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The Cumberland Islander Jan 15, 1921

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Provincial Library
THE CUMBERLAND
■"**»'»*
s£\\
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland Kens
FORTIETH YEAR—NO. 3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1321.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Special Football Train To
Union Bay Tomorrow
Special Train Leaves Cumberland at One O'clock Tomorrow to
Convey Two Local Teams and Football Enthusiasts to Union
Bay for Practice Game, There Being No Snow at the Shipping
Point—Two New Players Signed On.
Leaving Cumberland at 1 o'clock tomorrow a special train will
run to Union Bay, where two teams selected from players of the
Cumberland United Football Club will engage in a practice game.
There is no snow at Union Bay, so the club is taking advantage of
the opportunity to have a good practice game so a sto get the
men into first class shape for the contests coming the following
Saturday and Sunday.
All fans and those interested are urged to make this trip and
encourage the players. The local club has recently signed on
several players with splendid reputations, and a humdinger of a
game is expected.
"Blues" Versus "Black and Gold"
The teams will play under the colors of "Blue" and "Black and
Gold," and the teams selected aro as follows:
BLUES—Goal, Clark; backs, Strang and Campbell; half-backs,
Irvine, Conti and Home; forwards, Reid, Milligan, Ledingham,
Collins and Ed. Hunden.
BLACK AND GOLD—Goal, Foster; backs, Jackson and Cairns;
half-backs, Brown, Roberts and Carle; forwards, Bannerman
Nicol, James, Boothman and Harrison.
Reserves—Slaughter, D. Hunden, Somerville, Miller, Gibson and
W. Boothman.
Two New Players Signed On.
The local management has signed on two new players, who come
with brilliant reputations. These are Charles Reid, a Scottish
Junior from Aberdeen, Scotland, and W. Milligan, a star forward
who played with the B. C. E. R. and St. Andrew's, of Vancouver.
Heck Smith, a well known player of the local team, has been
transferred to the I. L. A. of Vancouver.
Play-Off With South Wellington Next Saturday.
From present indications the protracted play-off in the Upper
Island League between Cumberland and South Wellington will be
played on Saturday next. On the following day the United will
play their first game in the Vancouver Island Football League
schedule when they meet the Victoria Metropolis.
Opium Peddler
Fined^$500.00
11 Chinese Fined $20 and Costs
For Smoking Opium or Being in Opium Rooms.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Second Sunday After Epiphany.
Sunday School, 2.30.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH,
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at 2.30.
Evening Service at 7.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening
at 7.30.
Choir practice Friday evening at
7.80. •
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH"
Rev. O. B. Kinney, B.A, F.K.G.8.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday at
7.30 p.m.
S. B. Club, Tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
Basketball Clubs, Tuesday night.
Bible Class Study, Wednesday, 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday at 7.30.
WtH.O. Club, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
BURNS ANNIVERSARY
SUPPER JANUARY 25
The anniversary supper to commemorate the 162nd anniversary of the
birth of Robert Bums will be held in
the U. M, W. A. hall on Tuesday, 25th
January, at 8 p.m. Members can obtain their tickets from President John
Thomson, Secretary Robt. Strachan or
members of tbe committee.
CHINESE FAMINE FUND
Committee Appointed to Carry
On Campaign of Education
And Later Canvass.
In'connection with the above fund a
meeting was held ln the Anglican
Church Hall on Sunday evening last,
when the extreme urgency of the situation confronting millions of starving
people In China was placed before
those present. His Worship Mayor
MacDonald occupied the chair.
Among the speakers was the Rev.
Coleman, of the Chinese Mission Cumberland who gave a very able address.
Mr. Coleman's intimate knowledge of
China and its needs enabled him to
place the facts before his audience in
a forcible manner. The speaker stated that the famine area comprised the
central provinces of Northern China,
a very fertile district, so much so in
fact that though no artificial assistance
had been given to the land for 4,000
years It was still in such condition as
to make such aid unnecessary, but as
the land depended solely on rain fall
for Irrigation, and as little rain had
fallen during the past two years, the
crops had been a total failure, as a
result ot which thirty million people
were slowly starving to death. The
greater part of these people, In all likelihood, were doomed to death.
The meeting decided to carry on a
campaign of education and arrange a
canvass later and for this purpose a
committee was appointed consisting of
Mayor D. R. MacDonald chairman;
Rev. W. Leversedge secretary-treasurer; Rev. Coleman, Mr. A. J. Fouracre,
Mr. A. MacKinnon and Mr. Ben H.
Gowen.
RECORD OF PRECIPITATION IN INCHES IN CUMBERLAND
DISTRICT FOR THE FOLLOWING YEARS
The following very Interesting table showing the precipitation in this district
for the past six years has been supplied to us by Mr. A. (1> Lymn.
Month.                   1915    1916    1917        1918              1919 1920
Rain. Snow. Rain. Snow. Rain. Snow
January       8.01     6.21     2.52     7.31     4.00 11.95     6.00 3.93 18.00
February       7.38     6.20     4.06   11.22   12.60 4.17   22.60 1.09 —
March         4.12     7.89     4.74   11.01   11.50 4.14     6.60 5.13 —
April       2.96     3.43     6.77     1.22     — 6.70     — 1.52 —
May     4.96    2.21     1.13    0.89    — 3.08    — 2.69 —
June      1.04     1.08     1.88     1.44     — 1.86    — 2.87 —
July      2.49     3.27     0.17     1.50     — 0.13     — 1.63 —
August       0.08     0.63     0.33     1.45     —         .73     — 3.66 —
September         1.49     0.59     4.01       .07     — 1.01     — 7.97 —
October      14.21     1.71     1.49     6.82     — 6.19     — 9.58 —
November     12.12     6.76     6.76   10.23     — 7.76     1.25 13.16 0.50
December  .*....   16.65     3.80     8.31     8.45     6.C0 10.99     2.75 15.63 6.60
76.51   42.77   42.16   61.61   34.00   56.71   38.00   68.75   24.00
On Thursday the N. W. M. P., under
Corporal Cronk, searched some buildings In Chinatown for opium and
found a locked trunk, in which, on being opened, was found several tins of
opium and a number of small jars, apparently used lu retailing tbe drug.
At the hearing before Magistrate
John Baird Friday morning, Mah (lame
was charged with having the opium in
his possession in contravention of the
Drug Act, and through his couusel,
Mr. P. P. Harrison, pleaded guilty and
was lined $500 and costs. The line
was paid.
fined Fer .Smoking Opium.
At the same raid Chow King was
found smoking opium, aud was charged
with this offence, to which he pleaded
guilty, being assessed $20 and costs.
Sing Chow and Chong Kwong, who
were also In the room at the time, were
charged with being in a room used
for opium smoking, and were each
fined $20 and costs.
On Thursday, before Mr. Baird, eight
Chinese who were found in opium dens
by Provincial Constable Mortimer,
were each fined $20 and costs.
James Maxwell     MacDonald Re-Elected By
Dies Suddenly
Funeral Will Take Place at 2.30
This Afternoon From Banks'
Undertaking Parlors.
Mr. James Maxwell, an old-time
resident of Cumberland, was found
dead tn bed Thursday morning. Deceased bad been ailing for some time
and was under medical treatment. Il
was not considered ueceBsary lo bold
an inqudst, deatli being due to uatural
causes.
Deceased, who was IS years ol* ago,
was born lu Scotland, bul bail been in
British Columbia for nearly -IT, years
He was the eldest sou of Mrs. William
Maxwell, of this city. Besides his
brother, Mr. Alex. Maxwell, lie leave;:
three sisters, Mrs. Wm. Haggarl u
Vancouver, who is expected hero to attend the funeral; Mrs. Walter Hudsoi
ol Union Buy, and Mrs. H. Wallace.
The funeral will take place this afternoon at 2.80 from the Undortnltlng
Parlors of Mr. T. E. Banks.
G. W. V. A. WHIST DRIVE
AND DANCE ON FRIDAY
On Friday evening next the Ladles'
Auxiliary of the Great War Veterans'
Association is holding a whist drive
and dance in the Memorial Hall. The
whist drive has the floor from 8 to 10,
and dancing from 10 to 12. Remembering the very enjoyable affair held
recently it is expected a big crowd will
turn out on this occasion. The admission has been fixed at fifty cents for
gents and twenty-five cents for ladles
Special Meeting Monday.
On Monday evening a special meeting of the Ladles' Auxiliary will be
held, to which all members are re
quested to be present.
MONTE'S ORCHESTRA
HOLDING BIG DANCE
On Wednesday evening next, Monte's
Dance Orchestra ls holding a big dance
in the llo-Ilo Dance Hall. Good music,
a good floor and a good time is in
store for all who go.
There will undoubtedly be a good
turn-out of dancers, as when Monte's
Orchestra supplies the music dancing
folk know they can dance to music
second to none in this part of the
woods.
DANCE ON THURSDAY NEXT
On Thursday evening next, a dance
will be held In the Anglican Church
Hall, the proceeds of which wlll be devoted to the organ fund. Mrs. Ralph
E. Frost and Mr. C. Graham will supply the music, the opening dance being at 8.30.  Admission fifty cents.
A committee has been appointed with
a view to securing a new organ for
the church, which Is badly needed. A
good start has already been made, and
it is hoped a sufficient sum will soon
be in hand to enable tbe committee to
put chase a good Instrument. Mr. F.
Dalby and Mr. J. Walton have charge
of the fund, and any contributions may
be sent to them or Rev. W. Leversedge.
FIRST AID CLASS TO
ORGANIZE FOR LECTURES
All those Interested In FlrBt Aid
work nre asked to meet ln the First
Aid Hall on Sunday, January 16th, al
10.30 a.m., for the purpose of organizing a class for the lectures to be held
in connection with First Aid.
INSTALLATION OF
A. O. F. OFFICERS
The Installation of officers for the
current term of Court Bevan, No. 9830.
Ancient Order of Foresters, took place
on Wednesday evening, when the following brothers were duly Installed:
Past Chief Ranger, Bro. W. M.
Brown.
Chief Ranger, Bro. Frank Bond.
Sub Chief Ranger, Bro. H. M. Davidson.
Secretary, Bro. Chas. O'Brien.
Treasurer, Bro. Frank Partridge.
S. W„ Bro. Ed. Gomm.
J. W., Bro. A. J. Fouracre.
S. B., Bro. A. Derbyshire.
J. B., Bro. Frank Kynoch.
Organist, Bro. W. C. Edwards.
INTERESTING PAPER
READ BY MR. WALKER
Last Monday night al the usuul
weekly meeting ul* tlie Holy Trinity
Men's Club. Mr. Robert Walker read
a very interesting paper on "Competition Versus Co-operation." After the
paper was read questions and discus-
Blons were then in order, and from
some of the questions fired at Mr.
Walker it was very apparent tiie members had been taking a keen interest
in the* subject. Mr. Walker met all of
his questioners with bis usual sung
frold, and had no difficulty in advancing his theory.
A short time was devoted to discussing the subject, the members being allowed five minutes grace. Notwithstanding the short time allowed
some of the members managed to take
the boys all around the world. A most
enjoyable evening was brought to a
close by a hearty vote of thanks being
accorded to Mr. Walker for his able
address.
Literary Night Monday.
Monday night, January 17, is to be
jjerateu to a Literary Night, when It I;;
hoped another full meeting will lie
present.
Majority Of Three To Two
NINE MONTHS FOR
STEALING WHISKEY
Alex. Smith, the logger who broke
Into the express oilice at Courtenay
and stole two cases of whiskey, was
sentenced to nine months' imprisonment by Judge Barker. The ease was
heard at Nanaimo. A plea of guilty
was entered, counsel asking for the
clemency of Ihe court, as tbe act was
done when accused was under the influence of liquor.
Judge Barker said tliat while he
would take into account the plea for
the defence he could not exonerate a
man because he was drunk al the time
the deed was committed, or tbey would
have men getting drunk deliberately
before they committed a crime in order
that they might plead their inebriated
condition.
NANAIMO LIBRARY
HAS WONDERFUL YEAR
First Annual Report Shows Thnt
New Venture Has Been
Widely Appreciated.
NANAIMO.—Eleven thousand luniks,
oiie-ihird of which were children's
reading, Is the lirst year's circulation
of Nunalmo Public Library, as announced at the annual meeting ol Hie
Library Association. These were taken
out by (inn readers, ihe highest record
for one evening being 121 books. I'lider
the provisions of tlie II. O. Library
Act and by arrangement with the victoria Public Library, 1,600 bonks have
been loaned by that library during the
year, In addition to tlie small stock belonging to tbe Nanaimo Library,
The year's expenditure Ior books bus
been nearly $351), and for beat and
light almost $2J>0, towards wliieh Hie
City Council is appropriating $160
which also fitted up thc tup lloor of tlie
Athletic Building fur library purposes
The amazing circulation of 11,out
'books ln one year at a total cost ol
$682 has beeu made possible onlj
through the co-operative effort ol
nearly fifty ladies and gentlemen win
have served nightly as librarians.
Owing to a slide on the railway line
near the soutli end of Ihe [Bland, tlu
up train yesterady was delayed for
several hours.
Mayor D. It. .MacDonald, who has been returned for the third time a.; Mayor
of the City ol* Cumberland.
Although all other seats on the Council, Police Commissioners
and School Trustees were elected by acclamation, keen interest was
taken in the election Thursday for chief magistrate, when Mayor
D. R. MacDonald easily out-distanced his opponent by a three to
two vote, thus being elected for the third time to occupy the
Mayoral chair.
On hia visit to the City Hall just after the ballots were counted,
'the Mayor was given hearty congratulations on all sides, one of his
friends varying the. form by telling him "It served you right."
Among those who look considerable interest in the election were
a number of boys, who watched the counting of the ballots eagerly,
and on the Mayor's arrival greeted him with three lusty cheers,
indicating the popularity of Mr. MacDonald among the rising
generation as well as with the older folks.
The offices of Aldermen, Police Commissioners and School
Trustees are as follows;
Aldermen. Police Commissioners.
J. C. Brown. Alex* Maxwell.
Thomas Bannerman. Chas. J. Parnham.
Louis Francescini. School Trustees
Fred. D. Pickard. Mrs. T. E. Banks.
Chas. J. Parnham. Alex. MacKinnon.
Duncan Thomson. Neil McFadyen.
COURTENAY RESULTS
Charles Simms Elected Mayor by
ISig Majority—Mrs. Kilpatrick
Elected School Trustee.
The election to the municipal unices
in Courtenay was fraught with no
little interest and al times rather high
feeling,
Mi. Charles Simms, Jeweloi', was
oloctcd Mayor with the handsome majority of Hit uver hii opponent, Mr, w
(I. Roboruniii, druggist.
For School Trustee M,*s. Jessie Kilpatrick outdistanced hei opponent,
Mrs. Millard, b) 31 votes.
Full details of Ihe voting on Thurs
day follow:
Hill  II Wlll!
Charles Simms   .... .   .....142
W. (i. Roborisou     4!)
Majority for Simms, 90,
i im; Ai.in:iMii:\.
John Altken  133
I*'. Kerton      131
Robert Surgenor    tlfl
ti. II. Pldcock ....112
W. Cnnk   . 109
J, W.  McKenzie. Jr. 108
Johnston   ..                               .. 60
Plgotl   ..   .                               II
Btenhouso     36
Flrel six elected.
Illl,II I! COMMISSIONERS.
.1   Mclntyre 97
J. N. MoLood                               ... "!l
Burnotl     48
Johnston    ss
Hannay 28
Dunham 21
* Klrst two elected.
SCHOOL Till SI CI*.
.Mi:.. Jesslo Kilpatrick             .    . 121
Mrs. Margarel Millard              ... CI
Majority [or Mrs. Kilpatrick, r'7.
Super Specials Coming to the Ilo-llo
SATURDAY NEXT, JAN. 22—JOHN BARRYMORE IN
"DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE," by 15. L. Stevenson.
"THE SEA WOLF" By JACK LONDON
"THE TEETH OF THE TIGER"....An Arserie Lupin Story
"ON WITH THE DANCE" With MAE MURRAY
"THE PRINCE CHAP" Wilh THOMAS MEIGHEN
"THE RESTLESS SEX" By ROBT. W. CHAMBERS
"THE FIGHTING CHANCE"    By ROBT. W. CHAMBERS Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 18, Mi.
■Ill
The MATTRESS
on which you sleep should be soft and comfortable,
yet have that quality of resilience and elasticity which
helps to keep it in shape.
MATTRESSES
we offer are most carefully made of the best materials
and sure to give you years of satisfactory service.
Ask more about them.
T. E BATE
=     P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
CUMBERLAND
THE CORNER STORE
BANK PRESIDENT
ADVOCATES THRIFT
Declares   Sanity   of   Action   is
Necessary to Meet Situation
—Scaling Down of Prices
The Corner Store
If you deal at this store you will be enabled to open
a Savings Account at the Bank, and make provision for
a rainy day.
Don't go on paying big prices, when you have a store
in town operated on the basis of Small Profiits and
Quick Returns.
Don't ask for Long Credit
Pay your account every payday, and I will continue
to offer you the best value possible.
My You
Price Save
Best Creamery Butter, per lb '. Go .05
Best Flour, Purity, per sack  3.40 .10
Rogers' Sugar, 20-lb. sack  2.90 .10
No. 1 Hard Onions 8 lbs. for   .25 .25
Oranges, good and juicy, per dozen 25 .15
Dry Green Peas  2\'., lbs. for   .25 .05
Sago  21/, lbs. for   .25 .10
Tapioca   2'/] lbs. for   .25 .10
Side Bacon, per lb.     .G5 ,10
$8.85 81.00
Buy this order from me for $8.85, and put one dollar
saved in the Savings Bank account.   Begin now. Don't
delay.
Dry Goods, Boots an (-/Shoes
W. GORDON
Phone 133
TORONTO.—A call for sanity action to meet the exceptional and not
encouraging outlook of the coming
year wus sounded hy Sir Edmund
Walker, president of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, at the annual meet-
iiiK of thftt Institution, Sir Edmund.
after ji detailed review of trade ami
Industrial conditions, summed up his
address with the following;
"Among the lights and shadows of
tho world ut tho moment are too many
rihaftowa in warrant anything bul
anxious care, You have heard from
ilii' general manager the results of tlie
heal year the hunk ever lias had, ami
thus far wo have not had much evl
donee or a decline iu the spending
habits nf our people or the hard times
that are ahead of us. We know, liow-
over, iIml here, as elsewhere, all
prices, whether of commodities or of
tabor, must he reduced to a more reasonable basis, and the effect of the
world's lower prices for farm products
is already in plain view.
"When this readjustment haa
reached the retail shop and a new
•asis of values has been generally ac-
epted, a genuine prosperity will arise
throughout the world, in which we
shall have a large share. We shall
merit and we shall secure that prosperity in proportion to our good sense
in realizing, however, that our particular sin is extravagant expenditure
and willingness to incur debt."
MARRIAGE LAWS
ARE CONSIDERED
Montreal   Presbytery   Protests
Against Annulments at Behest of Church
"fiiiilliiiiiii
!i!M
| Notice to Advertisers I
s
[j—an *a«y^^S#VN/V\«*,'VVa**'"^V''*«»*'*'ai'**V'\'VV*'^V^^
§ Advertisers desiring change of advertisement
§§ are requested to have same in this office by Wed-
II nesday evening or Thursday morning at the latest.        ;
•*= i
s= You will assist us greatly by doing so, and we
§1 will then be in a position to give you better service
3 than ever.
I   Cumberland Islander   I
.MONTREAL.—The marriage laws of
Quebec province formed the subject of
a report which was presented to the
Montreal Presbytery at its meeting by
a committee which has beeu considering the legal position raised by various
recent decisions of the courts, unuul-
ing mixed marriages.
After hearing the report and the
statements of Hev. Dr. Hanson, a protest was formally entered against such
annulments.
The' report cited that part of the
constitution of the Dominion, which
stules that "no foreign prince, person,
prelate, slate of potentate, spiritual 01'
temporal, shall exercise or enjoy any
manner of power, spiritual or ecclesiastical," and concluded therefrom thai
no decree of any ecclesiastical authority cun have any force In this country.
The report added that the General
\sseniljly should be memorialized tu
urge on the Federal Qovernment the
passing of a law which shall remove
any possible doubt no Ihe subjecl uf
mixed marriages.
The Presbytery further Instructed
other ministers to warn members and
adherents of Its churches against the
perils of mixed marriages, tlle risks involved of the betrayal of the Innocent,
the repudiation of marriage vows, the
breaking up of homes and the proselytizing of children.
BRITAIN TAKES LONG
LEAD IN SHIPPING
NEW YORK.—Great Britain is building more commercial ships than all the
rest of the world combined, said :
statement issued here by Lloyd***8 Regis
ter of Shipping,
On reports received up to and including December IU, shipping under
way in the United Kingdom amounted
i" 8,759,000 gross tons. In the U. S.
it amounted to 1,310,000 tons, and in
all countries 7,170,000 tons.
Tonnage under construction in all
countries on December 31, 1919, was
7,861,000 tons.
On a percentage basis, the report
shows Great Britain's share to be
SI.6 per cent, ot the total, as compared
with 38.1 per cent at the beginning of
192(1. In the same period the share
of the United States has decreased
from 117.7 per cent, to 18.2 per cent.
J1Y CHEQUE
The hours I work for thee, dear cheque,
Seem like a string of yenrs lo me.
I earn thee over several times, by heck!
My salary, my salary.
Five bones a day, or thereabouts,
By toil and perspiration won.
I count them over by lives and twos,
And one by one.
Oh, little shekels that 1 e»rn,
You come so slow and go so fast,
Strive as 1 will, I fear I'll never learn
To make them last.
FINED TOR FAILING
TO REPORT INCOMES
NEW WESTMINSTER.—R. K. Sang-
ster, J. I'. McMurphy, Kenneth Mackenzie and Ed. Faleh were each lined
$10(1 and costs in the police court by
.Magistrate Edmonds for failure to
make a return of their income for 1918
when such information was demanded
of them by formal nolilication last fall.
This is the minimum line prescribed
by the act.
Five other cases were adjourned.
Other prosecutions, it is understood,
are pending.
BRITAIN'S TRADE
SHOWS ENORMOUS GAINS
LONDON.—British imports for 1920
were .C 1,930,000,000, an increase of
£310,500,000 more than in 1919.
Exports were more than £1,500,000,-
i"'0 for 1920, showing an increase of
■••..ii .j   ^.ouy,uuu,uue.
DANCED ALL NIGHT IN
GRAVEYARD WITH SPIRIT
YAKIMA, Wash.—Torn Nye, a Yakima Indian, disappeared from his home
about 5 o'clock Thursday afternoon
and was missing until 11 o'clock the
following morning, when he was found
dancing, shoeless in the snow in the
Indian cemetery near Toppenisli
Tracks in the two inches of snow that
covered the ground showed tliat during the night and forenoon he had
danced over all of the two acres included in the burial plot. When a
friend approached Nye fell uncon
seious, but recovered and explained
that his dead daughter's spirit had led
him to the cemetery and that he had
danced with her aud other departed
Indians. He wore out two pairs of
socks In the dance.
BALLOONISTS MAY PAY
DEARLY FOR THEIR TRII
OTTAWA. — The Ottawa Journal
says: "It Is understood that the three
American navayt4)alloonists who drifted far up into .N'orthern Canada after
leaving "Kockaway Ueach, N. Y„ on
December 13, will be placed under arrest by the United Slates military authorities when they reach their country, and.will be paroled for courtmar-
tial. Their flight is said to have been
hi the nature of a joy ride. United
States authorities have been aware of
this but presumably have bad their
reasons for keeping quiet about it.
Cumberland Public and High School
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
For the Year Ending December 31st, 1920.
RECEIPTS
Government Quarterly Grants   $ 8,905.00
Half-Yearly Grants, outside pupils      3,695,81
Sundry amounts  '.  22.00
City of Cumberland *      6,326.89
Total '. $18,949.70
EXPENDITURES
Salaries  :  $14,001.60
Janitors        1,650.00
Repairs         380.95
Sundries         202.20
Supplies          596.58
Fuel          518.90
Offlce   v         269.17
Heating, new furnaces, etc       1.132.40
Insurance  120.00
Light and Water  78.00
Total .'. $18,949.70
Estimates for 1920, $19,315.00
Examined and found correct, January 10th, 1921.
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
A. MacKINNON, Secretary School Board.
Vhe Chocolates-with
tha'HbncktfulCetiterS
YOU'LL haw to bit*
into one of thwe
chocolates to learn juit
what that meant. Flavor
doesn't show on the surface. In the meantime,
stop at our candy counter
and get some to take
home. Packed In a
strikingly handsome
orange-and-gold box.
Is Your Child puny and
apparently ill-nourished ?
WAMPOLE'S GOD LIVER OIL
IS THE THING
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
CUMBERLAND
Here are some
Bargains in Shoes
BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES—Sizes 1 to 5; absolutely solid
leather  $4.25
YOUTHS' SCHOOL SHOES—Sizes 10 to 13'/2; absolutely solid leather $3.75
CHILDREN'S SHOES—Sizes 5 to 10"/2; kid or gun-
metal  $3.50
These shoes are made by an Eastern firm and are
A No. 1 grade.
LADIES' SHOES
60 pairs, any size, kid or gunmetal, Louis or Cuban
heels; at only $5.50
These are without doubt the best shoes at the price
in town. Every woman should have a pair for everyday wear.
OUR   LEADERS
HIPRESS RUBBERS at $7.50
LECKIE'S FULL CHROME PIT SHOE at $8.00
PARIS HAND-MADE PIT SHOE at $10.25
You might buy cheap shoes at the corner grocery stores
—but do you get a guarantee like you get at
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
\\f have Rubbers to fit any shoe in town.
Aritbmmetio, according to the aver-
ago small boy, was simply invented In
order to give the teachers a good excuse for punishing their unhappy
pupils. And, certainly, little Tommy
Smith found it the unpleasant feature
of his young life.
"Now Tommy," said the school
teacher one morning, during the usual
hour of torture, "what is half of
eight?"
"Which way, teacher?" asked the
boy, cautiously.
"Which  way!"   replied   the  aston
ished lady.   "What do you mean?"
"Well, on top or sideways, teacher?"
said Thomas.
"What difference does that make?"
"Why," said Tommy with a pitying
air, "half of the top of eight Is nought,
but half of It sideways is three."
Seek I.undliiK* nt Prince Rupert.
PRINCE RUPERT.—The Board ot
Trade has been requested by the Seattle Aero Club to submit a report as to
facilities for an airplane landing field
here. January 16, 1921.
*ME   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
lb
Threo
For the
Cold   Weather
PURE WOOL BLANKETS
In Red, Brown and Grey.
EIDERDOWN COMFORTERST.ND COTTON
COMFORTERS, A GOOD ASSORTMENT.
A FULL LINE OF COTTON MATTRESSES, REST-
MORE AND OSTERMOOR, AND CHEAPER LINES.
FURNITURE AND HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS.
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of affluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT  ALL  THE   LEADING   HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C,
^
m
WINTER LAYERS OF
DIFFERENT AGES
Five-Year Test Proves Cheapest
Winter Eggs Produced By
Early Pullets.
Experimental Farms Note.
EVERY time .you telephone you have at your ready
command property worth millions of dollars.
Thousands are actually used for the long distance call, and for your simplest message you have the
use of hundreds of dollars worth of property.
This vast telephone plant must be not only constructed and installed, but must be kept electrieally alive to
respond instantly to your convenience or emergency.
It is manned by a multitude of telephone workers day
and night to maintain perfect pathways for that delicate telephone current started by your nearest branch.
The service must always be kept up to maximum usefulness.
The telephone system is a vast, vitalized plant, but
is accepted in such a matter of fact way that its immensity and efficiency is rarely realized.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
It is thought that farmers keep hens
until too old for profitable winter egg
production and it ls also a common belief that late hatched pullets commence
to lay only during the following spring.
To throw some light on this subject II
was decided in 1915 to compare early
pullets, late pullets, yearling hens ami
old hens as winter layers, at the Cap
Rouge Experimental Station, Quebec.
The Experiment.
The experiment began on the lirst
day of November and ended on the Inst
day of February, during five consecutive years. The number of birds In
each pen was twenty-five, and the
wholo lot occupied the Hame house.
A strict record was kept of all feed
consumed, also of all eggs produced
by every pen. At Ihe beginning und
at the end of each experiment the birds
were weighed, so that, In th spring,
the gain or loss ln weight could be
credited or debited to them.
Ihe Results.
If the cost of production of one
dozen of eggs, during winter, is taken
at 100 for early pullets, hatched before
May, it would be represented by 249 for
yearling hens, by 280 for late pullets,
hatched after April, aud by 84S for old
hens, ln other words, when pullets
hatched before May produced a certain
number of eggs at a cost of $1.00, yearling hens produced the same number al
a cost ot (2.49, pullets hatched after
April at a cost of $2.80, and old hens
at a cost of $8.48.
Height ot Eggs.
It is sometimes objected that, though
early pullets lay more eggs than yearling or older hens, the size of the egg
is such that they would bring much
less If eggs were sold by weight. Taking the figures from the present experiment, we find that, for the same
weight of eggs, when it cost $1.00 to
produce them with early pullets, It
cost $2.35 to produce them with yearling hens, $2.92 with late pullets, and
$8.10 with old hens. It will be seen
that, as expected, the weight of eggs
from hens was a little larger than
that from early pulletB, but tbe difference was a little larger than from
ence doeB not materially change the
figures for the cost per dozen.
Same Birds Compared.
The birds used for this experiment
were not specially bred for egg production, so that the early pullets put
in each year were not from better
stock than the yearling or older hens.
Two seasons, the yearling hens used
for this experiment were the same
birds, with the exception of a very few
which had died, as the ones ln the pen
of early pullets of the previous year,
and in both cases they were, for cost
of production, below the new lot of
early pullets taken Indiscriminately in
the same flock.
Eurlr Pullets Best.
That early pullets are the cheapest
producers of winter eggs has been told
and written so often that it is like an
old story. But a carefully conducted
experiment wlll again remind poullr
keepers of a well known fact which
they often seem liable to forget.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day ond Mght
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
DR.R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
streets, and many have been rescued
from the rivers Into which they have
been cast by their impoverished parents. The sale of children is often reported, much despised girl babies being offered for sums as low as a dollar.
A boy of live years, whose mother had
died and whose father was ill, was
rescued from the father who declared
that if no one would feed him he intended to "throw him into the river."
There have been suicides of entire
families,
1.000 I len (lis Heidi I),
Reports from numerous points In
the famine area which, it is estimated)
will require $20u,uUit,(."J.) worth of the
plainest food to avert the greak-st los.s
of life, have been received as follows:
One thousand deaths from starvation are occurring daily in tht! IVkin
district; from and draught animals in
Tehchow and Siuocrang, in Shantung.
have been sold by their owners for a
song, because of lack of fodder to
keep them and fuel to cook thorn ii
slaughtered; every road northward
from Chaugteho, in tlonon. swarms
with hunger pinched humanity, many
of whom fall exhausted out nf the
weary procession to die by Ihe roadside; the district soul Invest of Pao-
tingfu, denuded of vegetation, looks as
though It had been swept by a plague
of locusts; at a village near Wu
Chieng an old mau, with a basket on
his arm containing about six pounds
of red millet, explained that ho had
traded two overcoats and a pair of
boots for tlie millet, which lie was
taking lo his wife and their seven
children.
SKY IS THE LIMIT
CHICAGO.—Manager Bvet'B, of the
Chicago National's team, has been
notified that the "Sky is the limit" hi
purchasing players ami that the fortune of William Wrigley, jr., chief
stockholder of tho club, was at bis
disposal in procuring men who would
bring the pennant to Chicago next
season.
Norah—Just think, Jack is on the
football team.
Caroline—That's fine. What is he?
Half-back or full-back?
Norah—He's a drawback. Bobby
he's the greatest drawback the team
ever had.
As the Ancient Myth runs,
Atlas held up the world, and as
Atlas held up the world, the business of Electric Light and Power
Companies sustain almost every
other business.
Each day we pass to and fro surrounded by tlie
Modernization of thc World; we go to bed, we read,
by tbe glow of an ELECTRIC light, rise to a room
heated by the pleasant warmth of an ELECTRIC
heater, breakfast on toast made on an ELECTRIC toaster, wash it down with coffee from an ELECTRIC percolator, listen to the grind of an ELECTRIC
washing machine or the hum of an ELECTRIC vacuum
cleaner, and if we live in a large city we ride to business
on an ELECTRIC car—with never a thought of the
great power, the great expense that is put forward to
maintain us in the Elysium of comfort.
It has become part of us, a thing beyond our contemplation, our due; and the fact that this business must
be fed to keep it running, like anything else, is beyond
the probability of even our consideration.
But give it a little thought—
Just imagine yourself working at your desk, in your
home, or your store by the light of a candle, your
ELECTRIC lamps useless (it occurred for a few short
minutes last week and it surely was not pleasant, was
it?).
Imagine going home to a darkened house, to the
smoky oil lamp; your lights, your appliances—toaster,
washer, cleaner, iron, telephone—JUNK, just junk,
and this is what would come to you without the
ELECTRIC LIGHTING COMPANY.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that It Is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 CO., Ltd. P. O. 314
CHINA FACES WORST
FAMINE FOR 50 YEARS
1,000 Deaths From Starvation
Every Week in Pekin District
Is Ghastly Result of Widespread Crop Failure.
The area and extent of the famine
situation in China has recently been
brought out ln a number of reports
reaching Pekin. The region chiefly
affected extends east and west from
the (lull of Chihll to Han-chlnga In
Shensi and north and south from
.Mongolia to Shang-chlaug lu Honan
Forty-two years ago China was
swept by a memorable famine In which
millions of persons perished from cold
and hunger. In 1878, huwever, conditions were less serious than at present.
for at that time a wheat crop preceded
the drought, whereas today, due to two
years' lack of rainfall, only limited
areas have produced even the scentleBl
yields. The reports have told how the
trees of entire districts have beei.
stripped of their leaves for use a*
food. The starving people mix them
with millet chaff, clover or weeds, with
a minimum of grain, and bake them
Into cakes which resemble clay. Thou
sands of refugees who are endeavoring
to migrate afoot from the famine area*
are said to be living on such "food."
hoping to reach the more fort.unat<
cities aud towns where they may readily purchase necessaries ot life.
Extraordinary means to obtain
money for food are reported from ali
sections ot the five provinces. Little
children are  found  deserted  iu  the
Ford Service that is
Satisfactory
Ford repairs in our shop are made at contract rates
on labor. You know before the job is started how much
it will cost you. \
The excellence of our shop equipment and the mechanical skill of our men enables us to guarantee our work
fully. If your repair work proves unsatisfactory, return
it to us within five clays and we will do it all over again
to your satisfaction, free of charge. Genuine Ford parts
used.
The average man can easily afford a Ford car. It is the most inexpensive car to drive.
Twenty to twenty-five miles on a gallon of gasoline is an every-day
occurrence; 33 mile:, is frequently reported by Ford owners. Yearly repair
expenses of less than one dollar are nol unusual. The car is light iu
weight, aud tires give more mileage ou a Ford than on any other car.
You can always sell a "used" Foi'd at a gooil price. You have to accept
a big reduction for a "used" larger car.
Come and take a ride in (he 1920 model. Sec how comfortable il i.-.
And stylish, loo—stream lin.* effect, tapered hood, crown fenders, beautiful finish. You need one for business. Your wife and children need one
for pleasure and health.
SEE US FOR FORD PARTS, REPAIRS ANI) ACCESSORIES
E. C. EMDE, Ford Veak
COURTENAY, B.C. font
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
January 15,1321.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1821.
HAVE YOU EVER BEEN  HUNGRY?
Not the between meals kind, but the sort that comes
when food is not obtainable? The gnawing, Insistent kind
tliat refuses to be checked by tightening your belt or any
other subterfuge—so hungry that a crust of bread Boomed
of more value than gold—so hungry that at last you were
too weak to eat even when food wus obtainable?
Millions in China are now hungry. .Men, women and
children are dying hy thousands dally, and we out of our
abundance are asked to help the sufferers. A Relief Committee composed of Chinese and the foreign residents-" iu
the afflicted area, are looking to us to help them In their
work of mercy.   Our assistance is urgeuely needed.
The Chinas'* residents of Cumberland are sending such
help as tbey can. They gave liberally to tiie appeal for
starving Europe.   Let us be as generous as they.
AFTER TRADE
Post-prandial discussions upon the development of trade
within the Empire du good up to the point where they
draw attention to the fact tliat a closer I rail,* relationship
between thc Dominions and tlie Motherland is highly desirable. But It must he remembered that Great Britain's
commercial supremacy did not come by way of sentiment.
She bought in the cheapest market and sold ber own goods
at the highest figure obtainable. If the American manufacturer offered his wares at a lower figure than the
Canadian merchant the business went across the border.
That was at a time when the pound sterling was worth
four dollars and eighty-six cents in Wall Street. Today
three dollars and a half will purchase a sovereign and
there Is no Immediate prospect of a very substantial improvement ih the general exchange situation.
Great Britain has taught industry and the consuming
public at large thut American goods must be dispensed
with as much as possible as long as the dollar is at a
premium. The closer harmony existing between the value
of British imports and exports is indicative that the
Motherland is better aide to provide her own support than
was considered possible before the war. Canada should be
able to reduce her imports from tbe United States to a
great deal more than appears to be the case at present.
But the partial British set off to the high cost of the dollar
has been development of continental trade which is practically closed to the United States by reason of the low-
value of European currency.—Times.
Cloth changes color with a change of weather, if it Is
dyed with chloride of cobalt. In clear weather It Is a blue;
when a change is near it turns to violet; and for rain it
turns to bright pink. The change is due to moisture, and
it can be produced by breathing upon the cloth. This property of cobalt salts has been applied to the construction of
little barometer (lowers. The petals of artificial flowers are
tinted with cobalt salts, and vary in color from blue to pink
according to the weather. Their action, however, is different from that of a barometer, which indicates a change of
pressure of the atmosphere, and is also usually behind the
change of weather. The barometer Indicates the cause of
th storm, and the colored cloth shows Its effect.
LEAGUE FUNCTIONING WITHOUT STATES
Hon. N. W. Howell, one of the three Canadian delegates
to the assambly of the League of Nations in Geneva, in an
interview nt Toronto on his return to Canada, referred to
the non-participation by the United States iu the League of
Nations and staled tllat this had no effect on the formation
and functioning of the assembly at Geneva. "There was
some apprehension in some quarters over the refusal of the
United States to participate," Mr. Rowell said, "but the
lirst meeting of the assembly changed all that. The correspondents for tho United States were astonished at the
success of the league conference." Referring to complaints
from the United States about Canada having a vote in the
league. Mr. Howell said that Canada was accorded similar
rights to other nations,
Thomas A. Edison was so stranded financially when he
lirst landed in New York, lu 1869, tbat he hadn't a cent to
buy food. Seeing a ten-taster at work. Edison begged him
for some tea. and this formed bis first breakfast In New
York. Three days later Edison was sitting In the oliicos
of the Gold & Stock Telegraph Company watching the gold
ticker ut work--speculation in gold was then at fever
pitch. Suddenly scores of boys rushed Into the place excitedly, explaining Unit the ticker in their employer's olh
had stopped working. IU*. Laws, head of the concern, also
arrived breathless. The apparatus hud broken down,
Edison calmly told Laws that he thought he could fix it
und proceeded to do so. The grateful and astonished doctor
asked the stranger his name, und the next day, after a
searching quizzing bee. he put Edison in charge of the
whole business al a salary of $300 a month. When th
hungry, penniless, out-pf-work operator heard the amount
he was to receive he nearly fainted.—Detroit News.
A father's adminition to his son to emplate the Industry
of the beaver ran thus: Consider, son, the beaver beast,
who builds a big, big dam. He's lull of vim and pep and
yeast, he scorns the sodden clam, and north or soutli or
east or west he is the ham what am. Not by a dam site
does he pause, but with his might and main, with shining
teeth and busy claws he works in sun and rain. If men
destroy, be guaws and gnaws and builds it up again. The
curses of offended folk he never minds, nor will. The rage
with which the woodmen choke leaves him sere and still.
These words long since his forbears spoke: "Thrice
dammed he brook and rill." So blithely on his damming
way tlie beaver haunts the shore; he dams by night, he
dams by day as flooded fanners roar, and while one heaver
hits the hay his brother dams some more. Consider, son
the brute who dams while life endures. He has no time
for lute or loot. Make his ambition yours and dam away
nor give a hoot when idle fancy lures.
The most exclusive and highest-priced photographer in
New York has his studio in u ramshackle building on Fifty-
seventh street. There Is no elevator and the place is musty
and creaking witli loose hoards. Doors swing on broken
hinges and the whole atmosphere of the place is depressing. But the answer is—he makes the best pictures. So
they go to him.
W. H. Vanderbilt of Newport was fined the other day for
not tooting his horn. A failure of this character is seldom
noted in society and never in politics.
A Chicago girl cashier fooled robbers by hiding the company's pay money, nil currency, in her stockings. Reading
of it, the next time the robbers will revise their "Hands
up!" order.
BREEZES
By X RAYS.
"Eagle Eye" Wilson has given a very
creditable display of managership during the past week, having captured
Vancouver's left half, and also a crack
centre forward from Calgary.
The following was overheard at a
basketball practice. Trainer: "No, no,
Andy, you must tackle the man with
one arm only." Andy (learning the
game): "I don't care If he's got no
arms at all. He'll get it if lie conies
my way.
Heck Smith played a brilliant game
at Nanaimo against South Wellington.
He ls booked for the forthcoming season by the I. L. A., his old love.
Adnm Bell possesses twenty-five
medals which he lias won at soccer on
the coast.
"Boyd," the silent sentinel, Is recovering from his illness very slowly but
surely. Hopes were entertained thai
he would be In harness for the opening game. But at present it is doubtful.
Al McKinnon, 146 lbs. boxing champ,
star Inside right for St. Andrew's, Vancouver, endeavored to swim at the
Gorge in Victoria every day last winter. But one day It wns a little too
cold. So Al gave up the Idea. Miss
Audrey Grillin was the only person to
accomplish this feat.
smith challenged the City of Nanaimo.
This was ignored for a while, until
old Bob Yates, manager of the Hotel
Bevan, who at that time kept a boarding-house, accepted tho challenge.
Bob along with eleven boarders journeyed to Ladysmith, but they were defeated by five goals to nil. A return
game was played, resulting In a draw.
Immediately after this game a league
was formed and soccer sailed merrily
along. The selection committee for the
Nanaimo team was Boh Yates, Tom
Graham (General Superintendent of
the Canadian Collieries) and Bob
Adams (president of the Upper Island
League, 1919-20).
Footballers have peculiar names,
but who ever heard of "T-llone" and
"Fish and Chips"?
Whilst following his occupation at
the mine, Dave Graham bud a narrow
escape, being slightly injured by
falling rail.
For preventing mud sticking to
football hoots, blncklead rubbed well
on the sole nnd heel, and Into the
seams,  has proven  very satisfactory.
If it took three years to make
Eleanor Glynn famous, how long wlll
it take to persuade some of Cumberland's forwards to part with tlie ball
lirst time?
"Toots" Plump has forsaken his old
<dub, Victoria West, and enlisted with
Art Curtis of the .Metropolis. Plump
is one of the most dangerous inside
forwards produced in Victoria,
Three or four hundred lusty-lunged
supporters wero sorely disappointed
last week on account of not being nble
to travel to see the big game. It Is a
pity the powers that be cannot lend a
little aid on these occasions, by putting
on a special, which would certainly
pay if a guarantee was given by the
officials of the Cumberland Football
Club. The support on the line make
a great difference to the players.
> It ls rumored in town that a combine is about to bo formed hy Jimmy
English, Bill Walker, Bob Brown and
the Blacksmith. We only hope with
the present prices of meat that they
will refrain from forming a Beef
Trust.
The resurrection of soccer on the
Island took place ln 1907, when Lady-
Eating 14 lbs. of turkey at Christmas
may mnke a man walk unsteady, Bul
the excuse of dancing wi kills on al
Merville could hardly be taken in i\:-
the reason for another man's Inability
to travel straight.
The Juniors at Bevan were pulling
all they knew Into their soccer practice until the recent downfall of snow.
They mean lo make the other team.'
travel fasi next season.
Tom Rickson, of Victoria, captain of
the .Metropolis Football Club last year,
won live cups and other prizes for Hal
races last summer In Victoria and Island sports.
Shrlmpton, the G. W. V. A. goalkeeper In Victoria, received some
tempting offers from class teams In
London, but turned them down to return to Canada. "Apres, Ia guerre."
Bill Shearman, county cricketer nnd
one-time captain of Notts Forest first-
class Old Country soccer team, iu spite
of bis forty-four years of age, is playing good football in the Lower Island
league.
If a man sold a bicycle and bought a
suit of clothes—and then lost tlle
clothes—where ls—oh, never mind.
When and where do Cumberland Intermediates train for soccer? Or do
they not need it?
Johnny Cunimings, Victoria's crack
shot, scored three goals in the opening
tilt last week for Met against Yarows.
Has Ihe fleetfooted Danny Banner-
man retired from the game, or is It owing to business reasons he does not
figure on the line-up for Cumberland?
The Island teams have always been
noted for strong defences. At no time
wero the forwards us well balanced
or as stable as the rear-guard.
Hilly McGulre, the Old Country pro.
and Ladysmith star, lias just returned
from a trip lo "Bonnie Scotland."
'Che veteran captain of Victoria
Wests Is about the oldest at the game
In Victoria.
The "Mets" team Is composed this
season of seven North Wards players,
two Harbor Marines and two Army
and Navy. Not one of their last year's
team has been retained In the senior
dull.
Chester, formerly of Nanaimo and
Victoria Wests, has transferred his
affections to .Mets this season.
Tommy Carney still performs good
enough on the Mainland to catch a
place in tlie all-star games.
South Wellington have been notified
that three of their best players will
shortly leave the village.
In answer to a conversation which
did not end satisfactory to both parlies in a certain poolroom, please accept the following: Preston North
End won the First Division, English
League, without lps'ing a point, and the
same  season   won  the  English   cup
illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli
Grand
Clearance
SALE
10 days
only
at
Campbells,   Cumberland
of
HIGH  CLASS  DRY  GOODS,
GENTS   FURNISHINGS  AND
BOOTS AND SHOES
§     There will be a distribution of Fall and Winter
| Merchandise at from
|    35 to 50 per cent, below today's prices    j
Sale commences on
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
and will continue for
Ten Days only
without having n goal scored against
them. Although P. N. E. is reckoned
a Lancashire team, all the players
during that record season were Scotchmen.
Vancouver and district had over
forty clubs participating this fall in
the various leagues.
Hughes, full-hack of the Longshoremen, is rapidly making   a name   for
himself. He is playing sound football.
His brother Jimmie is custodiuu for
Nanaimo.
Trainer:   "There's  no  smoking allowed in the dressing room."
Player: "I'm not smoking."
Trainer: "But you have your pipe in
your mouth."
Player: "Yes, and I've got my boots
on my feet but I'm not walking."
The greatest bank is the Bank of
England, iu London; the oldest college
is University College, Oxford, founded
ln 1050; the largest library, the National, ln Paris, containing nearly
-3,000,000 volumes. The largest theatre
is the Paris Opera House, covering
three acres; the largest bronge statue,
that of Peter the Great, fn Petrograd,
weighing 1100 tons. Tbe largest college is in Cairo, with over 10,000
students ami 310 teachers.
Another Price Suggestion
BISCUITS, BUNS and ROLLS
BISCUIT! What delight this word suggests. So tender they fairly
melt in thc mouth, and of
such glorious flavor tliat
the appetite is never satisfied. These are the kind of
biscuits anyone can make
with Dr. Price's Cream
Baking Powder and these
unusual recipes:
Biscuits
*eups flour
4 teaspoon*) r>r. Price's
linking Powder
% teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons shortening
•Si cup milk or halt milk and
half water
Sift together (lour, baking
powder and salt, add shortening and rub in very lightly;
add liquid slowly; roll or pat
on floured board to about
one inch in thickness (handle
as little as possible); cut
with biscuit cutter. Bake in
hot oven 15 to 20 minutes.
Cinnamon Buns
i% cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoon's Dr. Price's
Baking Powder
9 tablespoons shortening
legg
J4 cup water
Vs cup sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon
4 tablespoons seeded raisins
Sift 2 tablespoons of measured  sugar with  flour,  salt
•DR'
CREAM
fiakiniPowter
Made from Cream of Tartar,
derived from grapes.
MADE IN CANADA
and baking powder; rub
shortening in lightly; idd
beaten egg to water and add
slowly. Roll out 'A inch thick
on floured board; brush with
melted butter, sprinkle with
sugar, cinnamon and raisins.
Roll as for jelly roll; cut into V/i inch pieces; place with
cut edges up on well-greased
pan; sprinkle with a little
sugar and cinnamon. Bake
in moderate oven SO to 35
minutes; remove from pan it
once.
Parker House Roll*
4 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
0 teaspoons Dr. Price's
Baking Powder
3 tablespoons shortening
Ht cups milk
Sift flour, salt and baking
powder together. Add melted
shortening to milk and add
slowly to dry ingredient!
stirring until smooth. Knead
lightly on floured board and
roll out lA inch thick. Cut
with biscuit cutter. Crease
each circle with back of knife
one side of center. Butter
the small section and fold
larger part well over the
small. Place one inch apart
in greased pan. Allow to
stand IS minutes in warm
place. Brush each with melted
butter and bake in moderate
oven IS to 20 minutes.
All measurements for all materials are level
■pp January IS, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
J
Five
Music and Photoplays
"Why Change
Your.Wifef
A Striking Drama of Married
Life Produced on a Lavish
Scale—Showing Tonight
Cecil B. DeMille's latest Paramount
Artcraft production, "Why Change
Your Wife" will be Bhown nt the Ilo-
llo Theatre this evening. It is described as a striking drama of married
life lavishly presented. Gloria Swanson nnd Thomas Melgheu are the featured players. The story is by William DeMIUe.
Robert Gordon, a lawyer, nnd Both
have been married ten years. He is
still deeply in love with his wife, but
is beginning to feel tiie matrimonial
walls hemming him in. Beth, in her
supreme effort to be a model wife, is
living only for his good and is getting
a little on his nerves.
She is trying so hard to be a "model
wife" that she forgets to play with
him. She is not the charming companion he had married. She has become
another person, a woman without the
grace and charm that won him. He is
growing slowly more despondent..
She, in turn, is disappointed. She
thinks him unappreciative and blind to
her good motives, so a tension has
sprung up between the two.
On the day ot their first quarrel,
Fate—in the form of unpaid alimony,
throws Sally Clark across his path.
He is much attracted to her, but is
still loyal to Beth, until a few evenings
later, when the horrors of a longhaired, slow-witted muBlcian aud several boresome guests for dinner, stare
him in the face, he angrily leaves the
room.
His Angers touch Sally's card In his
pocket and before he knows it he is
spending a cheery, cozy evening in
her apartment—a striking relief to the
stiff evening he has ran away from.
Beth learns of his visits and his interest in Sally, and believing her husband
far too noble to carry on a mere flirtation, she assumes that he is ln love
with Sally, accuses him of being so
and offers to divorce him so he can
marry her. Such a thought had never
entered Gordon's head. But now, in a
quarrel with his wife, she goads him
to the point of admitting that he does
love the girl and wants to marry her,
and the divorce proceedings take
place.
Beth's heart is fairly broken the day
the final decree reaches her, but she
is far too spirited to show her grief.
She realizes all too late just why she
has lost Gordon, but life is before her.
She is still a young woman and beautiful. So she decides, with a recklessness born of her deep grief, to make
the most of the years before her, to be
gay, beautiful, extravagant—all the
things she has not been. Had she allowed this side of her nature free play
Instead of burying It under a weight
of wifely responsibility, she would
never have lost her husband.
Gordon marries Sally and is surprised to And that the same things
happen as before. She changes just
as the other woman had changed from
a sweetheart to a wife. He meets with
an accident and is taken to Beth's
home. His wife follows him later and
jealous of Beth's growing influence
over Gordon, upbraids her. The
women engage in a fierce struggle and
Beth  proves  victorious.    Gordon  re-
NOTICE
In the Nanaimo County Court, Holden
at Cumuerlnnd, B.!'.
In the matter of the Estate of Alex,
Wllie or Wilier, deceased, und In the
matter of the Administration Act.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
Judge Barker made the 8th day of
December, 1920, I was appointed administrator to the estate of tho said
Alex. Wlbe or Weber, deceased, and all
parties having claims against the said
estate are hereby required to furnish
same properly verified to me on or
before the 1st day of Februnry, A.D.
1921, and all parties indebted to the
aald estate aro required to pay the
amount of their indebtedness to me
forthwith.
WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated at Cumberland this 28th day
of December, 1920. 2-3
covers and renews his love-vows for
Beth.
The climax is reached when Gordon
realizes that Beth, whom he loves, is
now a free woman captivating and
alluring. She ultimately wins him
back from his second wife. And now,
having learned her lesson, that a
woman must not only win a man's
love but keep it—and that a wife to
bring any manner of comfort to a man
must be his playmate as well as his
married mate—the future looms before
them, aglow with happiness.
The picture has been produced with
all the beauty of setting, mastery of
screen technique, and admirable attention lo detail that was characteristic
of Cecil B. Deintlle In "Male and
Female" and his other cinema classics.
"FIGHTING SHEPHERDESS"
Thrills, Mystery and Love are
Splendidly Portrayed by Anita
Stewart in Novel Role.
An almost lifelike story of how a
simple, Inconspicuous girl, through a
strange series of incidents arose from
the depths of a western roadhouse and
obscure and uncertain parentage to a
position of wealth aud power in her
community, is the story of "The Fighting Shepherdess," from the famous
book by Caroline Lockhart, and the
latest Anita Stewart production which
will be seen at the Ilo-llo Theatre on
Tuesday evening next.
The natural inclinations of the girl
are against the surroundings in which
she was placed and It so transpired
that by chance a recluse sheep-herder
with a sense of chivalry arrived at the
tavern to champion her cause against
the advances of an objectionable character. It was through the opportunity
offered by this man that Kate, played
by Anita Stewart, was able to leave
the tavern and take up a life as a
hermit girl.
An appealing romance enters the
story shortly after Kate leaves the
tavern. Hughie Disston, played by
Wallace MacDonald, visiting the cattle country becomes enamored of the
simple shepherdess and an engagement
is the result. Little does the youth
realize that when he visits the sheep
country after his years ln college he
will find a difference tn his little shepherd girl and a difference that causes
much pain but makes for a very Interesting picture.
The Deadlier Sex
Can a Woman Tame a Man and
Then Be His Obedient Wife?
POIGNANT QUESTIONS
Why is there a deadlier sex?
Is the heart of a woman ruled by an
unseen power?
Can a business girl retain her
womanly charm?
Does the spirit of Cleopatra still
burn iu the heart of the modern girl?
Does business recognize sex?
Does the Great Outdoors kindle the
spark of manhood in the weakest
male?
Does hate ofttimes turn to love in a
woman's heart?
Does the independence of our women
make them more deadly?
You know the way of a man with a
maid—do you know the way of a maid
with a man?
Do you think the female ot the
species is more deadly?
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the business, including house, horses,
wagon and implements, lately carried
on by Kwong Shung, gardener, etc.,
has been taken over by Leong Kum,
to whom all accounts must be paid.
Any accounts owing by the said Kwong
Shung will he paid by Leong Kum.
Accounts must be rendered not later
than January 15, 1921, addressed to
P, 0. Box 127, Cumberland. 2-3
Can a woman tame a headstrong
man and then be an obedient wife? If
she has known the Independence of be
ing a successful business woman of
big affairs can she win the love of her
business rival? Can the "weaker sex
be, for the "stronger sex," the "deadlier sex?"
Jf any of these questions puzzle you,
the answer can be found at the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Wednesday aud Thursday
next, when Blanche Sweet will lllus
trate them in "The Deadlier Sex." It
Is a story in which effervescent comedy
and tense emotions have been injected
Into a clever plot evolved by a no lesB
famous playwright than Bayard Vei
Her.
High finance in Wall Street and the
rugged life in the Maine woods figure
in this tale of a girl who had the nerve
to kidnap a money-grabbing business
rival who waB threatening the investments of her stockholders. Against
Nature's background of pine-clad
mountains, blue sky and Bwift-running
river is enacted this modern American
romance.
"The Deadlier Sex" was written for
the screen by that master playwright,
Bayard Velller, who wrote "The Thirteenth Chair" and "Within the Law."
The role of Mary Willard, president of
a railroad and wholesome outdoor girl,
provides Miss Sweet with every opportunity to display her comedy and
emotional talents.
"High and Dizzy"
A Harold Lloyd Comedy Special
—A Riotous Mirthquake of
Ringing Laughter
Eight mouths ago Harold Lloyd entered the ranks of big league screen
comedians when he presented "Bumping Into Broadway," his first $100,000
feature comedy. And it set the tongues
of photoplay fans wagging. People
who had never laughed before found
themselves screaming with joy over
the clean-cut fun of a good-looking
youth who had the happy knack of
showing the absurd side of situations
anyone might find themselves in.
The producer decided to make tlie
second series, of which "High and
Dizzy" Ib the first, so much funnier
that there can not be the slightest
doubt but that Harold Lloyd Is firmly
established as the screen's greatest
comedian, an opinion voiced by the nation's critics and the approval of the
public.
High and Dizzy," Bhowlng at the
Ilo-llo on Wednesday and Thursday of
next week, with the quantity of its
production and the quantity of Its
laugh, lives up to the promises made
for the second series—the Mirthquake
Specials.
Mildred Davis, the pretty blonde
comedienne who gains new friends
with every new Lloyd picture, continues as leading lady.
PEGGY HYLAND IN "THE
REBELLIOUS BRIDE'
A Comedy Picturing Life and
Romance in the Ozark Mountains, and the Oddest Marriage
a Girl Ever Contracted.
Peggy Hyland, tn "The Rebellious
Bride," will be the attraction at the
Ilo-llo on Friday next. This William
Fox photoplay tells the story of a
pretty, happy, bright girl of the Ozark
mountain region, who contracts a peculiar marriage. Her old grandfather,
with whom she lives, fearing that the
child ls getting beyond his control,
forces her to marry the first man they
meet on the country road. This happens to be a wealthy St. Louis man
who had dropped into the mountains
during an airplane flight.
Of course, ln marriage a girl always
takes more or less ot a chance. Did
this girl assume any greater risk in
marrying the first man she met than
it she had known him for years? "The
Rebellious Bride," it is said, answers
this question in a delightful way and,
according to advance notices, Peggy
Hyland makes the girl a thoroughly
wholesome and pleasing character.
A letter of Introduction was handed
by an actor to a manager. It described
the presenter as an actor of much
merit, and concluded: "He plays Macbeth, Hamlet, Shylock and billiards.
He plays billiards best."
The census taken runs up against
many amusing experiences. Chief
among these are the explanations some
people offer for the various answers
they make to questions put to them.
A census taker recently asked a woman
whether she could read. She answered, rather hesitatingly, that she could
not, and then hastened to explain: "I
never went to school but one day and
that was in the evening, and we hadn't
no light and the teacher didn't come!"
"Forty-two families live in the same
apartment house where I live," said a
city business man, "and I do not know
any of them except my wife, the Janitor
and a little baby girl whom I meet In
the hall occasionally and who, the first
time she saw me, asked: 'Are you my
daddy?' Poor little kid! Her daddy
must be a morning newspaper man.''
"John, do you ever play cards for
money?" "No, ma'am; I sometimes
think 1 do, but It's always the other
man that does It!"
In the dark, two things that can always be found: The sharp edge of a
door—and a pretty girl'B lips.
Father—Who sent those flowers?
Daughter—Oh, a certain young man.
Father (slightly Irritated)—Certain!
No man is certain until you have loaded him.
Minister (wishing to be very severe)
—Do you know, John, whenever I sec
you in an intoxicated condition I think
of a certain animal?
John—Aye! I know, parson. Yo'
thinks—"Lucky dog! lucky dog!"
She—Everybody knows about it.
Some people take her part and some
her husband's.
Mere Man—And a few eccentric in
dlvlduals mind their own business.
m
ILOIL0 THEATRE
Saturday, January 15th
Cecil B. DeMille's
production
Why Change Your Wife?
Why Don't Wives Remain Their Husband's
Sweethearts ?
I
Monday, January 17th
CHARLES RAY
— IN-
ALARM  CLOCK   ANDY
Tuesday, January 18th
ANITA STEWART
IN
The  Fighting   Shepherdess
A lone girl who fights unaided for life, love and
honor using a man's weapon's, but not in man's way
Wednesday and Thursday, January 19th and 20th
BLANCHE SWEET
— IN —
THE DEADLIER SEX
Why Is She So Deadly?
Harold Lloyd
IN A SPARKLING COMEDY COCKTAIL
HIGH AND DIZZY
Also the 15th Episode of "The Third Eye"
Friday, January 21st
PEGGY   HYLAND
— IN —
The Rebellious Bride
Special Comedy, " Wild Woman and Tame Lions"
Don't forget the Country Store Drawing
takes place each Friday Night THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 15, 1921.
Quality Grocers
WE HANDLE THE BEST
GREAT WEST tEA
Haine's Marmalade
PERRINS' BISCUITS
Old City Pure Jams
IX GLASS JARS ONLY
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
Before The Dawn |     Corporation of the City of Cumberland
Specially Written tor The Islander.
By H. R.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
begs to advise that it has for rental at
moderate prices
SAFETY   DEPOSIT
BOXES
They are recommended for the protection from fire or
burglary of valuable business or private documents,
Victory Bonds, jewelry, etc.
THE MANAGER WILL BE GLAD TO FURNISH
PARTICULARS UPON APPLICATION
Land for Sale
To close out nn estate tho following
parcels of land are offered for sale:
I'nrt l»'ls acres, nioro or less, and
part 70.2't acres, man* or less, of Lot
4.1, Newcastle District, IM'., and commonly known as the "George Stevens
property."
Persons desiring to acquire said
lands or any part thereof may secure
particulars respecting tho same and
the price asked therefor, by writing to
the undersigned.
CLAUDE I. HARBISON
Barrister, Etc.
Law Chambers VICTORIA, IU',
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
■jjinjt aain     ii.aet
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEBBIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. c
UNION HOTEL
0ITOSITK KAIMYAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout hy Electricity,
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
rumlinrlai.fi.  IT C
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
T^^aT^ar       a ^TT-.     r\r»T7ec*I7r,
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double>ad)_._$5.0o!
The only two countries ln which the
mile is ui equal length are England
and America. t
INCUBATORS
BROODERS
We have the largest and most
complete stock of Poultry Supplies in B. C.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUES
A. I. JOHNSON & GO.
844 Cambie St.
Vancouver
'   iien( Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. !i8.i0 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in tbe
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland.    Visiting
brethren cordially invited.
Frank Bond, Chief RrfVigor; Chan.
O'Brien, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
The scene was India, and it all happened during the time of the awful
mutiny. Things were very quiot at
the station where Colonel Ross was
serving, The Colonel along with the
majority nf brother oflicers, had decided to ro ou a tiger shooting expedition. Left in command of the fort was
Major Ross, tlie Colonel's cousin, and
in his care was left Jimmie Ross, the
Colonel's only son, a mere child of
thirteen or fourteen summers,
Jimmy wns the pet of the officers'
mess. There were good points about
tlie boy that were very noticeable, and
ope could easily depict the fine breed
(if slock to wblcb he belonged. Nevertheless, Jtmmle was almost spoiled by
the- officers and men of the garrison,
who loved him as though he belonged
to eacli and every one of them,
His mother was mites and miles
away iu England, where she remained
on account of hor delicate health, and
every man in the fort seemed to have
(lie idea that it waa his duty to mother
the Colonel's son. Although petted
and almost spoiled, there still remained in the lad fine streaks of man
Uness that bore out the fact that he
was of fine birth and of good fighting
stock.
One day, however, just at noon, when
the sun was glaring down fiercely and
the whole fort was taking its siesta, a
mighty yell rang out from a thousand
throats, and hordes of crazy fanatics
rushed the fort. In a few minutes tbe
place was changed from a place of
lazy, droning flies and sleeping Inhabitants to a scene of terrible carnage. Not one had been prepared,
for the news of a native rising had not
yet been sent up from tlie south, and
the attack came with the suddenness
of a cloud-burst. The Major and
Jimmie were sleeping in their bungalow when the attack took place, and
their resistance was less than useless.
They were both quickly seized, bound
and carried off In triumph through the
battered gates of the fallen fort. They
wore then thrown across a hor.se and
taken away to tbe hills where the
whole tribes faded away almost as
quickly as they bad descended. Once
in thc rocky fastness, where the
natives had made their headquarters,
ihe prisoners were released from their
bonds nnd thrown roughly into a cave
where a strong guard was placed over
them.
The Major Was grave «and white to
tiie lips, for he realized their position
much more than did the boy, whose
lips were bitten red, in his endeavor to
stifle hack the tears and sobs. For a
long time neither of them had very
much to say. Presently, however, a
tall, black-beared tribesman came In
with a note from his chief, and handed
it to the Major, who, on reading it,
paled and started back with an appalled stare, and crumpled up the note
into a paper ball, and sank down on
the floor In despair.
"What is it, sir?" cried the boy.
But for a while no answer was forthcoming. Then the Major spoke in a
slow, measured tone: "My boy, they
have been good to us. Very much better than I expected they would he. One
of us must live and tbe other must die.
and it is left for you and I to choose,'!
Then without a moment's hesitation
out came Jimmic's breed. He marched
across the cave, saluted the .Major and
spoke in a voice without a tremble.
"Sir, I shall stay. I am of no account, not even entitled to be in the
garrison; whilst you, sir, are an officer, and can be of some use to our
country even yet. Therefore it is you
who must take tlie opportunity of re-
'urning to the fort. Then maybe you
will avenge me." Here Jimmie's voice
faltered and almost broke, as lie took
from his pocket a watch that had been
given to him on his thirteenth birthday by his father, and a locket containing his mother's picture. He kissed
both and handed them to the .Major,
saying: '(jive these to dad and mother,
ami toll them I died as dad would have
liked me to   like a soldier."
Just ai dawn, into the darkened
doorway of the cave, stepped tlie chief.
With him were four tribesmen armed
with rifles. He spoke to the Major in
Hindustani and said:
"Have you chosen?"
"Yes, it is the boy," answered the
Major.
Tears stood in the brave old soldier's
oyes as he grasped tiie hands of Jimmie, who was unable to speak. "Goodbye, laddie, goodbye*!" "was all he could
say.
Then for a moment a glance of admiration showed In the eyes of the
fanatic chief, as he grasped the shoulders of the boy and roughly hustled
him out of the cave, It was but a
glance, for immediately it changed into one of fierce hate and cruelty. The
parly left thc cave and for a while all
was silence. The Major sank to the
ground sobbing with grief, as though
his   heart  would   break.   Then with
TAXES—
City, General-
Current   	
Arrears   	
Interest ~.	
Financial Statement for the Year ending December 31,1920
RECEIPTS
  $4,626.81
       611.60
         25.18
$5,263.09
School—
Current   8,421.29
Arrears   695.07
Interest   47.09
EXPENIDTURES
Advertising   $    80.44
Printing  135.80
City Buildings  136.70
Election   76.31
Fire Protection   1,191.73
Insurance     132.75
Interest and Discount  126.25
Road Tax 	
Dog Tax 	
Trades Licences ...
Streets nnd Sewers .
Fire Protection 	
Police Court Fines .
280.00
42.00
2,112.50
1,062.00
592.23
770.00
9,163.45
2,884,60
$16,811.04
2,426.18
School Government Grant .
Scavenging (buckets) 	
Trust Account  .*!	
Stock Sales 	
Freight Refund 	
Hauling	
Night Watchman	
2,425
12,007
1,880.03
Loan   	
School Sales 	
Night School	
Stable Account
Sale ot Lots 	
26.04
109.40
20.48
11.80
266.40
720.00
15.00
98.00
42.00
552.00
1,151.72
Interest and Discount .
6.02
713.02
1.154.7
3,000.1
713.02
Light and Water-
Current   $ 526.51
Supplies   142.37
Water   6.00
Supplies   4.80
Offlce—  —
Salaries    1,076.00
Stamps   20.00
Supplies   245.08
Sundries     -     84.20
Audit   20.00
Police— 	
Salaries    1,316.96
Supplies   138.10
Light and Water   51.40
Night Watchman   720.00
Streets and Sewers— 	
Labor    2,888.78
Material     1,772.00
Health Department— 	
Medical Officer  102.13
Scavenging     1,104.25
Total
Telephone 	
Stable Account—
Feed  	
Repairs 	
Loan 	
Legal 	
Road Tax Refund
Stock   	
Hauling 	
692.74
101.62
160.00
16.00
173.76
3.50
679.68
1,445.28
2,225.45
4,660.78
1,206.39
49.25
694.36
3,000.00
343.25
14,304.47
CITY TOTAL 	
SCHOOLS—
Salaries   16,901.35
Supplies mid Repairs    3,048.35
16,184.47
Night School .
18,949.70
98.00
19,047.70
Total Expenditures for 1920   $35,232.17
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ACCOUNT
GENERAL TAXES—
Arrears (1920 rates plus Interest)..
Delinquent (1919. plus interest) 	
SCHOOL TAXES, INSIDE—
Arrears (1920 rates plus interest)....
Delinquent (1919, plus interest)	
SCHOOL TAXES, OUTS IDE-
Arrears  (1920, plus interest)	
Delinquent (1919, plus interest) 	
$493.74
163.60
4<iS.93
143.:il)
94.21
2S.47
—   $1,392.25
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE—
Scavenger Buckets   25.50
REAL ESTATE—
Land owned by the City      4,000.00
City Buildings 	
STOCK AND EQUIPMENT—
Wagons, Sleighs, etc	
Horses	
Fire Hall Apparatus 	
Fire Motor Truck	
Tiled Piping 	
Plough 	
Feed   .*	
Tarvia    •.	
3,438.50
300.00
300.00
1,800.00
2,700.00
120.00
34.11
65.00
220.00
Cash in hand
5,539.11
2.247.S5
15,250.96
Total Assets   $10,043.31
LIABILITIES
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE—
Outstanding Cheques         802.34
Bank Overdraft          193.95
        996.20
BALANCE STATEMENT
Outstanding Cheques J 966.14   Cash in hand  $2,247.85
Bank  Overdraft   193.96
1,160.09
Balance on hand  1,087.76
Total
..$2,247.85   Total  $2,247.85
Cumberland, B. C, Jan. 6, 1921.
To the Mayor and Alderman of the City of Cumberland,
Cumberland, B. C.
Gentlemen—
beg to submit herewith my report as Auditor for the
Corporation of the City of Cumberland for the year ending
December 31, 1920.
BALANCE.—The business of the year shows a credit balance uf $1,087.76, as opposed to a deficit of $392.29 for the
(year 1919.
COLLECTIONS.—An outstanding feature ls the amount
[of money collected during the year both by the tax rates
and by voluntary subscriptions for various purposes. Taxes
outstanding at present are $1,392.25, as compared with
$1,970.79 iu 1919 and $5,494.77 in 1918. This is due to the
I general prosperity of the city and to the beneficial effect
'of the tax sales.
During the year $1,062.90 was collected for paving Dunsmuir Avenue. While this is a credit to those who contributed and to the Council for financing the balance of the
work, it Is evidence of the inadequacy of the present basis
[of taxation that the work was not financed by the ordinary
methods. Although the city has no bonded debt, the rates
are practically at the maximum and it will be increasingly
difficult in future to raise the money required for ordinary
business. The question of changing the system ot taxation
to meet the increased requirements ought to be given urgent
considration by both the ratepayers and the Council.
SCHOOLS.—The cost of Schools has increased to
$18,949.70, being an Increase of $4,222.08 over last year.
This Is accounted for mainly by the Installation of new
[furnaces and increase of salaries over those paid In 1919.
The Government grant shows a corresponding increase of
$1,800.50.
TRADE LICENCES.—This source of revenue shows an
Increase of $642.50, due mainly to the imposition of "near-
beer" licences in the hotels.
In conclusion permit me to express my appreciation of
the courtesy shown me by the City Clerk and his assistance in conducting the audit.
I have the honor to be, gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
C. W. WOOD, Auditor.
startling suddenness shots rang out,
and the old warrior thought the boy
had gone to his deatli.
But hark! What was that? A cheer?
Surely not. Yes. there It rang again;
first a shrill bugle call anil then a wild
hurrah, and shots were Hying everywhere. Out to the doorway rushed the
Major, and beheld the tribesmen running in all directions, and Britisli
troops pouring into the rocky fastness
from many different ways.
Jimmie had been placed with his
back to a large rock, and tho firing
party was drawn up when tlie attack
broke loose. And the first man to
jump over the parapet was his father,
Colonel Ross, who led the storming
troops. He saw Jimmie and rushed
towards him, aud In their eagerness to
save their own skins the firing party
(led, too anxious to get away to bo
thinking of Jimmie.
The father and son clasped each
other in fond embrace for a moment,
and then the Colonel suddenly remembered the firing party and nsked what
it meant.   Iu a few moments Jimmie
told his stofy. Then his father's .face
was rigid and stern, and for a while
Ills look boded 111 for his cousin. He
strode hurriedly to the door of the
cave and met the Major face to face.
Thc Colonel seemed as though he
could not control himself and appeared
as though he was ready to leap nt the
other's throat.
"You, you miserable coward. What
have you to say, you hound?" came
from the Colonel's lips.
"Nothing," replied his cousin with
downcast head.
"Then, hy God, you shall die as you
would have had my son die," at the
same time drawing his revolver from
its holster and pointing It at the heart
of the Major. Just then Jimmie rushed
between them. And as his father
glanced toward the boy his eyes fell
on a crumpled ball of paper on the
floor of the cave. He mastered his
feelings, strode over and picked up the
ball, opened it and read it. Then a
glance of understanding flashed over
his face, ns he strode toward the
Major.  He held out his hand and said:
"Forgive me, cousin; I am mistaken.
You are a man and a true British soldier."
The note read In Hindustani:
"One must be shot at dawn, whilst
the other dies by torture at noonday."
It was the darkest hour before the
dawn.
The Other End!
The ceremony was over, both had
"I willed," and the happy couple were
receiving the clergyman's blessing.
First of all he said a few words to
the bride. Then he turned to the
bridegroom.
"Now, my son," he said, "you have
come to the end of all your troubles."
A few months passed, and the young
man met the clergyman again. "I
thought you told me at my wedding
tTiat I had come to the end of all my
troubles."
The clergyman smiled; his right
band lay flat and open in a position
near his heart.
'My friend," lie beamed, "I did not
tell you which end." January 15, lSSi.
THE  CtJMJBEftLANl)  ISLANDER
Seven
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE  CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER  HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS, %=*
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
I NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAYJ
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SINQ CHONO, Cumherland
HONO CHONO & CO., Bevan.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sueclaltr.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The election ot Chancellor and fifteen members of Senate wlll be held at
the University of British Columbia on
Thursday, April 7, 1921. As this election must of necessity be carried on
by mail, it is essential that the committee in charge should have the correct mailing addresses of all members
of Convocation. Many members have
moved during tlie past three years and
have not notified tho University of tlle
change. Every member of Convocation
is, therefore, asked to send in his correct address at once to the Registrur.
Course in Forestry.
There is being offered in the University of British Columbia a course in
Forestry, and a number of students
are already enrolled.
The course, approved by the Senate
at its last meeting, is especially de-
sigtitl to turn out professional engineers trained for logging operations,
and foresters who are in close touch
with the actual operations in British
Columbia's great industry. The University is now fulfilling Its function
as a Provincial University by giving
professional training for all the basal
industries of the province. In a very
few years the influence of such training on the industries will be marked.
THE FUTURE OF CHINA
IF YOU REQUIRE
Windows,  Doors
Frames
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHTTTINUTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offlce 2*20 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C
A Chinese publicist warns us
against the Imperialist ambitions ot
Japan. He gives the impression tliat
Japan desires to annex China and
dominate Eastern Asia, and perhaps
tlie world.
The situation is that of a well-
organized military nation, occupying
a small territory poor In resources,
lying beside a huge, peaceful, ill-
organized nation, occupying a vast
country ricli In natural resources—a
tempting prey for a conqueror. It
may be that the Chinaman's fears are
exaggerated, but the situation is
worth considering.
The danger would be in Japan
controlling not only China's territory.
Iron, coal and other resources, but its
man-power, from which greater armies
than those of all Europe could be mobilized. Left to Itself, or receiving only
disinterested aid and guidance, China
would devolop along lines which would
benefit the world instead of being a
source of danger. But if the Chinaman's fears were realized there would
be a "Yellow Peril," to some extent for
the white races, but still more for the
Mongolian races themselves, which
would be courting disaster by arousing
the antagonism ot the whites.
Japanese statesmen, however ambitious, are credited with common
sense, and must surely have before
their eyes tlie warning given by the
calamity which has overtaken Germany.
On the other hand other countries
ought not to grudge Japan the advantages due to geographical proximity to
China, and knowledge of its people.
There are magnificent opportunities
for trade aud for legitimate business
enterprise. The whole of Eastern
Asia, including Siberia, is a fine field
for agricultural aud manufacturing industry .and commerce. Japan and
China could supply Siberia with
manufactures. Siberia could supply-
wheat anil timber. A splendid future
awaits the whole region if the aim of
peaceful development and freedom of
trade is maintained. Disaster would
follow if Eastern Asia were turned into an armed camp such as Europe was
before the war.
Whatever we may think of Japan's
Intentions, we should keep our own
hands clean. We should regard the
hundreds of millions of Chinese people
with disinterested sympathy. We
should welcome their entrance into the
field ns a great Industrial nation, not
view its progress with jealousy. We
should look at China from the Chinese
point of view. Then we could fairly
ask Japan to do the snmo nnd not to
abuse the advantages of its geographical position. Those who are contributing to tlle relief of tho famine
stricken people of Honan are doing a
work that Is not only beneficial, but
statesmanlike in the largest sense.
Their spirit should govern ull our relations witli China, Not what we can
get out of China, but how we may help
China should be our motive. The destiny of China depends largely upon the
attitude of the outside world, upon tlle
choice between selfish exploitation alld
a broad international spirit.—Vernon
News.
EXTRAVAGANCE IS
STRONGLY CONDEMNED
Minister of Finance in Public
Address Offers Severe Comments on Waste.
BROCKVILLE, Out.—Speaking before members of the Eastern Ontario
and Ottawa district branch of the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada.
at their annual banquet, Sir Henry
Drayton, Minister of Finance, conveyed to the citizens of Canada a
strong denunciation of tlie extravagant spending of Canada's money in
tlie United States.
He spoke of the distribution problem, and warned that unless Canada
swings the balance of trade in her
favor by buying more at home or in
Oreat Britain she is merely postponing
tiie inevitable end.
Fruit Inipurlutlniis Doubled ill Year.
Canadian Importations of fruit from
the United States jumped from $170",-
OUU iu 11)111 to $374,000 last year;
canned vegetable importations jumped
124 per cent., pickles aud sauces 50
per cent, aud textile products 66 per
cent.
Ull'l.diKUlilil In United States Shoes.
Despite the fact that many shoe factories were closed, Canadians imported last year $13,000,000 in shoes from
the United States. He told the merchants that only the people could bring
about a change, aud he asked their
assistance in bringing them to their
senses, by pointing out the* reason
why they sholuld buy at borne.
BIG DROP IN FOODS
IN COLD STORAGE
Our national supply of food in cold
storage today is less than it was a year
ago by over 20 million pounds. In
fact, only three prime urticles show
Increases and of these only in butter
is there a really important change. All
meats together show a decline of 7%
million pounds compared with the
supply available a year ago. Beef
alone has dropped 0 million pounds.
The total meat In store at the last return was 67,340,000 pounds, which,
however great the figures may look, Is
not more than about three weeks' supply for everybody at the usual rate of
consumption. There is a still greater
decrease ln cheese.
TUGBOAT SINKS IN
VANCOUVER HARBOR
Marvis Goes Down Four Minutes
After Collision With Scow in
Fog—No Loss of Life
VANCOUVER.—Struck by a gravel-
laden scow and crushed like an eggshell, the tugboat Marvis sank lu the
harbor at 8 o'clock Tuesday morning
and now lies iu sixteen fathoms near
the second narrows. The accident occurred in tbo fog with the Marvis
bound up to tiie gravel bars and the
tugboat Earl coming down with a
seowload of gravel for the C. P. R.,
pier Illl. As the edge ot the loaded
scow cauglU, the Marvis it crushed her
ill and (lie tugboat went down iu three
or four minutes. No loss of life is
reported, the crew having taken
promptly to the scow and to the tugboat Earl. The only member of the
crew reported as suffering inconvenience was Chief Engineer Kelly, who
got wet. The Marvis, Capt. Coldicott.
and the Earl, Capt. Rogers, were both
engaged In the work of the Pacific Construction Company on the new C. P. R.
pier.
BOGUS V. C. "HERO"
RETURNS TO ENGLAND
ST. JOHN, N.B.—In the police court
here, Albert E. Wood, bogus V. C, expressed a desire to return to his home
in .Manchester, England, where he says'
he has a wife and two children. The
court agreed and Wood will be held
here until a position is secured for him
on a trans-Atlantic boat.
MILLIONS KILLED
IN ACTION
Wonderful news I Millions and millions of germs killed ia aotlon anil
thousands and thousands' of victims
relieved of bronchitis, asthma, coughs,
and colds. There ls great rejoicing in
the fact that science has at laat invented the world's surest death trap
for germs—Buckley's Bronchitis Mixture. With ths flrBt dose this remedy
gets right down to business, and
never ceases in its destructive work
until every trace of the disease is
completely removed and the victim
restored to normal health. Letters
from all parts of Canada praising this
wonderful mixture are literally pouring into headquarters. Bead this letter:—"Years of Buffering from that
terrible affliction, bronchial asthma,
ordered by all medical men to close
my business in Montreal and go south
to a warmer climate, but I noticed
your ad. ln the "Montreal Standard"
for the above mixture and I said I
would give one more trial to health
before I leave my native towu, and
thank the good maker I did. My
bronchial tubes are clear, the hacking
cough has disappeared, the wheezing
cough has ceased as if by magic, and
all discomforts have gone since taking
your wonderful mixture."—Herbert
Corri, 417 McKay Street, Montreal.
There is no reason whatever why you
cannot be completely and speedily restored to health if you take this remedy. You are satisfied or the money
is refunded, according to our guarantee. Don't delay. Buy a bottle now
from your druggist 18
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND BY
R. E. FROST.   *"
January Sale
Your Big Opportunity to Save Money
I Specialize in Shoes, Men's and Boys' Clothing, Underwear and Gents' Furnishings.
Having been buying and selling these lines of merchandise for over 20 years, I should
and do know, whon, where and how to buy. Having bought just at the right moment,
I am able to solicit your patronage for our mutual benefit, as I know I am able to give
you better values than you can get elsewhere.
Below are a Few of the January Sale Bargains
SO PAIRS HOYS' TWEED BLOOMER PASTS, lined. (PO EA
aud Governor fasteners; sizes 21 to 34, January Sale *3s£t.u\f
*-' IM)/. PAIRS BOYS' DARK BROWN CORDUROY lll.on'ltlts
Just the thing lor'liurd wear and       (I»Q OF dJQ '7C
service.   Slues 24 to 34.   On sale at  *DOia.U and «H)» i *J
2(1 BOYS' SUITS—Sizes 2ti to 34, witli bloomer pants; In allwool
tweed effects; brown, grey, slate and dark green mixtures;
out iii latest styles, with and with- (PI \ Cft op <j>*|/****; !Z(\
nut belts. Beg. $17,511 to (28.50 for tDl^iauU to ■tDlOaajU
MEN'S NAVY BLUE SERGE SUITS—Medium weight, allwool:
sizes 35 to 40 breast measure.   Good value at       *£QO l\(\
$46.00.   January Sale Price 	
YOUNG MEN'S TWEED SUITS—In snappy styles 1111,1 ihe 1:ii.*-i
colorings.   Brown, green and blue* effect
84, 35, and 36, Sollnig regular at $10 an
colorings.   Brown, green and blue effects.   Sizes   Cl*QO P\H
nd $45. lor «DO£.OU
50 PAIRS MEN'S ODD PANTS—in blue serge, brown, navy and
other colorings, at reduced prices for (J » PA up (P'7 ("ft
January selling, from   «D*±.OVtn tP I a»)U
HOBBERLIN  SUITS
Tailored to your individual measure, at ONE-THIRD OFE REGULAR PRICES (tor January only).   Tliis gives you the chance
of Inlying a nice suit at a much  lower price than  will be
offered for Spring selling.   100 samples to select your suit from.
WE HAVE A FEW PAIRS LEFT OF MEN'S AMiWOOIi RIBBED
SOX—In black, heather and slate colorings.   Usual  (PI   AA
price $1.50 pair.   On snle at     •JJlaUV
MEN'S HEAVY RIBBED WINTER UNDERWEAR,     fljl   CA
Per garment   wlaOV/
MEN'S WORKING LEATHER GL0VE8-
Specially priced at 	
A NICE RANGE OF BOYS'SWEATERS AND SWEATER COATS,
in dark grey, brown, cardinal (PI OC (PI 7C (PO He
navy; 24 to 32 chest measure wl-.UO' «51.I<J> sDs^.tO
90c
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND
SHOE STORE
Note the Address—Opposite the Post Ofllce
F. PARTRIDGE
SAYS fill AND TRUNK
NEGLECTS PR. RUPERT
PRINCE RUPERT.   Addressing
Hoard of Trade here, Col. Cy   1
M.P., entered a strong protest 11 gi
if ncgli
what he termed a policy of noglei
this port by the Grand Trunk Su
.ship Co.   lie thought thai overytl
was done  for Vancouver at   the
pense of the northern purl.    lie
Hint Prince Kupcit was a natloiia
with a great drydock, anil was
entitled to consideration Instead ul*
tagonism.
THEY BEGIN EARLY
the
•eck,
lust
t of
aiu-
ling
ex-
said
pori
ally
nu-
Sn soft and flowet'-llke she seems,
So sensitive and mild;
A thing, a fairy-weaver dreams,
A frail, defenceless child,
No will,to gain her heart's desire-
All wisdom still to learn;
Tlie feeble, new kindled lire
As yet can barely burn.
But put her in her trundle Ind
When she prefers In play,
And she will howl lo wake the dead
And keep it up all day:
And when, for hour after hour,
You've listened to her wail.
The tender, fragile little.flower
Won't seem so tail* anil Hail.
A little, tender trusting mile,
All lunoceul of guile,
Who coos witli rapturous drii^'it
To see her mother siniii*.
Too weak she is to walk atone,
Her little tongue untaught
(You think) to iiinki' hei wishes known
Or (ell her tiniest thought.
Hot try to lake away Hi'* shears
Her hand su 1 Ily grips
The while the kitten's tail ami ears
industriously site clips,
Ami when you hear Iter lift Hie lid
With outcries loud and ■ 11 Hi,
You'll see, Unit though she's ,n I a kid.
she lias a woman's will
TASTE is- the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is Sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
f
Silver Top Soda Water KfllBEi* Pure
Cascade Beer
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO. B.C.
D. Campbell's
Meat   Market
I'lliine (ill
Cumlicrliiud
Ynun)r Steer  Beef, tender
•anil juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausagos.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Hani
Hani Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried nor Pickled Pork
nml Corned Beef? II !*• delicious.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire. • Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, U.C Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 8,1921.
Within the past few days we have been notified of a considerable reduction in several
lines, and extend our customers the benefit, believing as we do that the first loss is the
least,   ere are a few prices:
BIG   HORN   BRAND   OVERALLS   are LADIES' RAIN COATS—       fr{\ AfT
marked now for regular sell- d»0  FA Only a few left   <Pt/."t)
ing at, per pair  tytstuinOXJ
LADIES' COATS, made of allwool vplnnr
BIG HORN WORK SHIRTS, dependable Only a few to go             Tor AA
pwetir .. .  . $2.50    Du™' ^' W5.00
WHITE FLANNELETTE SHEETS, J* "^SJi^L^^S
full size; in pink or blue bor-dji  r/\ to $22.00.                       d»-*rt t»t\
der.  Were $5.50.  Down to.... &± DV Clearing at $9.95 and         JblZ.50
W-StaMyrJdU™ WTp CIIILDR?N'? RAIN CAI'ES'thc kind -
w^syrir.0;. $1.15 sr&^ysar $7.95
FZadTvryard™NG"Ni AC™ ^ TEED RUBBER LINED C0ATS
thiead,^V4yaidswide.             QK„ -Regular $35.00 values.   |fO<? A/I
Downward price, yard ^dt R?duced to $25„„ and  ^fo.()()
WHITE FLANNELETTE, good     FA.        c„.t,|t|, ,^irn .	
quality; wide width, per yard.... DUL S\\hA I COATS at greatly reduced prices.
BOYS' ROCK RIB HOSE, no better cotton LADIES' FINE LISLE HOSE, in pale blue
hose on the market. Worth 90c. '/Cf. and pink.   We bought them at a snap
Downward price   t DC and give you the benefit.     Q prs. fl»-|
Prion 35c pair or      O for 3) A
GINGHAM—About 200 yards of splendid v
quality, mostly pink checks.       OZn REE 0UR SPECIAL BED-       d»0 ftC
Special price, yard    ODL SPREADS at      ■tpO.lJD
WE INVITE  COMPARISON
I
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
LOST
HLACK   COCKER   SPANIEL,   WITH
little white on breast; finder please
return  to  Mrs.   M. J.  Waddington,
opposite Anglican Church.   Reward.
1-3
BUNCH KEYS AT OH NEAR POST
Office; Under please return to the
Islander Oilice and get reward.   3-5
conn wrist watch in frater-
nlty Hall 011 Friday, January 7.   Reward on returning to Isoliel Pryde.
LOST—HAND-MADE GOUJ BROOCH,
name  on  front   in   raised   letters.
Reward given on return to Islander.
ON SUNDAY LAST, NEW WEED TIRE
CHAIN, between Royston and the
Anglican Church, Cumberland. Reward on returning to Rev. W. Leversedge. 1-3
CHRISTMAS GIFTS TO
GENERAL HOSPITAL
WANTED
GOOD  SECOND-HAND   PIANO —Apply Dox A. B„ Islander. 2-1
WANTED TO RENT, A PIANO.    Apply Box 121, Courtenay. 2-2
FOR  SALE
WHITE ROTARY SEWINC MACHINE
iii first-class condition. Apply to
Mrs. Peter Myers, Now Townsite.
Cumberland, 3-5
ANNOUNCEMENT
F. C. Frazee, Chiropractor, has opened an oilice nt Mrs. Cairns', Victoria
Street, Courtenay.   Consultation Free.
FAMINE!
What Does It Mean?
That money has no value.
Thut human affection in powerless.
That hushand aud wife, parent
and child, must look on helpless
while their loved ones slowly die.
That the thrifty and thriftless
alike are reduced to the same
terrihle level and must share the
awful pangs of hunger that can
not be satisfied.
That those who survive aro too
weak and emaciated to bury
those who die.
That disease and plague lurk
in the shadows.
Miss M. Brown, matron of the Cumberland General Hospital, desires to
thank the following persons and firms
for Christmas gifts for tiie institution:
Mrs. W. J. Fraser, Union Bay, cake.
Mrs. J. Shortt, cake.
Mrs. Myers, cake.
Mr. John Clark, cake.
Mr. \V. Brown, reading matter.
Mrs. Donnelly, reading mailer.
Methodist Girls' club, home-made
sweets.
Mr. MacNaughton and .Mr. Chas,
Oraham, smokes,
Mr. Donaldson, children's books.
Mr. t. 1). McLean, magazines and
periodicals.
Mv. C. J. Parnham, turkey.
Campbell Bros., turkey.
City Meat Market, turkey.
Mumford &. Walton, fruits aud sweets.
\V. Gordon, sweets.
King Kee Jan, fruits, sweets, pro-
serves, ham, bacon and nuts.
.Mrs. Jas. M. Savage, flowers.
The City Band, Church of England
choir and .Methodist Girls' Club visited tlie hospital during Christmas and
regaled tlie patients with music selections and carols.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
S. GEORGE'S CHURCH
Old Linen Wanted
Tlie matron would like to receive
donations of old linen for use iu the
hospital.
Advocates of (he metric system are
making strenuous efforts to Induce
Great Britain to adopt il.
Big Dance
ILO-ILO   HALL
Under auspices ot'
MONTE'S DANCE
ORCHESTRA.
Wednesday
January 19th
Come and Bring Your Crowd!
Tlie anntfal meeting of St. George's
Presbyterian Church was held in the
basement ot* the church on Monday
evening, and was well attended.
Dr. Ceo. K. MacNaughton was elected chairman,
Encouraging reports were heard
from the following: Tlie Ladies' Aid,
Women's Missionary Society, Young
Women's Missionary Society, Sunday
School, Board of Managers, the
Session, the Forward Movement.
Tlie following were elected to the
Board of Management: Dr. MacNaughton, Dr. Hicks, Mr. A. McKinnon, Mr.
I). a. MacDonald, Mr. J. C. Brown, Mr.
Mackay, Mr. C. Nash, Mr. Davis, Mr.
John Potter, Mr. Redmond,
Dr. MacNaughton was returned to
office as treasurer, and Mr. C. Nash
was elected envelope steward.
Rev, .Mr. Hood spoke appreciatively
of the valiant service rendered hy Mr.
.McKinnon as Sunday School superintendent for 15 years, and regretted his
resignation,
A hearty vote of thanks to Mr, C, J.
Parnham for his faithful and cfliclent
service as choir master and organist
was carried.
A vote of thanks was also extended
to the Ladles' Aid for their valuable
work during tlie past year.
A vote of thanks and appreciation
to I lie pastor and his wife for their
faithful and efficient work, their many
mil varied services during the past
year, was carried unanimously by a
standing vote. The meeting then closed
witli prayer offered by Mr. Hood, after
which the Ladles' Aid served refreshments.
India is preparing to manufacture
tinplale on a scale so large as to
threaten tlie Welsh supremacy in the
industry.
Thos. H. Carey
1I1IK  AM)  LIKE  I.NSUJIANCE
Cumberland, II. C.
G.W.V.A. MEMORIAL HALL
Personal Mention
Mr. and Mrs. Lowe of Victoria, who
have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Mumford during the past two weeks, returned to Victoria on Friday.
Mr. James M. Savage, General Manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned to Victoria on
Wednesday.
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Nanaimo ou
Monday and returned Wednesday.
Mr. Bert Knappett, who has been in
Victoria since Christmas, returned to
town Thursday evening.
Mr. R. Hindmarsh arrived from Na
naimo Wednesday and returned Thurs
day.
Mr. Wm. Mutliison, who has been
visiting Mr. and Mrs. S. Horwood for
the past month, returned to Vaucou
ver Monday morning.
Mr. and .Mrs. P. S. Burrell have been
paid a short visit by the mother of Mrs
Burrell, Mme. Vnuderghoto. nnd two
friends, Messrs. Audet and I.'lieuroux,
of Salem. Mass. Mme. Vanderghote,
who is at presenl. residing in Montreal,
where sbe is "fenime des lettres' 'to the
papers "La Presse" and "Canada,"
brought her youngest daughter, Mile.
Marie-Louise, with ber. Mile. Marie-
Louise will stay for tbe next few
months with Mis. Burrell.
Mr. George Mordy and Miss Marjorie
Mordy returned to Vancouver on Monday, where they are attending the
University.
Air. Boy L. Rideout loft, for Vancouver Tuesday and returned Friday.
Mr. Peterson of Vancouver arrvied
in town Friday.
Mr. W. Richards, of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., arrived on
Thursday.
Mrs. Thomas Graham left for Victoria Tuesday morning and returned
Friday.
Cadets Morton, Thomas and Fierce
Graham returned to University School,
Victoria, Tuesday morning.
Mr. P. S. Fagan, Assistant Secretary
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., returned on Monday.
Mrs. Jas. Hood returned from Vancouver Thursday.
Mr. G. C. Baker of the Canadian Collieries, returned to Victoria Monday.
Mrs.   nnd   Miss   Coleman   returned
from Vancouver Thursday.
Mr. D. C. Macfarlane, Purchasing
Agent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned to Victoria
Monday morning.
Mr. 0. M. Lightbody, who has been
on the staff of the Cumberland branch
of the Canadian Bank of Commerce for
some time, left Tuesday for Campbell
River, where ho will relieve the mana
ger for a while, afterwards going to
the superintendent's office, Vancouver.
On Monday, January It, was Christened at the Roman Catholic Church,
by Rev. Father Beaton, the sou of Mr.
and Mrs. F, S. Burrell, under the
names of Frank Fredy Augusts Orille,
the godmother was Mme. Marge.ite
Vanderghote. mother of .Mrs. Burrell,
who came from Montreal; the godfather was Mr. Orille L'Houreux, from
Salem, Mass., U.S.A., both having come
for the ceremony. We offer our best
wishes to the young parents and tlie
child.
BIRTHS
LITTLE—At the General Hospital, on
December 23, to Mr. nnd Mrs. Little,
a son.
MAROCCHI—January 6, to Mr. and
Mrs. F. Marocchi, a son.
SHEPPERSON- At the General Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. C. Shepperson,
January 12, a son.
DRAMATIC CLUB MEETING
A meeting of the Dramatic Club will
be held in the Anglican Hall on Tuesday evening next at 8.15 p.m. for the
purpose of making arrangements for
the caste of the play, "An Economic
Boomerang," to lie produced tiy the
club in tlle near future.
All those wishing to take part are
asked to attend this meeting.
Following this the club intends tp
put on the comedy opera "Dorothy."
Good Music! Good Floor!
Good Time!
Gentlemen $1.00.      Ladies 25c.
OPEN DAILY
The Sail is now open daily from 10
a.m. to jp p.m., and Sundays from 2
to G p.m.    Il
R. W. EYRE HAS BEEN
COMMITTED FOR TRIAL
H. W. Byre, the Vancouver barrister
charged with obtaining money by false
pretenses from David Clarke, to whom
he is alleged to have promised protection from "dry squad" activities, has
been committed for trial.
SPECIALS
49-lb. sack King's Quality Flour $3.40
20-lb. sack Sugar $3.00
Bulk Tea, per lb 50c
Fresh Ground Coffee—No. 1, per lb 60c
No. 2, per lb 50c
Squirrel Brand Peanut Butter, lb. 35c 3 lbs. $1.00
Libby's Apple Butter, 1-lb. tins, 25c; 2'/2-lb. tins 50c
Crest Apricots, 1-lb. tins .**. 25c
Pure Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.50
Pure Cherry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.25
Pure Plum Jam, 4-lb. tins 95c
Pacilic Milk, baby size tins, 10c 12 for $1.00
Maple Leaf Milk, 16-oz. tins, 15c  7 for $1.00
Kollogg's Corn Flakes, pkt. 15c  7 for $1.00
McCormick's Sodas, per tin 75c
FOR BISCUITS
TRY THE FAMOUS
ROBBIE BURNS BRAND BISCUITS
Per pound   50c, 60c, 70c
SPECIAL
Five-sack lots of Yakima Netted Gem Potatoes, guaranteed best keepers; IJJJO r7fT
per sack  9*»I9
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
FOR SALE
CORNER KNOWN AS THE WILLARD BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, B. C.
Good paying proposition.   For full particulars apply
P. O. BOX 86, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
January (I—Moresby, coastwise.
January 7—Annaeis, Progressive,
coastwise; Charmer, Clayburn and
Scow, Vancouver.
January S — Talthybius, Seattle;
Clansman, Cleeve, coastwise.
January 10—Mamma, Australia.
January 11—Equator and Scows,
Seattle; Dola and Scows, Victoria.
January 12—Peerless, coastwise;
Surydamus, United Kingdom; Protective aud Scow, New Westminster; Active, coastwise.
BOOK SHOWER FOR G.W.V.A.
Mrs. J. Walton is holding a "Book
Shower" to take place on February 2nd
in aid of the G.W.V.A. library. Books
of any description will be glndly received on behalf of this worthy cause.
TENDERS
WANTED
TENDERS wanted for huilding
up a furnace room In basement
and lining up tho basement wall
on the south side of building
and laying a tongue and groove
floor in basement; also repairs
to fence and fixing up one gate.
Particulars can be had from the
secretary Royston School Board.
Tenders must be in on or
before January 17th, 1921. The
lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
"They are just boys—until they are
men, and oven then the really nice
ones will keep on being boys."
Help! Save Life!
30  Millions Starving  in China
20 MILLIONS WILL DIE
10 Millions May be Saved
if we give quickly,  and
generously.
$5.00 Will Save One Life
How Many Lives Will You Save ?

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