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The Cumberland Islander Jan 20, 1923

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Array AND ISLANDER '"
With which la consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR—No. 3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH   COLUMB1 A, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLL ARS PER ANNUM.
CUMBERLAND LITERARY
AND ATHLETIC CLUB
FORGING AHEAD
Board of Management, Literary and
Keei-mtloi: (ommttteem Start
1048 With a Bang.     .
When the Board ot Management of
the Cumberland I Iterary and Athletic
Club Bald they v. ore going to make
1923 a banner >*ar, it woe not Just
talk. They meo..i It. They are now
busy doing It.
On Monday, January 16th, the Board
of Management held a meeting with a
good attendance. President A. J. Taylor, presiding, and Messrs. E. D. Pickard, J. W. Tremlltt, H. L. Bates, H.
Walker, R. C. Walker, D. Stewart, Sr.,
A. J. Thompson and W. Walker, also
being preeent.
Billiard Room Improvements.
The Ilrst thing the Board decided
on In the way of Improvements was
to Improve the equipment of the billiard room to the extent of a set of
new ivory balls and a dozen new cues.
The other set is now being used and
when the second set arrives this will
permit billiard balls being used on
both tables. The tables will be leveled up, too. At present they are not
quite true, but when the Board ot
Management ts finished with them ttiey
will be quite level.
Order 68 Publications.
The Literary Committee has been
on the Job and Its report with a recommendation to rtock the reading
room with 58 publications waa accepted. The list Includes 37 periodical magazines, in engineering and
scientific magazines and 11 dally and
weekly papers. These magazines Include the best literature obtainable.
The Literary Committee has one of
the University of B.C. Extension
Course lectureB In the near future for
the members. At tie time of writing
Saturday January 27th is the date set,
although there Is a possibility of the
date changing, reference will be
made to this event elsewhere ln these
columns. Lost winter these lectures
were greatly appreciated by the club'B
members.
The Library !» receiving lota of patrons ln these days of long evenings
Those Interested In this. department
will be pleaeed to learn that there la
a consignment of bookB due here sometime next week.
The gymnasium at night Is becoming quite a resort for the members ol
the club. In the last two weeks there
has been always a big number on hand
to watch the boxers of the club, who
participated In tho Courtenay tournament last Tuesday. It is the Intention
of the Recreation Committee to conduct a boxing meottng sometime In the
latter part of February. Boxing has
taken large strides this winter and
the local boys who have beon working
out at nights arc anxious to perform
under the auspices of the local club.
Orchestral Society
Concert Sunday
The Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society will hold a sacred concert
ln the Ilo-llo Theatre Sunday, January 21st, at 8:30 p.m. Mr. A. J. Merry,
the conductor, Is putting forth his best
efforts to make this concert even a
greater success than the previous concerts of the Bociety.
Several artists who have not been
heard at the previous entertainments
>,iu assist Sunday evening to help
make this concert the best yet. The
programme has been arranged so that
everyone can take part. There aro
Bevernl community hymns that everyone knows, aand they are also printed
on the programmes, bo It givea overy-
one a chance to do their bit by taking
pert In these hymns.
This organization Ib noted for Its
punctuality In starting the programme
and those who wish to hear it all
would be well advised to go early.
SCOTCH NICHT
NO FAR AWA'
Excellent Programme Slated for January 25th.
Remember the date a' you Scotch
folkB. Keep January 25th open. Get
the balms awa' to bed early and come
along and listen to the bonnle Scotch
songB we used to hear in the lend o'
the heather. And it's no ower muckle
siller, only twa shillings.
The .ScottlBh concert being arranged to be held In the St. Oeorge's Presbyterian Church, under the ausplceB
of the Ladles' Aid Society, of that
church, on the evening ot January 26,
Is going to be a concert well worth
attending.
Preparations are being made to
make this anniversary of Bobble
Burns, the renowned Scottish bard,
the very best yet.
Excellent Programme
The artists who have been arranged
to assist In the entertainment, are
among the vest best that can be procured in the district. One will not
have to be Scotch to enjoy this programme, for the beBt Blngers will be
heard and the best entertainment of
this nature that Is possible to present.
The chairman for the evening will
be Dr. George K. McNnughtou. There
Is every Indication that there will be
many present and everyone wishing a
good seat should get there early.
1923 Council Holds The
First Regular Meeting
Appointment of City Clerk Causes Lively Session — Several
Applications Under Consideration—Mayor Parnham Says
"Go Slow" During 1923—AH. Maxwell for Reduced Taxes.
The 1923 Mayor and Council recently elected by acclamation, were all
sworn In by Returning Otllcer Mordy,
at the Council Chambers on Monday
evening.
Communications from the local G.
W. V. A. and applications from A. J.
Fouracre end T. T. W. Cuslnnce tor
(lie position of City Clerk, were laid on
the table. Accounts were passed as
usual.
Mayor Parnham extended a cordial
welcome to all the Aldermen, and said
he thought It necessary to move slow
In face ot the Idle time and depression
in the coal trade, and requested the
finance committee to prepare on estimate for 1923.
Aid. Maxwell was In favor of economy and reduction of taxation. Aid.
Partridge was thankful that 1922 had
left them a substantial balance in the
bank.
Aid. J. J. Potter spoke on civic affairs and did not see that the Council
could  Introduce any more economy.
; The rest of the aldermen in a  few
brief remarks all promised to do their
'oeBt for the home town.
Applications (or City Clerk ratno up
■ for consideration.   Aid. Potter immediately moved that A. J. Fouracre be
' appointed City Clerk.   This was sec-
1 oaded hy Aid. Dallos.    Aid.  I.eding-
I ham   made  an  amendment  that   the
matter lie laid over for a week.   Aid.
; Maxwell was not In favor of rallrood-
i lug and waB anxious to give the matter
'. a little consideration.   Aid. Partridge
was in favor of calltng for applications.
City Clerk -.Mordy waa dually appointed, pro tem, pending the Council's
decision.
It was suggested that the Council
i and Police Commissioners hold a joint
I meeting to consider the appointment
of the Chief of Police to the position
; of City Clerk In addition to Police
i Officer.
Cumberland Piles Up Big Score, 8-0
North Wellington Never Quit Trying
In Second Round of R-K
Clip Game.
PYTHIAN   SISTERS' SOCIAL
SCHOOL TRUSTEES*
FIRST MEETING
Pull Attendance at Organisation Mating-Rain- in Salaries.
The Ilrst meeting of the School
Board was held ln the school last Friday. The new members, F. Partridge
and J. C. Potter both new faces on the
board, and also A. McKlnnon, were
sworn In previous to taking their seaU
as School Trustees. Mrs. T. E. Banks
occupied tbe chair.
The 1922 annual report was discussed with the new members of the board
who as yet are not quite familiar wit)
the ropes. Previous to the next meeting the new members will have a look
around the school and make them,
selves familiar with their new duties
Daring the meeting the question ol
salaries was discussed. The leinoh
teachers were given a (50 raise pei
year, which amounts to (5 per month
for the ten working months. The maximum salary for the lady teachers was
set at |1,200 per annum. In the pasl
the rule for the minimum has beeu
$900 per annum.
The meetings will be held on tht
fourth Tuesday of every month.
W. H. O. CLUB
SOCIAL TUESDAY
The young ladles of the W. H. O.
Club are holding a social evening op
Tueaday, January 23. The evening
will be spent playing games and singing songs, and will terminate with
light refreshments. All those young
ladles who are nt all Interested ln the
activities of tho club are given a cordial Invitation to attend. The social
will be held In the Methodist Church,
and commences at 7:30 p.m.
The Pythian Sisters held a very successful whist drive and social Wednes--
day last. After the whist refreshments were served and games were
Indulged In. The whlBt winners:
Ladles first, Mrs. C .Whyte,; consolation, Mrs. Robert Walker and Miss A.
Haywood. Gentlemen's first, Mr. Robert Walker.
Mr. A. McKlnnon went to Nanaimo
on business Thursday, returning the
following day.
LADIES' AUXILIARY
HOLDS SOCIAL AND DANCE
The LadieB' Auxiliary to the G. W.
V. A. scored another success last Saturday night when they held a well-
attended successful social and dance.
The dance was under the ausplceB of
the Ladles' Auxiliary to the G. W. V
A., and over 200 Invitations were Issued.
The first half of the programme was
of a social nature. Mrs. A. Bird, PreB
Ident of the ladles' organization, gave
a few words of welcome to those pres
ent. ThlB was followed by a few remarks by the President of the local
branch of the G. W. V. A„ Mr. John
('.. Brown, who explained the objects
ot the two organizations. Miss Connie
Bird entertained with a piano solo and
waB followed by Mr. Gasket, who sang
Mr. Harry Jackson was the next entertainer, whs as usual delighted his
audience to the extent of an encore
Miss Bird again entertained with a
piano solo, the social programme being completed with a solo by .Mrs.
McAdam, who was accompanied on the
piano by Mrs. W. Hudson. Then followed refreshments, which were a
credit to the ladles.
Dancing followed till midnight, and
the evening was voted the beat yet
under the uuspiccsof this enterprising
ladles' organization.
ThlB was the first ot what Is proposed to be an annual social and
dance. One thing Is certain, those
who are Interested ln the ladles' organization will certainly look forward
to the second annual social and dance.
In the second round of the Drack-
man-Ker Cup Cumberland took the
second step towards winning it, by
defeating the North Wellington soccer
eleven. The game was played Sunday
afternoon on the Recreation grounds
on a very slow Held. The Wellington
boys, who are a second division team,
fought gamely to the last, although
it was evident they had not the skill
and science to compete with a team
of the calibre ot Cumberland.
Tbe entire Cumberland line-up, of
course, played well. Wilson made one
brilliant save in the first half, when
the visitors seemed certain of a goal.
Stewart did some good work on the
defence. Tho half-backs were good
and the whole forward rank simply
had no great opposition to break
through. The crossing of both wings
was exceptionally good.
Sammy Starts It
The first goal was registered
through a corner kick. The ball was
placed nicely, it volleyed to and fro iu
the goal mouth and Sammy Gough
punted It into the net about 20 minutes after play commenced.
Goal number two was bagged by
Charlie Hitchens. The custodian saved and knocked the ball out whence
it was passed to Hitchens who put it
where it belong, as far as Cumberland
was concerned.
During the first have the ball war.
kicked Into Wilson's open arms, when
it looked like a gift shot.   The score
stood 2-0 at the interval.
The Second Half
When the game was resumed the
locals again commenced the offensive.
Tucker James missed a nice chance
and Charlie Hitchens grazed the upper
side of the top bar, and was rewarded
a little later when he bent Thompson
completely.
Danny Bannerman then came nearly
breaking Into the scoring column after
a line run. Tucker James registered
another. The goalie was a little lax
In getting it out o( the way, Tucker
putting it through liis legs. The goal
rampage still continued. Andy Home
crossed ii to Samuel (lough who again
scored. It was a nii-ely placed kick,
Gough having to reach, for the
ball. Home waa the next to tally. On
a pass from Sammy Gougli. passed ou-.
to Andy, who hit the far post of the
goal, the ball rebounding into the net.
Tucker James then followed in the
procession on n cross from Home, he
ran right into the net with the hall.
Then They Quit
The last goal was registered by
Tucker James, which v.-aa his third ot
the match, scoring on a pass from
Hitchens. Sakl Coin! took a pot at
the goal mouth a few minutes later,
from away out. It bounced and looked
as IE it was going to sail over the goal-
tender's head for another tally.
The North' Wellington lads never
quit fighting and were pressing with
a corner at the last.   .
Th*elr forwards, It was evident, were
weak In shooting, for on one occasion
during the last half they should certainly have scored. In the first half
on another occasion, the visitors hac:
tough luck In not registering, when
Wilson saved brilliantly, and aftei
clearing one of their forwards headed
the ball out of play.
The North Wellington lads deserve
credit for keeping their fixture here,
and playing the game, although they
realized the chances were slim. J
Biggs and T. Zaccarelli did the best
work of the visitors.   The teams;
Cumberland — Wilson, Stewart
Campbell, Brewster, Conti, Mortimer
Bannerman, Gough. James. Hitchens
and Home.
North Wellington — Thompson
Davis, Hindmarsh, Louden, T. Znccar-
clll. Sloger, T. Briggs, Trew, G. Zaccarelli, J. Biggs and Jensen.
Referee—A. S. Jones.
BURGLARY IN THE CITY
The necesBlty of suitable police protection of the City nt night Is ugaln
brought under notice by a burglary
that occurred at Uie Vendome restaurant between the hours of midnight
on 'Wednesday, and 7 a.m., on Thursday last. Unfortunately a report wns
not made to the police until late on
Thursday night, but the occurrence
was at once Investigated, and It was
found that entrance to the kitchen was
effected through a side window, which
was unfastened,.and Ihe thieves then
obtained access to the pantry, which
was padlocked—by drawing the staple
of the lock—and £ considerable quantity of goods, chiefly provisions, were
stolen.
Investigation shows the stolen property wub removed by way of the back
alley, and, from Information received
the police expect to make an arrest
shortly. Goods to the value of $45
were stolen, end Include 1 ladles' fawn
colored coat, 1 Gillette safety razor In
case, 1 bread knife, 9 boxes of cigars,
5 lbs. tea, 3 lbs. coffee, 3 bags macaroni, 1 bag sugar, 1 sack oatmeal, 5
tins tomatoes, 4 tins peas, 2 boxes
soap, 4 large bottles preserves, 5 dozen eggs, 1 bottle sauerkraut, packages
of salt, raisins, prunes, towels, etc.
OFFICERS INSTALLED
BY THE  MACCABEES
At the regular meeting last Thursday evening the officers of Cumber-
lend Review, No. 17, Women's Mcnelll
Association of the Maccabees, were
Installed for the ensuing term by Installing Officer Grace McNeil, assisted
by Mary Hudson, as Mistress of Ceremonies, and Kllu Miller, Chaplain,
After the meeting refreshments were
served nnd a social time was spent
which was enjoyed by all, This is ono
of the strongest women's benefit organizations on tiie continent, lly advantages are not limited to benefits
being of a social nature as well, The
local review meetings on the second
and fourth Thursdays of each month
Those who are desirous of information
can have It by Inquiring to any of tho
officers of the lodge.
The following ladles will hold office
during the coming term: Commander,
Lena Francescini; Lieutenant Commander, Hanna Watson; Past Commander, Mary Clark; Record Keeper.
Annie Davis; Collector pro tem. Jessie
Gray; Chaplain, Jennie Maxwell!
Lady-at-arms, Margaret Graham; Sergeant, Annie Whltehouse; Sentinel,
Ada Davis; Ticket, Mary Devoy; Musician, Mary Hudson; Captain of Guard,
Parent-Teacher's
Ass'n. Meeting
The regular monthly meeting of the
Parent-Teacher Association was hold
In the school on Monday evening last,
with the President, Mr. Colin Camp-
hell, in the chair. A large attendance
of parents, teachers and others Interested in the work of the school were
present. A special welcome was made
to Mr. and Mrs. Aps and Mr. Murray.
Mr. Kyle, Superintendent of Technical
Fdueatlonan, who was to have addressed the meeting wired the Secretary on Monday afternoon regretting
liis inability to attend, at which general disappointment was felt. The
meeting was opened hy the reading ot
tlle last mlnuteB whicli were adopted
One of the chief features of the
evening was the report of the Manual
Training and Domestic Science Committee, which Is composed of Mr
Leversedge, Mrs. George Richardson
and Mr. John Sutherland. Mr. Leversedge had gone to considerable trouble
getting all the information possibk
from the various centres where manual training and domestic science art
taught, as well as from the Superintendent of Education. The relntivi
cost expected, from the locality, am.
that provided by the Superintendent
of Education, for the furthering of
theflo subjects wns discussed in thorough detail. Mr. Leversedge, we understand, plans to prepare a paper on
this important subject In the near future. One of the chief difficulties of
this locality Is that there Is no suitable place where manual training
could he taught, as In the school
building there is no spare room. In
discussing this, it was unanimously
decided that the present committee
should continue to act ill procuring
information relative to either erecting
a new building or making room In the
present one.
Various other committees reported
on the work done. Mrs. Hood and
Mrs. Leversedge, who were appointed
visiting committee to the school for
the month, reported very favorably in
praise of the work being done, and the
splendid manner In which it was being
carried on.
The President, Mr. Campbell, and
Mr. John Sutherland, who were appointed some time ago to visit the
schools, also spoke very favorably of
the progress being made. Mrs. McKlnnon and Mrs. Bryan were appointed visiting committee for the mouth
of January.
A committee was formed for the
purpose of arranging to have -Mr. Sovereign, of Vancouver, here If possible,
for tlle next meeting.
Mr. Stubbs, Principal of the Courtenay School, was present, and said he
felt sure that the teachers and the
School Board of both Courtenay nnd
Comox schools would lend them every
assistance, and ill the case of manual
training and domestic science, one
teacher could be used Jointly for Cumberland and Courtenay.
It was moved and seconded tha* tho
meeting adjourn.
FOSTER GETS DRAW
WITH BOLTON  IN
SIX-ROUND BOUT
Kingsbury and Monks Also Good —
Other Bouts Inder Auspices of
Courtenay Athletic Assn.
CAMPBELL BROS. ARE
STAGING  BIG  SALE
Prominent Local Dealers In Middle of
Klg Stock.taking Sale.
Messrs. Campbell Bros., the big local
drygoods and grocery dealers, are
just getting started in a big Januarj
stocktaking sale, Everything in till
store, with the exception of groceries
hns been reduced to bargain prices.
Drygoods, men's and boys' shoes, havo
all been greatly reduced, and In many
cases to below nctual cost. There U
a special lot of travellers' samples ii
boys' sweater coats, which is one ol
the speclul features of the sale. Tht
present sale is one of the largest thai
has been offered to the buying puhllt
of Cumberland for sonic time, and
there seems every indication, judging? by the volume of business in tin
last few days, that the public reallzi
this.
The prlcea nre genuine reductions
which can he easily recognized by
those familiar with them, and are recorded in detail elsewhere In these
columns.
WHO ARE THEY?
Printed Invitations have been Issued
by a new club In town for a dunce being held in the Anglican Church Hall
Wednesday. January 24. They spor:
themselves under the name of the On-
wego Club.
Susan Covert; Color-bcnrer No. 1
Martha Coe; Color-bearer No. 2, Jane
Walker; Ensign No. 1, Jennie Ronald;
Ensign No. 2, Llla Potter.
The Courtenay Athletic Association
conducted a most successful series of
boxing bouts In the Gaiety Theatre,
Courtenay, on Tuesday, January 16.
The main event proved a well
matched battle. Foster, of Cumberland,
securing u draw with Bolton, ot Courtonay, iu six . fast rounds. Foster
fought one of his best fights, and
there wore many who thought that he
was no match for Ills stocky little
opponent Jack went all the way
witli Bolton, and It seems as It this
man has been over-rated.
Other Interesting Bouts
There were seven other fast bouts,
every one full of pep. With the exception of the Wclr-Ewart affair,
which wus a bit lopsided, they were
all full of ginger. This Al. Kingsbury,
of Cumberland, mixed a fast three
rounds with A. Monks, of *'.nto, In a
tout that proved almost ai attractive
is the headllner. Neither o these men
.ire novices in the manly art, and sure
made an Impression on the crowd.
Lcs. Moody, of Courtenay, made a
great hit with the crowd in his bout
with Larrigan, of Cumberland, and
was given a great ovation trom the
crowd, with whom he seemed Immensely popular. The two paperweights, Smart and McNeil, both
young lads, gave a nice demonstration
of what can be learned with a little
coaching.
Johnston vs. Boffy
Johnston (123 lbs.), of Union Bay,
clashed with Boffy (130 lbs.), of Cumberland, iu the curtain raiser. Johnston started out In the aggressive.
Bofl'y warded blm off and ln the second round they both cut things up.
The Bay lad lost his wind and Boffy
punished him till he was groggy In the
third and lost round.   BotTy's light.
Monks Mlnto (155 lbs.), and Kings-
hurry (1C5 lbs.), Cumberland, bumped
Into one another In the next fight.
Monks started out in the aggressive,
but the colored boy covered up well.
Monks did the most of tho leading. He
gave a great exhibition in ducking
and avoiding KIngsburry's slugging
haymakers, probably a dozen times in
the bout. Both took and gave lots of
deadly punches In a fast bout and a
draw would have been a better decision.   Monks' fight.
Kids Show Class
Ed. Ewart (135 lbs.) put it over J.
Weir (135 lbs.) via the land of slumber route. Weir was game and aggressive and picked an argument with
Ewart all the time he was on his feet.
In the second round Weir was groggy
and the third he was winded and groggy and a clout sent him to the floor
(or a goal.   Ewart's fight.
JoneB (135 lbs.), Cumberland, connected with Thompson (140 lbs.), Bevan, ln the next preliminary scrap.
Jones knew more about fighting and
did the leading. The Bevan boy was
a little shy at first but got better as
.he fight progressed. He was fost on
liis feet, and came back great ln the
hist round.   A draw.
The Main Event.
Ilolton rushed his man all the way.
lie chased him to the ropes in the first
round and uppcrcut his way for a goal
but Foster got away. Foster had an
advantage In height and reach, which
lie used to keep out of Bolton's way
in the first couple of rounds.
That I'ppercnt
lu the third Ilolton rushed Foster
to the ropes and tried to get his upper-
cut In the right place. Foster slugged
;its way out and Inter both were check-
oil by Referee Jackson for hitting low.
COMOX MINE, NO. 5,
HAS CLOSED DOWN
Coniox Mine. No. 5, of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, ceaaed
operations on Saturday last. This
mine gave employment to over three
hundred men, and produced over a
thousand tons of coal per day.
We understand the reason given for
the closing down of this mine is tho
depression in the coal trade, caused
hy the tremendous Importation ot
foreign fuel oil.
It seems as though the Government
is willing to allow our coal miners to
go hungry while our good Canadian
dollars are going out of the country
for fuel oil.
The question asked today by every
coal miner is, when will the Federal
authorities give the coal Industry the
needed protection by placing an additional Import duty on fuel oil? TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
Watch   this   space   next   week   for   notice   of   our   Big   Sale
C. KENT & CO., Courtenay
DRYGOODS
TAILORS
FOOTWEAR
TOILET SUPPLIES
^£
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
SHE SAID GOOD NIGHT
Did you ever stand by al an actual
leave-taking otter an evening session of one of Cumberland's select
little card clubs?
"Well, good nighl, Mrs. A. Had a
charming time,   Good night."
"Good night. Come again. Good
night. Got everything? Well, good
night."
"Good n;ght. Romember, at my
house next Tuesday.   Good night."
"Yes, next Tuesday. Isn't this your j
umbrella?   Well, good night."
"No, I didn't bring any. Good night."
"Good night. We've enjoyed ourselves so much.   Good night."
"Good night."
"Good night."
And all the evening, while those
women shuffled, cut and dealt, bookcases filled with the great thoughts of
the masters of literature frowned In
dumb protest.
field, although it seems doubtful if
if there was not a knock-on in executing this play. Illght through they
we-nt (or a culminating effort In a try.
Iioing made by "Aussie" Wallace.
Jackson, from right in front of the
sticks, sent it sailing over for a convert.
Nearly Another Try
The Hornets pushed off towards
their objective again, only to be chased
back to their own defence. It looked
as If Cumberland had scored another
try, but linesman Torn Scott said the
ball went out of touch and made the
Tigers throw in. The Tigers could
noe get through and the game ended
without further event.   The teams:
Nanaimo Hornets—T. Edmunds, E.
Edmunds, W. Hammond, I). M. Grant,
W. Davis, .1. Smith, 1. Dykes, A. Kirk-
bride. II. Todd, J. C. Timlin. H. Thompson and Dobbs.
Cumberland Tigers—J. Hatch, M.
Graham, A. Xunns, H. Jackson, E.
King, Elliot, T. Jackson, J. Quin, W.
Prior, Watson, C. Finch, J. Tremlett,
T. Graham, Wallace. Preston Bruce
officiated as referee for the game.
TKJERS DEVOUR THE
HORNETS 5-0 IN
RUGGER BATTLE:
Weakened Tenuis Vet Evenly Matched'
I'lii.v (lose Game.
tin Sunday afternoon at 1 p.m., on
Uie "Y" field, the Cumberland1 Tigers
won a closely contested rugby game
from the Nanaimo Hornets. The visi-
lors brought up n weakened team,!
landing here wilh but 12 players. The]
Tigers were also In a bad way, not j
having tlielr regular lineup. Cumberland made the only score of the
game, a try and a convert.
When tin- whistle blew for the commencement of play Xanaimo had only
12 men, so Joe Dallos played for the)
Hornets   lo  even   things  up  a  little.
This still gave the home team the advantage of a man.   As a result of the
soccer game, which was scheduled to
commence at 2:30. the Tigers were
without   the   services   of   Mortimer,
Gougli. James and    Bannerman,    all'
regulars on the lineup.   The Hornets
were short Mines and several of their j
regular  lineup.    Under  the  circumstances the tennis were very evenly
matched,
Griilinuis Show l'p Well
Harry Jackson did some outstanding work for the home fifteen, whicli
was duplicated by Messrs. Nunns.
Wallace and Hatch. The young Mori
and Tom Graham showed trp wonderfully well for tiie Tigers. They showed
a clear understanding of the game
and were fully capable of holding their
own witli the* other players much tlielr
senior.
The piny opened with a rush from
Nannlmo, tlielr forwards weaving their
way toward the try line, when ynung
Tom Graham pounced on a burly forward nnd killed what looked like a
certain score. The Hornets continued
to hum around the Tigers' end for n
little while, till they wero forced to
defend their own territory. Cumberland pushed their way right against
tho honoymakers' 5-yard line. The
locals hud not the weight to make it
good, and were chased away.
The second half commenced witli
tiie honey crew on the aggressive. The
Hornets gained the better of a punting duel, and the Tigers were drlvetl
against the walls of their den. It wns
a tough battle. The Hornet forwards
swarmed the try line but did not score.
Jack Hatch stopped a Hornet on the
verge of breaking through, and Allan
Nunns cleared the mess up when he
dribbled almost Into nildfiehl.
The Tigers crossed the field and
from touch started n fine forward
movement  towards the centre of the
THE ST. GEORGE'S
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HAS SUCCESSFUL YEAR
The St. George's Presbyterian
Church held their annual meeting on
Tuesday last. The various Teports
were read, showing tliat a most successful year and all the financial
statemonts ended on the right side of
the ledger. One of the features in the
Improvements affected throughout the
year is the attention given to the basement of the church, which is now a
most pleasant meeting place.
The organ committee gave a very
favorable report and stated that a new
organ lias been purchased and will be
installed at an early date.
Mr. Charles Parnham was given a
hearty vote of thanks for the faithful
and efficient manner in which he has
acted in the capacity of organist and
choirmaster throughout the year.
Air. L. It. Stevens presided over the
meeting and Mr. R. McLean acted as
Secretary.
FIRST AID DANCE
THIS SATURDAY
The Si. John's Ambulance Association, of Cumberland, will be the hosts
again at a whist drive and dance In the
G. W. V. A. Hull this Saturday. Proceedings will commence sharp at 8
p.m. The ladies are requested to bring
refreshments. All those who are Interested in the work are invited to
attend.
BAIL   FORFEITED
OIlu Swanson wns arrested at
Union Bay by Constable T. Regan, of
tiie Provincial Police, on January Uth,
charged with being drunk. Swanson
fulled to appear before Magistrate
Balrd on January 15th nnd forfeited
Ills ball.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
Eyesight & Hearing
roatored by Chiropractic. See me at
('lurk's residence, near Union Hall.
Hours from 4 to fi o'clock, daily, except Sundays,
E. 0. Haukedal
Ilnetor of Chiropractic.
IN THE MATTER OF  1MIE "IKIltT-
OAGES  STATl'TOKY   FORM  ACT,"
R.H.B.C, CHAPTER 107, 1911.
AND IN THE MATTER of that, certain Indenture of Mortgage dated
April 30th, 1915, made between Ismay
naniel, as Mortgagor, and John K.
Urquhart, as Mortgagee, and being a
mortgage upon Lot 1 of Section 30.
Map 1532. Comox District, British Columbia.
I, the undersigned, JOHN K.
UHQUHAHT, hereby require you on
or before the 31st day of March,, A.D.
1923, to pay off the principal money
and interest secured by tliat certain
Indenture of Mortgage dated April
30th, 1915, made between Ismay Daniel
as Mortgagor, and the undersigned.
John K. Urquhart as Mortgagee, to
secure repayment of $1,200.00, on the
6th day of August, 1910. and Interest
therein mentioned, and which said Indenture of Mortgage is a mortgage
upon that certain parcel of land and
premises situate in Coniox District in
the Province o( Uritisli Columbia
known and described as Lot 1. of a
subdivision of Section 30, according tu
Map or Plan thereof, numbered 1532.
and is registered in the Land Registry
Office at the City of Victoria in said
Province.
AND I hereby give notice that the
amount due on the said Mortgage for
principal, interest, taxes and costs
respectively, is as fallows, that la to
say:
To Principal     $1,200.00
To Taxes by Mortgagee for
years 1915 to 1920, inclusive          125.(17
To Interest on said $1,200.00
at 8'/r from and Including
June 6, 1915, to and Including January 1. 1923 ..'       736.00
$2,061,117
('mill
191D—
June 30, Credit    $     S.oo
July 28, Credit      ,      8.00
July 25. Credit   10.00
November 25, Credit   20.00
1916—
February 5, Credit   16.00
April 20, Credit   -10.00
December 26. Credit   16.00
1917—
December 22, Credit   48.00
1918—
April 2, Credit   50.00
July 14, Credit   50.00
1920—
April 8, Credit          109.50
1921—
June 18, Credit   53.40
1922—
April 21. Credit   18.00
$475.90
Balance due, $1,585.77.
AND THAT unless the aforesaid
principal money, Interest and taxes
hereinbefore set out and contained
are paid on or before the said 31st day
of March, 1923, 1 shall enter nn and
sell the property comprised in the said
Mortgage under and by virtue of the
power of sale contained therein.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
thut payment of said principal, interest and tnxeB may be made lo the undersigned personally or may he made
to Mr. P. P. Harrison, Barrister and
Solicitor, at bis office, situate in the
Wlllard Block, Third Street. City of
Cumberland, British Columbia, Solicitor for the undersigned herein, who Is
hereby authorized to receive and accept said principal money. Interest
and taxes, and to give a good, valid
and effectual receipt, discharge and
release in respect thereof.
DATED this 19th day of January,
1923.
JOHN K, URQUHART,
Of the City of Courlenay, British Columbia, the within named Mortgagee.
To—Ismay Daniel, the wlthin-named
Mortgagor, and to all other whom it
may concern.
I.O.O.F.  MAN COMING
Grnnd Master Phillips, of the I. O.
O. F. Ib paying an official visit to the
local lodge on Friday, January 2G.
All brethren are asked to make a special point of attending, After the
meeting the evening will be spent In
a social with Rebeccas assisting In
this part of the programme.
2E
January Stocktaking Clearance
Sale
Commences Thursday, January the
Eighteenth, and Continues for One
Week Only.
Big Reductions in All Departments.
Special Lines at Less Than Manufacturer's Prices.
For Further Particulars and Prices
See Page 8
NOTICE
I am purchasing a fine registered
Jersey Bull in the near future, and
will l>o glad if my old customers will
make use of liis services, Fees same
us form or ly.
Will announce his arrival later.
H. WADDELL.
1±;
tmQtJX.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
«09 B.C. Permanent loan Hldg
I'llONK •.'HIS     VICTORIA, IM.
ROYSTON COMMUNITY CLUB
The Royston Community Club held
a well-attended meeting Wednesday,
January 17. Mr. P, J. Dalby occupying
the chair. On Friday, January 2C, a
dance will be held for the members of
the club who may bring a friend, and
on February 2nd, the Club will hold a
dance that will lie open to the public.
BATTERY
SERVICE
Have your Batteries attended to before the fine
days come.
We sell all types of WILLARD BATTERIES. We
repair all makes of BATTERIES. We charge BAT-
TEKIES for ONE DOLLAR.
We sell and repair Batteries for the same price as
charged throughout British Columbia.
FREE DISTILLED
WATER
FREE
TESTING
Cumberland Motor Works
.1. H. CAMERON, Proprietor.
Phone 77
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
M
Corporation of- the City of Cumberland
AUDITOR'S REPORT AND
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Cumberland, B.C., January t, IMS.
To the Mayor and Aldermen,
Corporation ot the City ot Cumberland, B.C.
Sirs:—
I beg to report that 1 havo examined lully the various
books and accounts of the Corporation of the City of Cumberland, B.C., end of the Board ot School Trustees, tor
the year ending December 31st, 1922, Including the Tex
Roll, "Better Housing" Accounts, and the following
attached statements:
(1) Receipts and Disbursements.
(2) Assets and Liabilities.
(3) Statement of "Better Housing" Account.
(4) Balance Sheet
(5) Statements of Receipts and Expndttures ot School
Board, In accordance with Municipal Act, Sec. 379 (2), I
hereby certify that:
(a) I have received all the Information and explanations required.
(b) In my opinion the Balance Sheet referred to
above Is properly drawn up so as to exhibit truly and
correctly the state of the affairs of the Corporation
according to the best of my Information and the explanations given to me and as Bhown by the books of
the Corporation,
(c) The books, documents and accounts are properly vouched and ln accordance with law.
(d) That subject to the following reservations the
several forms ot account kept by the officials of the
municipality are appropriate.
(1) The books of the Corporation show cash
receipts and disbursements only. Revenue and
expenditure accounts should be kept both for the
City and School Board.
(2) Proper rolls should be compiled for Poll
Tax and for Trades Licenses.
(3) Receipts for Dog Taxes and Night Watchman collections should be Issued by the City Clerk
Instead of by the Chief of Police as at present.
Permit me to draw your attention to the fact that of
the net amount collected from Poll Taxes during the year,
viz., $5,417.00, the hoBpttal has received $944.69, but the
School Board has received none.
The net school taxes collected during the year were
$8,866.16.
The amount paid the School Board was $8,313.30.
Balance due School Board, $662.86.
I have the honor to be, gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
RECEIPTS
Trades Licenses  $ 1,400.00
Road Tax         74.00
Soldiers' Houses         66.66
Fines         421.65
Poll Tax     6,486.00
Police Refunds         68.45
Watchman's Collections        701.60
Street Account  2,167.67
Sales Account        102.71
Dog Taxes         49.00
Hauling         81.00
Loan  !    6,000.00
Liquor Profits     2,786.60
Pound Fees         16.70
Scales Fees   .85
Auto Tax       630.36
Race Money       604.08
Scavenging   S.26
Interest, Exchange and Discount  1.45
 $21,439.72
TAXES—
City, 1922  $ 4,821.99
City, 1921        167.80
City, 1921, Interest   7.99
City, 1920        144.08
Schools, 1920 (Inside)       1S7.6I
City, 1920, Interest   6.65
    6,147.41
Schools, 1922 (Inside)  $ 4,583.16
Schools, 1921 (inside)       158.21
Schools (Inside), Interest  7.58
Schools, 1920 (Inside), Interest   5.31
    4,892.14
Schools, 1922 (outside)  $ 3,954.63
Schools, 1921 (outside)         15.00
Schools, 1920 (outside)         62.04
    4,031.67
Government Grant  $19,(52.06
Transportation Grant        120.00
 19,772.05
Other Receipts         50.00
$55,332.19
EXPENDITURES
Audit   $      85.00
Advertising          196.37
Printing         265.65
Donations         11.00
Fire Department        730.27
Light Account-
Current  $    510.43
Repairs          06.13
 606.16
Water         32.70
Office Account-
Salary   $    720.00
Supplies       105.15
Sundries          84.60
       910.76
Election           30.00
Legal        467.47
Police Department—Salary ..$ 1,210.00
Light and Fuel         57.18
Sundries         207.98
Watchman      960.00
    2,435.16
Sidewalks Account-
Labor  $     90.45
Supplies          262.08
Street Account—Labor      3,014.70
Supplies       2.043.21
    5,057.91
SowerB—
Labor  $    409.66
Supplies          128.42
      638.07
Health Department-
Isolation Hospital  $    324.06
Scavenging         674.41
Gneral Hospital     1,319.79
  2,318.26
Telephone   84.10
Stable Account-
Feed  $    308.92
Repairs        139.55
  448.47
City Buildings   89.25
Dog Tags   3.18
Memorial  Arch    7.37
Workmen's Compensation Board   96.86
Loan Account   6,140.60
Poll Tax   1,068.00
Interest, Exchange and Discount  14.35
Civic Salaries   384.00
Soldiers' Houses    288.00
Refund of Licenses   75.00
City Pound   1.60
Tex Refund (City)   62.00
School Account-
Tax Refund  ?      67.65
Salaries  $20,754.16
Sundries        7,381.20
  28,135.36
$22,752.07
28,193.00
ASSETS AND LIABILITY ACCOUNT
TAXES OUTSTANDING—
City-
Arrears (1922 Taxes)......?  368.42
Delinquent (1921 Taxes)    216.90
 $  585.32
Schools (Inside)—
$50,945.07
Arrears  (1922 Taxes)....$ 350.12
Delinquent (1921 Taxes)    206.42
556.54
Schools (Outside)—
Arrears (1922 Taxes) $    94.79
Delinquent (1921 Taxes)      13.72
108.51
-$ 1,250.31
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE—
Soldiers' Houses Account-
Outstanding on Notes ....$2,763.59
Arrears of Taxes ...-.      69.06
Arrears of Insurance ....     54.68
-$2,887.33
Savings Account-
Taxes Paid $ 270.79
Insurance Paid       17.32
     288.11
Sundry Accounts      310.68
-$ 3,486.0:
REAL ESTATE—
Land Owned by City $ 300.00
City Buildings   3,000.00
3.300.0
STOCK AND EQUIPMENT—
Wagons and Sleighs  $ 270.00
Horses   270.00
Plows   30.00
Tools, etc  25.00
FIRE DEPARTMENT—
Motor Truck $2,000.00
Apparatus   1,250.00
3,350.00
MATERIAL ON HAND—
Sewer Pipes $    28.00
Tarvla, 29 Barrels      348.00
376.00
135.23
Cash on Hand	
LIABILITY ACCOUNT
Outstanding Cheques  $ 1,575.13
Provincial Loan on Soldiers' Houses  $ 6,000.00
$ 7,575.13
CASH ACCOUNT
Receipts $55,332.99
$65,332.99
Deposits    $55,197.76
Cash on Hand      135.23
$55,332.99
RANK STATEMENT
Deposits, 1922  $55,197.76
Outstanding Cheques    1,575.13
Difference on 1921 Outstanding Cheques   .61
$56,773.50
Dr Balance January 1st, 1922  $    916.29
Payments, 1922   50,945.07
Balance on Hand     4,912.11
$56,773.50
STATEMENT OF SOLDIERS' HOUSES ACCOUNT
Loan     Interest   Taxes   Insur.     Total
Nov. 12, 1921, $6,000.00   $329.52   $239.85   $72.00   $6,641.37
Dec. 31, 1922,   5,874.95       89.88       69.06     54.68     6,088.57
The  Publishers'  Responsibility
More and more difficult every day
is the choice of good reading—the
kind that nourishes the young and refreshes the old. One way to avoid
mistakes is to choose the book or
periodical that stands for something
—that is not everlastingly supplying
the sensational and silly. The Youth's
Companion has always been published
by men who felt a keen responsibility
to their readers, and they have held
steadfast to one purpose: To familiarize Companion readers with the best
things in the world, and by means of
original articles and stories to Illustrate the truth that the practice of the
old homely virtues brings the greatest
t
.atlsfactlons In life.   Try It for a year
and see.
The 52 Issues of 1923 will be crowd-
id with serial stories, short stories,
editorials, poetry, facts and fun.   Sub-
crlbe now and receive:
1. The Youth's Companion—52 Issues
In 1923.
1. All the remaining issues of 1922.
1. The Companion Home Calendar for
1923.
All for $2.50.
I. Or include McCall's Magazine, the
monthly authority on fashions. Both
publications, only $3.00,
The Youth's Companion,
Commonwealth Ave. & St. Paul St.,
Boston, Mass.
.Subscriptions Received at this Office)
Brew ■ eup of Celery King
-a "tea" of Nature'sown herbs and
roots,—the finest laxative and
blood purifier you can get. It gently cleanses the system of all impurities, banishes headaches, etc.
80c and 60c packages, at druggists.
A Croupy Cough
brings dread to the mother's heart.
For safety's sake, keep a bottle
of Shiloh, the old time remedy, at
hand. A very few drops makes
the cough easier atonce, and taken
regularly gives complete relief.
30c, 60c and $1.20.   All druggists.
SHILOH
r FOR
COUGHS
Paid Up
$  126.05   $239.64   $170.79   $17.32   $   552.80
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNT
DEPOSITS
January 1st, 1922, Balance on Hand  $ 57.48
Deposits In Year  552.80
Interest     1.50
$611.84
PAYMENTS
W. H. Morton  $315.25
Interest on Loan (Half Year Only)  149.69
Balance on Hand, December 31, 1922   147.00
CITY LOAN ACCOUNT
Amount of Loan $3,286.76
Interest on Same at &%     232.38
$611.84
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. DAVIS, fe*
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
HEALTH SERVICE.
E. O. HAUKEDAL
Doctor of Chiropractic
(8 Years Experience)
Office Hours: 12 to 3 p.m.; 5 to 7 p.m
Over Mrs. King's Book Store
Dunsmuir Ave. CUMBERLAND
Now Is the Time
FOR STOMACH SUFFERERS TO GET
RELIEF FROM SUFFERING
TAKE
stops STOMACH misery
This remarkable remedy is guaranteed
absolutely harmless and will stop
quickly without pain or inconvenience
Gas Pains, Acidity,
Sour Burning Stomach,
Bloating, Heartburn,
and All After-Eating
Distress
JO-TO IS SOLD BY DRUGGISTS ON A SATISFACTION
OR HONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. IS NOT A DRUG.
JO-TO IS A COMBINATION OF NATURAL MINERALS
COMBINED WITH A VEGETABLE COMPOUND
WHICH PROMOTES A LASTING BENEFIT TO THE
ENTIRE SYSTEM AND DIGESTIVE TRACT.
Try JO-TO Now and
STOP STOMACH SUFFERING
All Drug Stores
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
Cascade
OR
U.B.C. Beer
PURE    FULL-STRENGTH    BEERS
They Wear Well
Paid by Cash S 700.00
Paid by Instalments       65.65
-$3,519.14
755.55
32,763.59
Examined and cortllled correct this 8th day of January,
1623.
T. MORDY, City Clerk.
C. D. WOOD, Auditor.
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or rlo you e ■; other less nourishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIDAY S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
On the market as long as the oldest
inhabitants remember and still
the most
Popular Beers
Sold in British Columbia
OLD FRIENDS  ARE BEST
Leave Your Order at any Government
Store-WE DO THE REST FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
A Wondrous Beauty
Cream
YOU will love the fragrance first. Then the
velvet smoothness, the delicate creaminess,
of this marvelous beauty cream. It fairly melts
into the skin—without a trace of grease, or the
clogging of a single pore. Anemic tissues
speedily drink it in, becoming smooth and softly
pliable under Combination Cream Jonteel. A
perfect base for powder. Take home a jar
today.
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
SUNDAY HOURS: Morning, 10-12; Evening, 6-9.
a
>)
The Superior Grocers
Where Most People Trade
Just Arrived, a full line of
Perrin's Biscuits
The Quality Biscuit
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
•THE SUPERIOR GROCERS."
T. H. Mumford""
.1. Walton
WALLPAPER
AT VANCOUVER  PRICES
By request we will be pleased to mail you a booklet
.showing 150 different patterns, with prices marked.
Phone 111 at our expense and have us put a booklet in
Ihe mail for you.
Jeune's Furniture Store
Opposite the Double Arrow Sign.
'HONE HI COURTENAY, B.C.
Wood for Sale    CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DOUBLE LOAD
1-OR 	
$6 00 WM"MK1?I{mKr'n' i>iop|iotor
  GOOD ACCOMMODATION
Any Length Requited EXCELLENT  CUISINE
W. C. WHITE & SON 	
Happy  Valley Phone 92R Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland, B.C.
CARS
FORD   TOURING—Late   model,   new
top, repainted, good tiros—
$425.00
EORD   DELIVERY—Good   tires,   toil,
etc.—
$175.00
KOHD DELIVERY- Lato model, good
tires, Relf starter, etc.—
$400.00
CHEVROLET   TOUBISO—Repainted,
good top and curtains, self starter.
A snap at—
$375.00
FARMER'S WIFE
WRITES VIEWS
OF FARM
LIFE
Skagit fount1.,  Slump I'lirui Situation
Presented, Willi nn Offer to -
Sulimii il Kerned).
Vho Following article, written from
her home In Skagit County. Washington, hy Mrs. C. D. Green, wife of a
"stump rancher," makes the presentation of the position of Htump ranchers
in that and other parts of the State of
Washington, U.S.A. Skagit County is
a section of Washington whose timber
lands have been logged ofT, making
conditions in that respect very similar
to those obtaining in certain parts of
Vancouver island. How nearly the
condition of the farmers across the i
line approximates that of people following agricultural pursuits 111 Coniox
District is left for the reader to conclude. She says she believes there is
a remedy for the unsatisfactory condition, but will not submit her prescription until she finds Iter diagnosis, as
presented here, has met approval.
Readers of her letter, addressed to
The islander, will look for her "prescription." which she says she Is ready
to write.   Her letter follows:
CHEVROLET TOUB1NO—1018 model
repainted and in very good mechanical condition—
$375.00
We have several other cars, at equally low prices.   Easy terms it' desired
Blunt & Ewart
THE COfRTENAY GARAGE
PHONE «l PHONE 01
NEW CAVE IS
DISCOVERED
GLACIER, D.C.—By far tho largest
cave In the series of subterranean caverns In Glacier National Park, known
as The Nakltnu Caves, has just been
uncovered by workmen engaged in development work. Unusual interest is
being shown In this discovery as It
opens up possibilities for exploration
the extent of which can only he surmised.
The Nakimu Caves, the most wonderful series of underground chambers
ln Canada, was discovered in 10il4 by
a miner while prospecting in the
Cougar Valley. The story of the early
explorations of these underground
caves reads like a page from Jules
Verne. Over a mile of high-domed
halls and connecting passages, whose
walls of crystalline limestone send
back the rnys of the lights iu a myriad
of colors, are open to visitors, forming one of the most thrilling experiences Imaginable.
Halfway dwn the valley Cougar
Creek, which has come down from
the glaciers, is suddenly snatched
down Into the bowels of the mountain
and roars along through the caves at
the very feet of the visitors. Twice
during lhe course of a mile ii reappears and flows for n little in the
light nf day to finally disappear by an
underground channel. The rumbling
of tho waters through the eaves Is
probably responsible for the Indian
name, "Nakimu," which means
"grumbling or spirit noises."
The new chamber, which adjoins
Cave No. 4. is a large cathedral-like
cavern, equalling In length ami height
some of our largest halls. It Is 435
feet long and from 12 to 16 feet In
width, with an approximate height of
100 feet.
Stomach Trouble
yields to Chiropractic. See me at
Clark's residence, near Union Hall,
any day except Sunday, between 1 and
6 o'clock.
F.. 0. IIAl'KEDAL
Doctor of Chiropractic
The Loiter,
"My home is at .Mount Vernon.
Skagit County, Wash,, where my husband and 1 are numbered among   a
I 'heroic fraternity' of stump ranchers.
For several weeks 1 have read closely
all items relating to farm produce,
shorts, longs, mediums, etc.; also the
articles by Forbes and Brisbane particularly, and  now that  1  am  intro-
I dttced I'll talk.
"I am reading of the butter situu-
i tton, and 1 think the shortage is a
natural outcome of what has happened to dairy farmers since the World
War. when we were producing all we
' could. During the war we borrowed
money from banks and boughts cows
at prices ranging from $100 to $250.
We arranged to pay from milk and
cream checks a certain percentage on
! loans each month.   The feed we had
: to buy in addition lo homegrown hay
and pasture cost so much that no dairy
fanner had even wages left for himself after paying on the loan and for
grain each month, but loyalty kept
him going on. Then came the end of
the war. We were in many cases still
paying for high-priced cattle. Milk
and milk products dropped to half the
cost of production, as feed remained
high. The dairyman grew less and
less able to keep going. Ilo began to
sell cows, not always tiie poorer ones.
Sell Cows lo Meet Notes
"I have known, in tiie past two
years, cows from six to ten years old
that cost from $1U0 to $15(1 each to be
sold for $40 to $75. and very many
went to the butchers at $25 to $40
that, were really good producers. The
reason for these sales was that notes
were due, taxes to pay, and many of
us stump ranchers were and are trying lo pay for our homes, ten to fifty
acres in size, whicli, in the stumps,
without improvements, cost on an average of $75 per acre. To clear an
acre of land during war time cost from
$20(1 to $:iu0, so we had land that cost
around $300 per acre to keep cows on
that produced mllko that cost $2.50
per hundredweight, or forty-eight
quarts liquid measure, and the price
we were paid was $1.55.
"You can see, on tho rule of going
upstairs, 'we went up one and fell
back three.' So more cows were sold,
few calves were grown into cows, ami
the result is not enough milk products.
Iluve to Write far the Remedy
"I have told lhe story of the stump
ranchers, The well-to-do dairyman before the war is practically a well-to-
do man yet.   He dldnt owe any debts,
i he was able to hold a sale, turn his
j cuttle info money and quit a vocation
that  involved sixteen  hours of labm1
each day.    Neither do I  knock   our
small town bunks.    In every case   I
personally   know   of,   the   banks   are
carrying every farmer who is working
hard anil doing tlio best be can to meet
! liis obligations.
"The same story holds good in pork
! production, The farmer in Skagit
| County who in 1022 pinned his faith
to a potato crop is 111 a like position,
and I havo no reason to think Skagit
County stands alono In her farming
failures.
"I believe there is a remedy, but
whether this epistle from a much-
interested dairywoman will meet approval such as to lead me to write a
prescription foi' farm evils remains to
lie seen."
MIT INFREQUENTLY
Blink—"It would prevent many an
accident if every nut on a car was
kept tight!"
Jinks—"But it is the tight nuts at
the wheel that causo so many of
thein." -Cincinnati Enquirer.
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries paHt were heavy because the
human race did not know how to lighten them. An enlightened
age has gradually brought now labor-saving devices to assist
her—the greatest of which Is the Electric Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features  that  further  reduce  women's  burden:,,
saving time, labor and anxiety.
There Is the Protected Element—the Element is the burner,
where the heat comes from. Like other Electric Appliances, the
heat Is radiated from wire colls, but the Protected Element
snugly encloses these coils In porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element laBtB longer, as acids, moisture and grease cannot harm
it. It heats quickly and holds the heat long after the power is
turned off.
The wonderful samless, round-cornered Oven- -not a nick
or crovlco ln Its smooth, even, Impenetrable, glussy enamelled
Interior. As sanitary as any enameled utensil, rust resisting,
cleanly. Rucks and rack holders removable. Elements swing
on hinges, so that entire surface of oven is clear for denning.
The Oven hns a 1% In. Insulation around the side ami a Ui
In. magnesia block Insulation in the door—this holds the bout
In oven. Roasts and baked foods retain their full flavor. The
result Is better baked foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small element inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven is on or off.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.
Fuses easily accessible.
KOI It TYPES OK McCLARY'S RANGES
E. S.—E. S. C—and E.—supplied lu tho immaculately clean
battleship grey enameled finish, also black japan—see all these
         features—have them demonstrated to you nt
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd. ,
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valves of the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out that it is a serious offence to. tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
THROUGH SERVICE TO EUROPE OR EASTERN
CANADA ON THE
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
Leaving Vancouver 7.45 p.m. daily.
Compartment Observation Cars.
Standard and Tourist Sleepers
Alternate Route via Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships!
to Prince Rupert and Rail Line i
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
Canadian NaNonalRailwaqs
Full Information—apply to E. W. Bickle, Cumberland
HEINTZMAN & CO. LTD., VICTORIA
REMOVAL
SALE
GRAND PIANOS  :  PLAYER PIANOS  :  PIANOS
ORGANS and PHONOGRAPHS
We will be moving to our New Showrooms at end of
November, and in the meantime are making Prices
that should
CLEAR OUT OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Any person thinking of purchasing an Instrument in
the next six months or year should not fail to take advantage of these bargains.
Suitable Terms Arranged     : :
Full Particulars on Application
Heintzman & Co.
Opposite  Post  Office
VICTORIA
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
r
FIVE
Precious Secrets Revealed
Wonderful Book tells how to attain Longevity and
Prosperity and to ensure Domestic Happiness and lifelong Bliss, and Healthy Offspring.
No more groping—no more hoping! Mystery and
conjecture changed to light and truth—Past theories
brought to naught. Genuine knowledge relating to the
Law of production and determination of sex, so long
hidden from mankind, has at last been unearthed and
is now yours to utilize for your own benefit.
44Science of Life"
SECRETS OF HINDU SEX-PHYSIOLOGY
The result of long
research and much
labor delving Inte
ancient Sanskrit
Writings, the sacred
teachings of Hindi
Itishis, whose devotion to philosophy
imbued them with
divine knowledge,
which revealed tc
them the Science of
Life and Mysteries of
Sex.
The most re.
marlialile work of
our time. A boot
for those win
want to know an
should know. An
Infallible guide
for the married
and those nboul
to marry.
MgytoJaw»ji«Ai.
Size 7%"x5", 230
pages, over 50 illustrations. Contains
original Sanskrit
texts with lucid, eas
lly understandable
English renderings
together with highl;
Interesting chapter
on the Ancient Hindu Scleuces of Palmistry and Physiognomy.
Willi this book dlsiippoIiimentB in Lore become things of the past
1st' Edition sold within a month. 2nd Edition—50,000 copies
just out. Rook your orders TODAY with remittance to avoid
disappointment ns the demand Is very great.
PRICE: Each book nicely bound 72c. Three Copies
$2.00. Six Copies, $3.84. Twelve Copies, $7.04, post free.
THE MYSTIC CHARM COMPANY
Hindu Secrets' Publishing Department
123, Lower Circular Road, Calcutta.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by ElectrlcUy.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
WE TAKE CARE OF
YOUR BATTERY
We see that they are charged and lu
good working order, and deliver to
you when you want them. Our Batteries are standard and give complete
service to car owners and others who
must have a Battery that Is dependable.   Also Dry and Wet Storage at
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.     •    P. O. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
J. SUTHERLAND
GENTS'   FURNISHINGS
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' aud Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will  Please Ton   n   n
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTOBIA, B. C.       I      Phone 8802
T.WHERRY
TAXtDERMBT&TANNCR
Bend (or price Hit ot
Wor k—m ountlnn
htftdl,   tto.
629 Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B. O. -
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Car  For  Hire
at Reasonable Prices
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B, C.
Financial And Market News
From the World's Centres—Gathered
By the Direct Private Wire System
of Burdlck, Logan & Co, Ltd, 787
Granville St, Vancouver, B.C.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Wheat-Winnipeg
The market opened a little easier
this morning with buying power limited and seaboard news not encouraging. However, the undertone to the
market was firm and prices recovered
from a decline or %c and closed a fraction over yesterday.
Hedging pressure is very light in
this market at the present time, and
only a very ordinary business Is passing between the producerand interior
elevators. At the Bame time receipts
are holding steady. Embargo still exists on rail shipments from the head
of the lakes, and only a very ordinary
clearance is possible to Canadian and
American Atlantic seaboard ports, because of slow clearances from the seaboard, which undoubtedly reflects the
very ordinary foreign demand.
Argentine undoubtedly Is to be an
active competitive factor In the near
future.
Copper
Boston — Domestic copper buying
continues good. Producers remain
grim in their prices, although a small
amount is being offered by secondhand sellers at slightly under the market. Foreign buying Is moderate waiting more definite Indications of what
action will be taken by the Allies in
regard to reparations.
Price of electrolytic copper for domestic shipment Is 14%c a pound, delivered to end of March, and 14%c to
14%c for second quarter. PrlceB for
European destinations are 15c f.o.b.
London or Hamburg.
Boston Wires—New Cornelia Mining
Company December output was 3,206,-
547 pounds of copper.
Calumet and Arizona Mining Company output during December totalled
3,582,000 pounds ot copper.
The old Dominion Smelter output
for December was 2,180,000 pounds of
copper.
New York—"The world Is facing a
shortage of copper because of the
record consumption, indicated by the
sale of 300,000,000 pounds in December," Is the opinion of James J. Godfrey, President of the Motherlode Copper Mines. He said that the consumption ln 1923 will be about two and one
half billion pounds, while production
cannot exceed 2,000,000,000. The peak
production was 1,928,000,000 in 1916.
The deal under which control of the
Chile Copper Company will pass to
the Anaconda Copper Company, virtually has been consummated and a
tentative plan worked out for financing this and other requirements of the
latter company. The transaction is
understood to Involve the purchase by
Anaconda from the Guggenheim Interests of 2,000,000 shares of Chile copper
stock at $35 a share, a total of $70,-
000,000.
Oil
Underlying conditions in the oil industry are strong as far as light grade
oil Ib concerned. This grade of oil is
the principal source of gasoline supply. There Is a large output of low
grade oil whclh has little value from
a gasoline viewpoint. Indications
point to a new high record consumption ot gasoline in 1923. This distinction between high and low grades of
crude oil resulted ln the recent grading of oil by the oil purchasing companies and Is causing Investors to differentiate between oil properties.
Caspar , Wyoming—In November
Mutual Oil shipped 200,000 barrels of
6rude oil from the Cat Creek field fo
Wlnnett, Montana, for shipment. In
11 months to November 30th, Mutual
Oil shipped 2,000,000 barrels, half of
whicli went to Standard Oil Comanp
of Indiana's Whiting Refinery.
Houston, Texas—Houston Oil Company has made a three year contract
with St. Louis South Western Railway
for 3,000,000 barrels of oil at "3lie
per barrel. Most ot the oil comes from
Smackover, Arkansas field.
Royal Dutch Is making good progress
In the Venezuelan fields. With Its far-
flung fields of production it looks an
If the Shell Group or London is the
largest oil concern In the world, even
surpassing the Standard Oil group.
New York—Standard OU of California and Associated Oil Company, are
preparing to drill for oil at Portage
Bal, Alaskan Peninsula. The scene
of operation Is Pearl Creek Dome, 17%
miles north-east of Knnatak, where
drilling Is expected to start before the
Spring of 1923. Only oil produced In
Alaska In 1922 was from eleven small
wells In Katalla field, which supplies
the local market with gasoline.
Walt Lake City—Utah Oil Refining
Company, a subsidiary ot Midwest Refining Company, declares 25c dividend
on the common and i% on the preferred.
Casper,    Wyoming—Mammoth    Oil
m
Company completed big gas well of
thirty million cubic tect of gas per
day of 24 hours.
Tamplco, Mexico — Mexican Seaboard Oil has brought in Well No. 25
in the Toteco pool ot Mexico, with
initial production or 4,000 barrels per
day.
Detroit, Mich.—Henry Ford produced a total of 1,352,000 cars ln 1922
against 928,760 in 1921. Tractor production at Detroit and Cork slightly
in excess of 60,000, against 36,878 for
1921.
It looks like a race between the oil
companies and Henry Ford, with the
odds ln favor of Henry.
London Cables
Beer consumption for year ending
March next estimated at 18,000,000
barrels, against 36,000,000 ln 1913.
Tax revenue probably only £90,000,-
000, against £123,000,000 two years
ago.
Manchester returns to her old love
—free trade. The Chamber ot Commerce voted 4 to 1 In favor of repeal
of safeguarding of Industries Act.
London Times reports Soviet Government has arranged with German
engineers to reconstruct Minsk-Moscow railways,
The £850,000 new stock of Anglo-
Persian Oil Company Is being issued
at £3 15s per share. The shares being underwritten at 2% commission on
the Issue price.
American Syndicate Is prepared to
spend £500,000 to build new hotel In
Manchester which would occupy whole
Victoria block in centre of town.
Closing prices on the London Metal
Exchange: Copper, £64 12s 6d; tin,
£183; lead, £26 10s; spelter, £36
10s.
Rubber
Notwithstanding the seeming lack
of Interest on the part of manufacturers iu the crude rubber markets,
prices have steadily advanced since
the British plan for control of plantation output was announced with the
result that the commodity Is selling
at the year's highest prices. The upturn in Sterling has had Its effect on
prices. Great Britain controls over
90 per cent of the world's rubber output, and her recent buying of shares
in Dutch rubber companies looks as
If British control over the crude rubber supply was about complete. The
United States is the largest rubber
consuming country, and it looks as if
Uncle Sam Is going to help pay Brl-1
tain's war debt lu increased rubber
prices. They still do a lot of real
business thinking over there ln London. United States will need 350,000
tons of rubber ln 1923, and will pay
Great Britain double the price paid In
1922. Even at a shilling a pound, the
bill will be £35,000,000 pounds
sterling.
Zinc and Lead
Strong at TAc St. Louis and New
York for both metals. No sign of lei
up in the demand, and every blast
furnace In the United States working
24 hours a day. A most profitable byproduct ot lead furnaces is arsenic, bo
badly needed as calcium arsenate in
the southern States, to defeat the boll-
weevil. In fact a prominent authority states that the cotton production
of the States depends upon the quantity of arsenic available. Only 20% of
the quantity needed Is produced.
Surely an excellent chance lor British Columbia to supply the United
States with this article.
Howe Sound's new 2,500-ton concentrator will shortly get Into action. This
Is the largest mill under the flag. Capacity of the property Is estimated at
40,000,000 pounds of copper per annum. Howe Sound (Britannia Beach)
has entered Into a 10-year contract
with the B. 0. Electric for 6,000 h.p.
Greater Interest Is being manifested
in Granny. New York specialist Is ot
the opinion Hint Oranb'y's tuturo Is as
a custom smelter to hnndle ore trom
the great properties now developing
In Northern British' Columbia. With
its own conl mines at Cassldy, Granby
Is a complete smelting unit. Granby's
copper production for 1922 cost 9%c
per pound, with average selling price
of 14c.
Indications nre that the 1'rcmler will
easily outstrip the Holltnger In 1923
ln gold production, and that when the
mine is in full swing, the records ot
the great City Deep and Moddertonteln
properties In Johannesburg will go by
the board.
Reports arc that the Premier is not
Financial and mining men look to the
the only good property In the North.
North to re-establish Ilritisli Columbia's mining reputation.
Experimental manufacture of auto
tlrco will begin at plant of Dunlop
Tire & Rubber Corporation late In
February, according to tho president
ot the company. Dunlop plant, largest ln the world, Is located at Buffalo.
Value of gold, silver, copper, lead
and zinc produced from Utah mines
in 1922, according to U. S. Geological
ft
Closing Out Prices
ON OUR STOCK OF SHOES
BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES—Sizes 11, 12 and (fif) AP
13.  Regular $3.75.   Closing Out Price     1&L..VO
BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES—Sizes 1 to 5.
Regular $5.00.   Closing Out Prices ...
$3.75
GIRLS' BLACK CALF SHOES—Sizes 11
to 2.  Regular $4.50.   On Sale	
$3.50
LITTLE GENTS'—Sizes 8 to 10 i/s.
LADIES' STRAP SLIPPERS AND OXFORDS — 50
pairs.   Values to $7.50. d»,| QC
Closing Out Price *j)4.«79
LADIES' CALF AND DONGOLA HIGH LACE SHOES
—Regular $6.50 to $7.50. (fi A   At*
On Sale at fjV*.4D
MEN'S FINE DRESS SHOES—In Recede and Round
Toe.   Regular $6.50 to $7.50. (fiA  E»n
Closing Out Price  ejVfceOv
FELT AND CARPET SLIPPERS—Men's, Ladies' and
Children's.   Closing Out Price, QK/»
from, per pair «/9C
ALL OTHER LINES AT SALE PRICES
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
F. Partridg  ::     CUMBERLAND
THE
PIKET
ELECTRIC
WE ABE HEADQUARTERS FOB
BADIO  SETS AND PARTS.
WE HAVE A SET IN OPERATION
DAILY.
YOU ARE INVITED TO LISTEN IN
AT TOUR CONVENIENCE.
HOURS £ PJt TO 11 P.M.
Everything
Electrical
PHONE IU
COURTENAY
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
Coal, Hood and Goods of Any  Kind
Delivered to All Parts ot District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODEKATK ghakues
TELEPHONE  |T9 TELEPHONE
er Leave Orders at  Vendome Hotel.
Satisfactory   Telephene  Service
Telephone service embraces a variety of operations;
the installation of telephones and changes in location;
telephone operating; maintenance of central office
equipment, outside plant and telephone apparatus;
accurate and up-to-date directory listings; billing; collecting and numerous other things that must be done
to give service that will be complete and satisfactory.
Notwithstanding our aim to give the highest possible standard of service, we realize that at times difficulties will arise. Usually they are quickly remedied.
But defects occur at times, which, in spite of watchfulness, are not immediately detected.
■ Patrons will confer a favor if they will advise us
immediately of such occurrences.
By "satisfactory service" we mean that the individual user shall be satisfied.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Survey $39,738,000 compared with
$22,123,790 In 1921.
Tbe Western Paclllc Railway has
been granted authority to Issue $5,-
500,000 first mortgage six per cent
bouds and proceeds used In acquisition of refrigerator and auto cars.
Studebaker Corporation Is planning
to build and ship 35,000 cars In the
current quarter, compared with 22,000
In  the  precednlg three months.    If
selling prices remain unchanged,
theso cars should return net profits
equal after preferred dividend, and all
charges to about $6.75 a share on the
750,000 shares of common stock now
outstanding. Estimated output 1923
Is 150,000 cars.
Kelly Sprlngflelds   common   stock
was active around its high level ln
anticipation of a favorable statement
(Continued on Page Nine.) SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING   MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
News of Courtenay District
ANGLICAN CHURCH NATIVE SONS ARE
ELECTS OFFICERS FORGING AHEAD
STYLE and
QUALITY
goes with the well-
dressed person. We
have the highest grade
Shoes in
FLORSHE1M AND
REGAL
These classy Shoes
always retain their
perfect "hape.
MEN'S HIP RUBBER BOOTS—For   ...$6.95
MEN'S LOW BOOTS—5 eyelet, for    3.65
WOMEN'S TAN BROGUES—Regular $6.50, for $5.00
LARGE STOCK OF CHILDREN'S SHOES IN ALL
SIZES AND ALL PRICES.
Modern Shoe Co.
COURTENAY. B.C.
A largely attended and most interesting vestry meeting was held last
Friday evening, January 12th, by members of the Anglican Churches of St.
John, Courtenay, and St. Andrew,
Sandwlck. The Rev. J. w. Fllnton,
vicar, acted as chairman. The churchwarden's annual report showed the
fiances to be in good condition, this
alone making the meeting an interesting one. Wardens were elected as
follows: Vicar's Warden for St. Andrew's, Sandwlck, Mr. R. U. Hurford
and Mr. James Hornby, People's Warden; for St. John's, Courtenay: Vicar's
Warden, Mr. Heber Cooke, and Mr. W.
Eadie, People's Warden; Lay Representatives to the Synod, Mr. Heber
Cooke and Mr. 0. Smith; Church Committee, Capt. Q. R. Dates; George Robertson, W. R. Cooke. Eric Duncan, M
B. Tribe, Frederick Field, Mrs. W. J.
McQuillan, Mrs. P. Forde and Mrs. H.
V. ColllnB.
i Mr. J. H. Wilcox and Mr. J. Spears,
i St. John's, and Miss Forrest and Mrs
I Treherne, St. Andrew's, were accorded
i unanimous votes ol thanks for their
' services as organists during the past
j year, and a similar honor was confer-
j red upon Messrs. E. Lloyd and J. D
\ Irwin, who have acted as Church War-
! den's during 1922.
Courtenay Assembly, No. 3, Native
Sons of Canada, held their regular
meeting on .Monday evening last, the
attendance being good and the interest iu the affairs of the order extremely keen. A campaign for new mem-
burs has been begun and it is expected that very shortly the membership
will lie greatly Increased. This is an
organization of Canadian born citizens whose chief aim Is the promotion
of the welfare of their native land I
without regard to party, creed, or politics. The membership at present contains the names and has the active co-
operation of a great many of the most
influential men In the district. There |
Is a place on the membership roll lor
every true Canadian, every man who
believes In the future ot Canada; every
Canadian who wants to honestly develop a high national spirit among
Canadians and thoso people who may
come to this country to make a home.
COURTENAY, Jan. 13—Today while
returning from Union Bay in his light
delivery truck, accompanied by Mr.
J. Hawthorn, Mr. Domlnlck Magglora,
owner of the local soda water works,
met with an accident which almost
had a serious ending. While coming
Optimism prevail-1 down the incline on the Island High
Programme of
Scotch Concert
ST. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIAN (III IU'11,
January 25th at 8 o'clock
ed throughout the meeting and the way at Millard's Creek, about a mile
year on which the church has JustI and halt south of Courtenay, the steer-
entered is expected to be more pros- lug gear of the truck broke, sending
perous than the one just closed. the machine and Its occupants over
 the    embankment.      Hawthorn    was
SCHOOL  CLASSES '■ down with the door across his neck
HOLD ENTERTAINMENT iaml ,ne car was Brad»all>' sinking in
  i the soft ground.    Magglora, who is/
Last Friday evening at the public j much younger and stronger man, man-
school a very   enjoyable   time   wasjW t0 frce himself in time to re-,
spent by the pupils of Mr. Stubbs and ;Iease llis companion    and    probably
Mlaa HUdebrand's classes.   They had j save Ms life.    The car is a mass of j
as their guests the boys and girls of! tangled ruins and the occupantB are I
McLeod's Store
GENTS'  FURNISHINGS  IN  ALL  LINES
BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.
—Sole Agent for—
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
In This District
Including Cumberland
i.Vi ¥'.'
JUST ARRIVED
The "Astoria" Shoe
SOLID LEATHER—FITS LIKE A GLOVE
Stetson Hats to suit all tastes. Boys' warm Overcoats for rainy days.. Sweaters and Sweater Coats in
all styles, sizes and colors.
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
the Courtenay High School. A musical programme formed a large part of
the entertainment and various games
were Indulged In. The concert party
comprised: Sidney Williams, chair-
main; Gypsy Dance. Gladys Perez;
Recitation, "My Dear! Dolly." Annie
Rushton; Song. "Just Like a Gypsy,"
Gladys Perez, Ann, Alice ami May
Moncrieff, Honor Fcchncr. Kitty Wil-
llams and Eileen Beadnell; Recitation,
"la It Anybody's Business
Catchpole; Song and
Little Wooden Shoes,'
May Moncrieff,
Honor Fechner;
Take My Wife to the Ball Again,"
Sydney Williams; Song, "Two Little
Wooden Shoes," the Teachers, Alter
this part ot the entertainment there
was a dance participated in by the
older pupils. Refreshments were served and all had a good time.
nursing their injuries.
COURTENAY  CHURCH
ANNUAL MEETING
Chorus—"A Hundred Pipers"  Choir
Song—"Afton Water"  Miss J. Crawford
Song—"The Lie Rig"  Mr. R. Splttal
Recitation—"Baimies Cuddle Doon" Mrs. Perzeni
Kong—"Angus MacDonald"  Mrs. Campbell
Recitation—Selected  Mr. R. Strachan
Song—"Jessie's Dream"  Mrs. Gordon
Heading—Selected  , Rev. James Hood
Concertina Solo—Selected  Mr. Robertson-
Song—"I'm Glad My Heart's My Ain"  MIsb Beckwith
Heading—Selected    Mr.  Armbister
Song—Selecied Mr. George Ramsell
Song—"Mary of Argyle"  Mrs. Waluwrlght
!-ong—"There Was a Lad Was Born In Kyle" Mr. Splttal
Duet—"Ye Banks and Braes"     Misses Etta and Edith Hood
Piano Solo—Selected  Mrs. Frost
Song—"Caller llerrin"  Miss Jessie MacDonald
Recitation—Selected   Mr.  Armbister
Song—"Hamo o' Mine"  Mr. Goodall
Song—"Blue Bells of Scotland" Miss Crawford
Duet—"Huntlngtown" Mr. Hood and Mrs. Gordon
The Chair will be taken hy Dr. G. K. MacNaughton.
The   annual   meeting   of   the   St.
George's    Presbyterian    Church,    of i
Courtenay, was held on Tuesday, Jan- i
uary 10.   A good attendance was pres-1
cut nnd the reports of the various committees  on   hand  indicated  that  the
Beatrice church has made remarkable progress
Dance,    "Two during the year.    Mr. Alex. Urquhart
Ann Alice and  occupied  the  chair  for the  meeting.
Kitty   Williams  and and Mr. H. R. Clark acted as secretary.
Recitation, "I Won't The results of the work throughout
the year has been most gratifying. The
reports showed where the membership
had increased 40 per cent, and the
revenue had increased 33 1-3 per cent.
Tlle Ladies' Aid Society offered to lift
$700 off the debt of the church during
the coming year. Three new members
were elected to the hoard of management to take the place of the retiring
three, who automatically retire at the
end of each year. After tlle business
of the meeting had concluded, the
meeting retired to the basement of the
church, where refreshments were
served.
Rev. W. T. Beattle is the pastor of
the church.
Why Send to Vancouver for
Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
Comox Community Club.
The Community Club at Comox held
a whist drive aud social dance in their
ball at the Bay on Monday evening.
the event being generously patronized.
There were thirteen tables occupied.
the wluners ot prizes being: Ladies,
Mrs. A. T. Beckensell; second, Miss M.
Graham; consolation, Mrs. Walter
McPhee. Gentlemen's prizes were
awarded to Mr. Albert Hornall; second, Mr. John Prltchard; consolation.
Mr. J. James.
-i
ADMISSION, FIFTY CENTS.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Leaves for Vancouver.
Mr. George A. Hamilton, accountant at the local branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce left on Tuesday morning for Vancouver where he
will In future reside. He has been
transferred and received promotion.
Mr. Hamilton has been in Courtenay
for two years and has made a lot of
friends for himself and the bank. They
will wish him rurther success In his
new position.
*   *   *
Now at Victoria Bunk.
Mr. James Quinn left ror Victoria
on Tuesday to take up his new position at the Capital with the Douglas
Street branch ot the Royal Bank of
Canada.
...
COURTENAY, Jan. 17.—Mrs. W. J.
Hagarty Is receiving the sympathy of
her many friends on the receipt of
news from Ottawa that ho brother,
Mr. J. P. Foran, has Just passed away.
The news came through on Monday
last.
On January 11th, at Rock Bay, Mr.
Johu Brown, an employee at Hanson's
logging camp, Rock Bay, was the victim of an accident that caused his
death at the Rock Bay hospital. A
tailing tree Btruck him, crushing his
skull. The body has been lying at
Sutton's undertaking parlorB here
since Monday and the tuneral took
place today to tho Sandwlck Presbyterian cemetery, the Rev. W. T.
Beattle officiating.
January   Sale   now
Store, Conrtenar,
on.     Kaver's
OLD COUNCIL
RETIRES FOR NEW
Reports    Presented    ut    Courtenay
Council Meeting.
On Wednesday night the members
of the City Council who had served on
the Hi..i'd during the year 1022. met
for the last time to complete their
labors of a strenuous year. There
were some details ot business that had
been uncompleted, and these were
cleaned up in order to give the incoming Council a clean sheet to begin
with. Three of last year's Council are
retiring and were tiie recipients ol
'.vonls of commendation from tholr
brother Aldermen for the energetic
and harmonious manner ln which they
had all worked together. A spirit of
good fellowship and optimism pervaded the atmosphere and those Aldermen who remain on the 11)23 Council
certainly enter upon the new year with
the best of good will toward each
other and respect for their retiring
comrades. Those men who will not
he at the Council table In the year
1923 wished the new Council every
success in their endeavors to give the
city and efficient service. In expressing his regrets ntthc departure of
Aldermen Cook, Pidcock and Everett,
Mayor Slmms said ho hoped that after
a year's rest they would be back In
office. Alderman Everett said he
would have another try next year.
The principal business of the meeting
was the reception of reports of the
various committees and some interesting data was presented Bhowlng that
the members of the various committees
had not been asleep on the job. Alderman   ridcock,   in   his   report   as
age ot the system. In January, 1922,
there had been seventy-eight consumers, whereas in 1923 there are two
hundred and fifteen. This Is commendable growth, showing the spirit of
progresslveness everywhere apparent
In the municipality. He referred to
the adequate supply ot water, even
during the summer ot the past year,
when one ot the driest seasons ln the
history ot the Valley was experienced.
Tho supply had been adequate at all
times, and there was no tear or a
shortage in the future.
The Committees' Reports
Alderman Embleton, Chairman of
the Board of Works, submitted a report showing how the money that had
been appropriated for use of his department, had been spent. His statement showed that the expenditure had
been well within the appropriation.
These two reports received the favor-
uble comments ot the other Aldermen.
Alderman Fielder, father of the Fire
Department, asked the Council to pass
a resolution thanking the members ot
the Volunteer Fire Department tor
their generous and efficient service to
the community during the year. This
was done unanimously and much favorable comment passed respecting
the work of the department. Alderman
Everett made a verbal report on the
conduct of the Sanitary Committee, of
which he had been chairman, aud in
his remarks referred to Dr, Butters,
the health officer, in words ot praise
for the energy with which he had carried out the duties of his Important! was ordered for 1921 and 1922. A vote
office. He had carried out his duties, of thanks was tendered to the City
with moro energy than any previous: Clerk and Electrician, both of which
oi'llco holder. Alderman Cook, Chair-1 offices Mr. Wood fills, for his services
man or the Finance Committee, had no | during the year, and the meeting ad-
report ready, because the auditor had j journed atter a reply rrom Mr. Wood.
not quite completed the task of audit-1	
Ing the City's books.   However, he In-
Flre Department had proved Itself a
most useful organization, having had
to answer twenty-nine calls, and had
put up a successful fight In every case.
The department meant much to the
city.
Electric Plant Successful
The report of Alderman Kerton,
Chairman of the Electric Light Committee, was a good one, showing the
growth of the system since 1918, the
year In which the city bought the
plant. In that year there had been a
deficit ot one hundred dollars. In 1921
the gross revenue was $14,500, with an
expenditure ot $8,500. In 1922 the
gross revenue had been $19,000, with
an expenditure or $12,000, leaving a
profit of $7,000. He gave much of the
credit for this satistactory state ot af-
raira to the electrician, Mr. Clinton
Wood, to whom he alluded as a most
etflclent and painstaking orilclal. In
respect of the carrying through successfully of the electric light extension to Headquarters, the Council
thought the promise made to tbe city
electrician at that time should be fulfilled. ThlH was to the effect that, a
bonus would be paid If the line were
completed and put In successtul operation. At tlle time the contract was
undertaken by the city electrician an
outside engineer had estimated hla
charges at three hundred dollars.
Therefore In keeping Its promise the
Council voted that Bum as a bonus to
Mr. Wood.
A rebate of taxes to the churches
January   Sale
traduced Mr. Porter, and when asked' Store, Coiirlennj,
In what condition he found the office, |	
The
now   on.    Laver'n
the auditor said that the city was In i    The   snowfall   Tuesday   afternoon
much better Bhape than at this time ] meant the loss of many dollars to the
last year, and that everything was In j Courtenay Athletic Association.   Many
chairman of the Waterworks Commit-! order.   Fire Chief John Thomson sub-1 more would have been there but for
tee, told of the growth of the patron-' mltted his report showing that the the weather conditions. SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923,
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
0
AARON SAPIRO PREACHES
CO-OPERATION AMONG
INTERIOR FRUIT-GROWERS
Prosperity  of  CiUlfornlun  Producers
Attributed to Co-operative Mar-
kctlng Says Supiro.
Aaron Sapiro, noted San Francisco
attorney, has been on a tour of the
interior fruit-growing centres, preaching co-operation in the marketing of
produce by Ihe farmers. His tour is
sponsored by the Farm and Home, the
noted farm journal, who were responsible for bringing this noted organizer
to the Province. Mr. Sapiro Is closely
associated with the farmers' marketing agencies in California, and his
reputation is known throughout tho
continent by those interested in cooperative marketing of farm produce.
He addressed one of the largest
meetings  in  Vernon  on  January  11,
and explained to the fruit-growers
there his co-operative plan of marketing their products. He has also addressed large gatherings in Penticton,
Kelowna and Summerland. and hlB
lectures ill these places have been
stirring the different farmer organizations to action.
Mr Sapiro said that in 1892 the farmers of California were flat broke and
it was because of this, the farmers
were prompted to do something drastic. They were not getting a fair price
for their products, the middleman was
devouring the profits, and as a result
the farmers were losing money. In
those days the farmer got 8 cents out
of every dollar that, his fruit brought,
and today, as a result of co-operative
marketing by the farmers themselves,
they get 48 cents out of every dollar
their fruit brings in. In dairy products tlw Increase of returns to the
farmer for his produce has been 14
per cent.
Toe Many Associations
In California, he said, they tried on
many occasions, till they eventually
succeeded, ln co-operatively merchandising tlielr produce successfully. One
of their initial failures was due to too
many organizations, till eventually all
the organizations united into a strong
group. Today 80,000 farmers market
$300,000 worth of produce annually
through their marketing associations.
The system ot marketing the produce of the farmers was explained
The different producers organizations
were united together Into one organization who marketed all the produce.
Six steps ot remedying merchandising
were:— ,
1—Grading, standardizing and keeping up the quality of the product.
2—Package, an attractive, convenient one.
3—Extension of markets by place,
time and intensifying the use of the
product.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Jan. 19 and 20.
Peter B. Kyne's Great Story
"The Pride of Palomar"
MuiotieDaw »o.gmuvmtgicta»
•The Pride'of Palomit*
Ji Cosmopolitan Production
A fighting romance of the great Southwest. Something to thrill and think about, where fiery Spanish passions, where Spanish ideals of honor still cling to the
West.
A virile romance, gay with color and bold with
adventure, and as a climax, a horserace that will hold
you speechless.
Four Reels of Comedy
"LET 'ER RUN," Christie Comedy, and "SPLITTING
HAIRS," Sunshine Comedy.
MATINEE SATURDAY, 2:30 P.M.
Owing to the length of this show, which is 12 reels,
first show will commence at 6:15 sharp; second show
at 8:45 p.m. *
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE SHOW MONDAY AND TUESDAY
2--Special Feature Pictures--2
"ARABIAN   LOVE*
Here is a wonderful picture that has been acclaimed everywhere as a sceond Sheik.
"LIVE WIRES"
A Five-part Feature Full of Laughs and Thrills.
COMEDY.
DONT MISS THIS WONDERFUL DOUBLE FEATURE SHOW.
REGULAR PRICES.
SPECIALS
Heaters reduced to clearance prices.
A special line of Rugs.   Regular $3.00.     (PO Of*
Sale Price 	
Linoleums, short ends suitable for pantry or bath
room.
Comforters, specially marked to clear.
Stanfields' Red Label Underwear.-
Per garment	
$2.00
Flannelettes, in blue and pink stripe. (fil   AA
Five yards for 	
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
4—To regulate the supply so that
there Is neither a glut nor a famine
of the product on any market at any
time.
5—Make price dependent on supply
of product at point of consumption,
not at point ot production.
6—Make the product a staple Instead of a luxury.
Calif or nliiii Eggs at Premium
It was pointed out that with several
minor organizations the middleman
wns approached by several producers
to buy his produce, whereas with the
mammoth organization like they have
in Southern California it was the
middlemen who approached the merchandising organization for his produce.
The egg industry was quoted beside
many other examples. The Poultry
Producers' Association of Central California handles 20 million dozen eggs
on a purely co-operative basis. If a
man shipped dirty eggs he was penalized and he was penalized more If he
sent washed eggs that would not keep.
Small eggs were us inexcusable as
dirty oneH. The eggs were graded and
the "Nulaid" brand of infertile guaranteed eggs, after an eighteen day
journey to New York, sold at a premium of 2c to 4c over eggs produced
close to New York.
PROFIT   IN   DAIRY   HERDS
Uood  Stock, Scientific Feeding nnd
Management Required to Hake
Cows Profitable.
Cost records kept by the State Col-
many dairy herds In the State do not
lege of Washington show that a great
return ordinary laborer's wages to
their owners. On the other hand, ln
a few cases, because of better stock,
scientific feeding and management,
and favorable market conditions, some
dair yherds return more than the going wage.
In a survey ninde by the college,
Farm No. 38, on which there were
twenty-seven milch cows and butter-
fat was sold for uO cents a pound last
August, lhe farmer realized a labor
return of 111 1-10 cents an hour. This
was realized utter allowing 6 per cent
interest on money invested in the
dairy plant, depreciation on herd,
buildings and equipment, taxes, Insurance, cost of feed, pasture and management. The cost of Imtterfat per
pound was estimuted at 29 cents. By
having a favorable market this farmer
waa able to make a good profit.
A neighboring farmer with less favorable market conditions made 25 3-10
cents per hour. Another with a good
market for butter fat at 411 cents a
pound made 65 cents per hour, while a
neighbor showed labor earnings of
only 8 cents per hour.
It was found that the number of
hours work required In the dairy varied from 100 to 300 hours per year for
each cow. Arrangement of buildings
and fields and the adaptability of the
farmer to the dairy business were factors found to affect the returns.
Feed costs were found to represent
47 per cent, nnd labor 24 per cent of
the total cost of producing milk.
SELECT STRAINS OF
WESTERN RYE VS.
COMMERCIAL SEED
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary. '
C. G. WILSON
Courlenay British Columbia
Roller Canaries
from high-class registered stock.
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.   Reasonable prices.
Walker's Aviaries
1611 DENMAN ST, VICTORIA, B.C.
Director, International Roller Canary
Breeders' Association.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland and Courtenay.
(Experimental  Farms  Note.)
Western rye is one of the best cut
tlvated grasses in its resistance to
cold and drought. It produces good
results for both hoy and pasture,
either sown alone or In combination
with clover or grasses. In tests at
the Invermere Experimental Station
'it has stood second, over a period of
three years, Meadow FeBcue lending
It by a very small margin. The best
quality hay Is made when the head Is
Just out of the sheath.
Individual plants of Western Rye
grass vary greatly In size, stoollng
qualities, vigor and color. Botanically
speaking, It flowers quite dieffrently
from most of the native and cultivated
grasses, iu Ihnt It is normally Belf-
fertlllzed, like wheat. This makes tlle
development of a large number of
distinct varieties fairly easy, these
varieties breeding true to type, or are
constant from one generation to another.
A number of select strains that
were originated ntthe Central Experimental Farm. Ottawa, have been tried
out for the pnst two suesonB in conjunction with ordinary commercial
Western Rye grass seed, which Is a
mixture ot many distinct varieties in
a great many rases. In all cases the
select strains of Western Rye have
out-yielded for hay purposes the ordinary commercial seed planted under
similar conditions. The uniformity of
the select strains over the commercial
stock was very marked.
Between the select strains there is
in many cases a wide difference, Some
| strains stool a great deal more vigorously than others; some have a heavier leaf growth; some have quite a
distinct color; while some strains are
[ decidedly tailor than othorB.   By bc-
Acts Like \\FLAW" Results Guaranteed
¥
BRONCHITIS
MIXTURE
AT ALL DRUGGISTS
Sold by FROST'S DRUG STORE
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired^
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
$250.00
Terms arranged. A beautiful Wright Piano, in
Mahogany finish. Full compass; rich tone; recently
overhauled.  A snap.   Terms.
$25.00 CASH. $10.00 PER MONTH.
Marshall Music Co
CUMBERLAND—" Centre of Town."
COURTENAY—" Top of Town."
lection of the desired characteristics
and propagation, without the admixture of other strains, pure seed lines
can be secured that are distinctly superior to the ordinary commercial sen!
now obtainable; an increase in yield
of 19 per cent, being obtained by the
highest yielding strain over the commercial slock; while the lowest yielding select strain gave an Increase ol
over 4 per cent over the commercial
seed.
R. O. NEWTON,
Superintendent,
Experimental Station,
Invermere, B.C.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
FARMERS' COURSES
Short Courses ln Agronomy and Agriculture for Farmers. I
7 Acre Blocks
Some choice 7-acre blocks on Bea-
front and Island Highway. Excellent
soil, close to Royston.
$150.00
On E«»y Terms
8 acres, 2 cleared, small house, well,
etc.   Good soli.   (1,000 cash.
Also other small farms.
Apply
F. R. Fraser Biscoe
PHONE 61 COURTENAY
The Faculty of Agriculturo in the
University of Urltish Columbia have
arranged a series of courses in Agronomy and Animal Husbandry, extending
from January 21'nd to February 3rd
These courses arc arranged for the
lienellt of farmers who wish to Increase their knowledge about soil fertility, management of land and crops
about feeding problems, about Judging and the selection and care of live
Block. Tho courses are open to anyone interested, and only a nominal
registration fee is charged. Full particulars can be hail by writing to the
Registrar of University of rUltish Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
I'nion Bay Road
COURTENAY, B. C.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1923.
WHITEWEAR    FLANNELETTE  WEAR,
CHILDREN'S     DRESSES,     LADIES'
HOUSE   DRESSES,   VOILE   WAISTS,
SWEATERS AND SWEATER COATS.
OUR STOCK IN MOST LINES, BEING BOUGHT
DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER, OUR
I'RICES ARE LESS THAN THE WHOLESALE
PRICE OF TODAY.
JANUARY   5T0CTAKINQ
CLEARANCE   SALE
Dry Goods - Men's and Boys' Furnishings - Boots and Shoes
COMMENCES THURSDAY, JANUARY 18
AND   CONTINUES   FOR   ONE   WEEK   ONLY
Big   Reductions   in   all   Departments
Cotton Specials
COTTON—36   inches.
$1.00
45c
10% discount
during the sale
on all C.C. a la
WHITE     BLEACHED
Regular 25c.
Sale Price, 6 yards for
BLEACHED SHEETING—94. Regular
90c.   Sale Price, per yard	
BLEACHED  SHEETING—8:4.    Better quality.1
sakUSc9e!cPerryardd: 45c j Grace Corsets
WHITE FLANNELETTE—Good quality. Regu-j
lar 25c per yard. d»"| AA
Sale Price. G yards for «J)l.UUj —	
LIGHT AND DARK COLORED PRINTS—Fast
colors
yard.   Sale
PLAID AND CHECK  GINGHAMS — Regular
40c per yard.
Sale Price, 4 yards for
STRIPED COTTON CREPES — In all shades.
Regular, 50c per yard. (fi -J   AA
Sale Price, 3 yards for tpl.UU
COTTON EIDERDOWNS—In plain colors, of red,
pink, sky and fawn. Regular 90c. A P_
Sale Price, per yard     ^t)C
FLANNELETTE WRAPPERETTES — In floral
patterns. Regular 40c per yard. fl*"| A A
Sale Price, 4 yards for «P J..UU
COTTON CASHMERES—In all shades. Regular
50c per yard. d*1   A A
SrScy3^ei""$I.00!20% discount on
$1.00 a^ ^ress Goods
150 SAMPLE CURTAIN ENDS — Large!
size. Special Sale 7^k/»
Price, each     • **V
50c
Sale Price, 3 yards for	
HUCKABACK  TOWELLING—Reg- d»1   AA
ular 30c.   Sale Price, 5 yards for ... «P J..UU
IVORY   MARQUISETTE,   BLUE   BIRD   PATTERN—Regular $1.25 per yard. 7K/»
Sale Price, per yard  • t) v
FANCY BORDERED VOILES—Regular
75c per yard.   Sale Price, per yard	
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN FANCY COLORED
AND BLACK SATEEN UNDERSKIRTS. _
ODD LINES OF HOSIERY AT BARGAIN
PRICES.
Towel Special
EXTRA SPECIAL TOWEL BARGAIN—Large
size.   BrowYi and white Turkish towels. PA.
Regular 75c.   Special Sale Price, each OUC
Only 200 Towels in This Lot.
Men's Department
MEN'S SUITS—Regular $25.00. (fi-tlj PA
Sale Price  «pl I »U\J
MEN'S SUITS—Regular $35.00. (POO PA
Sale Price  tyu£..*J\3
OVERCOATS-—The balance of our stock of Men's
Overcoats, ranging in prices from $35 to $22.50.
Price $27.50 to $19.50
PULL-OVER SWEATERS—St. Margaret's Pullover Sweaters. Tape neck. In maroon, brown,
navy, myrtle and white. Regular d»Q ryp
Price, $5.50.   Sale Price «pO. I D
I WORK SHIRTS—Men's Khaki drill Shirts, All
sizes.   Regular, $2.25. (fil    AP
Sale Price  tpl.^tt)
MEN'S TWEED CAPS—Prices ranging
to $2.50.   Special Sale Price, each	
STANFIELD'S RED LABEL UNDERWEAR—All
sizes.   In grey and white.   Regular d»i   r?P
$2.25.   Sale Price  t|>A. I O
PENMAN'S   95   NATURAL   WOOL   UNDER
WEAR—All sizes.   Regular price,
$2.50.   Sale Price	
MEN'S GREY WOOL PIT SOCKS—Regular 35c
a pair. fl»-|   AA
Sale Price, 4 pairs for «P J..VFU
SUSPENDERS—Men's fine dress Suspenders.
Cord and leather tips. Regular 95c. £JPrt
Sale Price  DDL
MEN'S HEAVY WORK SUSPENDERS—Reinforced back strap. Regular 90c. KA*»
Sale Price DUC
MEN'S PANTS—All sizes, in
Tweeds and Worsteds. Prices
ranging from $5.00 to $10.00.
$3.50 to $5.25
20 PER CENT. DISCOUNT ON ALL SHOES
DURING THIS SALE.
Curtain—Muslin Specials
IVORY    HEMSTITCHED    VOILE    COLORED
BORDERS—Regular, $1.25. 7K/»
Sale Price, per yard     I DC
FINE WHITE VOILE COLORED BORDERS —
Regular, $1.00 per yard. fiH/»
Sale Price, per yard  OUv
IVORY VOILE, FANCY HEMSTITCHED ROSE-
75c
BUD PATTERN.   Regular $1.25
per yard.   Sale Price, per yard	
LADIES* AND MISSES' RUBBERIZED RAIN-
COATS AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
10   PER   CENT.   DISCOUNT   ON   THE
BALANCE OF OUR STOCK OF ST. MARGARETS' SWEATERS.
SWEATER COATS—Men's "Pride of the West"
Sweater Coats. Regular Prices $10.50 and
$9.50, in brown, grey and maroon, (fit* AA
Sale Price  «PO.«7V
75c
$1.95
Odd lines of Underwear at Bargain Prices.
New styles in Men's Felt Hats in Brown,
navy, black and greys. (J»Q PA
Values to 5.00.   Sale Price     «PU D\J
MEN'S PIT SHOES—Solid leather sole, inner sole,
and counter nailed.   Regular price   (J»P QC
$7.00.   Sale Price *pD.&D
MEN'S DRESS SHOES—About 50 pairs of Men's
Shoes in black and brown. Reglar (fiA rt P
price $7.50.   Special Sale Price «(rl. I O
MEN'S FINE CALFSKIN DRESS SHOES — In
black and brown. Regular price (fi£* AA
$8.75.   Sale Price <])U.«/U
Boys' Department
BOYS' BLUE SERGE SUITS—Boy's Blue Serge
Suits in all sizes.   Values to (fiA  AA
$8.75.   Special Sale Price ipft.*/U
BOYS' TWEED SUITS—Some with two pair of
pants, at Special Sale Prices,
BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS—In grey and brown
tweeds.   Sizes 22 to 34.   Values to
$2.50.   Special Sale Price	
MEN'S SUITS—Regular $22.50.
Sale Price—
$10.00
WORK SHIRTS—Men's heavy
tweed Work Shirts. Regular
$2.75.   Sale Price—
$1.90
WORK GLOVES—Men's Muleskin Work Gloves.
Regular $1.00 values. np
Sale Price  ODC
$1.45
THE BALANCE OF OUR BOYS' OVERCOATS AT A DISCOUNT OF TWENTY
PER CENT.
BOYS'  MACKINAW
Values to $9.50.
To Clear at	
COATS—Sizes 22 to 32.
$4.90
new
75c a
BOYS'  TWEED CAPS—In young men's
styles, in brown and green and tweeds.
Regular price $1.50.   Sale Price	
SHIRTS—Boys'   white   and  cream   honeycomb
Shirts.   Sizes 12 to 14. ^Regular price
$1.25.   Sale Price 	
85c
BOYS' GREY FLANNELETTE SHIRTS—Regular price $1.75. d»"|   IA
Sale Price $1,111
BOYS' BLACK SATEEN BLOUSES—
Regular $2.00.   Sale Price	
95c
BROKEN LINES IN BOYS' UNDERWEAR
AT SPECIAL SALE PRICES.
BOYS' 6-EYELET RUBBER BOOTS-
Values to $4.50.
Sale Price	
-6 inch tops.
$2.45
BOYS' SWEATER COATS—In plain and combination colors. Sizes 20 to 32. (fi-t Bl»
Values to $2.75.  Special Sale Price $1.(0
Special   Lot   of  Travellers'   Samples   in  Boys' Sweater Coats at   Bargain   Prices.
Young Men's Suits, advanced styles in Brown and Grey Mixtures, regular price, $27.50, SALE PRICE, $19.50
CAMPBELL'S   -   CUMBERLAND
Phone 19 SATUI-:' W, JANUARY 20, 1923.
I
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
NINE
If
naervsr:
Frivate Sale of Household
Furniture
COMMENCING SATURDAY, JANUARY 20th, AND
CONTINUING UNTIL SOLD.
Gtrcrd-Heintaman Piano, Oxford Range, Franklin
Heaiar, Gramophone and 45 Records, Large Kitchen
Cabinet, Hand Singer Sewing Machine, three Beds and
Couch, two Chiffoniers, two Dressers, one Kitchen
Table, one Parlor Table, two Rockers, six Kitchen
Chair., Congoleum Rug, Kitchen Linoleum, Sealers and
Preserved Fruit, Automatic Washer and Wringer,
Child's Coaster Wagon, two Sleds, Pictures, Dishes and
Cookjr.g Utensils, 22 Laying Leghorn Chickens, Wire
Fence, i bo Summer Camp at Royston.
D. McLennan
OPPOSITE KEARSTED'S GARAGE
CUMBERLAND AMATEUR ORCHESTRAL SOCIETY
PROGRAMME OF AN
Evening Concert
IX THE ILO-ltO THEATRE ON
Sunday, January 21st, 1923
COMMENCING AT 8:80 I\M.
March—"Happy Da>m"  Orchestra
Overture—"Evenin;; Slumbers"  Orchestra
Community Hymn   "Lead Kindly Light" 	
Serenade—"Dear Heart" Orchestra
Song—"Abide With Me" Mr. R, L. Splttal
Cornet Solo—"Tho Lost Chord"  Mr. Ingham
Song 	
Selection—"The Bohemian Girl"  Orchestra
Community Hymn- "Star of Peace" 	
March—"Guard of Honor" Orchestra
Song—"The Trumpeter"  Mr. Goodall
Trombone Solo—".' fterwards"  Mr. Jackson
Song    :.	
Selection—"Martha"   Orchestra
Community Hymn -"Work for the Night Is Coming" 	
I        "God Save the King"
•Accompanist: MLS. F. OLIVER. Conductor: MR. A. J. MERRY
COLLECTION TAKEN AT THE DOOR
PICTURE BA ED
ON  1 YNE'S NOVEL
"The  Pride  of  I'alomar"  Scheduled
for Sin ..Ing Here.
Peter B. Kyne'
besides appearli
as a serial In C
It is familiar to
the announcem
produced on tht
tan Productions
which will grei
ture fans. The
Ilo-llo Theatre
and Saturday.
To many all <■
Borzage, who t
and other nol ■
"The Pride of
assurance of t
production.
The picture '
It deals with t
California!! for .
lly ranch  in
father of the r
played by Mai■',•
the consequent.
her father an,'
absorbing  and
she solves the i
Forrest Stai:'
the featured i'
cast, which  In
Joseph Dowlli ;
other artistic >
. "Pride of Palomar,"
', In book form, ran
•nopolitan magazine.
nany thousands, and
■t that it has  been
nreen by Cosmopoll-
>r Paramount is one
y interest local plc-
■ileture comes to the
,'br two days, Friday
the fact that Frank
eated "Humoresque,"
le pictures, directed
'alomar" will be an
high quality of thin
is a powerful theme,
i struggle of a young
ossession of the fam-
tllforula against the
1 he loves. The girl,
rle Daw, has to face
of her stand between
her lover, and It Is
hrllllng to see how
' oblem.
■I and Miss Daw aro.
yers of an all star
udes James Barrow,
Warner Oland and
:een artists.
not learn until their romance has progressed Into a deep love that Gilbert
Is a fugitive charged with the murder
of her husband. The story Is said to
have all the dashing romance and
thrill of the desert life.
Barbara    Bedford    plays    opposite
Gilbert.
FOX STAR »N STIRRING
SHEI1 (AND  PICTURE
John Gilbert,
will be at the
Monday   and   'I
Love," a stlrrini:
ian deHert with
its cruelty and
Gilbert plays
man who has I
slty to join a <
and who finds t
—until he mee,
from a looted t
girl from the I
cape, and falls
thanks her gal
Campbell River News
NEW STARS COMING
IN SNAPPY PHOTOPLAY
A new pair of stars will be seen on
the screen at the Ilo-llo Theatre next
Monday and Tuesday in a photoplay
entitled "Live WlreB." They are Edna
Murphy, blue-eyed and falr-halred,
and Johnnie Walker.
The pair have been elevated to
stardom by William Fox because ot
their clever work ln Fox productions
Johnnie is the hero, the fellow that
get* your sympathy, and makes the
big tears flow as you watch that won
derful Fox picture "Over the Hill,"
which has had nearly a year's run
on Broadway, and long runs in other
cities throughout the United States
Edna also appeared in "Over the
Hill."   They are a clever pair.
Edna has been In pictures only a
little over a year. She was leading
woman with Fox for George Walsh In
"Dynamite Allen."- She Is a Brooklyn
girl. "Live Wires," it Is said, reflects
accurately Its title.
Vi William Fox star.
■i Ilo   Theatre    next
,• .(day   In   "Arabian
.,' iry set in the Arab-
,' ilieiks, its outlawry,
:iiharm. .
iliii part of a white
f.'li driven by neces-
ci'k' of Arab outlaws
n h.nd a good refugo
i ,i v hlte girl captive
u iv.vi. He wins this
-li.I, telps her to es-
-n love with her. She
n1 i icucr, and does
We Want a Jail.
The two young Indians who were
arrested here recently, had to be taken
over to Quathlaska Cove for detention
prior to the arrival of a boat to escort
them back to Alert Bay.
This brings to light the fact once
more that there is no jail at Campbell
River. If an arrest Is made the prisoner has to be taken for a two and
a half mile boat ride to Quathlaska
Cove on Valdez Island. Should the
prisoner refuse this hospitality and
try to bust up tho party It Is no Joke,
for a lone police constable to navigate
these waters on a dark and stormy
night. Yea, Campbell River would like
a little jail of her own.
Dr. P. M. Campbell, of Lethbrldge.
Alta., is on his way to Cape Madge to
visit the Rev. Scott.
* *   *
Mr. N. P. Steacy, of the W. H. Mal-
com Company, of Vancouver, vlsltod
Campbell River last week-end on business.
* «   •
Boom of Logs Adrift
Mr. Walton, manager of the Sydney
Lumber Mill, accompanied by his son
and T. R. Dixon, District Forest
Ranger, are here. They are attempting to locate a very valuable boom
nf logs which are adrift this week.
Several of these logs are valued as
high as $100. No trace of the boom
has been found as yet.
* *   *
F. C. Fleming, of the Owl Cigar
Company, of Vancouver, waB registered at the Willows this week.
* *   *
Returns From Tour.
Dr. and Mrs. Shaw returned from
their holiday last week. Evidently
the Doctor hung up his sock at Christ-
mast time as he Is now the proud owner of a new McLaughlin six tourliu;
car. While away the Doctor and Mrs.
Shaw, accompanied by the Doctor's
parents, made a tour of the Sountl
Cities.
* *   *
Ed. Masters, of the I. T. Logging Co..
had the misfortune to fall und sprain
his ankle while on his way to work
last Thursday. He Is now at the
Campbell River Hospital.
»   *   i
Provincial Constable Dawson returned to the River Sunday morning
after accompanying to Alert Bay the
two Indian lads who robbed the poolroom. They have been sent to Oakala
to await trial on a burglary charge.
* *   *
Mr. George Hamilton, of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Courtenay,
spent last week-end here.
* *   *
The many friends of Miss L. Thulin
are pleased to see her around again.
having fully recovered from her recent Illness.
* *   *
Mr. Hanson, of Campbcllton, has
started the foundation work on his
new building. When completed the
building will contain a drug store.
lunch room, poolroom, while the second storey will be used as a rooming
house.
* *   *
Community Hull to Be Built.
The new Community Hall to be
erected at Campbellton, will be built
next to Mr. Hanson's new building.
Work of clearing, etc., will be commenced ln the near future. The lot
was a gift of the International Timber
Company.
* *   *
Mr. S. Hage lefftjn Sunday for hla
new logging camp. Operations will
commence there shortly. This Is n
new camp located about twenty miles
outside of Vancouver. The surveying
lias been proceeding for the last three
weeks, so operations should begin
very Bhortly.
* *   *
Any resident of the Campbell River
vicinity desiring to subscribe to the
Cumberland Islander, or who wishes
anything ln the way of printing, job
work, etc., may obtain information by
enquiring at the Barber Shop, Willows Hotel.
* *   *
Sad Heath.
The death occurred at the Campbell River Hospital, Friday, January
12th, of Mr. Thomas Yeatman, a resident of Valdez Island. HI4 death was
the result of an accident at the logging camp several days ago. The funeral took pluce from the Anglican
Church, Quuthlaskl Cove, Rev. Scott
officiating, and was very largely attended. Mr. Yeatman was an old-
timer, having spent practically all his
life on the Island, The deceased
leaves to mourn his loss a widow anil
two small children, also his mother,
three brothers, Raymond, Frank anil
Robert, and one sister, Mrs. A. Simons; all residents of Valdez Island.
A very sad feature of this death Is
that just this time last year two of
Mr. Yeatmans brothers were drowned
off the Coast of Valdez Island. Deceased met with the accident resulting
in his death on the same day of this
year. AIbo Mr. Yeatman's father was
lost several years ago while out on a
hunting trip, his remains being found
several months later.
The family havo the deepest sympathy of a very large clrclo of friends
on both Valdez and Vancouver Island.
Dies Afler Long Illness.
Mr. William McDonald, who worked
In one of the camps here, died in Vancouver last week after a long illness
He was In the Campbell River Hospital and the sympathy of many
friends here is extended to his relatives at the camp.
* *   *
Killed by Falling Tree.
Constable Marshall brought the
body of John Browne to the River last
week. The deceased was killed by a
falling tree at Thurlow Island last
week, his body being badly mangled.
Dr Wm. F. Shaw, the coroner, held
and Inquiry and the remains were
taken to Courtenay for burial.
* *   *
Ratepayers' Association.
Campbell River is falling ln line
with other organizations for better
toads. The Campbell River Ratepayers* Association was organized hero
Inst week for the purpose of appealing
to the Provincial Government for better ronils in the district. The road
between Oyster River and Duncan
Bay will be given the attention of the
Association In this respect. The district engineer, Mr. O. W. Smith, has
promised his co-operation in the
matter.
The officers of the new organization
are: Chairman, Mr. Herbert Pldcock,
and Secretary-treasurer, Mr. C. H.
Fitzgerald.
There is no iloubt that Bolton has
been highly over-rated here. It goes
further to show you can't judge by
reputations. Wait till the tournament
up here. Then look out for some fast
bouts.
LATEST FINANCIAL
AND  MARKET   NEWS
(Continued from Page Five)
Wouldn't thlB be a great old world
if each of us could put as much faith
In the other fellow as a woman puts
In a safety pin.
regarding the earnings outlook for
1923.
Anaconda will acquire between 2,-
000,000 uiid2,200,000 shares Chile Copper from the Uuggeuheims, paying
them $35 a share in cash for their
holdings. How much more than 2,-
000,0011 shares Anaconda will acquire
from tiie Uuggenheims will depend on
the amount of shares Anaconda will
have acquired in open market at the
time that it exercises its option.
Bond Market
Dealers, find difficulty in getting
supplies of high-grade Provincial and
Municipal bonds. Prices constantly
hardening with demand unabated. Six
per cent yields on Municipals practically history, Just a few good Municipals to be gotten to yield this figure.
West Vancouver, Kamloops, Pentlcton,
Summerland, North Vancouver, Lethbrldge, Chilllwack and Cranbrook can
Btlll be bought to yield six per cent,
hut offerings are getting very scarce.
Point Grey's, payable only In London,
are yet on a six basis, but if payable
iu Canada, are selling freely on a
5.55 basis. The recent Issue of $2,-
000,000 British Columbia 25 year 5%
bonds are being sold in the United
States on a 5.10 basis.
Today's prices, B.C. Municipal
Bonds—New Westminster, 5%, due
1043. 89.71), to yield 5.85%; Point Grey,
57r; Point Grey, t,%, due 1953, 91.95,
to yield 5.56%; Victoria, 4%, due 1933,
86.70, to yield 5.70% i Nelson, 6%, due
1904, 103.93, to yield 5.75%; Rossland,
T/r; due 1940, 105.26, to yield 6.60%;
British Columbia (guaranteeing P. G.
E.), iW/c, due 1942, 87.96, to yield
5.50%; British Columbia 5s (guaranteeing Vancouver & District Joint
Sewerage Board), due 1962, 94.26, to
yield 535%. All above payable in
Cannda.
Point Grey, 4V4s, duo 1961, 77.56, to
yield 6%; New Westminster, 5s, due
1944, 87.87, to yield 6%. Both payable
in London only.
Victory Bonds
5% War Loan.
1925   100.50
1931    100.65
1937    102.30
$%'% War Loan.
1923   101.10
1924   101.10
1927   102.60
1933    105.40
1934    103.05
1937   107.40
1932    102.60
1927   102.10
Old 1927's are non-taxable.
I    New 1927's arc taxable.
J    Bonds should he mailed to Burdlck,
Logan & Company, Limited, 737 Gran-
■ vllle Street, Vancouver, by registered
post only, and cheque will be mailed
j by return for price on day of receipt,
I plus  interest.    In  purchasing bonds,
state the bank to which you wish the
: bonds sent.
: Burdlck, Logan & Company, Limited,
i invite correspondence from readers of
the  Islander,  relative  lo any  stock,
bond or company.
Special Sale of
Suits
75 BOYS' AND YOUNG MEN'S SUITS.
WE WILL SELL THESE SUITS AT WHOLESALE
COST.
COME EARLY AND GET YOUR CHOICE.
SPECIAL CASH AND CARRY
SALE OF GROCERIES
GORDON'S
PHONE 133
RADIO
Special
Introductory
Offer
The Famous Crystal
Speaker
Complete with Aerial and Headphones
$12.95
To the first ten purchasers we make this Special Offer
of a $25.00 Radio Receiving Set.
Purchasers of this set will be allowed full purchase
price should they decide later to purchase our long
range set.
We Install Transmitting Sets and All Radio Equipment.  Phone or Mail Your Order.
Northern Radio Co. Ltd.
Operating Courtenay Radio Broadcast, C.F.V.C.
Phone 162 COURTENAY, B.C. Box 78
SPECIAL SALE OF
Toys & Crockery
at Prices that Will Bear Comparison
with Vancouver Prices.
SEE MY SELECTION  OF TOYS BEFORE
PURCHASING   ELSEWHERE
Special Showing of Coal and
Wood Heaters
Tommy Nakanishi TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY JO. 1923.
Pre-Stocktaking
Sale
Previous to completing our stock-taking for the year
we offer many special inducements on goods we are desirous of clearing out. Ladies' Coats, only three left,
and the price ought to speedily clear them out.
Navy Serge Coat—Size 36. Raglan (J»i C A A
sleeves, with belt.   To clear at    «pX*li 1/1/
Fawn Velour Coat—Size 38. Smart fl»1 Q EA
design, lined throughout.   Special «pX«7.tlV
Ladies' Tweed Dress—Size 38. New and d»r At
smart.   Special Price tptlet/t)
Ladies' Striped Knitted Skirts. Regular (fiQ AC
price, $5.95.   Sale Price «pO.»7«/
Ladies' Dresses at greatly reduced prices. Only a few
left and the prices should effect a speedy clearance.
Ladies' Overall Aprons—About two dozen, QF»f»
to clear at, each *7llv
Ladies' Flannelette Night Dresses—In white. A real
good quality, and well worth more. (fi-f   QC
Only  *yL.£iO
Ladies' Navy Serge Skirts—In very fine quality of
serge. Values to $12.00. (fiA AC <L*7 CA
Greatly reduced.   Prices *pl±.UO to tj) I .tlV
Girls' Dresses—About one dozen. This is a d»i I7C
real special and should go quick. To clear«P-l-» ' O
Girls' Flannel Dresses—New goods. Various colors,
and smartly embroidered. (j*A  AC
Were $6.95, now  $**•«/*)
Ladies' Corsets—In pink. About 18 pairs, d»1 i A
To clear, per pair <PA.XvF
Ladies' Vests—About 4 dozen. Long sleeves. OC«
4 dozen.   A real snap. To clear OtlC
Boys' and Girls' Heavy Wool Hose—Regular   CAp
95c.   To clear, this lot goes at, per pair «JV/V
Boys'Mackinaw Coats—Most sizes. (fiA  AC
Clearing at  ipHk.VO
Men's Heavy Winter Overcoats—In      (J»1 A CA
grey.   To clear, at ipLV.Oxj
Men's Raincoats—Only two or three in this (firj fA
lot.   Price  V I ttlV
Men's and Boys' Caps—About 75 in this lot.    QP.
Values to $2.95, now for quick sale, each 1/tlC
Boys' Suits, Extra Special, About
20 in the Lot.   Values to $17.50
Sizes 23 to 32.   For a speedy sale, (fit* AC
out they go at  «PO.t/tl
Boys' Heavy Underwear— 7^11*
Very Special, to clear, at  I tlC
Navy Serge—52 inches wide.   A real good (fi"t   OC
;1    all-wool serge.   Price, per yard «pA«»J
Extra Heavy All Wool Serge—A real bar- (fil   f7P
gain.  54 inches wide. For one week, price tP J.. I tl
Sheetings will be on sale at very low prices.
Towels are real snaps and ought to go fast.
For One Week Everything Will
Be Subject to a Discount of 10%
There are many bargains which we are desirous
of clearing out and the price ought to do it.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Royal Candy Co.
Give Us a Trial.
ICE COLD DRINKS OF ALL KINDS.
HOME-MADE CANDIES AND CHOCOLATES.
LUNCHEONS SERVED.   SERVICE THE BEST.
PHONE 25.
CAR FOR HIRE.
PHONE 25
COMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING
PRESSING
T. YONEDA
COURTENAY
Phone 11 P. O. Box 12
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
USED
CARS
In order to make room for our
spring shipments of new cars, wc are
obliged to offer the undermentioned
cars at a great sacrifice.
flJ/IAC—1922 F0RD f'VE PAS-
tJ/^ttJf/ Benger touring. This
car is in splendid condition, and has
not run more than one thousand miles.
If you want to get a new car at a used
ear price, you can't heat this.
(fiA Qf»—1922 FORD FIVE PAS-
iPTbOtJ senger touring, complete with self-starter, demountable
rims, etc. This car has done considerable more running than the one above
has done, but It has been completely
overhauled In our own shops, and il
is fully guaranteed. ,
(fiA CA~ml P0RD FIVE PAS'
•JjTItJvr senger touring complete with all the latest Improvements.
It has been completely overhauled and
repainted, and Is guaranteed to give
you real satisfaction.
(P/IOC—1921 P0RD F1VE PAS"
«Pr4^dtJ senger touring. This
car has been privately owned, and
driven by one man since new. It has
been overhauled, and Is at present In
the paint shop.
((ftQn't—1921 FORD LIGHT DE-
tpO I *J Uvery. This is a chance
to get a real snap. We have overhauled this ear and it Is complete with
self-starter, demountable rims, etc.,
all for the price you would havo to
pay for an old model car.
mQp»/\—LATE MODEL FORD
tpOuU Roadster, complete with
self-starter, etc. This car is one of
the best buyB wc have to offer. The
outward appearance Is fine, and the
engine is chock full of pep.
rt» Q J>» /\—LATE MODEL FORD,
tpOvvr five passenger, touring.
This car has been well taken care of
and driven by a very careful driver.
If you require a car around this price,
we would specially recommend this
buy.
4*QAA—F0RD FIVE PASSEN-
tpOi/U ger 1919 model. This
car has good tires, demountable rims,
and the upholstery aB good as new.
You would have to see this one to
realize the value you are getting.
mrtWJ>»—FORD FIVE PASSEN-"
tp4 I 0 ger touring. The most
important feature about this car is
the engine, and if you are interested
just ring up nt our expense and we
will show you how It can pull.
QtftAA—FORD FIVE PASSEN-
tp^Uv ger touring. Here Ib a
car, It's not much to look ot, hut will
last you a llfe-tlrao.
fl»-|QP»—FORD LIGHT DELIV-
Jp J. t/O ery, 1918 model. If you
have any hauling to do, ryou can't afford to he without this cor.
fl»fyp»—LAST, BUT NOT LEAST,
JJ) | O wo offer a real FORD CAR
to the Ilrst one here with a cheque for
175.00.
Above cars will bo on view Saturday morning, and each one will have a
ticket on the Btecrlng wheal.
COME AN" LOOK THEM OVEK
Personal Mention
January   Sale   now   on.     Lavert
Store, Conrtenay.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (D)
Lid., left for Victoria Monday morning.
* *   *
Miss Margery Mlchell returned from
Victoria Sunday evening after spending a holiday there.
*-"*■&
Arthur Owen returned to Nanaimo
Sunday after spending the last four
weeks with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
W. A. Owen.
* «   •
Morton, Thomas and Pierce Grnhain
returned to University School, Victoria, on Monday morning, after spending a month's vacation with their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham.
* *   *
Mr, W. A. Owen returned from Nanaimo on Wednesday evening.
* »   *
Mrs. John Newton, of Nanaimo, arrived on Monday on a visit to Mrs.
Thomas Graham,
* *   *
Mrs. T. W. Scott entertained a number of friends at bridge un Wednesday
evening last.
* *   *
Mr. T. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, is In town this week.
* *   *
Hawthorne and Thomas Graham returned to University School, Victoria,
on Monday after spending the holiday
with their parents, Mr. and MrB.
Charles Graham.
* *   *
Mr. Stanley Jemson, of Nanaimo
was in town last week-end-
v      +      *
Miss F. Sehl, of the Hospital, who
has been spending the last month visiting her parents in Victoria, and also
other friends in the Sound cities, returned Friday.
* *    +
Mr. J. English returned from Vancouver last week.
* +   *
Mr. Thomas Menzles, M.P.P., returned to the Capital Saturday after
spending a few days In the district
conferring with his constituents,
* ♦   *
Parents desiring (o enroll their
children with the February receiving
class will kindly send child's name and
age to the principal, Mr. A. H. Webb,
as soon as possible.
* *   «
Mrs. J. Grainger left for Vancouver
Thursday morning.
* *   *
Mr. T. Hudson, of Union Bay, went
to Nanaimo Tuesday on business.
* *   ♦
We were pleased to have Mr. Chas.
and Carl Thulin, of Campbell River,
pay us a visit Thursday.
* *    *
The Pythian Sisters will hold their
sewing meeting on Wednesday evening, January' 24th, at the home of Mrs.
Dan. Stewart.
James Marshall, of the North Held
football team, was fined $20 and costs
or thirty days ln jail by Magistrate
Bever-Potta for assaulting a referee
In a recent Northfleld-Daveiiport game.
*   *   *
Nanaimo defeated South Wellington
2-1 in this series. The semi-finals are
scheduled for March.
LOST
LOST — 1923 CHEVROLET CRANK
handle, arouud city, probably ou
western end of Dunsmuir Avenue.
Will Under please return to Islander
office.
FARM  WANTED
WANTED—TO   HEAR   FROM OWN-
crs of good  farm  for sale. State
cash price, full particulars. D. F.
Hush, Minneapolis, Minn.
HELP WANTED
Corfield Motors Ltd
FORD DEALERS
COtBTENAY, B.C. PHONE 46
WANTED — A MAN IN EVERY
town In Canada, to tuke the exclU'j
nlve agency and sell to homos, n
newly Inventod, fast selling household article of merit. Hustlers cm
make good wages. Small nmoun|
of money required as deposit. Write
for descriptive literature and fill'
particulars. Western Manufacturers, 533 Pender St. West, Vancouver, B.C.
WANTED—EVERYWHERE IN BRI-
ish Columbia, capable canvassers for
attractive and remunerative proposition. Write Immediately to II. V.
McKlnnon. 907 Rogers Building.
Vancouver, B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■ B. C.
Clearance Sale
20 PER CENT. DISCOUNT ON GREY ENGLISH
ENAMELWARE
3-qt. Coffee Pots.
2-qt. Tea Pots. j
5-qt. Kettles.
2'|;-qt.   Lipped  Sauce-     j
pans.
4-qt. Lipped Saucepans,
Medium Wash Bowls or
Basins.
Large  Preserving
Kettles,
Deep Pie Plates,
2-qt.    Deep    Pudding
Bowls.
lVs-qt. Dipper Mugs.
8-qt.    Deep    Pudding
Bowls.
1-qt.  Mixing or Soup
Bowls.
12-qt.   Rolled   Edge
Saucepans.
Medium, Size Chambers.
Round Double Roasters.
3-qt. Boilers.
8-qt. Windsor Kettles.
12-qt. Seamless Water
JUST
Table Brushes, all sizes.
Laundry   Brushes,   all
sizes.
Shoe Brushes,
Shoe Daubers.
Stove Brushes,
Dusting   Brushes,   all
sizes.
Nail Brushes.
Brooms, all sizes.
Hair Brooms.
ARRIVED
Mops and Mop Rags.
Liquid   Veneer   Mops,
round and triangle.
Princess Soap Flakes, 6
packages for 25c.
O-Cedar Mops.
Solvene Shredded Soap,
per tin, 15c.
Castile Soap Bars, 25c;
2 for 45c.
COFFEE AND TEA ADVANCES
Our Prices Are Still the Same.
Coffee, Fresh Ground
B. & B. Supreme, per
lb., 70c.
B. & B. No. 1, lb., 60c.
B. & B, No. 2, lb., 50c.
B. & B. Choice Tea, per
lb., 50c.
Our Special Blend Ceylon Tea, per lb., 60c.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38—FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
Cumberland     z    ::    ::    B. C.
AUCTION
SALE
ANOTHER ONE SOON.
What Have YOU to SELL?
The success of a business depends on the service
given.  I am to give the best service and shall continue
to do so.
E. FEUX THOMAS
Auctioneer :: All Kinds of Insurance :: Notary Public
Office: Booth Block :    COURTENAY   :   Phone 151
House Phone: 24-L
WE HAVE ON HAND
A set of Wind Deflectors, making driving a pleasure
this cold weather.'
Float-a-Ford Shock Absorbers, $25.00. They take
all ruts out of the road. You return fresh from an
all-day ride.
LATHE  WORK  AND  WELDING,  MECHANICAL
REPAIRS, ALL ATTENDED TO BY AN EXPERT.
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU.
Pidcock Garage
TELEPHONE 25
Hospital Acknowledgement
There were two omissions In the list
of acknowledgements by the Cumberland Hospital, They re the City Band
for music and the school boys for singing carols.
* *   *
.Mrs. James Hayworth is visiting
relatives In Minnesota, U.S.A., nnd will
ho there for about two months before
returning,
♦ *   *
Miss W. Fowlor, of the Btalt of tho
Cumberland Hospital, went to Victoria
on Tuesday, returning Friday.
City Clerk^ Wanted
Salary $60 per month.   Applicants
to give qualifications and references,
and state the number of hours they
are prepared to give the work.,.,
T. MORDY,
City Clerk.
IMPORTANT MEETING
The annual meeting of the Women's
Auxiliary of the Cumberland General
Hospital will be held In the Anglican
Church Hall on Friday, January 26th,
at 3 p.EL      AMY SCOTT,     Hon. See

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