bureau, with .Mirror; Rocker, all in
ivory finish; Quantity of Bedding; 6 pairs of Curtains; K. Table
and Chairs; 6-hole Cook Range, with water front; Kitchen un.l
Cooking Utensils, including Wear-Ever Aluminum Ware;
Quantity of Garden and Carpenter's Tools, Etc. Etc.
Four Strong Hives of Italian Bees, In double Kootenay Hives 11
at the house, 2 at Capt. Carey's, Royston aud I al Mr. Denholm's.
Royston Road), Honey extratctor quite new. All the above
Items are In good condition and practically new.
Also the well-built and pleasautly-sltunted house nnd premises
known as 303 Windermere Avenue, Cumberland. This property
which Is all fenced, comprises convenientS-room house, lilted
with the latest standard electric light equipment; large garage;
wood shed and garden; all ln excellent order and condition
and can be strongly recommended as a sound Investment.
TERMS STRICTLY CASH. On the Real Estate terms will be
given at time of sale. Further particulars may be bad from
the Auctioneer.
G. J. HARDY
TELEPHONE III
COURTENAY
A Courtenay man adds bromo sell,
zer to bis home brew to take care of
Uie "hangover." Why not put ln also
the embalming fluid, the crematory's
Friend I hear your boy devotes n
great deal of Ills time at thc university of Ma Jong.
Mother-I'm so glad he has taken
telephone number and the key lo a ] to an old lad...     I  was afraid he'd
mausoleum locker?
j fall for somo flapper.

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