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The Cumberland Islander Sep 25, 1920

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 39.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1820
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUAL
" The Woman Thou
Gavest Me "
Hall Caine's Story Big Feature
Show at the Ilo-llo Theatre
This Evening.
Comox Fall Fair
Next Week
MoBt people have read Hall Calue's
masterpiece, "The Woman Thou Caveat Me," and those who have not probably wlll sooner or later. Either class
will enjoy the remarkable presentation ot this story upon the screen at
the Ilo-llo Theatre this evening. Tlie
picture was directed by Hugh Ford
and Is a Paramouut-Artcraft special
of tbe highest class.
A cast of super-excellence Interprets
the characters. Katherine MacDonald
Is Mary; Jack Holt Is Lord Raa, Alma
Lier ls played by Frltzl Brunette, Milton Sills does Cunrud and Theodore
Roberts Is Daniel, the stern fatelir of
Mary. The aunt is played by [Catherine Qriflith. The settings and locations of the exterior scenes are alike
realistic and beautiful. The picture |
covers India, Africa, Egypt and tlie
Antarctic. Every scene is vividly portrayed.
The story concerns Mary MacNeill,
married to a man she hates, Lord Una,
a rake and a beast. She refuses to
be more than wife lu name and be goes
his way with an afllnity. Mary meets
all old lover, Martin Conrad, an explorer, and they are thrown together
in Africa and In the heart of the Immensity they are played with by Fate
as the wind toys Willi tlie desert sand.
Martin goes back to the polar regions and Mary with hor child is in
London. Then she hears lie is dead.
Lord Raa returns from India and
Mary's father, who has forceh the
hateful marriage upon her to satisfy
his own selfish enas, insists that the
husband shall be sponsor for the child.
Bat Mary escapes with tlle baby and
goes to London, ln the end she ls
forced upon the street and accosts a
man who emerges from the dense fog.
It ls Conrad, back from the dead,
searching the world over for Mary.
The dramatic features of the story
are deftly and delicately handled, yet
always with a vigor that makes them
convincing. Tlie direction throughout
is highly artistic.
Miss MacDonald as Mary is exquisite and gives a wonderfully strong performance. The same may be said of
the others and In every way this pic.
tare offers the best posible entertain
ment for those who like real drama
which wrings the ends happily for
those who deserve happiness.
There will be two shows this evening, the first commencing at (i.30. A
matinee will take place this afternoon
commencing at 3 o'clock.
Entries for the Comox Fall Fair,
wliieh is to be held on Tuesday alld
Wednesday of next week, are pouring
in, and indications look to this being
one of the best fairs ever held in this
locality. The first day Is set aside for
the judging of exhibits in the ball and
there are usually very few of the public present, but Wednesday is tho big
day. and given line weather n great
number wlll attend the show.
The programme as far as it hns been
'ranged is as follows:
Titesdliy, September *.'■*.
Judging uf all* fruit and all hall
exhibits.
Wednesday, Sept. 28.
9 a.m.—Fair opens.
10 a.in.—Judging of stock commences.
11 a.m.—Opening uf fair by Hon. E.
D. Barrow.
12 noon—Hot lunch served by the
Ladies' Auxiliary.
2 to 4.30—Lectures commence in
tent.
:i p.m.- -Baseball mutch, Courtenay
vs. Powell River.
4.30 p.m.—Demonstration of lace-
inuklug by Miss Spencer and Denman
Island ladies.
LIBERTY LEAGUE MEETING
Government Control To Be First Aim of Cumberland Branch—
President and Vice-President of Liberty League Address
Meeting in Ilo-llo Theatre Thursday Evening.
Lady Missionaries
Visit Cumberland
Two of Them Address the Congregation in Holy Trinity
on Sunday Evening.
TAG DAY TO BE HELD
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9
The Women's Auxiliary of the General Hospital intend holding a tag duy
ou behalf of the hospital on Saturday,
October 9th. Commutes are being appointed to handle the affair at Union
Bay and Bevan.
Nanaimo City
Defeat Ladysmith
Nniiulnio City Defeated Lailysmltk
And United (Jot The Better ol
(Irani))*.
Nanaimo City defeated Ladysmith
by a score of 1 to 0 on Sunday, and
by reason of tlie victory went to
the top of the Up-Island league with
a lead of one point over Soith Wellington, who journeyed to Cumberland and took two points from the
champioiiB hy tlie close margin of
one goal to nil.
The game between Nanaimo Unite***,
and Granby played on tlie Nanaimo
ground, resulted In a win for United
by a score of two goals to one, the
game being played on a slippery field.
At half time tlie score stood one goal
each, Husband registering the winning goal for United during the second
period of pl»y.
As a result of Sunday's games the
League standing is as follows:
W.  L.   D.  Pts.
Nanaimo City   2    0     0     4
South Wellington   10     13
Nanaimo United   110    2
Cumberland    110    2
Granby   0     1     1     i
Ladysmith   0     2     0    0
Owing to the visit of the Monteagle
to Union Bay for coal on Sunday Inst
on her outward trip, a party of four
lady missionaries of tlie Anglican
Church—who are on their way to the
Far East—were able to take part in
the Anglican services at Union Bay
and Cumberland on Sunday.
Miss Jenkins, who is on her way to
the diocese of Houan, China, and Miss
Hamilton, who is returning to Japan,
gave short addresses at Union Bay.
Deaconess Hawkins, who is going
out to Japan, and Miss Cooper Robinson, daughter of the Rev. J. Cooper
Robinson, who lias been a missionary
of the Canadian Church in Japan for
over 30 years, is returning to Japan
after furlough, gnve very Interesting
addresses nt the evening service lu
Holy Trinity Church.
Cumberland will thus be the last
point in Canada where the ladles took
part in Church services before leaving
for the mission field.
Police Court
Before Jliiglstrulc J. Iliilrd.
Sam Stanway and his brother and
W. Hudson, boys of Cumberland, were
euch fined $5 and costs for damaging
fruit trees in the garden of Mrs.
Fraser.
I-ninuglin** (-aniens u Serious Offence.
Tlie magistrate pointed out the seriousness of the offence, informing the
boys that If they were again charged
witli a similar offence they would be
liable to two years' Imprisonment.
Boys of the town who have a habit
of helping themselves to fruit on the
trees—and at tlle same time damaging
the trees and gardens in many cases—
will tlo well to take warning, as tlie
authorities are determined to put
down these prnctices.
New Shoe Store
Tomorrow's (lames.
Nanaimo United at Granby.
Ladysmith at South Wellington.
Cumberland at Nanaimo City.
Mr. Cavin Opens Exclusive Shoe
Store in Building Erected
For That Purpose.
Cumberland now enjoys the possession of a new store devoted exclusively
to the boot and shoe business. Mr.
Caviu today opened the doors of his
new store next to the Waverley Hotel,
which place lias been specially erected
for bis use by .Mr. Frank Dallos. II Is
a very creditable addition to tlie stores
of the city.
Mr. Cavin took possession a couple
of duys ago and has been busy unpacking and arranging his new stock
of boots and shoes. He has a large
and well assorted line of high-grade
goods, and should he able to satisfactorily fill the needs of all comers-
women, men, children, miners, spots-
men, etc.
He Invites the public to step in and
look around. Mr. Cavin specializes In
good solid leather shoes, and he expects every pair he sells to get liim a
regular customer.
Mr. J. II. Gillespie, President of tlie
Liberty League of Vancouver Island,
with headquarters at Victoria, and
Mr. T. C. Cross, Vice-president, addressed u meeting In the Ilo-llo The-
atre Thursday evening. This meeting
wus called with the Idea of the formation of u branch of tho league In Cumberland. Its objects principally are
akin to those of the Moderation
League, which operates on the Mainland, tho Liberty League being a Vancouver island organization, with head
quarters at 203 Belmont House, Vic
toria.
The first aim of the league Is to
work for the success of Government
Control at tho Prohibition Plebiscite
to be held on October 20 next.
Mr. H. G. McKinnon was chairman
of the meeting, which was somewhat
disappointing as regards numbers. In
his opening remarljs Mr. McKinnon
said, Inter alia:
These gentlemen represent a movement whose object is to steer a safe,
sane and temperate middle course between all extremes of whatever nature. A review of history finds that
the extreme rushed for by society to
seek alleviation from another extreme
invariably reacts to defeat the purpose. In a period of mental turmoil
due to stress of a world at war, a
minority of mistaken though possibly
well-meaning reformers, so prevailed
on the sentiments and emotions of tlie
people that they succeeded in writing
on the statute books of B. C. a Prohibition Act so-called, a law that the
leaders of tbe government have
peatedly stated is utterly Impossible
to enforce. A strange condition, truly,
and quite obvious—to the thinking
men and women a condition not to be
wondered at, as alcohol exists sc
abundantly in nature, It being ae
necessary as oxygen for the propagation of ail animal and plant life, glv
Ing life an color to all vegetation,
sweetening to sugar and leaven to
bread. Alcohol, a natural, native element, is here to stay, and cannot be
prohibited. As well try to prohibit the
operation of Ihe force of gravity.
It ls a factor to be reckoned with In
our HveB, that has got to be overcome
by the Individual. This can only be
done by personal example in moderation and temperance. It can never be
eliminated by statute, try how we
will.
Pernicious Legislation.
The records of responsible government show that legislation in advance
of tlie people, such as this, therefore,
lacking their co-operation lu Its enforcement, Is peruiciouB In principle
and dangerous in practice, causing
flagrant violations, striking blows at
the root of true democracy by utter
contempt and disrepute of society's
very foundations—law and order.
What we want on our statute books
are laws with which the people are
aulliciently in sympathy with lo uphold and obey—laws begat of vision,
laws uhpntched by amendments—laws
tiiat should not be broken.
In touching the hearts of the people
their pocketbooks were also touched
to the extent that the primitive and
obnoxious poll-tax was resuscitated to
help Hill an empty exchequer and to
finance the army of spies necessary to
enforce a law which is not enforcible,
and which thc majority of people resent as an encroachment on their personal liberties, thus making criminals
of otherwise estimable and respectable
citizens.
On this particular subject we observe divided opinions in every profession, group and even family, and
now as never before are we called
upon to use to the fullest our common sense to enact and bring Into being such legislation as will adequately
regulate the liquor traffic and remove
forever the evils that have become
associated with its use and sale.
Flourishing Branches.
Mr. J. H. Gillespie, who was the
next speaker, said they wanted to form
a branch here and make it a permanent organization. In these days, said
the speaker, laws are put on the
statute books which affect the liberty
of the individual. The other day a
gentleman came from Alberta trying
to prohibit shooting on Sunday. They
endeavored to prohibit smoking, and
even picnics were assailed. He spoke
of the success which had attended
their efforts to establish branches at
other points on the Island. Branches
had been established at Duncan, Cas-
sldy, Ladysmith, Parksvllle, Courtenay, Qualicum, etc., and some of
these were In a very flourishing slate.
Some of the meetings bail been most
enthusiastic, and voles favoring government control had big majorities.
The speaker laid emphasis on the
necessity of every voter going to tlie
polls on October 20. for they must
give government control a big majority on Vancouver Island.
He urged all present to sign membership cards. There are no fees in
the Liberty League, they only expected that local brandies hear the Incidental local expenses, such as postage,
etc.
Mr. C. T, Cross, the next speaker,
aald the Moderation League was an
organization similar tu tlie Liberty
League except that II was not Incorporated under our laws. The Liberty
League had thought it advisable to Incorporate, so as to be a political organization.
Hirelings Instruct II. ('. People.
We are faced today with a situation
where hirelings are brought here from
other provinces and from across Hie
border to tell the people of British
Columbia what Is good for them. We
believe the people of B. C. can decide
for themselves. He created laughter
when he told the audience that Mr.
Bell. M.P. for Victoria, had gone to
Scotland to tell tho people there they
should not drink Scotch whisky!
Thc Prohibition Party had much
money to spend. Undoubtedly this
was provided by a certain company
maaufacturlng a soft drink.
The speaker bad been assured that
there was not a single Prohibitionist
at Merville. In Victoria they felt sure
of a 3 to 2 vote for government control, and possibly a 2 to 1. But they
wanted every vote In case of a possible
adverse vote In other parts of the
province. Every man and woman on
the "list should go tu the pulls on October 20.
If the Prohibition vote carries the
government will call in the heads of
the Prohibition Party for advice. On
the other hand, if government control
carries the government had promised
to invite the beads of the Moderation
and Liberty Leagues so as to have
the benefit of their advice in dealing
with the question.
If Prohibition carried, Sir. Cross
had been assured by a member of the
government that they were going to
enforce it, though it would take every
dollar the government got above the
money necessary to meet interest on
loans. j
1200 Illicit Stills.
In one American State, before tlfe
war there were 100 illicit stills—last
year there were 1200—becaase tlie
people must have alcohol in some
form.
The Provincial government bad gone
on record that if Prohibition carried
they would, at the next session, apply
to tlie Dominion government to take a
plebiscite to stop the Importation of
liquor.
The present legislation wus class
legislation In that It permitted those
who could afford to do so to fill their
cellars. Many people had sufficient
liquor In their cellars to last them a
lifetime. One agent iu Victoria had
told him that since the war no less
than $6,000,000 had gone out of Victoria alouo for liquor!
Speaking of Hie present Prohibition
Act, Mr. Cross said Ihe act gave policemen the power to search anyone's
house If he "imagined" Ihe householder was uelllng liquor; and furthermore if lie found utensils customary
In bars, I.e., tumblers and decanters,
he could charge Ihetu with selling
liquor, and thc onus of producing
proof to the contrary was on the
accused! It was most un-British, said
the speaker.
Wauls All Drinkers Licensed.
We are not asking for th e return of
the bar but for a sane lliquor bill,
which will give us sucli liquor as we
desire, provided we do nol annoy our
neighbors. The Liberty Lca.guc wants
any adult desiring liquor to get a
licence at a nominal sum, say ^G cents.
Should any licensee lie convicted ol
drunkenness his licence should be tuts-
ponded for one year, and should* any
further conviction lie recorded aga.'ust
him ills licence should be sii,spci*'led
for ever. It should be an offence for
any person to supply and suspended
person witli drink.   They tni'jst liavd
Contract Awarded
For Athletic Hall
The contract for tlie erection of the
Athletic Club Huilding 1ms been
awarded hy the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., to the H. P. Peterson
Construction Co. Ltd., of Vancouver.
This firm handled the removal of the
houses to the new townsite from
Bevan in 1918.
The new huilding will start on 1st
of October and construction work
rushed until the roof and walls are
completed, thus taking advantage of
whatever line weather will be available.
Champions Lose
By Odd Goal
DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
AT CAMPBELL RIVER
His Excellency the Duke of Devon-
will be nt Campbell Kiver this week.
He is going there for the Ashing. The
Duke and Duchess were In this district
last year closely following the visit of
the Prince of Wules but they hud no
time to go farther north. The visit
Is purely an informal one, but the
residents hearing of it have arranged
for a dance in Their Excellencies
honor tonight.
Wedding
IIKJiDEHSO.N-MITdlEM,.
A qulel und pretty wedding took
place at Puntledge on Tuesday, Sept.
21, when Helen F. Mitchell, only
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robt,
Mitchell, was married to Alexander
Henderson, second son of Mr. and Mrs.
Wm. Henderson of this city. Tlle
ceremony was performed by Rev. G.
Kinney of Cruce Methodist Charch.
The bride wns attended by Miss E.
Henderson, 3lster of the groom, while
the bridegroom was attended by Mr.
Thos. Mitchell, brother of the bride.
The bride was attired in a suit of
dark brown broadcloth, heavily embroidered, with picture hat of brown
velvet and black fox furB. The bridesmaid wore a dress of white voile and
white picture hat.
Following the ceremony, a wedding
breakfast was held at the residence of
(lie bride's parents, at which place tbe
wedding ceremony was performed.
A number of relatives and friends of
the contracting couple motored from
Cumberland to attend the ceremony.
After the honeymoon, which ls being
spent at Victoria and Mainland points.
Mr. and Mrs. Henderson wi(J take up
their residence in this city.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
Sept. 16—J. C. Potter. Ocean Falls;
Phoenix and Achates, coastwise.
Sept. 18—Wairuna, San Francisco;
Protective and Scow, New Westminster; Esdud, coastwise.
Sept. 19—Coaster, coastwise.
Sept. 20—Monteagle. Japan; Glen-
boro. coastwise; Richard Hoiyoke and
Scows, Seattle.
Sept. 21—Daring and Scow, Vancouver; Active, Coastwise.
Sept. 22—Princess Ena, Cleeve.
coastwise; Tartar, Ocean Falls.
Plebiscite Oct. 20
The  Prohibition  plebiscite is to
taken oil Wednesday, October 20.
GRACE METHODIST
TEA WELL ATTENDED
The Ladles' Aid of draco Methodist
chinch held an afternoon ten in the
parsonage yesterday afternoon from ?,
fi at which a large representation of
all the churches attended, a pleasant
time being spent. Contributions were
received for the purpose of providing
new hymn books for the church.
The young people held a social
evening at the parsonage later for the
same purpose.
no sympathy for men who got drunk.
It was tho drunkard who had given
the prohibitionists (heir best argument.
Near beer war, not supposed to con-
tuin more than 2\'2 per cent, alcohol—
as a matter of fact It was nearer 8 per
cent. If Prohibition carried the government intended to put an inspector
in every brewery, who would Inspect
all beer manufactured and stop any
leaving the brewery which wns over
2'/j per cent.
Mr. Cross advocated Fill per cent, of
the profits under government control
going to the municipalities from which
it was derived.
Cumborland went down to defeat in
their first home game of the Upper
Island League. South Wellington getting tlie points.
Weather conditions were of tlie
vilest, rain falling continuously during
the game, as it had been doing mostly
for the previous ten days, yel the
ground Blood Ihe test well, and if it
has lien said lu the past, that Cumborland hud the worst playing pitch in
the province, thai saying can be reversed and they can now lay claim to
the best.
Referee Watson started the game
promptly on time, before a fair ai-
t'cnduui'e of spectators, who lind courage enough lo brave the elements.
For the first ten minutes It looked
like easy money for the locals, but
South Wellington finding their feet
and udaplliig themselves to tlie ground
conditions, look up tiie pressure and
continued to do so during the bulk of
the lirst half.
After twenty-five minutes play Uow-
man scored the lirst, und what proved
to be the only goul. The visitors deserved Ihe point, their forwards combining much better thun the local
front rank.
Locals Improve In Second Hull*.
South Wellington had the edge during the remainder of this half, but
were kept well away from Clark,
Smith and Campbell covering up well.
After ten minutes respite, the teams
resumed the struggle, Cumberland
starting out bent 011 beating "Shepherd," of Sooth Wellington, who had
the pull In thc lirst position. Tk«
locals were much stronger during the
second half of tlie game. Corner nttem
comer was forced, and well placed,
but "Sally" was always on the Job.
The pep seemed to have been taken
out ot South Wellington, and excetit
for an occasional break away they
were continually on tiie defensive, nnd
did not hesitate to bang the ball out of
the grounds in order to kill time.
Sheppard in goal was a tower of
strength to the visitors. The hacks
and the centre hall were untiring lu
their efforts' (0 keep the champions
out. Strang, James and Home were .
working like trojans (o get the equalizer, hut try as they would they could
not get Ihiougli.
Had the forwards kept the ball on
the ground at the latter stage of the
game they would have made belter
headway. The ground was cutting up
In spots towards the finish of the gam
referee was in doubt about calling the
game off.
Time was called with South Wellington winners of what must have
been a gruelling game for ihe players.
The visitors were lucky to get away
with a win, Cumberland being much
the better team during the second
half, forcing no less Ihiin six corners,
and "Salty" handled three shots for"'
every one that Clark got.
South Wellington has a strong defence. McFagan and Potter at back
and Stubbart at centre half take some
beating.
Ground conditions were against tlie
locals, as their forwards always do
better on a hard, dry pitch. They
never seemed to settle down to the
game they usually play, and there was
too much individualism and too little
combination, The bocks, Campbell
and Smith, played a safe game, and
should improve as the season goes on.
The halves were untiring iu Ihelr
efforts nnd came near pulling Die
game nut of the fire for Ihe forwards,
Home and Strang having shois thai
Just missed by Inches. James was the
pick of Hip front rank, and deserved
better luck with several of his attempts.
Soulh Wellington's win makes Ihe
struggle for league honors worth
welching, as all the tennis seem to bo
ivell matched.
High School Club
Last Friday evening the Cumberland
High School Club elected their officers
for the term. Tho members showed
their appreciation of Mr. Colin Campbell's efforts on their behalf by elect-
ng him honorary president, while the
management of the club will lie in the
hands of Mr. I). Watson as president
and Messrs. II. Stewart and F. Mac-
Kii a as secretary and treasurer respectively.
Plans are being worked out for a
great variety of activities, of which
football will probably lake the leading
place. The enthusiasm of the members augurs well tor a very successful
yen I*. ********
********
Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 25, 1920.
GAMES
FOR THE  LONG EVENINGS
Now that the long evenings of Fall and Winter are
upon us, you will require some interesting games to
help pass the time pleasantly. We havo received a
large assortment of popular and novel games, etc.,
including—
CHECKER 130ARDS—Folding heavy cardboard, with
15 black and 15 white checkers.
PARCHES1—The game that has been very popular for
years. Highly lightographed board, for 2, 3 or 4
players.
OU1JA BOARDS—A very interesting and mystifying
game. Supposed to answer questions, past, present and future. Will supply amusement for long
evenings.
CHESS, DRAUGHTS AND CKOKINOLE.
SMALL CARD GAMES, ETC., IN LARGE VARIETY.
P. 0. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,
JMITED
Ask for the'Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
CaSCade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION  BREWING  CO.,   LTD
NANAIMO, B.C.
A Straight Message
To Your Interest As Much As Mine
A WORKINGMAN'S OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A
FORTUNE
I menu eiery word uf I lie above statement und II J nil will only
giie nn- llu- opportunity, I can absolutely convince tin- most
skeptical, (lit- must suspicious mini union*.' you, Hint I am really
offering yon an opportunity. Thai is genuine. That Is honest.
Tlml is a real opportunity anil mil merely u dream. I own three
dllTercnl Groups of rich Silver Sillies in Ihe famous Shiran Mill-
Ing District. I am giving up n hall' Interest in those properties
lo secure the iieeessurj cnpll'il tn put them on u paying hnsls.
Tin* syndicate Is composed of only l.llllll shares. Wc are soiling
five hundred shares ul *iiiii each. Vie started work on one
group August llrsl, and ne are shlppln-r ore from II now. Will I inure mono) In get II (hers started.    Help us nun, ne
»ill help you litter.  Write for full particulars, copy ni Kugllicer's
liepurl, *;<<iiil assays nnd smeller returns In
R. G. McLEOD
533 Pender Street West VANCOUVER, B. ('.
GLANDS OF YOUTH
PUT IN OUEGONIANS
SETTLING WITH THK PLUMBER
I thought I was not going to he able
to meet ray plumber's bill. He hart
been working about the house quite a
little, off and on. But I settled it, all
right. I gave him my house and he
gave me one dollar and eighty cents
in change.
"He is quite an artist, isn't he?"
asked Smith. "Yes," replied Brown.
"He painted an apple last week, and
the critics agreed it was rotten."
Moat of us don't want the government to squander our money because
•we want to do it ourselves.   M
PURCHASING AGENT'S BEST KID
The doctor stood at the bedside of
the purchasing agent, and said, "Yes,
I'm pretty sure I can cure you."
"What will be your charge?"
"Probably in tbe neighborhood of
nne hundred dollar:*!."
The buyer rolled over with a groan
and faintly replied, "You'll have to
shade that price considerably. I have
a much better bid than that from the
undertaker."
Some girls never can learn to swim.
There's one who's had a different man
teaching her every year since 1!)1C,
and she still hollers for help..
Goats Used in Operations—Ex
periments Successful—Lasting Benefits Predicted.
The transplanting of goat glands to
the human body lias been successfully
performed in Portland in 34 instances,
in all of which the patient has been
made fully ten years younger in vital
ity and general good spirits.
This is the announcement following
a series of experimental operation
performed by Dr, M. Ci. McCorkle, the
experiments covering a period of ten
months. Each of the 34 operations, ii
is stated, proved successful in reju
vena-ting the patient.
The operations have not been confined to men alone; seven women hav
undergone    the    gland    transplanting
and received benefit.
Great Future Predicted.
The operations have all proved si
successful that Dr. McCorkle predict
a great future for the gland operation
method of making 'the old feel young
and the young feel gay."
"1 have so much confidence in the
results of my experiments that I
sider the gland operation, discovered
a few years ago by a Chicago physician, to be one of the medical achieve
meats of the age," he declared, "i
alrio believe thut this work will prove
one of the big fields for medical development and activity of the near
future."
Dr. McCorkle said that he planned
to go east and confer with other pioneers in experimentation with tbe goat
gland operation. This, he said, would
give a chance to compare notes with
some of the best authorities. During
the coming winter he intends introducing a large number of the patients
'..ho bad undergone his operations to
the local medical society.
AmistlicKlu Is Only Local.
The operation, as it has been performed during these series of experiments, is a simple one and is done
under only local anasthesia. There is
but little pain involved for the patient and the immediate after-effects
are not of a serious character, Dr. McCorkle said.
The experiments which Dr. McCorkle has been performing for the
last several months have meant an
outlay of about ?700U, and all the
operations were performed free of
charge. The expenses included*tbe
purchase of about 300 goats, which
were cared for under tho physician's
directions, to Insure the greatest
cleanliness and health of the animals.
The physician announced
In this case, the Angora goat is the
"goat" of the operation. Tbe selection
of the type of animal was made be-
aiise goats are immune to many of
the diseases that attack mankind, including tuberculosis. The use of
monkey glands, which has been practised by some eastern physicians, was
said to invote tlie risk of transferring
disease.
Dr. McCorkle says that -the goat
glands, judging from experiments
which he had made iu the examination of patients who had undergone
flie operation, would last for years.
presumably the natural life of a goat,
which is 18 years. After the gland
had ceased to be of value it could be
replaced by another.
Speaking of the benefits, tlie doctor
declared that the patients showed remarkable improvement in both their
mental nad physical conditions. Patients formerly morose and worried
regain Spirits and face life with a new
outlook. In addition, patients with
extremely high blood pressure have
had almost unbelievable reductions in
assure and their various organs
net ion more normally.
Of Hie seven operations performed
upon women all the patients averaged
from 46 to -18 years, and a number
were suffering from nervousness and
oilier women's illnesses, lu each case
there was a noticeable benefit from
the operation.
The men who were operated on all
ranged in age from Ct to 74 years.
Dr, McCorkle said that it was a conservative estnmate to say that the
operation had In each instance made
the patient ten years younger. He
said that iu many instances the change
in the patient was apparently much in
excess of that.
AN OPEN LETTER TO
MR. WILLIAM SIKES
The following letter appeared in the
Vernon News last week and is well
worth reading.
Dear Sikes,—I was sorry not to have
been at home when chance, or, I am
vain enough to think, a desire to make
my closer acquaintance brought you
to my place on the eve of the shooting
season, Friday, September 3rd, wasn't
it?
I heard that you sat down on the
steps of my packing house and complacently munched a Duchess apple-
I don't admire your taste, by the way;
the unpicked Joffrys hanging within a
few yards of you are much nicer, ii
your teeth aie as good as your cheek
Perhaps the Jeffry apple reminded you
of a famous gunraaker of that name
aud your fancy lightly turned to
thoughts of guns. Or perhaps the eating of forbidden fruit recalled to your
mind a similar incident in which our
common ancestor played a leading, it
not a very creditable, part.. At any
rate your eye chanced to light on my
double-barrelled hammerless ejector
shot gun, 12 gauge, with a 1 stamped
in gold on the barrel near the breach,
by Jeffry of London (sounds like a cop
giving evidence in court, doesn't it) —
but, I forgot, you aren't in touch with
the seamy side of life, are you?' Your
evil angel said, "Borrow it for the
shooting season," and you promptly
took the hint, i hope it suits you and
has been successful iu securing a good
bag of grouse. I must say I admire a
man who gives his bird a flying chance
Instead of potting it with a .22.
The season is very short, just four
days more, so make the best of it, but,
when It's over, come and look me up
again. Bring a brace of birds along
with you (hang them on a nail well
out of ihe cat's way) and don't forget
the gun. Your good angel may tempt
you by whispering in your ear, "Be a
sport; put it back where you found it."
if you resist the temptation — I
scarcely think that sort of thing is
much in your line, however—you will
find in the same old corner my gun
case. Take it, old man, as a souvenir
of an absent friend and keep tbe gun
in it—it's worth taking care of, 1 can
tell you; it took me some years to save
enough money out of a parson's pay to
buy it and I flatter myself it can hold
its own in any company.
Talking of parsons reminds me of
one, a friend of mine, Woolley by
name, who served a slum parish in
Bethnal Green, London. One day
when he was on his way through a
mean street to visit his flock, a man
(curiously enough his name was William Sikes, too) relieved him of his
gold watch and took to his heels. On
reaching a street corner he turned
around to see if he was being followed
and then-what do you think he did?
He ran back and handed the watch to
its lawful owner with the remark,
Gawd bli" me, if it ain't the Reverend
Woolley."
Take a leaf out of that man's book,
old chap, and when you read this letter, say to yourself, "Gawd bli' me if it
ain't tbe Reverend Mackie."
Thanking you in anticipation, as the
begging-letter writers say, I am,
Yours expectantly,
AUGUSTINE MACKIE.
P.S.—I    couldn't    send    this    letter
through the mail as you forgot to
leave your address.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKHU1F1ELI),    Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. 11. C
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
a. oatz, Proprietor
BEES
DO NOT LIKE
PROHIBITION
GOOD «EATS
VENDOME
•   Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open  liny mid  Nidi!.
by selecting the shells that
hunters from coast to const
have proved dependable
under all conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
nre a doub'c assurance oi
success for tlie man who
prefers ballistite powder.
Wo ulso carry a full line of
Canuck and .Soverclrtn Shot-
ttlin Shells and Dominion
Metallic CartrllMM — <*:"*!i
backed by tin bis "B" traHo.
mark
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
AUTO
PAINTING
General Woodwork, Auto Bodies,
Trucks ond Wheels b-iHt L) order
Repairs  Promptly Attended to.
Jas, C. Allan
Cor. Prldenux & Fltzwllllnm Sis.
NANAIMO, B. C
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and_Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a SucclnltT.
CUMBERLAND.  B.O.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
ONE-PIECE BATHING SUITS
Mother—1 object to these one-piece
bathing suits.
Daughter—Oh! mother! I think I
might wear something.
An Irishman had squeezed himself
Into a scat In tho car between two fat
women, and presently began wrizzllng
about.
I'm afraid that you are not vers'
comfortable?" commented one of tiie
ladies.
"Well," said the man, "I haven't
niueli room to grumble."
The Department of Agriculture of
Washington, says a Central News dispatch, has received a report from a
farmer in Fairfax County, Vu., that lie
is experiencing considerable trouble
witli his bees. They huve tired of their
regular work of filling honeycombs,
he says, and from pure devilment have
dropped on tlie ground under his apple
trees und there muile themselves
drunk by consuming thc oozing juice
of decaying fruit. The fanner anticipates a serious financial loss owing lo
ills bees' behavior.
flow doth the busy Utile beo
Go posting to perdition—
The only U. S. nutlve free
To mock at Prohibition!  ,
From sea to sea no human thirst
Affronts the sober scheme;
Only tlie bee Is on the hurst
And. breaks Columbia's dream.
How strange that in that   land   of
drought
Our old Industrious model
Should take to drink and lie about
Too stewed to fly or toddle!
With all his labors unbegun
He snores beneath a tree
(Forgive an unintended pun)
As drunk as drunk can he.
0 Mussa Johnson (Pussyfoot),
Ere next you cross our border,
You'd better hustle round and put
Your own affairs in order;
To all the birds, from rook to wren,
St. Francis preached with ease—
Before you tackle us again
Convert those horrid bees!
—Manchester Guirdlan,
Fresh Stock of
MOIR'S
Chocolates
In All Flavors.
Large Stock of Nut Bars.
Tobaccos, Cigarettes and
Cigars.
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, .Hnti-rinl
and
Workmanship
('iinriiiitcfd
ItuMior Heels Fixed While II Walt
Phillips' Military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS   -   Dunsmuir Avenue
fjftat Mouth^
•  ^sonIa-jw1
"Stelf PealljvffJircWd
o
tiiig-tSjl T.;i^BJ.C..A.:iTI-;HT
*?**.""•':•' WIPP MOUTH JARJ
KEEP AH.I'hTil'roU' j
NO RUBBER WWiS0 M
aa*1_r-^a"':3*'''/
fvWti
ViKir'AJv
'■■•.i-ti^ff
tgm
SOLD BY
SIMON I.r'ISI'lt & CO, LTD.
DUNCAN HOTELKEEPERS
SUCCESSFULY APPEAL
JUNE CONVICTIONS
They Were Fined $800 for Unlawfully Having Liquor in
Bar and Selling It.
In the county court held nt Duncan
lest week His Honor Judge Barker allowed the appeols of Messrs. T. Marsden and A. Grifiln, licensees of the
Tzouhalem Bar, Duncan, against their
conviction In the Duncan police coure
on June 28th last on charges against
each of unlawfully keeping liquor in
the bar and of unlawfully keeping It
for sale there.   The lines imposed then
amounted to $800.
The city was represented by Mr. C.
F. Davie, who stated In court that
he did not see much use in bringing
up any more cases under the present
Prohibition Act, as it appeared that
the police, ill order to sustain a conviction, actually had to prove that the
proprietors brought the liquor into the
bar and sold it. Finding liquor in the
bar-room, he said, appeared to bo no
good ut all.
His Honor held that had the liquor
found been a larger quantity than the
"spoonful or so" it would have materially affected his decision.
Join the Liberty Lengno und vote for
Government Control.
■i September 25, 1920.
THE  CUMBfiRLAJfb   ISLANDEk
Three
if
*t
RANGES AND HEATERS
A FULL LINE OF HEATERS NOW SHOWING
NEW HOT BLAST RETORT, in three sizes, at $22.50,
$29.50 and $38.00.
FAIRY OAKS at $18.00 and $22.50.
TWILIGHT HEATERS, semi-open hearth, at $22.00
and $26.00.
REGALS, the best open-hearth style on the market.
at $30.00 and $35.00 each.
PLAIN  COAL  BURNERS.
AIRTIGHT WOOD BEATERS.
RANGES
We are offering: some very good prices on Ranges,
which it will be to your interest to investigate before
buying.
A FULL LINE OF HOUSEFURNISIJINGS
ALWAYS SHOWING.
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Prompt Service
FIRST   CLASS   REPAIRS
Full line of Accessories, including
some choice
AUTO RUGS
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Cumberland Motor Works
DO DIVERS SEE GHOSTS
IN THE VAST DEPTHS
Considering the number of people
who have found a last resting-place at
the bottom of the sea, it is not surprising lhat divers should occasionally
come across what are popularly
known as ghosts.
A diver, while" employed one day in
bringing up various articles from the
wreck of the "Royal George," which
went down off Spithead on August 28,
1782, being seized with a s*dden (it of
drowsiness, fell asleep. He dreamed
three times ln succession that just as
lie was about to pick up a curiously
wrought silver dish from among a
masB of debris, a very tall tlgure,
dressed In a diving-suit, sprang at him
and tried to cut the lifeline.
As at this time the other two men
lie wns working with were both of
short slnlure, not in the least degree
like the llguro In Ills dreams, he soon
forgot It.
But great was Ills trepidation one
morning when on turning up at his
work, he found one of his mates absent, and a newcomer—a very, tall
man—In his place. Indeed, so alarmed
was he that, on descending, lie took
witli liim a stout cudgel, and warned
those In chargo of tlie communication
rope to be on the alert for a signal,
however slight. On arriving at the
bottom he was soon ot work on the
wreck, and, amid a pile of loose spars,
he came upon a dish exactly like the
one he had seen in his dreams.
He was staring at it in a kind of
dazed fashion, when suddenly lie saw
Ills companion, the new diver, coming
towards him, just as he had seen the
figure in his dreams, and the next moment he was engaged in the most desperate struggle for his life.
He succeeded in administering
such a severe blow on tlie hand of his
assailant with his stick that the latter
dropped his knife with which he had
been armed, and before lie could pick
it up again our friend the dreamer
had pulled the communication cord,
and was drawn up out of danger. It
subsequently traimpired that the new
diver bad gone raving mad.
Another curious case occurred not
so many years ago off the coast of
Galwaj*. Some divers were employed
in looking for the remains of Spanish
treasures when one of his party,
wandering a little apart from the rest,
sam a dim light in the distance.
Advancing towards it. he discovered
that it proceeded from the porthole of
a wreckage of very ancient date.
Approaching the ship, not without
trepidation, he peeped in, and saw. to
his amazement, an old man, witli a
very long beard, kneeling down exam-
ing an iron-clasped oaken chest. By-
and-by he raised Ihe lid, and dipping
his hands In, drew them out full of
golden coins, which he ployed with
like a child plays with some new toy.
The diver, happening at this juncture to make a noise, tlie old man
turned slowly round, revealing a face
of the most phastly pallor, wliieh so
terrified the diver that he turned tall
and (led back to his mates, witli tar
more haste than dignity.
Pooh-poohing his story, they went
back with li|ni, and there, sure enough,
In the very spot he haddescrlbed, was
the ship, and, what was even more
wonderful, tlie chest of gold.
Lastly, there ls the case of the diver
who was repairing one of tlie Loudon
bridges. He had made his descent into the water, and was kneeling down
examining tlie masonry.' when he felt
something tapping, liim on the shoulder. He looked round when to Ills utmost terror he saw standing at his
shoulder, peering down at him, an exact counterpart of himself.
Tho following day, against tlie advice of ills wife, who was a Scot and
very superstitious, he again went
down ni the. same place, and, a piece
of loose masonry falling on him, he
was killed.
SHORT HOURS FOR
DUNCAN MERCHANTS
DUNCAN.—At a special meeting of
the Duncan branch, Retail Merchants
Association of Canada, held last week,
tlie committee appointed ou tlie previous day to ascertain their views concerning hours of business during the
winter, repurted that a large majority
of the members were in favor of continuing the curtailed hours adopted
this Bunimer. It was therefore decided that hereafter all stores belonging
to members of the association would
close at 5 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Fridays, aud 9.30 p.m.
on Saturdays.
FOR   TEA   LOVERS
ELITE TEA
THE TEA DE LUXE
A special blend of high-grown Ceylon, Assam and
mountain Dar.jeeling, together with a sprinkling of
Caravan China, Formosa and Scented Orange Pekoe.
Selected with a view of obtaining the maximum of
quality with a minimum of tannic acid. Peculiarly
adapted for those with whom as a rule tea dues not
agree.
Packed into a unique airtight, moisture-proof package.
$1.50 per pound
And money cannot buy better, or less money cannot
buy as good.
This tea is not expensive because you use less of it
than the ordinary kind.
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
SUPPOSING you went up to speak to a man you did
not know; and blurted out "Hello!" He would
doubtless look in wonderment at you, and then
he would ask, "Who arc you?" Then you would
apologize for not introducing yourself.
It's about the same thing when you say "Hello"
when answering a telephone call.   The person you are '
speaking to does not know who is at the other end of
the phone, and naturally he questions .who is speaking.
Don't say "Hello!"   Introduce yourself first thing.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
"The Woman Thou Gavest Me"
BY HALL CAINE
" The Woman
Thou Gavest Me
Striking Linos from Hull falne's Novel
See These Scenes In (lie Picture
Think what marirage means to a
woman—a young girl especially. It
means the beginning of a new life,
tho setting out Into an unknown world
on n voyage from which there can be
no return.
* *   *
• Do you know that thc man to whom
you are going to marry your daughter
is a profligate and a reprobate? If you
do know this, you are deliberately selling her, body and soul, to gratify your
rotten aspirations.
* •   *
Thus in my youth, my helplessness,
my ignorance and my inexperience, I
became engaged to a man who bad
been found and courted tor me. Love
had not spoken to me, sex was still
asleep in me, and my marriage was
arranged before my deeper nature
knew what was being done.
* -f   *
A married widow! Tho worst condition in the world for a woman—
especially if she is young and attractive, and subject to temptations.
cA Paramount (Artcraft Special
WIFE   IN   NAME  ONLY!
MARRIED! The record signed.    The words at the altar
spoken.   The world informed that this man and this
woman were one till their lives should end.
And it was all a ghastly lie!
He, a wastrel, traded his name for a wife, and money to
spend on his paramour.
She, a sweet innocent girl, was sold like a slave to feed her
father's lust for power. Sold to a man she loathed! Yet she
was glowing with youth, thirsting* for love and life.
Then came the inevitable-another man, finer, nobler than
any'she had known.
Played by a brilliant cast, including Katherine MacDonald,
Theodore Roberts, Milton Sills, Fritzi Brunette and Jack Holt.
If you have read the book you'll surely see the picture. If
you haven't read the book-you must see the picture.   Come!
DIRECTED BY HUGH FORD
" The Woman
Thou Gavest Me "
Striking Lines from Hull Callio's Norel
Sec those S eg in tlie Picture
When a woman lias been forced into a loveless marriage, ami it. is
crushing Ihe very soul out of her, and
the Iron law will not permit her lo
escape from It, what crime does she
commit if she Dees to a man to whom
she is married in her heart?
Had as'bls own life had been, he
considered he hail a right to Heat me
In tills way because he was a man and
I was a woman.
.   .   .
I knew that what bail long been
predestined had happened, thai the
wonderous new birth, the.Joyous mystery which comes to every woman in
the world, had come at last to me. I
was In love. I was In love with .Martin Conrad. Vet I wus married, and
lo love another than my husband was
sin.
.   *   .
Oh, you good women, who arc happy
in the love that guards yon. shields
you. wraps you round and keeps you
pure and true, -tread lightly over the
prostrate soul of your sister in her
a hour of trial and lierce temptation.
ILOILO
TONIGHT tour
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
September 25, 1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumborland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE  Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 25,  1920.
FACTS AKE ESSENTIAL
If there is a market for British Columbia iron and steel
sufficient to insure tlie constant operation of blast furnaces
and rolling mills their establishment should be completely
successful. Through more than two decades tiiis phase of
the subject has constituted the fly in tbe ointment and
nobody has offered any definite Information during that
time upon wliieh a reliable estimate ot* tlie prospects might
be arrived at.
The whole of the preliminary enquiry has concerned itself with the available supply of the raw material and the
method of its ultimate treatment. Happily, however, there
is reason to expect complete details about the all-essential
market in the report which Mr. Nlcol Thompson hns been
authorized to make by the Provincial Department of Industries. Wc are told that ho haa canvassed practically
every user of iron nnd steel on the Pacilic Coast, with tbe
result that the Government will be placed In possession of
the very information that should form the basis of hope or
disappointment In connection with the establishment of an
industry of this character. Mr. Thompson already has
stated that there is an actual market waiting to welcome
the British Columbia manufactured article to the extent
of llftecn hundred tons daily.
We presume, therefore, that that quantity—if continuously demanded—would warrant the launching of the
enterprise. How the Industry shall take shape and where
is a matter for experts to decide; tlie point upon which
the Province may congratulate itself is that there is now
In existence for the first time accurate data which seems to
indicate the brigbest of prospects. The public will await
with interest fuller details of Mr. Thompson's report-
Herald.
lit since tlie pale green shepherd's crooks uncoiled iu the
spring.
Sometimes tlie dogwood dresses in bright crimson In a
parting effort to beautify our valley.
Sometimes our Broad-leaved maple flames a golden ycl-
tow and the oak is dressed in rich uinbrous brown befitting
ts dignity; and jet, sometimes, our autumns slip by witli-
out any of these beautiful colors materializing and tlie
leaves turn a sickly yellow, shrivel and fall.
Whether or not we have brilliant autumn tints depends
on the stage which has been reached in the removal of the
food substances from the leaves, when the cold nights of
approaching autumn hurry the building of the little corky
partitions between leafstalk and branch which severs all
connection and the leaf fades and dies or dyes, as tlie
season decrees.—G. in Cowichan Leader.
PROHIBITION AND TAXES
Before going lo the polls on October 20th next, to east
his or her vote on the Temperance Plebiscite, it is tlie duty
of every elector o£ British Columbia to satisfy himself or
herself, as the case may be. upon the economic consequences which must follow the declaration of the will of
the majority, says "Liberty," the official organ of Uie
Liberty League. It is needless to refer to the present
financial status of British Columbia. The revenue is not
adequate tn the progressive necessities of the Province, yet
every possible source of income would seem to have been
taxed to the limit. In the face of this condition, the Prohibition Party asks you to vote for the present Prohibition
Act, to be followed by a referendum to prohibit entirely
the importation of liquor. No Act of Parliament should be
upon the statute books unless it is there to be enforced,
Under the present Prohibition Act the cost of the government dispensaries is barely met by the profit arising from
their operations. Of offences against the Prohibition Act,
perhaps one in every thousand is the subject of prosecution under the law. To prosecute every offender against
the act would require a force of men greater than that now
in the employ of the Provincial Government, and a sum of
money largely In excess of the present Provincial revenue,
Tiie increase in taxation to meet tlie demands of justice
if the present Prohibition Act continues in force, is so
.stupendous, that the Prohibition Party have very judiciously side-tracked that aspect of what the resnlts or
their efforts if successful will he, lest the taxpayers of
British Columbia despair of the future of this country.
ir, as is inevitable, Bone-Pry legislation follows the
approval of the existing Prohibition Act, to what extent will
the cost of enforcing these acts increase? There is not
enough money, there are not enough men to strictly enforce
both those acts in the Province of British Columbia. To
partially overcome them, the people of this Province would
be taxed to death, and the professional reformer would
smilingly ask for increased remuneration on account, of his
redoubled anxiety at the violation of the law.
The Prohibition Party claims that the lines aud penalties
Inflicted Tor the violation of the law would pay the cost of
enforcement. This is another example of Prohibition inconsistency. The Prohibition Party protests most strongly
against being made, as members of the body politic, partners iu liquor traffic by the Government, but that same
Prohibition Party is quite willing that, as members of the
body politic, their taxes may be lightened, by contributions
to tho Government exchequer from those who have broken
the law for which that Prohibition Party is responsible.
The Prohibition Party is only too willing that the Government, shall benefit by the price of crime-it is not willing
that, the Government shall benefit by legitimate trading.
Mr., Mrs. and Miss Taxpayer of British Columbnt, weigh
the cost carefully before you vote.
REMBRANDT'S LIFELIKE PICTURES
History bus been at its old game again, repeating this
ime with the month of a Kansas City child the words
uttered long ago by a Dutch workman in the Antwerp
picture gallery. It was a little boy about 6 years of age,
bright-eyed und somewhat surprised at the great size and
mpressive coloring of the classic masterpiece In the
Western Gallery of Art at the public library. As they
moved through the Dutch room he clung to his mother's
hand and his eyes travelled quickly from the Rubens war
picture to the Hals and Van Heist banqueters. At the end
of the room they came to rest on Rembrandt's "Night
Watch." After a few moments the mother started to move
on. "Come, we must be going," she said. "Wait," said
the six-year-old, "wait, mother, let's see what they're going
to do."
The "Night Watch" is full of action and palpitant with
life. A dog is barking and running about among the men,
whose faces are vivid and manners are alert. It was a
spjendid tribute to Rembrandt's picture, and the words
were exactly the same as those with which a workman in
Antwerp once complimented a picture of Rubens. The
picture was "The Descent From the Cross." Men at work
n another part of the building had gathered near the pic-
tare at the noon hour. It was time to return to work, but
o.ie of the men remained stationary. "Come," said another,
'it's time to go." "Wait," said the man, who had fallen
under the spell of the picture, "let us see what they are
going to do."
"HUGEST OF ALL JOKES"
Last July the Fraser River broke through tlie dyke aud
flooded Nlcomen Island, many of tho farmers there losing
their all in the flood. Now iu the middle nf September, this
year, two months afterwards, the Premier nf Uie Province
and misreproBQtltative for Dewdtiey, is making a grand pilgrimage from Victoria to tlie flooded district to see for
himself what damage was really done to the area covered
with water last July. In the meantime the rich soil and
fine climate of Nleomen Island has somewhat obliterated
the blackness that covered the Hooded land. McHwiney is
reported ftS dying in Ireland, but ft would not be just the
proper thing to start investigating how he felt during
his hunger strike two months after the man was dead and
burled. Two months after the waters of Nleomen Island
have subsided Premier Oliver hastens to the district to see
for himself just what really happened. When ho reached
llaney lasl night one lone Liberal met him to bid him
welcome tn the district. He passed through Mission this
morning in his Ford not the same old Ford of 1016 politi
cal fame —on his way to Dewdney and Hatzlc Prairie.
Doss the appearance of the Ford again indicate an election
on tiie 20th of next month, the same day as the Prohibition
plebiscite?—Fraser Valley Record.
THE INCOMING AMERICANS
It has been estimated by Government and railway officials that the immigration into Western Canada this year,
ncludlng new arrivals from the United States and Great
Britain, may total 75,000. The influx of Americans into
Canada is at the rate of from 5000 to 7000 a month, it is
said, and there are indications that the number will increase.
One official declared that lie had never seen a better class
of Immgirants than is coming into Canada at present. All
are intelligent and well off financially, and most of them
have farming experience. Thc American Immigrants are
nearly all English-speaking persons who had sold their
lands in tlie United States at the prevailing high prices
and bought cheap Canadian land which is very superior
for farming in many respects.
Many persons intending to come Into Canada from the
United States have been refused admittance because they
were not born in tlie United States, and could not be
deported ill tlle event of becoming a public charge, the
oiiichil snld. This law is being enforced at present in order
to make it difficult for emigrants from Germany, Austria-
Hungary, Bulgaria and Turkey to enter tlie country.
ABOUT FIKE INSURANCE
A heading in one of the columns in a Montreal paper
recently read, "Firemen lind matches on floor of grocery
store v.ftor the fire." Tlie article tells of a (ire in the
grocery store of It. "Vlunuri in Montreal. As in the case of
so many fires tlie cause is unknown but from the presence
of matches ou the Hour the old theory of rats being the
neondiary is brought forward. The complete stock and
fixtures were destroyed.
Fire seems to lie Ihe most elusive agent of destruction
there is. A man may close up his store tonight, leaving
everything in perfect order. Every precaution is taken
against robbery and lire, yet, In the middle of the night, he
s called to lind the whole place a seething mass of flames,
anil lie is faced witli a total loss. A grocer's stock makes
line food for lire, especially in the cellars and store rooms.
There is little that may be salvaged after either lire or
water has touched tlie goods. Many precautionary
measures may be taken to avoid lire but there is no guarantee against fire that is sure. Tlie best precaution is to
have tlle stock well insured.
In discussing this matter with a newspaper representative recently a grocer remarked that the value of a grocer's stock during the past four or five years increased
between seventy-live ami one hundred per cent. A store
that carried a stock valued at say one thousand dollars
three years ago must lie worth nearer two thousand today.
Tlie grocer must realize this and increase his lire insurance accordingly. When tills merchant took stock last his
stock valuation was over 00,000. Immediately lie increased his insurance by $15,1100. This Increase of stock Is
mainly accounted for by the higher cost of each article and
not necessarily on larger stocks. There are different kinds
of lire insurance, lie points out, hut when a store ls covered
by an eighty per cent, lire Insurance policy, there Is every
reason In the world why the Insurance should be kept up
to the full value of the stock—Canadian Grocer.
THOUGHTS ON FALLING AUTUMN LEAVES
It is nearly a month since the first signs of approaching
winter, the flocking of tlie swallow birds and the circling
families nf gnat hawks, were seen. Now. walking along
the maple-lined path, one's foot crushes thc lirst of the
autumn's deluge of falling leaves. If we could peep Into
tho trunk or branches of our deciduous trees these days
wo would see the sap hurrying downward, laden with
foodstuffs from the leaves, too valuable to be cast off In the
whirling autumn gale.
Our autumn tints vary much from year to year. Sometimes the graceful bracken takes on a glorious rich old
gold, lighting our woodland glades as they have not beeu | Seattle,
MEMORIES
Two little eyes look lovingly Into yours,
Two little bands aro folded on your knee,
A tired voice repeats tlie nightly prayers,
A rumpled head droops, oh, so wearily.
Tho day was hot, Ihe fun was fast and great,
And playmates maybe strenuous played the game,
But back confidingly in lowly state
The tired footsteps come to meet the same.
Great mother love and tenderness and care,
Tlie warm affection that Is ever sure,
That now, and while life lasts, will always share
The little ills, or great, that young and old endure.
Ah! mother gone, could we once more kneel down
And say a prayer at your dear, tired knee,
We'd little caro if all the world should frown,
Or sorrows of this life should greater be.
Yet, oh, the thoughts of happy days that were,
When mother love and mother care were ours,
Keep memory's flowers sweet, and make us share
The fragrance that remains of childhood hours.
—William It. Walker.
Children's Hose
Children's Black and White
Cashmere Hose, per pair    75c. and 85c.
Children's Black Cashmere
Hose        75c., 85c, $1.15
Children's Black School Stockings
Heavy Ribbed $1.35
Children's Brown Cotton Ribbed
Hose 55c, 65c, 75c
Ladies' Black Cashmere Hose $1.65 and $2.50
LADIES' SILK HOSE IN ALL COLORS
RIDEOUT'S
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of veteran motorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay
"Well, dear, did you have a good
month at the beach?"
"Splendid! I was given seven engagement-rings, and only had to return three of them."
Counsel: "Was the prisoner sober?"
Witness: "No, sor; he was as drunk
as a judge."
The Judge: "You mean as drunk as
a lord?"
Witness: "Yes, my lord."
"Your sister's a long time about
making her appearance," suggested
the caller.
"Well," said the little brother, "she'd
ho a sight if sh-p came down without
making it."
'I see by the papers that they are
gcdng to build a thirty-story hotel
hare."
'You don't tell me.  Will it pay?"
'Oh, that's another story."
"If I should kiss you what would
happen?" he asked.
"I should cnll father," she said.
"Then I won't do It," lie answered,
"But father's in Europe."
Dora: "Did you have any trouble
with your French when you were in
Paris?"
Cora: "I didn't; but the Parisians
did."
mm September 25, 1920.
THfi  CUMBERLAND iSLANDSft
i'iv
&
Luxury Tax Removed
from Electric Heating:
Appliances
You will be interested to know that the efforts of
manufacturers of Electric Heating Appliances and of
others interested, have been successful in securing the
removal of the 10 per cent. Luxury Tax on nickle-
plated Electric Heating Appliances.
We quote herewith a recent letter from R. W. Bread-
ner, Commissioner of Taxation, to a manufacturer of
appliances:
"In reply to your letter of the 15th inst., I may state
that the luxury tax applies to articles plated with gold
or silver adapted for household or ofiice use. Nickle-
plated electric healing appliances are exempt."
Some of thc more important arguments used were:
1st—In almost all communities of the Dominion of
Canada it is actually more economical to iron, toast,
cook, etc., with electric appliances than by any other
method.
The proposed legislation, therefore, would be taxing
an economy rather than a luxury.
2nd—Appliances made from steel and iron require
a covering of something to protect them from the
action of rust.
Nickle is the best and most economical for this
purpose.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
FRESH   OYSTERS
SERVED IN ALL STYLES
Try Our Oyster Cocktails
TAMALES
MEXICAN CHILIES
"CUMBERLAND. B.C
,LLYkS
ESTIMATE THE LABOR
COST BEFORE BEGINNING OPERATIONS
(Experimental Farms Note.)
The labor cost In the operations involved In agricultural production demands considerable attention in any
productive scheme of farm management. The cost of producing any
standard farm crop depends upon a
number of factors, the most Important
of which are wages, climate, soil, rent
of land and yields. Under present
conditions labor costs are so high and
the service rendered often of such a
low standard as to make certain lines
of crop production unprofitable. Such
being tho case it is extremely important that a careful estimate be made of
costs to produce aud probable values
of returns before commencement of
operations.
In producing feed for live stock, can
the average farmer grow with profit
under the present labor conditions the
forage crops that require a lot of
human effort? The labor charge for
the production of one ton of ensilage
ten years ago did not exceed %2 on
well managed farms. Under present
conditions the labor cost is more than
double the cost of ten years ago. It
is the Bame with rootB, grain, hay,
dairy produce, meat products, fruits,
poultry and all other farm produce.
The greatest Increase In farm production cost is the labor factor. To those
farmers who keep an accurate account
of the number of hours of man and
horse power expended on each crop,
costs are definitely known, but to the
great majority of farmers, costs of
production are only known in a general way through experience. This indefinite or only general knowledge of
labor costs in crop production is responsible for considerable production
that Is below the border line of profit.
It is holding many farmers to certain
lines of crop production that might
well be abandoned, or at least adjusted to suit the prevailing high labor
COStB.
The actual figuring out by the individual farmer on his own farm, or the
cost of labor in his production operations Is the only way to determine accurately the profit or loss on operations, in so far as the labor factor Is
concerned for each Individual farm.
When the labor cost is contemplated
crop production operations is known,
the farmer is in a position where he
may readily detcrmino the advisability
of undertaking the lines of production
in question. For instance, if a farmer
considers the advisability of producing roots for stock feed. A number of
factors, are known, rent of land, cost
of manure, cost of seed, experience
will give basis for estimating the num.
ber of hours required ln preparing a
seed bed, in the sowing of seed, lu
singling the roots, lu hoeing, cultivating and harvest. These numerous
items are largely hand labor, and
when counted in the terms of hours or
dollars, give the operator the per acre
cost of his crop, and will determine
procedure. A wide margin must be
added to the total estimated cost of
labor, and the stable factors, to allow
for the restrictions frequently placed
on crop production by weather, plant
diseases and insects. Plan so that tho
field or farm will be producing whatever it Is best suited to produce, Keeping in mind that every hour of human
or horse labor is stacking up costs in
production. Aim to get the most out
of the labor expenditure by concentrating ou a few definite lines.
A New Line of Up-to-date
STATIONERY
Just Arrived
100 New Library Books
Arriving September 29th
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
Maybe one swallow doesn't make a
summer, but it would brighten it up
considerably.—Cartoons  Magazine.
Optimistic note for boarding house
keepers:Clarke county's annual prune
crop will amount to 9,500,000 pounds.
THE   GLADIATOR.
Before the kitchen fire he stood,
Like a Gladiator bold,
Bereft of coat, and vest, and shirt,
Although the night was bleak and
cold,
Tlie flickering firelight came aud went
Making alternate light and shade,
And on his flesh as marble white.
Fantastic shadows lightly played;
And as he like a stntiie posed,
(His form displaying every grace,)
A look of anguish, pain and woe
Spread o'er his erstwhile kindly face;
Then lifting up his strong right arm
A backward movement with it made,
And with his mighty vise-like hand,
He gripped his left hand shoulder
blade;
He writhed nnd swayed from right
to left.
His giant form was wrung with pain,
Six paces swift he forward went,
Then six swift paces back again,
No vulgar eye gazed on the scene
No voice the awful silence broke;
His teeth were clenched, his lips were
set,
But not one single word he spoke,
Fast down his brow the sweat drops
ran,
His eyes shot flames—those eyes so
black,
And then he cried, "Oh, Mary Ann,"
For God's sake, come and scratch my
back.
The Poles who are having so much
trouble abroad are ln no way related
to the well known totem poles.
$250 FREE
32 Prizes INCLUDING PHONOGRAPH
Most Rallies have one grand prize only—BUT THAT'S WHERE WE
DIFFER—we are giving NO LESS THAN 32 PRIZES, including this
beautiful Phonograph.
A TICKET
FOR EVERY
DOLLAR
SPENT
.IK
EVERY
J
I               V
1
a*           1
I**""*'   IJ
DOLLAR
A
TICKET
WE
WILL
GIVE
6 PRIZES
On the 15th and 30th of each month
Commencing October 15th, as follows:
2 FIRSTS
2 SECONDS
2 THIRDS
EACH A BEAUTIFULLY
BOUND ALBUM TO HOLD
12-INCH RECORDS.
EACH TWO 10-INCH COLUMBIA RECORDS OF YOUR OWN
CHOOSING.
EACH ONE 10-INCH COLUMBIA RECORD OF YOUR OWN
CHOOSING.
If winners of second and third prizes can not use Columbia Records, equal
value will be given in any other make.
ALL YOU HAVE TO DO
is to get a ticket with every dollar's worth of merchandise purchased at
either of our stores, and watch drawings on 15th and 30th of each month.
IF YOU WIN A DOZEN PRIZES YOU STILL HAVE A CHANCE
FOR THE GRAND PRIZE. A PHONOGRAPH
You can win a prize at every drawing—we don't mind.   All purchases
of a dollar or over entitles you to a ticket.   Piano and Phonograph purchases counted, if bought after September 1st, 1920.   	
OO   All 1 .UffEC    N0 L,MIT T0 NUMBER OF CHANCES OR
$£   ||nANvCWBNUMBER  0F  PHIZES  YOU  MAY  WIN.
The Editor of the Cumberland  Islander has consented  to  referee  the
drawings at the Cumberland Branch, and the Editor of (he Comox Argus
will take charge of the Courtenay drawings.   Everyone can be present at
the drawings and winners' names will be published.
EVERY TWO WEEKS
AND A CHANCE ON THE
^"VV^^^W^^'^/W-'ia**'. m
6 PRIZES
PHONOGRAPH
NO LIMIT TO THE NUMBER OF PRIZES YOU MAY WIN
1,000 New Records Just Arrived
ALL LATEST TITLES   RECORDS THAT WE HAVE
BEEN OUT OF FOR MONTHS
GEO. A. FLETCHER
music co., ltd.
Cumberland & Courtenay
PIANOS FROM $385 UP
PHONOGRAPHS FROM $1"» UP
5H
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -   B. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone lib'
Offlce: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
C33 Hastings SI., W„ Corner ol
Granville,     VANCOUVER, U.C. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 25, 1920.
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
Wo also specialize   in  REPUBLIC  TRUCKS  and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it iu fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aftlu&nce long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES ARRANGED IF DESIRED
Send for catalogue, stating course desired.   Pupils accepted ouch .Monday.
IT
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
ISLANDS OF MYSTERY
OFF EASTERN CANADA
Inhabitants Attired in Skins uf
The Eiderduck—Only About
125 People All Told.
An Interesting romance of picturesque adventure in the discovery five
years ago of the Belcher Islands is
told hy a correspondent of the Loudon Times. A young Canadian, named
Huh Flaherty, who, even at the age of
21, had achieved a reputation as
tried adventurer in the Canadian and
American wilds, while engaged In
searching for minerals between Jamei
Day and Fort George, heard u rumoi
that there were islands off the Nasta
pokas, barely 100 miles from a Hud
son Hay post, yet never seen hy uny
white man's eyes. Flaherty was
familiar with the admiralty charts,
aud knew that only a few small islands
were then shown. Reckoning distance
by the time it tooU to travel with dog
teams, lie surmised that tlie largest
island must not be less than 100 miles
long.
Returning to civilization at the end
of his mineral uuest, Flaherty told li
backer, Sir William Mackenzie, that
tliis large and mysterious island might
be worth exploring—if il existed. "All
right," remarked Sir William, "go and
find out."
Flaherty went back to the north by
way of James Bay, hut for two yean
persistent misadventures, including
the wrecking of craft pjurcbased for
the expedition, prevented his attaining
his goal.
He returned to Toronto, received
further financial assistance from Sir
William .Mackenzie, purchased the
top-sail schooner Laddie from Captain
Sam Bartlett, the Arctic navigator
ami, with Capt. H. Bartlett in com
tiKtnd, set sail for Newfoundland, and
finally sighted the islands of mystery
-the Belchers—on August 23, 1915
Belcher Island had little to recom
mend it. It is a barren waste of rocks,
91 miles long hy 47 miles wide. On
tin's island there were only 25 families
about 125 people in all, who supported themselves by hunting foxes, whose
pelts they sold for odds and ends of
finery and rough tools in their annual
trip across the ice to the Hudson Bay
trading post on the mainland at Sandy
Point. There was practically no vege
tation, and there were no animals
though there was a legend that cari
hon once had been plentiful. At any
r.ite there were
.No Skins for Clothing
ami the natives, making the best of the
situation, had used that which was
most plentiful and most readily obtained—the skin of the eiderduck
Worn with the feathers inside, it
makes a wonderfully warm costume
but to the nose of the white man, at
least, a thing of horror. Yet such was
the national costume of Flaherty's
•kingdom," a costume, it is believed,
found nowhere else among the tribes
of Eskimos.
The women are seamstresses of
wonderful ability. Also, they tanned
walurus hides for boots hy thc simple
process, of squeezing the skin in their
bands and finally shewing it, a lump
at a time, to remove the fat. Hides so
(aimed and sewed by tbe hand prove
absolutely impervious to wnler.
Although tbe Eskimos on Belcher
Island were intensely interested, with
ihe naive curiosity of children, in almost everything in tlie Laddie':; cargo,
yet. two small phonographs were really
their delight. Harry Lauder was their
favorite. The lilt of the songs caught
their ear and brought broad grins to
stolid countenances, They listened
and learned, learned with almost unbelievable fidelity, and it was a sight
for the gods to see some Eskimo
woman sin ing cross-legged on the
rocks and to hear the Scotsman's rolling r's dropping from lips as ignorant
nf tin- white man's tongue as tbe foxes
that roamed the gullies.
n may be added thai Ottawa ex-
prosBed frank unbelief, ami assorted
thai where Flaherty's island was said
t-i oxlsl Admiralty Chart lflfl- showed
s of water. However, a gov-
geologist and a Dominion
lyor were sent to investigate,
nod to corroborate all thut
ind claimed. Great stores of
found, but all believed to be
of too low a grnde to make it worth
exploitation under tbe peculiar conditions of its location.
20 fathom
eminent
land .••in vi
anil retur
Flaii )rty !
ore were
According to the Manitoba Free
Press, Victor R, Midgley, general secretary of the One Big Union for Canada, has been refused admission to the
United States by the Department of
Immigration, Washington. Admittance
was refused on the ground that he was
an agitator. An appeal for reconsider-
itlon of tho decision was not granted.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY
AUTOMATIC MACHINE
A new horror, tlie product of efficiency, speed and perhaps civilization,
is the machine which takes one's photograph automatically after a coin is
deposited in the proper slot. This instrument of torture—for even painless photography becomes torture after the portrait is completed and set
forth to view—is no simple affair.
The voluntary victim aits down he-
fore the machine and drops his coin
in tlie slot as requested. Immediately
follows much busines of preparation
for the ordeal. A hell rings, then a
small card appears urging the sitter
lo "lie careful. Turn your head to the
right, fix your eyes on the little cross
above the'mirror—and smile." Jt may
Bound easy, but imagine smiling at the
behest of a printed placard without
the aid of the genial photographer's
little bird! There Is another bell and
another card which tells one to sit
perfectly still. And then, before one
knows it, the terrible deed is done and
a third curd startles the beholder with
tbe words: "Tbanlt you. Tlie photo
graph is taken aud you can now leave
your seat. In four minutes your por
trait will be delivered at tlie bottom
of the apparatus." Aud sure enough
it Is, it is, printed on a postcard, ready
lo send to family or a friend.
If practice makes perfect, the lucky
person with plenty of the proper coins
might in time get a satisfactory picture of himself. We wonder!—St.
Joseph's Gazette.
PARISIANS ARE
BUSY HUNTING RATS
City  Is  Over-run  With  Worst
Plague of Rodents in History of Republic.
TARiS.—When the armistice was
signed nearly two years ago and the
trenches were deserted, rats which
had multiplied and fattened there decided to migrate to Paris. Only the
hardiest finished the journey, hut
these once here became the ancestors
of the most abominable plague of their
species the city has ever had.
Old men declare that if there had
been a quarter as many rats in 1871
Paris would never have surrendered
to tlie famine. At night along the
boulevards they swarm so thick that
the cubs run over them and passersby
kick them off the sidewalks.
Every cellar is a nesting place and
visitors are no longer taken to the roof
of Notre Dame, for thc rata have made
it one of their favorite ballrooms and
when the doors on the roof are opened,
they come tumbling down on the visitors' heads.
Three weeks ago bubonic plague
broke out in one quarter of the city,
aud though it has been controlled and
the deaths have been few, the danger
was so evident that it has resulted in
the city fathers and police declaring
war against the rats. The help of
every householder haa been enlisted
and three hundred thousand francs
voted by the Municipal Council for the
work.
For every dead rat presented at certain depots the Minister of Hygiene is
paying 25 centimes reward, and measures are being taken by professional
rat catchers to destroy with poison
and poison gas. These last measures
ire being carried out especially in
market and slaughter house areas.
While householders are being encouraged by the reward to catch their
rats whole and deliver the bodies, another useful measure is the abolition
from the streets of dust bins and refuse boxes which formerly it was tlie
habit of the Parisian to set outside the
door all night to form a feeding place
for vermin and a trap for the unwary
pedestrian in the dim-lighted streets.
Now they must he set out and taken
up within certain hours. The ministry
of hygiene is preparing posters appealing to everyone to go rat bunting
hy day and night.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
FOR
Fire, Life and
cci dent Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
We make a specially of
CHILDREN'S
Photographs
Have a picture of your
children taken now before
they lose their charms of
childhood.
BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
I
A. I,. Williams        A. V. Webb
COURTENAY
PLUMBING
COMPANY
SANITARY PLUMBING
— nml —
GENERAL REPAIR
WORK
Corner Comox Road and
Lake Trail
COURTENAY, B. C.
Telephone 127
HOME SONGS
fs\     S1NC
ILOH
30858BCOUGHS
The world Is just a little plnce,
After all—nfter nil.
A bright hearth lire, a loving face,
After ull—after all.
The surface shine of fortune goes
And friendship follows fust,
While   fume  sits   trembling   on   the
throne
That's all too frail to last.
But love has gone the quiet road,
Broadening day by day,
For real life takes with placid step
The deep and peaceful way.
The world Is lust a little place,
After all—after all,
A bright hearth Are, a loving face,
After all— after all.'
—M, Nelson.
Grown-ups mny learn something
from little Johnnie. On the morning
of his birthday this notice was found
posted on tho door of his bedroom:
"Remember my birthday; give till it
hurts."
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General  Merchandise.
0HARL1H SINC1 CHONO, ,Ci*   ''crlnnd
HONU CHONO h CO.. Dhvi.,i
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and endorsed "Tender for wharf at Mansons Landing, B.
C," will be received at tills office until
IS o'clock noon, Tuesday, October 5,
192(1, for the construction of a wharf
at Mansons Lauding, _Cortez Island,
B.C.
Plans nnd forms of contract can bo
seen und specification aud forms of
tender obtaineiLal this Department, at
the offices of tlle District Engineers at
New Westminster, B. C, and at the
Post Offices, Vancouver, B. C, and
Cortez Island, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and in accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Bach tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of the Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
uf tho amount of (he tender. War
Loan Bunds of the Dominion will also
be accepted as security, or Wur Bonds
and cheques it' required to' make up an
odd amount. i
NOTE. -Blue prints can be obtained
al, this Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order of the Minister of Public Works, which will be
returned If the intending bidder submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa. September 1, 1020.        1-38
NOTICE
Amendments to the Pound Bylaw
prohibiting stock of kinds from wandering on tlie public thoroughfures of
the city at any hour of tho day or
night, will come into force on October
1st, 1920. It ls the intention of the
authorities to have this Bylaw strictly
enforced. Owners of stock will kindly
acept this warning.
C. J. BUNBURY,
4-39 Chief of Police.
FORESHORE  LEASE
X0I3011 District) Vancouver Island.
TAKE NOTICE tliat the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, of
Victoria, B. C, Colliery Owners, intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from the South-East corner post
of Lot 11, Nelson District, thence East
sixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to the
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
the South-East corner of the North
Fractional half of the South-West
quarter of Section 32, thence West to
aforesaid corner of said fractional
part of Section 32, being the original
high water mark, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being tlie Easterly boundary of Section 32 and D. L. 2S In snld Nelson
District lo point of commencement,
containing in all ninety-six (!itj) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DIJNS-
MIJIR). LIMITED,
Charles Oraham, Agent.
Dated June 22nd. 1020. 28-8
LAND ACT
NOTICE OI' INTENTION TO APPLY
TO LEASE IAN1).
wrsEirAwrRtcoMMENC them
SIMON LEISER
AND  COMPANY,   LTD
In tbo Nelson Land District, Recording
UWrirl   Niiiiiilinu, und  sllualo  om*
mill* In 11 Northerly  direction  from
Union lliij on liii) pes .Sound.
TAKE notice  that A. E.' Water-
house, of Port Alberni, Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to leuso
Hie following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 11, thence ln
a north-westerly direction following
the shore five thousand eight hundred
(5.S00) iect more or less to tlle northeast corner; thence east five hundred
(500) feet more or less, thence approximate low water mark; thence ln a
south-easterly direction paralleling the
shore to a point east of the point of
commencement, thence west live hundred (500) feet more or less to the
point of commencement, and containing forty (40) acres more or less':
ARTHUR E. WATERHOUSE.
Name «t' applicant.
K. B. Fraser, Agont.
Dated 17tti August, 1020.
10-47-Nvl2
A gardener, with a conservatory full
of Ilowers for sale to passengers, Is
Ihe latest addition to the luxurious
Atlantic liners. September 25, 1920.
THE  CUMBERLAND   .SLANDER
3everi
<//
Music and Photoplays
FAMOUS HALL CAINE
NOVEL  PICTURIZED
WITH FINE RESULTS
"The Woman Thou Gavest Me"
Has All the Elements of
The Successful Story.
A magnificent plcturlzation of "The
Woman Thou Gavest Me," by Hall
Calne, the most fatuous novel by the
Manx author, will be shown at the Ilo-
llo three times today, at the afternoon
matinee and two shows in the evening commencing at 0.311. Hugh Ford,
one of the ^nost experienced of stage
and screen producers, went to California to muke tho picture with u
powerful caat which includes Katherine MacDonald, Milton Sills. Theodore
Roberta, Jack Holt, Fritz! Brunetto,
Katherine Griffith and others.
"The Woman Thou Gavest Me" was
produced upon tlle stage hy Derwent
Hull Calne, son of tbe author, lu 1017.
lu Boston with success. As a novel it
outsold all other works of Hall Calne.
As a picture It is proving one of
tlie screen's greatest triumphs. The
tremendous story of Mary's struggles
after being sacrificed upon the altar of
wedlock to a man she hates Is unforgettable and as the story covers a
wide field—Egypt,, Africa, India, England and the South Polar regions—it
will not only be powerful dramatically
hut colorful and fascinating in every
other way.
...
ON THE EASY ('HADE
The old peer was on his deathbed
talking to liis old coachman.
"Yes, James, I'm off on a longer
Journey than you ever drove me."
"Shure, sir, but never mind, it'll be
down hill all the way."
.   .   .
Snow has fallen for the second time
In three centuries   In   Buenos Aires.
the storm being severe enough to stop
the electrical works.
...
Onlooker (to prisoner leaving dock,
who has been sentenced to six months
Imprisonment):   "Excuse  me,  but do
you want to rent your house?"
...
DOROTHY GISH'S
"THE HOPE CHEST" IS
A SUPERB PICTURE
Story Brings to Light Many Big
Problems for Young Married People.
Music?-What
Is Music?
Suppose you were just married.
Suppose you were looked upon as one
with high social standing, and you had
promised to love, honor and provide
for one of your father's working girls,
without Ills knowledge. Suppose your
father found It out und forced you to
separate from your wife.. Suppose
your cousin, who is in love with yOu.
tells you thut your wife has beeu seen
at twelve o'clock at night saying
goodbye to ono of the most widely
known rogues of the city. Suppose
you later found your wife in his nruis.
What would you do?
These are the problems that confronted Tom Ballantyne, in "The Hope
Chest," Dorothy Glsh's second paramount picture, which will be shown at
the Ilo-llo Theatre on Monday evening
next.
Their solution by Ballantyne. and
the way Dorothy as tlie wife accepts
tlie solution constitutes one of the
most gripping moments of the play.
The girl was innocent. She had
met the mnn by accident but her husband did not know tbat, The next
night when she wns found in Ibis
man's arms, had her husband been
one moment sooner be would have
seen her struggling with nil her might
to save herself from being kissed. Aud
she was fuintlng when he found litem.
This ls the second picture In which
Miss Gish Is being starred by Paramount, the lirst having been "Battling
Jane," u picture which won for Itself
high commendution.
...
You who nre Interested In motion
pictures and who huve wondered from
time to time just whether you wero
abnormal ln your desire to see good
dims, even to the extent of wading
through mud, leaving Ihe babies -witli
the neighbors, to see them, did you
know that:
Fifteen thousand regular theatres
are showing motion pictures?
Twelve thousand legitimate theatres
are showing motion pictures?
Twenty-live hundred of them change
two or three times each week?
Dally attendance at picture theatres
Is 13,000,000?
Total income of luotiou picture the-
atres In 1010 was $700,000,000?
Of all tlie fine arts—music alone
appeals to all humanity—universal In
Its force und unlimited ability, it
strikes straight, unfailingly and unfalteringly at the heart and soul of
man-no mailer what race or creed,
and always for bis uplift und betterment tor truth and beauty—the un*
questionable proof that art Is for the
good or God's creation—the human
being.
As we must huve food, clothing and
shelter, so must we also, today, have
music. Music wlll level tlle furuws
of sorrows—will increase the joy of
living -It strengthens the ties of family and home—builds character Into
tlie hearts of the lllle ones—helps us
to overcome the burdens and disappointments of our every day lives aud
causes tlie star of hope and encouragement to shine in the hour of
darkest despair.
And In those trying days of yesterday, music played Indeed, a great part
and there is doubt today in any mind
(hat music did help win the war. It
cheered tlie boys ubroad; In army
camps, hospitals and transports and
naval vessels. It maintained morale
among tlie recruits and the folks at
home.
And yet does music originate only
from a string? Is there not to be
every ear, untrained though It may
be, music of some kind—somewhere.
Indeed, tills great world of ours is
full of It—if we will only open our
hearts to receive it. No matter where
we are or what station in life we may
hold—we can find tlie things beautiful. How many of us on leaving the
happy singing home circle lu the
morning to face tlie stormy seas of
life with tlie many hardships and
cares, find joy and happiness ln the
hum and buz/, of the factory or
machine shops. How many cares have
been forgotten when the big engines
started their dally toll singing to us
continually throughout the day, making us glad that we are indeed a part
of Ibis great world of ours? And again
there is another kind of music—it is
the voice of tlie man on. the next
bench. Are not his words of encouragement nnd cheer music to him who
perhaps was weighted down with discouragement? How many a man can
attribute ills success to the friendly
words of- advice of his fellow work
men? No matter where we go
we can hear music—faint though It
seems at times—aud yet every one of
us help to swell that great chord and
bring additional harmony Into the
brotherhood of mankind.
*     a     *
"1 suppose your motto is, 'Make hay
while the sun shines,'" remarked the
summer boarder who tries to be congenial.
It used to be," answered Parmer
Corntossel. "But" lately I have been a
little bit careful not to mention sunshine for fear tlie hired man would Insist ou havin' extra help to hold an
umbrella uver him while,he worked."
...
CHARLES RAY FARM
DRUDGE AND POET
IN "STRING BEANS"
Popular. Incc-Paramount   Star
Portrays Strong Role of
Country Boy.
THE MIRACLE MONEY
WORKED IN THE HEART
A Drama of Love That Flowered
in thc Hearts of Two Faded
Women.
Romance is ageless. It does not
dwell alone in the hearts of youth, but
in the fascinating period of middle
ige it has also Its place lu the sun of
content. In fact, no romance can he
us beautiful and tender and sympathetic ns that of middle age—the age
that has given up hope and bad It renewed.
The Miracle of Money" Is a
romance of middle age—of a woman
whoso youth gave her a love that
proved a tragedy, but who found her
happiness In middle age through the
miracle of money.
Beulah Poynter, authoress and actress, originally told the romance of
Emuieline Hodges ln a story called
Marrying Off Emmy." For his second
Pathe subject, Hobart Henley chose
that charming story and called it "The
Miracle of Money."
This beautiful romance in picture
form will be shown at the Ilo-llo on
Wednesday evening of next week.
* *   *
LEGACY BRINGS HAPPINESS
IN "MIRACLE OF MONEY"
If you suddenly fell heir to $300,000
no doubt you would have a very definite Idea as to what to do with your
unexpected wealth. Emmellue and
Patty Hodges, forty-eight and forty-
two years of age, respectively, had
such luck befall them and immediately
they made their plans.
They would go to the theatre and
sit In two-dollar seats. They would
ride in taxi-cabs and live at a grand
hotel. Maybe they would even go to
Europe aud perhaps—who could tell
one ot them might get married.
Marriage had never interested Patty
for herself, but Emmy had wanted the
love of a good man, a home of her
own aud children in it. Poverty had
wrecked the love affair that had been
the big thing in her youth, but wealth
at middle age worked a miracle and
brought romance back to her.
This is the simple, yet charming
•story told In "The Miracle of Money,"
a Hobart-Henley Pathe feature showing at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Wednesday of next week.
* *   *
"Will you come and make a four at
bridge, sir."
"I'm exceedingly Bony, sir, but I
don't play bridge,"
"You don't play bridge, sir? Then
what the devil did you join a golf club
for?"
* .   *
Seedy Caller: "Madam, is your husband up yet?"
Wife: "I guess he Is."
S. C: "Well, I'd like to say a few
words to him."
Wife: "So would I; he hasn't come
home yet."
* .   .
SCENES WERE "SHOT"
UNDER THE WATER
Catallna Islands, William Wrigley's
haven for millionaires and the t. p. a.
(tired picture actor) was the "shooting ground" for some of the most
thrilling scenes of "The Third Eye,"
(lie new Pathe serial starring Warner
Oland and Eileen Percy, which will
commence at the Ilo-llo ou Wednesday, October 13. „
Toby Watklns Is the all-around Epochal ln the advance of the cln-
drudge ou his uncle's farm—a twenty ematograph  are the  line  underwater
acre patch of black mud entirely surrounded by mortgages, This Is the
opening sentence from Julleu Joseph,
sou's scenario, "String Beans," which
serves to introduce Charles iu his
Paramount picture which wlll be
shown at die Ilo-llo Theatre Tueoday
evening next, in highly condensed
form II presents u vivid picture of tlie
story's opening scenes.
Toby Wutkins ls the sort of country
boy, brave, humorous and thoroughly
huninii, that all Charles Ray's admirers like to see him portray. It Is the
sort of character that has made the
Ray pictures sure-lire offerings from
tlie exhibitor's point of view. But Toby
WatklllB Is no ordinary boy. He is
Imaginative and somewhat dreamy,
and every night when his day's work
is done he goes to his room and lakes
oul a bodk that he has bought by mall,
"What Every Young Poet Ought to
Know." For Toby Is ambitious to be
a writer.
The scenes of the story change to a
country newspaper olllce where Toby
goes in search of opportunity. This
part of the story is developed with
realism   and   charm   by   tlie   author.
"shots" in the sixth eplsodo of the
mystery narrative of the screen which
were taken, by Cameraman Connie De
Roo, not tu a tank subsea, but from
the water's surface.
Fierce struggles for the possession
of a black bag thai figures In the mystery of the story occur twenty feel beneath Hie briny. Hie photography being ns clear as If Ihe objects were under glass.
Director James W. Horne, creator of
'Hands Up," a Ruth Rolund serial and
'The Midnight Man," James J. Cor-
bett's vehicle, took his company to
Catallna, thinking to remain but a few
days.
Storms set In, however, and fog as
Ihlck as Loudon's hindered (liming.
During the tiiking of one underwater battle ln which Eileen Percy
participated, the furious set-to with
Sam Polo, who plays one of Warner
Oland':; henchmen in the serial, overcame the plucky little actress but polo
Instantly rose with her to the surface
and Miss Percy was revived by the
physician kept with the company
throughout the trip.
Jack Mower, the Juvenile; Polo, who
ls all internationally noted acrobat and
Julien Josephson, who was formerly a
I country editor himself, and who writes I athlete; Miss Percy and two youth:
There are 890 different chains of|of that life with delightful sympathy, who had won aquatic medals, were
motion picture theaters Aa this coun-l It Is stated, by Ray's handling of the featured in the submarine encounters
try*? |role of Toby Watklns will  rank as which are expected to prove of a high-
Well, It's true.—New York Tribune, one of the best screen portraits. ly sensational and popular character.
IL0=IL0 THEATRE
TWO COMPLETE SHOWS EVERY NIGHT
First Show- Commencing at 6:30 o'clock
Saturday, September 25th
"THE WOMAN THOU
GAVEST ME"
Featuring an AH Star   Cast   Including   Katherine
MacDonald and Other Stars.
She knew that to him the marriage vow meant nothing. Yet she was his
wife, bound to him by the law. She knew that she had been sold to him to
gratifv her father'I lust for power. Yet convention said she was his until
death "should set her free. His, though her heart went out to another man
who was good and brave and clean. What did she do? Come and see this
wonderful picture and see the result. You'll say that this pulsing epic ot a
young wife's soul is the greatest woman drama you have ever viewed on
the screen.   A picture that will thrill you—startle you—make you think!
*
Monday. September 27th
DOROTHY  GISH
— IN —
"The Hope Chest
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
"Wake up, little girl! You're only a waitress in his millionaire-father's
restaurant. You know how to handle men, do you ? Believe you can put
it over his haughty family?   All right.   Go to it!
99
Tuesday, September 28th
CHARLES   RAY
Known as the Original "Country Boy" of the Screen
— IN.
"STRING BEANS"
"Subscribe to The Hick News antUGct a ColTee-Grindcr Free!"
This poet from the tall grass was breaking into journalism; but the sub-
' scription department got hold of him first, and he came mighty near
getting two new subscriber's in one day's work. Those coffee-grinders,
you see, were—well, say, come and see for yourself—it's Charles Ray at
his best, one of the best roles of his career.
Wednesday, September 29th
"The Miracle of Money"
MONEY BROUGHT GAIETY—MONEY BROUGHT CLOTHES—MONEY
BROUGHT NEW YOKE—BUT MONEY COULD NOT BUY ROMANCE
A drama of love thai flowered in the hearts of two faded women. A home-
spun play woven witli the endless threads of romance, U'hnl would you do if
you (suddenly fell heir to $800,000? Would you go on living as you always
had, or would you make your rosy dreams come true? Would you want to
travel and see the world! Would you wanl lovely dollies anil theatres and
motors cars?   Or would you want romance?
Also Episode 14 of
"THE BLACK SECRET'
Don't forget there will be.Two Shows on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday nights, also Matinee Saturday
Afternoon—Subjects will be announced later
"TheThird Eye" SJr^.SS
Featuring a Baffling Mystery and Love Story Page Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
September 25,1920.
Extensive Showing
of New Ties
The largest and most comprehensive selection of
Men's Ties are on sale at popular prices. The manufacturers' delivery has improved considerably, and as
a consequence we are showing Ties which were bought
for Christmas delivery, thus showing the most advanced styles and colorings.
GENTS' TIES, in the newest stripes, made
of a good quality silk, in d»1 PA
very smart colorings; price •tPl-wl/
SHOT SILK TIES, in a broche effect;
some magnificent colorings ijp"| FLf\
in this line; price  «JjA»*jU
HEAVY QUALITY SILK TIES, in small
checks, in brown, red and   (j»1   QP
blue; very smart; each
RICH CHINE TIES, in a choice of beautiful colorings; made of
heavy quality silk; price
SPECIAL QUALITY CHINE SILK TIES,
in subdued rich colorings; very exclusive and a good .selection.
Price 	
MEN'S BEAUTIFUL SILK MUFFLERS
AND SCARFS, in dainty shades, from
$5.50 each.
$2.25
SILK TIES,
very exclu-
$2.95
PHONE 134
DRYGOODS
GENTS'FURNISHINGS
Opening   Announcement
We are opening today the only exclusive Shoe Store
in the City of Cumberland. The new store next door
to the Waverley Hotel has been built especially for us,
and we are stocking it with an entirely new and up-to-
date line of Boots and Shoes—footwear that is warranted to give every satisfaction. We invite you to step
in and look at our stock.
Doesn't it stand to Reason
that the store that sells shoes only and does not try to '
sell you everything from a Paper of Pins or a Yard of
Ribbon, up to a
BALE OF HAY
can give you just a little more satisfaction than a store
that does—CERTAINLY.
Because we have nothing else to sell, and every pair
we sell must be good enough to bring you back
TRY  CAVIN'S   CASH  SHOE
STORE FOR YOUR next PAIR
WE DO NOT SELL HAY—BUT WE DO SELL
GOOD, HONEST SOLID LEATHER SHOES
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
Next Door to Waverley Hotel
CUMBERLAND
SCHOOL HOURS CHANGED
Mr. Chas. E .Burbrldge, principal of
the Cumberland schools, announces
that the school hours have been
changed this week, and are now from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This Is to bring them
into uniformity with other schools of
tho province. Mr. Durbridgo says
these hours will be maintained the
year round.
COWS MUST BE KEPT
OFF STREETS OCT. 1
Under tho provisions of the amendment to the Pound Bylaw recently
passed by the City Council, and which
comes into force on Octoher 1, cows
are not allowed to he at large on tho
streets of Cumberland nt any time, day
or night. Owners of cows are advised
to take warning.
"WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW"
Who is the latest grass widow?
If there's a cheaper way to get gas
than helping one's self ut midnight?
What they did at that Bachelor and
Bachelorette party last night?
Why some fellows get into a "blue
grouch" when one mentions Blue
Grouse?
Why six bottles of whiskey exposed
in a car standing by the sidewalk on
the avenue for a long time Thursday
evening wero not "discovered"? Ia
the Goddess of Justice still blindfolded?
Why some fellows are so keen on
grouse when there are such a lot of
deers about—two-legged ones?
Who wus the lady who tried to run
a "Sundy" with a bet of $10—and sho
only had a pair of tens.
Why the beauty, enjoying the so-
briquet of "The Watch-Fob," gives one
sueli a pleading sort of glance?
Have the Dominion Police any more
privileges than a private citizen? The
ordinary garden variety of citizen has
to turn his car at street intersections.
What tho cow wus staring at so long
ln a jewellery store Friday morning?
Was she figuring which clock was
displaying the right time? Afterwards
she sauntered leisurely up the sidewalk.
Why the inclining of the head and
a bewitching smile? We nre "safely"
married though we would like private hoard?
If tho gun sometimes on" view at
"Old Bill's" is an automatic or a
pump gun.
Why the combination of "snake"
juice nnd canaries? We will keep
Hint appointment at 10 a.m, sometime.
"Women prefer to he photographed
in evening dress," observes a writer,
"knowing that tbey look hotter iu this
garb than any other."
The real reason, to our way of thinking, is that because, when thoy are
thus arrayed, there is practically nothing to detract from their charms,
Church Notices
IIOI.V TIIIMTV (111 l!( II
Rev, W, Leversedge.
Sipii'iiiinr L'liJIi, Sovoulceiilli suiiduj
After Trinity.
Holy Communion, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.:tu p.m.   .
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Uev. J.  VV. Flinton   will   take   the
evening service.
KOYSTON—3.30 p.m.
ROHAN CATHOLIC CIIUKCH.
Kev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Mas sat Cumberland, 9 a.m.
UKACE METHODIST CHURCH
Hev. 0. li. Kinney, B.A„ F.R.G.S.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
livening Service, 7 p.m.
PBESBXTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, '7 p.m.
Personal Mention
The Rev. J. C. Robertson, D.D., General Secretary of the Board of Sabbath
.Schools and Young People's Societies
)C the Presbyterian Church of Canada,
ind the Rev. Robt. Grierson, for 21
years missionary in Korea, were tlle
ipeakerB at the Presbyterian services
at Union Bay on Sunday last.
Mr. M. N. Brown, manager of the
Cumberland branch of Simon Leiser &
Co. Ltd., left Thursday on a vacation.
He is visiting Victoria, Vancouver,
Seattle and other Coast points, and expects to be away a week or so.
Mr. T. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, arrived on Saturday on his
usual monthly tour of Inspection of
the local mines.
Mrs. A. 0. Lymn held un lit home on
Friday afternoon from 3 to 6. Mrs.
I'oin Scott and Mrs. Stewart Burrell
assisted in receiving tlie guests. Mrs.
W. A. Owen, Mrs. It. E. Frost und Miss
Hood assisted In serving tea. The
guests Included Mrs. T. E. Bate, Mrs.
C. J. Bunbury, Mrs. II. Bryan. Mrs. G.
W. Clinton, Mrs. J. W. Cooke, Mrs,
Emily, Mrs. J. W. Frame, Mrs, J. A.
Fraser, Mrs. R. E. Frost, Mrs. Thos.
Graham, Miss Janet Graham, Mrs. P.
P. Harrison, Mrs. E. R. Hicks, Rev.
and Mrs. Jas. Hood, Miss Hood, Mrs.
A. E. Jeffrey, Mrs. W. Leversedge, Mrs.
G. K, MacNaughton, Mrs. John MacKenzie, Mrs. T. Mordy, Mrs. McKinnon, Mrs. T. H. Mumford, Mrs. Alan
Nunns, Mrs. L. W Nunns, Mrs. W. A.
Owen, Mrs. E. Pickard, Mrs. J. E.
Spicer, Mrs. Shortt, Miss Tarbell, Mrs
J. Walton, Mrs. John J. Wier.
Conrad Reifel of Nanaimo, Manager
of the Union Brewing Co., was here
on a business trip on Monday.
William Barnes of Vancouver was
here on a visit on Tuesday.
Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Nanaimo and
Victoria on Monday and returned on
Thursday.
Robert Walker, Daniel Stewart,
Peter McNiven, John Taylor, Preston
Bruce and Sam Robertson were a
party that motored to Nanaimo on
Friday.
Mr. Henderson, of the Nanaimo
Marble Works, spent a couple of days
in town during the week,
Mrs. Brown, wife of Mr. M. L. Brown
of Cuba, who has charge of a bank
tliero, is expected here today to spend
a week with Mrs. Geo. Brown.
Mr. and Mrs. Q. C. Baker of Victoria
arrived yesterday by motor and are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Rideout at
Comox Lake.
Mr. J. L. Brown leaves today to
attend a meeting of tlle Upper Island
Football League at Nanaimo. This
meeting has been called to discuss a
protest which hos been lodged regarding the Nanaimo City vs. Ladysmith
game.
Mr. J. H. Gillespie and Mr. C. T.
Cross of Victoria were guests at
Beaufort House, arriving Thursday
and leaving Friday morning.
Mr. Fred Dallos leaves on Thursday
morning tor Portland, Ore., where he
tiu.'i accepted a position with the Pacilic Lumber Inspection Co. Freddy
will be missed by his large circle of
friends, especially by tlle sporting
fraternity.
Mr. Bert Jones left Thursday, going
to Victoria and Vancouver on a week's
vacation. Afterwards he goes to
Portland to take a college course.
Mr. and Mrs. Mumford und Mr. and
Mrs. Spicer returned Monday hy motor
alter a week's holiday down the
[eland.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien left Wednesday for
LudyHiulth. He expects to be away
eight or ten days.
Mrs. J. II. .McMillan of Pocahontas,
Mta., who has beeu visiting Iter parents, Mr. mid Mrs. John MacKenzie,
for two weeks, left Friday for her
home,
Mr. A. It. Peacey, formerly druggist
of this city, was a visitor iu town over
the week-end, returning on Monday.
Mr. Frank Higgins, barrister of Victoria, was a visitor to Cumberland on
Sunday.
Mr. Robson, of the staff of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, has been
transferred to the branch at Mission
City.   He left town Tuesday.
MrB. Thomas Rickson left for Vancouver Monday morning.
Mr. J. Grainger returned from Vancouver on Sunday after spending two
weeks' vacation in that city.
Mr. W. Thompson returned from
Victoria on Tuesday.
Mrs. Wm. Jones and Mr. A. B. Jones
left for Vancouver on Sunday, where
they will spend a short vacation.
Mr. Robert Thompson returned from
Victoria on Thursday.
WE HAVE FOR
PRESERVING
Pears, Crab Apples, Plums, Prunes
Pickling Onions
Green Tomatoes and Cucumbers
Also a Full Line of Fresh
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
APPLES (EATING AND       PLUMS AND PRUNES
COOKING)
ORANGES
LEMONS
GRAPE FRUIT
BANANAS
GRAPES
CANTALOUPES
TOMATOES (GREEN
AND RIPE)
SWEET POTATOES
CABBAGE
CUCUMBERS
CELERY
GREEN PEPPERS
FISH
SMOKED KIPPERS AND SABLE FISH
MEATS
COOKED LUNCH LOAF BOILED HAM
MEAT LOAF BAKED HAM
BOLOGNA SAUSAGE SWIFT'S BACON
SWIFT'S HAMS
AYRSHIRE ROLL PEAMEAL BACON
SALT PORK AND SMOKED COTTAGE ROLL
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38.
Limited
SOCIAL EVENING
AT HOLY TRINITY
Men's Club and Open Forum to
Be Established Shortly.
A social and business meeting of the
parishioners of Holy Trinity Church
was held in the Church Hull on Tues-
dny evening, when n very enjoyable
time was spent. About forty people
attended.
The lirst part of the evening was
devoted to a whist drive lu which Mrs.
Short proved the highest scorer of tiie
ladles and Mr. Burbrldge of the gentlemen, while Mrs. Uunbiiry and Mr.
Leversedge enjoyed tho distinction of
heading the south end of the score
card.
Statements of church finances were
presented, which are in a satisfactory
condition.
In his remarks, Kev. Leversedge laid
emphasis on tlie need of the church
taking an active part in social work,
especially among the men and rising
generation. Along this line he Is
endeavoring, wilh the assistance of the
Presbyterian and .Methodist Churches,
to provide some united action for tlie
welfare ot the boys ot the city. He
strongly maintains thnt o.ily by the
united action of nil tlle churches enn
any lasting good he accomplished,
Another idea of his Is to havo u
forum established, to which persons
holding diverse views could come and
air ihelr opinions, Tin* arranging ol
tills wlll he done by Hie Men's Club,
the forming of which the meeting
udorscd.
A coniniltleo wlll look Into tho nd-
Isablllty of forming n Young PeoplO'S
Society iu the parish.   There Is fell (o
he great need for such nu organization.
After the business wus ended, dancing was Indulged in for a short while,
music for which wns played by Mrs.
McMillan.
Refreshments were provided by the
ladles.
Musical selections were rendered
during the evening by a large phonograph lent by Mr. Marshall of the Geo.
A. Fletcher Music Co., Ltd.
SITUATION WANTED
WANTED — BY YOUNG ENGLISH
lady, position as companion-help in
gnod family; experienced; excellent
references. Apply "Companion,"
c-o Islander. 6-42
HELP WANTED
WANTED—A MAID FOR GENERAL
housework and plain cooking; also
nursemaid for three children. Apply immediately to Mrs. A. L. Smith,
Parksvllle. • 38-1
FOR SALE
seven Houses for sale cheap.
Easy terms. For particulars see T.
E. Bate. Phone 31.
Mrs. D. H. McKee left for Seattle oh
Wednesday morning, after spending
three months with her aunt, Mrs. D.
Marsh.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham and
family motored to Victoria on Friday
and will spend the week-end there.
Miss Mavis, representing Scurrnhs,
of Victoria, arrived in town on Wednesday.
Mr. T. Michell left on Friday morning for Vancouver, where he will
spend a short vacation.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $550 to (1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 81.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED IN
private family, Address J. Vernon-
Jones, c-o Islander Ofllce.
NOTICE.
1, Fritz .Manson, will not he responsible for uny debts contracted by my
wile, Einniii Manson, after September
21st. WHO,
FRITZ MANSON.
Bevan, Sept. 21, 1H20.
Agent Wanted
In this district by leading Western
Manufacturers of high-class Private
Christmas Cards.
Handsome book of samples will k*
supplied und n liberal commission paid
on ull orders. Person with local experience will find this highly remunerative and pleasant work.
Address communication to
■I. W. GEKRKE CO, LTD.
051 Granville Street, Vancouver, B. C.
JUNIOR FOOTBALL
THIS AFTERNOON
The Cumberland Junior Football
team play the South Wellington Junior
team at the new football grounds this
afternoon, commencing at 4.15. The
team to represent Cumberland will be:
Goal, Westfield; backs, Bennle and J.
Hunden; half-bucks, Stewart, Huddock and Brown; forwards, Lockhart,
Kuuan, Bond, Somerville, Damonte.

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