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The Cumberland Islander Jul 30, 1921

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Array Alfai
Provincial Library
•Toria, BL
ni
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
with which to consolidated the Cumberland News.
 l	
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 31
CUMBERLANp, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1921.
rS«B30RI£TjON PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Colliery Employees Fourth
Annual Picnic Best Ever Held
Happy Holiday Spirit Prevailed
Throughout Day—Children
Had Time of Their Lives.
In perfect weather, with a cool
breeze blowing from the gulf, the
fourth annual picnic of the employees
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., took place at Royston ou Saturday and proved to be a very enjoyable
outing for all taking part.
Shortly after 8 o'clock In the morning a long train pulled out from Cumberland loaded with holiday-makers,
many more being picked up at Bevan,
Puntledge and other places. The City
Band was on this train and enlivened
the journey with selections.
Another special train also ran from
Union Bay, bringing up a big contingent from that district. All rail
transportation was supplied free by
the Canadian Collieries
In addition scores of automobiles
were pressed Into use to carry folks
to the grounds A number of jitneys
did good business between Cumberland and Royston
Grounds Ideal for Picnic.
The grounds In which the picnic
was held Is Ideal for the purpose, having hundreds of cosy, shady spots under the trees and by the running
stream for picnic parties, which were
all occupied. All kinds of buildings
and equipment for the comfort and
convenience of the folks attending
had been erected, Including the G. W
V. A. refreshment booth, "kiddles' refreshment booth, shute-the-shutes, hot
water boiler, water taps all over the
ground, tug-of-war stand with mechanical indicator, bandstand and
speakers' platform, swings, race
tracks, committees' olllces, etc.
The beach close by Induced many to
go in for a dip, while the pier was
a big source of attraction to many,
At this point a life-saving committee
were In attendance ln case of accident, hut fortunately their services
wore not needed In that capacity.
Several thousand people were in
attendance, the most prominent, if not
the most numerous, being the children,
to whom It was a great treat. Their
pleasure was catered to very fully, for
on entering the grounds each child,
also ladles, was presented with a hag
of nuts and fruit and given a strip of
tickets valued at 25 cents, which were
exchangable at the stalls for refreshments, and Judging by the huge num-
cones consumed the youngsters thoroughly appreciated them.
In addition a big part of the sports
programme comprised races and other
events for the children, and besides
the valuables prizes, each child competing received a dime.
Many Visitors Present.
Among the prominent persons
present were Rev. Thos. Menzles, M.
P. P.; Mr. James M. Savage, General
Manager of the Canadian Collieries;
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent; Mr. Chas. Graham, District
Superintendent; Mr. Thos. R. Jackson,
Inspector of Mines; Mr. D. T. Bulger,
chairman of the Fair Wage Board;
Mr. M. Gulnlss, miners' representative
on the board; Mr. Auchlnvole, superintendent at Union Bay; Mr. C. E.
Thomas, sales agent for the Canadian
Collieries at Victoria; Mr. Louis
Marks, representing Canadian Ex
plosives, Victoria, and Mr. T. 0. Mac
kay, of Douglas, Mackay & Co., Victoria.
Splendid Programme of Events
A very Interesting and lengthy programme of events had been arranged,
with prizes totaling nearly $1000.
The children's races occupied the forenoon and the other events occupied
the afternoon.
Following the children's events and
jnst belore lunch the First Aid competition was held. This was won by
No. 4 Mine Underground team, and is
reported in another column.
Following the luncheon adjournment brlet speeches were made by Mr.
R. Walker, President of the Picnic
Committee, and Mr. Thomas Graham,
General Superintendent.
Mr. Walker said it gave him great
pleasure to greet the people gathered
there. He thanked the Canadian Collieries for their contribution to the
day's pleasure, and ln giving expression to his remarks the speaker said
he felt sure he was voicing not only
the sentiments of himself but of his
fellow workers and the women as
well. He mentioned that the Athletic Hall which the general manager
had promised at last year's picnic,
(Continued ou Page Four)
Baseballers Made
Big Score at Bay
Cumberland Seniors Pile Up 17
Runs Against Union Ilay'.s
Six—Many Errors.
On Sunday last the Cumberland
senior baseball team went to Union
and took the waterfront boys Into
camp to the tune of seveuten runs
to six. Tlie game was fairly good,
though there were many errors, most
of which were accounted for by the
rough condition of the ground.
This is the second game the Cumberland boys have won in the new
league series, having beaten Courtenay
last week by a Bcore of 12 runs to 10.
They thus have a leage standing of
1000 per cent.
The Llne-lJp.
Union Buy.                       Cumberland.
B. Mackay   c  W. Kerr
A. Anderson  p Tattle & Boyd
B. S. Abrams 1st T. Plump
J. Mackay  2nd  T. James
A. Miller  3rd J. Marocchi
P. Itenwlck ss D. Hunden
E. Ballo l.f D. Bannerman
Cairns cf D. Harrison
J. Princes r.f B. Westfield
Mr. Aitkin was umpire.
The Score by Innings.
Cumberland   .... 00132160 4—17
Union Bay   02012100 0— 6
Summary—Two-base hits, Tattle
aud Hunden. Three-base hits—Harrison (2). Home runs—Harrison, Kerr,
James. Stolen bases—Tattle, 1;
James, 2; Kerr 1. Double plays—
Hunden to James, James to Plump.
Struck out—By Anderson, 7; by
Tattle, 4; by Boyd, 3. Hit by pitched
ball—Cairns Pass ball—By Kerr.
Left on bases—Cumberland, 5: Union
Bay, 8. Hits off Tattie, 4; hits off
Boyd, 2; hits off Anderson, 13.
Courtenay Plays Here Sunday.
The next game takes place on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, when the
Courtenay boys will be on deck ou the
local grounds.
WINTER GARDEN FOUR
DANCE ORCHESTRA ON
TUESDAY AT ILO-ILO
If you want a pleasant evening and
dance to the very latest and classiest
jazz music, go to the Ilo-llo Dance
Ilnll ou Tuesday night next and take
part in tlie dance given that night by
the "Winter Garden Four."
At the present duy the dance seems
to reign supreme over all other forms
of amusemeni aud with this Idea in
mind this aggregation of "singing,
dancing, gyrating, dippy mad Kings of
Syncopation" were organized with the
sole purpose ln view to alford the
dancing public the opportunity of
hearing real jazz music and joining In
the big show themselves by dancing
anything from Schottische to preseut-
day fancy steps.
COURTENAY DEFEATS
UNION BAY BY 11 TO 4
A large crowd turned out on Wed
nesday evening to see the game at
Courtenay between Union Bay and
the valley boys, when the Courtenay
team won by 11 to 4. It was not a
brilliant game. In the first inning the
visitors on three hits and three errors
made four runs. Courtenay came back
with two runs and in the next frame
no runs were scored. From then on
Union Bay failed to score. Courtenay
scored four ln the third, three in the
fifth and two In the sixth. The game
was called ln the seventh ou account
of darkness.
Johnnie Robinson pitched a consistent game throughout but the boys
did not give him much support in the
first inning. However, they came back
to earth and Borne good ball was
played.
Anderson wus on the mound for
Union Buy at the start of the game
but after two Innings Saunders, a
new man, arrived and carried on.
Mr. Altken umpired the game.
Boards of Trade Will Meet
In Cumberland Next Year
Associated Boards of Trade Had
Successful Gathering at Port
Alberni Last Week.
That next year's convention would
be held at Cumberland was decided
by the annual meeting of the Associated Boards of Trade held at Port
fUbernl on Friday night last.
There was a large gathering ol
delegates from all pails of tlle Island.
Cumberland being represented by Mr.
G. W. Clinton, vice-president, and
.Messrs. T. H. Mumford, John Sutherland and A. MacKinnon.
Passages of resolutions favoring the
Llneham aud other plans for the encouragement of tourist travel, urging
reduction of rail rates, and appointment of an expert to watch the province's Interests iu railway matters
and requestiug Federal restriction on
Oriental Immigration, featured the action taken at the meeting.
Aid. A. E. Todd, of Victoria, after a
long debate, .put through a resolution
Instructing tbe executive to call together a congress, open to all British
subjects on the Island, to discuss
causes of the Island's failure to
realize the progress to which It was
entitled by natural advantages. ThlB
was a modification of the "home rule"
proposal previously advocated by Aid.
Todd.
Two GeorgoB Retain Control.
Mr. George I. Warren ol* Victoria
and Mr. George W. Clinton ot* Cumberland, were unanimously ro-eleoted
president and vice-president respectively. .Mr. W. II. Dawes, Sidney, continues ns secretary.
The only resolution to come from
the Comox district wus a request lo
the provincial government to have the
rond irom the Island Highway into
Campbell River Falls put Into such
shape tliat cars can gel over It. There
was another which stood in the name
of tho Courteuay-Comox Hoard ot*
Trade, namely, tlie extension oi tlie
Island Highway Into tin' Sayward
Valley district and Seymour Narrows,
hut It wus an amalgamation ot* various resolutions from two or three
boards of trade. There was complete
unanimity us to the need for n road
into Campbell River Falls. Senator
Planta, of Nanaimo, who proposed it.
said tiiat two or three men in two or
three days would fix It and it would
be  well  worth   while.
A notable feature of tiie convention
was the valuable report of Ihe president, Mr. Warren, who has gathered
some statistics of Vancouver Island
that are worth filing for future reference. The convention was iu every
way a success. Interest in Island
matters as a whole has been greatly
stimulated and (he executive next year
should amplify Its programme to moet
the larger alms of the associated
boards.
Cumberland Has Best Mine
Rescue Equipment in Province
$1500 Worth of Opium Taken
Oriental Had Sack With 29 Tins
Which He Dropped at Sight
of Constable Hicks.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police
have to their credit the first big haul
of opium at Union Bay. About 11
o'clock on Thursday of last week a'
party of police and customs oflicers
were on duty at Union Bay, evidently
on the look-out for smugglers of
drugs, as the big Blue Funnel boat
Talthybius   was  then  coaling  there.
While members of the party were
searching a number of Chinese coal-
trimmers who were coming ashore.
Constable Hicks noticed a man com-.
Ing from the boat along the top of the
wharf. As he came down the steps '*■*
the ground the Chinaman came face
to face with the constable, who was
the only one of the party in uniform.
Evidently taking fright at the sight of
the constable, the Celestial threw the
sack down aud beat it like a scared
rabbit, darting through tbe doors of
a shed nearby. The constable pursued the Chinaman hut lie escaped In
the darkness.
A little later Sergt. Bryan saw a
man running at top speed towards tbe
boat, whom he pursued and arrested.
This man, who was very much agitated and gave the Impression of being
badly" frightened, was taken to the
Chief Inspector of Customs for examination.    He   was   later   brought   to
Cumberland  released  on  $lnoo  bail.
The case came up for hearing on
Wednesday morning before .Magistrate
Baird, when the accused was charged
with being in possession of tlie opium.
The charge was laid by Sergt. Bryan
of tlie R. C. Jl. P.. while Mr. P. P.
Harrison appeared for the accused.
Three police officers gave evidence
as to what had happened on.the night
in question, but Constable Hicks, Ihe
main witness, could not positively
swear that the accused and the man
who threw the sack at his feet was the
one and same man, as at the time It
was late at night and the face of tlie
Chinaman was covered with coal dust.
Following evidence for the prosecution, Mr. Harrison moved for dismissal of the case, denying thai the
accused had unyFhing -wiwlevc*' to do
with the opium. Counsel said there
was no evidence produced to show
that the man who was seen running,
arrested and taken for investigation.
had any connection witli the sack. He
contended that the magistrate had no
alternative but to dismiss (lie ease.
Magistrate Baird said tlie prosecution bad not proved the case, as there
was no evidence to show that accused
threw the bag. On this ground the
case was dismissed and the opium ordered confiscated to the court.
It was later admitted that the police
had made the best case poslhlc under the circumstances, and credit is
due them for the big seizure ot opium.
No. 4 Underground
Won First Aid Prizes
Judges Pronounced Their Work
Almost Perfect—Have Won
Shield Three Years.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
The standing of the Comox Baseball
League Is as follows:
W.       L.       P.C.
Cumberland     2       0       1.000
Courtenay       1       1        .500
Union Bay     0       2        .000
"ALF'S BUTTON" BREAKS
VANCOUVER RECORDS
"Alfs Button." which played two
continuous weeks at the Orpheum In
Vancouver, to 40,000 people, breaking
all records, has just been booked for
a third week In another theatre. No
film has ever caused such a furore as
this British production.
"Alfs Button" will be shown at the
Ilo-llo Theatre on Thursday and Friday of next week.
The many friends of Mr. C. J
Parnham will regret to learn that he
Is seriously ill, being confined to his
bed with an attack of erysipelas. We
earnestly hope the genial Charles will
booh be restored to health and activity
again.
Probably the chief event of the Colliery employees' picnic on Saturday
was the First Aid Contest. Two teams
competed lu thla event, No. 4 Mine
Surface and No. 4 Mine Underground.
This year the doctors gave the competing teaniB two test cases. The
first was as follows:
"Ten minutes after explosion In
oul mine a man Is found under fallen
coal. Ou removal he Is found In foi-
lowing condition: Unconscious, llp.i
pale, breathing shallow, pulse weak
and rapid; ou movement, there Is
repltus over left scapula; large gaping wound Immediately above right elbow; swelling and deformity about
right hip; bight foot Is turned Inwards and there Is apparently two
inches shortening of right thigh and
leg. Treat and carry up slope ou
stretcher."
After this case had been demonstrated by the two teams, the captains
were handed the following test:
"After railway accident a patient Is
found in following condition: Unconscious, a large scalp wound on forehead; a compound fracture of middle
of right femur; the left hand has been
crushed off at the wriBt. Give First
Aid treatment and carry on Improvised stretcher to nearest house."
The Judges were Dr. MacNaughton
and Dr. Hicks ot Cumberland, Dr. J.
H. Gillespie of Vancouver, and Dr.
Millard of Courtenay. The contest
was the centre of attraction, hundreds
watching the contest with keen Interest.
The Underground Team Wins.
The judges announced that No. 4
Underground had done its work remarkably well, being almost perfect.
Liquor Store To
Open Next Week
Gatz's limber Shop Taken Over
By Board—Expects lo Open
Middle of Next Week.
Tiie barber simp occupied by Mr. A.
B. Glitz has been taken over hy the
Liquor Control Hoard, and Mr. Bob
Thomson expects to take charge beginning of Uie week. However, the
store will not he open to the public
for a few days as carpenters will be
mailing necessary alterations.
Mr. Thomson expects to have a
stock of "hard stulf" wherewith to
supply tlie needs of his patrons.
Beer Prices Take n .lump.
Commencing on Monday next the
price of beer in Cumberland will be
advanced. Orders have been received
from the head oilice that the price per
barrel will be Jill for l'l dozen pints,
and J2.10 per dozen.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE
RESULTS ANNOUNCED
Tlie High Scliool entrance results
have been announced hy tlie Department of Education. The results ure
disappointing as far as Cumberland
is concerned, for not a single one who
sat for examination passed. There
lire probably several reasons contributing tu this fact, the main one being
that the principal, exercising his prerogative, promoted sixteen scholars
without sitting for examination. These
were:
Constance H. Bird. Margaret W. Bunbury. Howard ID. Carey. Cecil D.
Fraser. Mary Gallafrls, William Glen.
Clifford Harwood. Edward Hughes.
William E. Jones, Clifton E. Mounce,
Hazel E. Mounce, Mildred K. Oliver,
Katherine Richardson, Funny R.
Strachan, Malcolm Stewart and Ellen
J. L. Waddington.
Minto—Mildred E. Caiman. 500.
Courtenay.—Jean M. Beasley. 710;
Clara D. M. Beard. 070; Margaret F.
Forrest, 640; Kathleen L. Stephens.
579; Lily A. Parkin, .678; Percy C.
Piggott, 508; Frederick E. Duncan.
550.
R"ystoh.--tIwendoleh M. Carey. 004.
Union Bay—Christina D, Pollock,
50!».
They secured the first prize of $50.
the First Aid Shield donated by Hon.
Wm. Sloan, and a set of gold medals
presented by the Central St. John's
Ambulance Association. Tlie winning
team was composed of William Beveridge (captain), Jonathan Taylor, J.
Williams, Louis Francescini and Robl
Reid, who were heartily congratulated
on ull sides nn Ihelr success ami good
work. This Is the third lime in succession thai No. I Underground has
won the first prize in tliis event.
No. 4 Surface toara ran a good
second, winning the (2U prize and also
a set of gold medals presented by tbe
SI. John's Central Association Tills
leum was: A. .1. Taylor (captain), .1.
Lockhart, II. Boffy, Jim. A. Quinn ami
Chas. Nash
Mr. Thos. It. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, presented tlle shield ami la Is
to the teams ami congratulated them
on their very excellent work, lie said
it gave liim very great pleasure to
present Ihe shield to Mr. Beveridge,
captain of tlie winning team. He wa ■
glud to see No. 5 .Mine so well represented, but hud hoped more teams
would have entered the competition,
particularly as the St. John's Central
Association had so generously provided two sets of gold medals and the
prizes had also beeu increased to $50
and $25. He said the Canadian Collieries, as far as he could see. bad
done their best to create an,Interest
in First Aid work. He hoped in
future events more foams would com
pete.
The medals are artistic specimens
of the Jewelers' art; the base is of
solid gold and on the front is a re!
cross on a blue background, and tin'
Inscription, "C. C. F. A. A. Firsl Aid
Competition."
ODD FELLOWS WERE
GREATLY  DISAPPOINTED
Minister of Justice Wires Grand
Master Judge Swanson That
He Cannot Hold Position.
The large number of Odd Fellows
who gathered at the Fraternity Hall
on Thursday evening to be present at
Ihe ollicial visit of Gland Master Judge
Swanson of Kamloops. were very much
disappointed on learning that he would
not  be present*.
'The reason given Is that His Honor
received a telegram from the .Minister
of Justice informing liim that a judge
cannot hold two positions. So tlie
head of tho Odd Fellows In British
Columbia hail lo cancel his projected
tour of the Island, alter making all
preparatlpns. This Is a very keen
disappointment to all Odd Fellows on
Ihe Island, as Judge Swanson, besides
being an outstanding Odd Fellow I
also one of the finest orators in tlie
province.
M. SHIAGA HELD ON
CHARGE OF ROBBERY
Tha Japanese, .\l. Shiaga, who was
arresLeil following the shooting affair
in Chinatown last wet-k, appeared he-
fore -Magistrate Baird again nn Thursday, when the original charge of shooting wiiii Intent to kill was withdrawn
iuni a new iiunet; of robbery with
violence in tht- gambling bouse of Poo
Venn was preferred against th*' accused, '('in' case wu. remanded until
Tuesday, when it will come up for pro-
llmlnarj hearing.
PLATE WINDOW BREAKS
On Saturday night about U o'clock
people on Dunsmuir Avenue ware
startled to hear tho crash of a window,
On Investigation it was found to be a
plate glass window In the store of
Campbell's Butcher Store, There was
no one in the Immediate vicinity of the
store when it happened nnd it is sup-
posed tho damage was caused by the
building settling on the foundation.
MRS. PANKHURST TO
LECTURE HERE AUG. 8
On behalf of the Provincial Council
for Combating Venereal Diseases, arrangements have been completed for
a lecture4 tour of the island, at which
the principal speaker will ho Mrs.
Emmeline Pankhurst.
Tbo meeting in Cumberland will he
held on .Monday, August 8, and will he
open to all over the age of 17 years.
It Is the hope nf those interested In
this work to form a branch of the
council in Cumberland at thai time, to
work in conjunction with tbo Provincial and Dominion Councils.
Six of the Latest Model "Paul"
Hreuthing  Apparatus  Just
Received at Local Station
Mr. John Thomson, instructor of tho
Cumberland Mine Rescue Station, is
a happy man these days. After considerable delay he bus received from
the Mines Depnreuient of tbo Provin-
il Government six of the latest
model "Paul" Mine Rescue Breathing
Apparatus, of tbo same model as the
four purchased by the Canadian Collieries (Oummiulr) Ltd. last year.
Thus the local station now has ten of
Ihe best machines available for mine
rescue work, and is tho host-equipped
station in tbe whole province.
The machines iu use previous to the
Canadian Collieries securing the
Paul machine were tbe Draeger, 1917
model, which at that time was the
best to be had. The local Mine Rescue
Station and Mr. den. O'Brien, Safety
First Engineer of the Canadian Collieries put tlie machines to exhaustive
tests some lime ago, which emphatl-
lally convinced them that tho "Paul"
,vas far and away tbo superior apparatus. The results of these tests were
forwarded to the Hon. Wm. Sloan,
Minister of Mines, which no doubt in-
uoneed liim In his selection of those
machines.
Tho outstanding feature of the new
Paul" machine lies in the fact, tbat It
is good for four hours' continual use,
being double that of tbe other make,
which is of great importance iu mine
rescue work, giving greater efficiency
as well as giving fuller confidence to
e men operating them.
Another improvement is an Improved cooling plate, keeping the air
breathed by the wearer In a much
cooler temperature than heretofore;
the breathing chambers also show a
decided improvement on those previously in use, being more accurate
aud easy of manipulation.
The automatic feed ls a special feature of this machine, the air being
automatically regulated according to
the wearer's particular requirements,
thus lengthening tbe time the machine can be used at each charging.
In the old-style machine the air-supply could not be so regulated as It
had a tlxod adjustment.
Tbo cost of maintaining the Mlno
Rescue Station is considerable. These
machines, which weigh about 36
pounds, cost in the neighborhood of
$250 each, and the maintenance is expensive. Each time a man uses ono
of them for practice or mine use, tho
cost is about six dollars, and tho men
are supposed to practice once a week.
Tho cartridges alone cost $.'{ each and
can only be used once.
In order encourage the men to take
an interest and become familiar with
tlie use of life-saving apparatus, the
Canadian Collieries generously allows
$2,50 for each two-hour practice undertaken by the men, figuring on four
practices each month, aud allowing
for 20 men, which runs into $200 per
month for tbo men alone.
However, tbe management of the
Collieries considers it money well
spent and aro always willing to make
appropriations In order that the lifo-
aavlug and lirst aid work may be the
most efficient possible.
Canaries Part nf equipment.
The Cub Reporter, while inspecting
the machines and absorbing as much
of the knowledge imparted by Instructor Thomson us his limited faculties
could assimilate, noticed some canary
seed on tbe table. Emulating the remark of tbe young lady who, on her
first visit to a farm and seeing honey
on tho breakfast table, said "I see you
keep a bet?!" tbo junior reporter said
"I see you keep a canary!" "A can-
ary!" replied John, "Yea, eight of
them. See that one there, and Ibe ono
over there; there's two more in that
room, and four In tliat room."
On enquiry as to why .Mr. Thomson
was so tond of keeping canaries iu
tho station, the reporter's superb Ignorance was enlightened hy the Information that these canaries Hie part
of the life-saving equipment and are
taken into Ihe mines by tho llfe-sav-
iug men following an explosion, as the
canaries are very susceptible to aflitr-
daiiip and fall to tbo bottom of tho
cage as soon us Ibe danger zone is
reached) which is a warning to thu
rescuers to adjust their machines belore procedlng Further. The canaries
aro taken to the-fresh air and soon revive.
INTERMEDIATES SCALP
LOCAL JAPANESE TEAM
The Cumberland  Intermediates de-
eated the local Japanese baseball team
on Sunday, alter a close game, as seen
by tbe score, which was three runs to
one. C. Saunders, (ho new southpaw,
pitched for the intermediates and was
a world of strength to them.
Game on Sunday l.ienlm:.
Tbe next game will bo belwon tbe
Cumberland Intermediates and Bevan
and will bo played on the Recreation
Grounds on Sunday evening, commencing at six o'clock.
Decorators are changing tlie interior appearance of tbe General Hospital, giving It a much-needed painting and general renovation. Just nt
present the place looks as If the tenants wore making a hasty get-away,
hut the improvement will be worth
the present discomfort. Two
TUB   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
July 80, 1921.
BAPCO
FLOOR VARNISH
A smooth elastic floor finish that bring*
out the natural grab perfectly
Won't show heel marks — no
"white marks" when scratched —
stands all kinds of rough usage-
even boiling water won't injure it.
DEVELOPING PULLETS
FOR EGG PRODUCTION
Wo have a big assortment of
Paints,  Varnishes,  Stains
Kalsomines, etc.
FULL LINE OF BRUSHES TO SUIT ALL REQUIREMENTS
Experimental Farms Note.
THE BATE HARDWARE CO.
PHONE 31
P. 0. BOX 279
You Spend One Third of
Your Time in Bed!
Why not Sleep Comfortably ?
SPECIAL OFFERING IN BRASS BEDS at $35.00,
$42.50, $43.50, S45.00, $51.50 and $56.50.
STEEL BEDS, in White and Verni   Martin finishes.
Prices ranging from $11.00 to $25.00 each.
IMg
*=> THIS IS THE BEST SELECTION
OF BEDS WE HAVE EVER SHOWN
SPRINGS—Woven Wire and Spiral Springs, at $7.00,
$8.50, $12.50 antl $15.00.
MATTRESSES—Cotton and Felt Mattresses at prices
ranging from $12.75 to $25.00 each.
BLANKETS, COMFORTERS,   PILLOWS,   SHEETS
PILLOW CASES, ETC.
EVERYTHING FOR THE BED
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
For the greatest ultimate success
in egg production, pullets, from the
time they are hatched, should2 be
ao handled that they will nol receive
any check. From "shell to laying
pen" should he one period of continuous growth.
A pullet tllat is stunted   at   some
stage In Its development Is a pullet
that Is ruined so far as heavy con^
tinuous production is concerned.
Hen-Hatched Chicks.
The big danger to hen-hatched
chicks is vermin. See that "biddy" is
treated for lice before the eggs hatch
und then, at regular Intervals, treat
the chicks with a good disinfecting
powder. Most of the commercial
powders will be satisfactory. Ordln
ary road dust with a little flowers of
sulphur added wlll serve the purpose
Inciilintiir-lliilt'luil Chicks.
The period when artificial heat Is
removed Is one when the chickens require close attention, otherwise they
are liable to crowd and very little of
this will give the chicks a serious setback.
Put wire netting across the corners
of the house so that the chicks can
not crowd Into them and trample each
other to death. Visit the house several times In the evening and if there
Is any crowding drive the chicks to
the centre of the house and stay with
them until they settle down. The
sooner chicks can be induced to roost
the better.
During the hot summer weather, be
ever on the watch for vermin. Spray
the houses occasionally with a good
disinfectant and if there are any
traces of red mites, keep right after
them, as It Is good-bye to healthy
growth ln the chickens if these pests
ever get headway.
As soon after "weaning" as possible
get the pullets on to good fresh range.
Hopper feeding will be found most
convenient. Keep mixed grain and a
good dry mash before them where they
can have free access to it. See that
they have an abundance of succulent
green feed and always a supply ot
fresh water. If buttermilk can be oh
talned nothing is better to produce
healthy, vigorous growth or to bring
the pullets into production.
■Get the pullets into winter quarters before they start to lay, so that
they will not receive any set back
On housing them, bear ln mind the
change ln conditions. Induce them to
consume large quantities of green feed
and to exercise for all the scratch
feed.
JEWISH IMMIGRATION TO
PALESTINE RESTRICTED
Great Brltlain having restricted immigration into Palestine, the Canadian Zionist organization was much
perturbed over It. However, an ex
change of cables between Canada and
England has shown the wise policy
of the British authorities, in order to
avoid the disaster likely to follow unrestricted immigration. The following cable from the Hon. Arthur
Melghen, Premier of Canada, sent
from London, is self-explanatory:
Have consulted Colonial Secretary.
Am advised as follows: Suspension
Immgiratlon waa approved by His
Majesty's Government as purely temporary measure. The Palestine Government now admitting comparatively
small number immigrants who were
actually en route at date of suspension. Number about fifteen hundred.
This done, is proposed in conjunction
with Zionist organization to admit as
many Immigrants as can be absorbed
into Industrial and agricultural lite
of community, but no more than this
number. The great body of Jews
throughout the world will doubtless
agree after serious consideration that
It would not be to their interest either
as community or Individuals that large
number of immigrants should enter
Palestine with no prospect of employment or means of livelihood, which
would happen If more Immigrants
than can be absorbed are admitted.
Self-supporting immigrants, travellers
and certain other categories already
being admitted."
ISLAND SUPPLY STORE
BEVAN
Wc cater for a general family trade and are open to compete with any
mail order house, consistent with quality.
We carry a $15,000   Stock of   Groceries
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, also Hardware
MATERIALS MADE UP
From our DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT we make up articles to your
measure, in HOUSE DRESSES, GARDEN DRESSES, APRONS AND
CHILDREN'S WEAR.
All we ask is the opportunity to serve you
Shipments of New Goods will be arriving monthly, as tlie business offering is showing a substantial increase.
A  SHIPMENT OF  PATON'S  "ALLOA"  YARNS  AND  "BEEHIVE"
FINGERING IS ON THE WAY
GEORGE   BEATTIE
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
iRIl!
SALE
i
ALL SHE WANTED
Acreage   on  Royston*
Cumberland   Road
m      Price
$30.00 I
er
ere
A young woman with three fair companions was on a trip to Cumberland
when the smell of smoke became perceptible. The man at Cameron's
garage told them It was a hot box
smoking. "It'll take me about twenty
minutes to llx It," he snld.
The owner stood watching liim n
minute as lie got to work; then she
Hnld: "Ily the way, while you're about
It, I wish you'd grind the valves, take
up thc foot brake and Illl all the grease
cups. You'll have to work lively. I'll
give you Just hulf an hour."
John crawled from under the car
and Blood up. "As long as you're in
such a hurry, miss," he snld grimly,
"I reckon you'd better git your horn
Jacked up and run a new car under It."
Coal, AVood and (loads nf Any Kind  -=5
Delivered to All l'arts of District.     =
Rubbish antl Ashes Cleared Away.
JIODERATE  CHARGES
TELEPHONE  CO  TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Ycmlome Hotel.
C. R. Mulholland
late  of Cameron's  Garage,  Cumberland, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton Street,   NANAIMO
sud   will   be   pleased   to   have   the
patronage of his old friends and acquaintances when in Nanaimo,
Repairs ('uuruntcetl.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Prices llensonnhle.
White Laundry
Leave orders at
LIDDELL'S   BARBER  SHOP
Dunsmuir Avenue
or Phone 17-F
when   your   requirements   will
receive immediate attention.
THE COURTENAY LAUNDRY
The soap-hox orator found many
things to criticize. "And what do we
do?" he cried. "We pursue the shadow,
the bubble bursts and leaves but ashes
In our empty hands!"
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of tho Great War
Veterans Association aro held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock ln the Memorial
Hall.
APPLY—
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
F-R-E-E
1000 watches absolutely free. Owing to the enormous success of our previous puzzle advertisement, which gained
for us hundreds of new clients, who, being so pleased with
their free watch, that they are now our permanent customers, we hate decided to further advertise nml gain recognition in 1000 new homes, by giving awny another 1001!
valuable watches, to those who are clever enough lo till
in thc missing letters in the following phrase,
W-.CII-S A.E F-L-Y G.-R-NT.KD
By correctly filling in thc missing letters, you can obtain absolutely free a watch,
that will equal for time any solid gold watch made, which iB sufficiently proven by
the large number of testimonials that we have received. Sol vn this pu/./.lc correctly and comply with our simple condition of which wc will write when wc inform
you if your repjy is correct, write clearly, your name and complete address, so
that we may without delay inform you of your success.
33
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valveB on the matas of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amousU of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, an d should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
NOTICE
May 25, 1921. g
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops fi
installed must be in conduit with externally operated =|
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance *§§
with Underwriters' Regulations. =3
This applies to meter loops moved from one location |||
to another in the same building. §|
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the g
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical |§
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National s
Electric Code. gg
Any person moving meters belonging lo this Com- -{j
pany, altering,  disconnecting or connecting service =3
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law. §3
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain §
sockets and switches arc required in certain locations, |||
and new installations will not be connected without §
them.   Old installations in which brass or other metal p
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this B
date will be disconnected.   And further be warned that B
the secondary circuits on the distribution  system  of =
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge B
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets S
and switches are used when same are within reach of §|
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will i|
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such H
fittings are used. 9m
Our authority for above regulations is written in- B
structions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity, =
which instructions may be seen at our oilice by inter- H
ested parties.                                                   " =g
HEX MANUMCTURINQ CO. DEM
11/ CWBiSSlHI SL Kabul -V
July SO, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
fhM4
Something New
Astley's  Self-Raising
Aerated Pastry Flour
EXTENSIVELY USED IN ENGLAND
MAKES DELICIOUS  PASTRY, SCONES, CAKES,
COOKIES AND PUDDINGS
FINEST  QUALITY — HIGHLY  RECOMMENDED.
25c. and 50c. Packets
Yeast and Baking Powder not required with this Flour.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
Small Bank Accounts
Many people put off opening a Savings Bank Account
until they feel they have a large enough sum to make
it worth while. This is why they never learn the habit
of thrift.
Open an account with us by depositing $1, and add
$1 weekly or monthly until you can increase the
amount of your periodical deposit.   _
WE WELCOME SMALL ACCOUNTS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
FORDS m DOWN
EMDE'S NEW PRICES
1921 models fully equipped with electric starter,
electric head and tail lights, dimmers, demountable
rims on all four wheels, traction tires rear, with many
other refinements, and delivered to you at Courtenay:
Touring  $ 841.67
Runabout     774.96
Coupe   1128.50
Sedan     1230.38
Now is the time to get that new car. We will lake
your old one as part payment.
E C. EMDE
PHONE 46
FORD GARAGE
COURTENAY
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Acreage for Sale
614 acres of Land for sale,
2'/i acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
List of Winners
At Colliery Picnic
The following are the complete results of the sports events at the Canadian Colliery employees' picnic held at
Royston on Saturday last:
Boys' race, 6 years and under—1,
Hugo Hatgh* 2, Willie Waugh; 3, John
Bannerman.
Girls' race 6 years and under—1.
Nellie Walker; 2, Gladys Idlens; 3,
Annie Taylor.
Boys' race, 8 years and under—1.
Walter Waugh; 2, John Davis; 3,
Bruce Good.
Girls' race, 8 years and under—1.
Agues Bruce; 2. Jean McWhlrter; 3,
E. Lallara.
Boys' race, 10 years and under—I.
Joe Stanaway; 2, E. Boffy; 3, Joe
Ferloni.
Girls' race, 10 years and under—1,
Prlscilla Cloutler; 2, Lena Bogo; 3,
May Taylor.
BoyB* race, 12 years end under—1,
Tom Bradley; 2, John Pearcy; 3, Sid
Waterfleld.
Girls' race, 12 years and under—1,
Em. Davis; 2, Edle McColl; 3, Sadie
Brown.
Boys' race. 16 years and under—1
W. Marshall; 2, Douglas Partridge; 3
Irving Morgan.
Girls' race, 15 years and under—1,
Martha Boyd; 2, Vivian Aspesi; 3,
Gwen Carey.
Boys' obstacle race, 15 years and
under—1, W. Marshall; 2, T. Kadashi;
3, Douglas Partridge.
Girls' egg-and-spoon race, 15 years
and under—1, Marjory McColl; 2, K.
Bono; 3, Jean Smith.
Boys' sack race, 12 years and under
—1, Tom Abe; 2, T. Kadashi; 3, O.
Freloni.
Girls' shoe scramble, 12 years and
under—1, Prlscilla Cloutler; 2, Beryl
Hudson; 3, Ethel Hunt.
Boys' three-legged race, 14 years
and under—1, H. Gibson and J. Picketti; 2, W. Marshall and D. Partridge;
3, Len Hudson and C. Davis.
Girls' relay race, 3 to a team, 14
years and under—1, Marjory McColl,
Edle McColl and Gwen Carey; 2, Mary
Davis, Katie Bono and Martha Boyd;
3, P. Cloutler, M. Ritchie and Mabel
Jones.
Boys' pillow fight, 15 years and under—1, Douglas Sutherland; 2, Jack
Johnson.
Quoltlng, English style, 11 yards—
1, Bobble Brown; 2, Hugh Dougherty.
Quolting, Scotch style, 18 yards—
1, D. Wilson; 2, J. Kirkbrlde.
Girls' potato race, 16 years and under—1, Mabel Jones; 2, Sadie Brown;
3, Marjory McColl.
Boys' cracker-eating contest, 10
years and under—1, Joe Freloni; 2,
Fred Fielding and H. Farmer; 3, H.
Conrod.
Girls' skipping race, 10 years and
under—1, Prlscilla Cloutier; 2, Lena
Bogo; 3, Ethel Hunt.
Boys' race, 8 years and under, 50
yards—1, John Davis; 2, Bert Carey;
3, Norman Freloni.
Girls' race, 8 years and under, 50
yards—1, Esther Lallara; 2, B. Caval-
lero; 3, M. Partridge.
Boys' human wheelbarrow race, 10
years and under—1, T. Kadashi and
Tom Abe; 2, S. Dowling and V. Dowling.
Girls' potato race, 10 years and under—1, Prlscilla Cloutler; 2, Isabel
Yarrow; 3, Edna Conrod.
Boys' 100 yards dash, 15 years and
under—1, W. Marshall; 2, Arthur
Boyd; 3, D. Partridge.
Girls' 100 yards dash, 15 years and
under—1, Vivian Aspesi; 2, Martha
Boyd; 3, Marjory McColl.
Bosche competition—1, P. Camlllo;
2, A. Bono.
Japanese obstacle race—1, S. Selta;
K. Motomochl.
Single women's race, 75 yards—No
entries.
100 yards dash, 18 years aud under
1, Jack Fouracre; 2, Robert Reid.
Married women's race, 75 yards—1,
Mrs. King; 2, Mrs. Campbell; 3, Mrs.
Magnone.
Old men's race, 50 years and over—
1, Jack Boffy; 2, H. Glover.
Chinese   race,   440   yards—1,   Yip
Boo; 2, Chow Wei.
Running high jump—1, Montgomery
Hood; 2, D. Bannerman.
Running hop, step and jump—1, D.
Bannerman; 2, uot claimed.
Putting 16-pound shot—1, J. Vi.
Boyd; 2, Jim Boyd.
Japanese race, 440 yards—1, K. Mo-
toiuuchl; 2, S. Stita.
Past barrel race—1, Tom Brown;
2, Dan Stewart.
440 yards race—1, Jack Fouracre;
2. 0, Brown.
Mauled women's nail driving competition—1, MrB. D. Bell; 2, Mrs. Joo
Thomson.
Returned soldiers race, 100 yards—
1. 0. Hitchens; 2. Alex. Henderson.
Committeemen's race, 100 yards—1.
Pete Heed; 2, A. H. Kay.
Chinese tug-o'-war, 7 men a-Blde—
Won by Wong Chlng's team, No. .*>
Mine.
Japanese tug-o'-war, 7 men a-slde—
won by Wang's team. No. 4 Mine.
Women's needle and thread contest—1, Mrs. Lawrence; 2, Mrs. Magnone.
Bandsmen's race, 100 yards handicap—1, Frank Potter; 2, A. Waddington.
Chinese race, 220 yards—1, W. Pa-
kon; 2, Yip Boo.
880 yards race—1, Jack Fouracre;
2, Geo. Carle.
Committeemen's obstacle race—1.
Jas. L. Brown; 2, A. H. Kay.
880 yards, 18 years and under—1,
Tom Johnson; 2, Tom Brown.
No. 5 Team Won Tug-of-War.
Tug-o'-war, 10 men a-slde—1, No.
5 Mine; 2, No. 4 Mine.
100 yards handicap, employees only
—1, Dan Bannerman; 2, O. Harrison.
There were no entries for the mile
walking race.
Baseball throw—1, R, Robertson;
2, R. Bennle; 3, D. Hunden.
When some of these dames trot
along the beach at Kitsilano can you
blame the tide for coming In?
REAL  BEER
BACK  AGAIN
ti
Cascade Beer
Guaranteed lull strength, nol less than s per cent, proof spirit, is
On Sale at all Government
Vendors' Shops
This is the old-lime brew thai for more than a quarter of a century has
been the most popular beer in llritish.Columbia.
Insist on Cascade   f
Vancouver   Breweries  Limited
Grand Raffle
There are several prizes not yet
claimed. Full list will lie published
later.
The following is a lint of prizes
donated for grand raffle nnd ol firms
donating:
United Typewriter Co., Vicloria. $5.
The Staneland Co.. Victoria. $10.
Moore-Whlttington Lumber Co., Victoria, $10.
Douglas, Mackay & Co.. Victoria,
$10.
Pacific Coast Pipe Co., Vancouver,
$10.
Great Western Smelting and Refilling Co., Vancouver, $10.
;   Cammell Laird Co., Vancouver, $5.
Alcock, Downing A; Wright, Vancouver, $10.
Link-Belt North West Co., Seattle,
$10.
Pacific Waste Co., Vancouver. $.1.
Giant Powder Co., Vancouver, $10.
Boganlus Wlckens, Ltd., Vancouver,
2 mirrors.
Barrett Co., Vancouver, Congoleum
rug.
Canadian General Electric Co.. electric Iron.
Crane, Ltd., Vancouver, glass Bhelf
and supports.
Cumberland Electric Light Co. Ltd.,
2 Superior grills.
Canadian Explosives, 2 razor strops.
Compressed Gas Co.. order for $5.
Dominion Rubber Co., 1 pair gymnasium boots.
Dunlop Tire Co., set running board
mats.
W. S. Fraser, Victoria, set of carvers.
Electric Blue Print Co.. 1 compass.
Gordon & Belyea, Vancouver, Universal wrench.
Gutta Perca 'Co.. 50 feet garden
hose.
Macey AbMl Co.
McLennan, McFeely * Co, Ltd., •">
fishing rods.
Northern Electric Co., electric
toaster.
E. G. Prior Co.. goods In value of
$10.
Storey & Campbell, leather music
case.
Weiler Bros., Victoria. Jewel Im**
Wood. Vallance & Lcggnt Ltd., -
safety razors.
E. J. Woodlson Co.. Seattle, »el <>i
molders' tools.
HiirdKung Manufacturing Co.
McLaughlin
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
'thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK,  WILLEMAR &  WAIN
Phone 25 COUKTENAY, B. C.     P. O. Box 153
Following the custom adoptod in
previous years, one-third of cnili and
articles donated wlll be sen I lo Lad)
smith, lo he used in connection with
the picnic there. In addition tu Hii-
all prizes not ololmod   by  Saturday,
July 30. will also he selll  In I ..i.ly mil li
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY I 111 III II
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Tenth Sunday .titer Trinity.
Holy Communion, 11 a .in.
Cumberland, S pm. Parishioners
will note the change of time I'm- the
evening service for July and August.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Eleventh Sunday After Pentecost.
Mass, 9 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHCRCII
Rev. 0. B. Kinney, IU., F.IU'.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m
Regular Pleaching Service, 7 p.m.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL.  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFlTand MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,073,215.00
W" Funds     58,067,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders     27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments-and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
  \
II. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
TRICKS OF ALL TRADES
Carpenter: In my work I saw my
duly was always plane. I never auger
lull net on Hie level; brace myself <i
Int. and tinil it adz lo the happiness
of life.
Blacksmith: In mine tho tiling is
to strike wlille tlie iron is hot; weld
your Interests; don't be a nut; watch
fortune's wheel nn It turns; never Ure,
and a felloe is bound to win.
"Colonel, I understand your oil well
was down 4.000 feet last week."
"Urn."
'How far down are they now?"
"Must be getting near the Infernal
regions- they've slruck asbestos!"
Friend: "Is your husband saving up
for n rainy day?"
Wife: "He's a perfect Noah! He's
wiving up for the Hood." Pour
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
July 30, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1921.
SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS
The results ot the entrance school examinations published this week by the Department ot Education are the
cause of much serious thought and not a little anxiety on
tbe part of parents and others interested in the education
and welfare of children. Tliis applies not only to this
district but to many other parts ot the province, and Includes the matriculation examinations as well. That there
is something radically wrung somewhere Is the general
opinion, but the reasons advanced are many, and no doubt
most of them have some hearing upon the situation.
The chief cause of resentment locally is tbe regulation
of the Department of Education which gives principals of
schools the right to promote without examination up to
Co per cent, of the class whom he considers worthy of
promotion. Tlie remainder have to sit for examination,
and of the twenty-six who sat In Cumberland not a single
one passed.
Surely there is something very wrong with the educational system of the province when such a state can exist.
The only logical and just method is lor all the candidates
to sit for examination—or else eliminate the examinations
entirely, it is unite true that examinations are not always
a true test of a candidate's efficiency, but, as long as the
examination test ls thc method ln vogue, tt should apply
to all the members of the class.
In some Instances children are%ware several weeks
before the examinations that they are slated for promotion, with the not unnatural result tbat many of them he-
come indolent and lag in their studies, the incentive for
them to put forth their best efforts being removed for the
time being.
The question naturally arises as to what Is the chief
cause of this unsatisfactory condition? Is the standard4^!
efficiency for teachers too low or is the standard of tests
altogether too high, or does the fault lie wilh the parents
and children? Some people contend that the percentages
of passes are Intentionally kept, low as thc province lacks
Unlversltly accommodation for all who would attend.
Although the university situation is a disgrace to the
province we can hardly believe this reasoning to be true
as it would inflict a gross injustice on scholars and parents
alike were the children compelled to remain another year
at school in order to pass, with tlie alternative of facing
the world with a failure to their credit on leaving scliool.
Public attention Is focussed on the 'educational system
at the present time and it is to be hoped some very necessary reforms will be Inaugurated.
A town cannot grow without business.   By helping your
local dealer you assist the community.
The Farmers' Sun Is convinced that there must be something wrong somewhere when hides, wool, grain, livestock
and other farm products "can hardly be giveir-away, yet
shoes, woolen goods, bacon and bread are still on the war
levels."   The feeling Is not confined to the Farmers' Suu.
The twenty centuries of Christian history are but five
minutes on the clock of Human Progress. What will the
Future be when the Hand of Progress has travelled twenty-
four hours around the Clock?—The Forum.
The people ot British Columbia paid out In exchange
during 1920 an amount sufficient to have irrigated the
whole of the Interior fruit districts by means of hydroelectric power.
In order to adhere to the principle ot the Made-in-B. C.
campaign, a* Vancouver manufacturer recently made
arrangements to take the entire output of a specialty mill
over a given period, In order to secure the commodity he
required locally. He purchased ten times the amount thot
he needed for his output for this year, but he gave employment to fifty workers.
Vancouver Elks plan to entertain forty thousand children
'on their annual Hag day, August 10.   Last year they acted
as hosts to twenty thousand youngsters.   The Elks' motto
for the occasion Is. "Be a kid for a day."
A representative form of government ought to be representative majorities, not minorities, nut it is up to the
majorities to attend to that.—Brooklyn Eagle.
ln years tbat are gone lbc women put on their best
clothes just before being photographed, but now they take
them off.
TIRED
All day the busy feet have trod the garden paths; all
day the merry voice has echoed through tho rooms; but
now, when twilight is deepening into night, and the lamps
of heaven are being lighted, the noisy feet grow still, the
childish voice is hushed to the low-breathing of the evening prayer, and as the brown head sinks w.earily to rest
upon Its pillow the red lips murmur faintly, "So tired."
Ah, tired one, ofttlmes thy feet will falter and grow
weary ere they reach the prime of manhood; and to thee
will come hours when not as now the innocent sleep of
childhood will bring thee rest.
Often from other lips than childish ones has escaped a
sigh, the burden of which has been, "So tired!" Eagerly
we toil for an independence which some day in the far-off
future Is to bring us rest; but as night after night we laid
our weary heads upon our pillows, we are still looking
forward, still unsatisfied; and thus It will ever be with us
till the Master calls. Sometimes ambition ls the guiding-
star spurring us onward to the temple of fame. But the
path ls a thorny one; the toot-steps falter; the brain grows
dizzy; and from the heart goes forth the cry, "So tired!"
Yet temptingly a siren voice whispers of glory and of
rest and again the feet press forward, till the goal ls
reached.. But alas! for the rest which ambition brings.
Too often with tlie cup of glory Is mingled the poison of
envy, and again Is heard the bitter cry, "So tired!" 'Tls
thus we are all weary. And yet we would not fold our
hands in idleness, because perchance, we may sometimes
grow "faint with the burden and heat of the day." To us
has been given a glorious privilege to press forward in the
battle ot life, and it our chosen path be that of truth and
right the assurance of well-being will be our sweet reward
when, by-and-by, we shall partake of that joy and peace
of which the blessed never tire.
Colliery Employees Fourth
Annual Picnic Best Ever Held
(Continued from Page One)
was now an accomplished fact, and
had been erected by the company at a
cost of $30.ii»o. He characterized the
Institution as one of the greatest
assets of the city of Cumberland,
Welcomes Fellow Workers.
Mr. Graham said il gave him great
pleasure to welcome his fellow-workers to the fourth annual picnic. To
the success of it they were thankful
for a perfect day. thankful to tbe energetic committee, and thankful to the
City Band, one of the coming bands
of Vancouver Island, for supplying
the music on tliat occasion.
Three years ago. snid Mr. Graham,
when the management Inaugurated
these picnics, ii was with tbe Idea of
getting together and becoming better
ncqunlnieii. lo know one another as a
family, which they ought lo be, nnd
which the speaker felt sure hail been
accomplished, line had only to look
nround at the children scattered over
the ground and see how they were enjoying themselvos and the larger
children also.
Referring tn Mr. Walker's remarks
concerning ibe Literary and Athletic
'all, Mr. Oraham snid we bad one
o! the lines! Institutions ut its kind on
Vancouver Island. The company had
done Its part, and it was up to the
men to make use of It and take full
advantage of their privileges.
(iinihi'rliiiid Prosperous.
Emphasizing ihe benefits of tbe get-
together spirit wliieh has prevailed
during the past four years. Mr. Graham
'.bought that we were one of the most
prosperous communities in the province. If the spirt had been a success, and be felt sure it had been, then
it was up to them all to continue the
pleasant relations. The management
intended to meet the men. ns tbey had
done in the past, in a spirit oi fairness,
lie thanked the people for their cone ■■:-.'irn In carrying out and main-
, u happy and prosperous com-
..mnlty.
Officials Worked Hard for Success.
For the undoubted success of this
year's picnic great credit is due to
Mr Chas. O'Brien for the highly creditable manner in which he filled the
position of secretary. He was on tho
job early and late and personally saw-
to the many little details so necessary
to the successful running of so large
an event.
The various officials and chairmen
of committees all worked hard for the
success of the  day,  aud were ably
assisted by the different committees.
The officers and others handling the
big event were:
Mr. Jas. M. Savage, hon. president.
Mr. Thos. Graham, hon. vice-president.
Mr. Robert Walker, president.
Mr. ('has. O'Brien, secretary.
Mr. John J). Davis, treasurer.
Mr. Chas. Graham, director of committees.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, chairman refreshment committee.
Mayor I). R. MacDonald, chairman
reception committee.
Mr. H. L. Bates, chairman transportation committee.
Mr. J. W. Tremlett, chairman of the
life-saving committee.
Mr. Jas. A. Quinn, chairman sports
committee
Mr. II. G. McKinnon, chairman
programme committee.
Mr. Andrew Pollock, chairman ot
grounds committee.
Judges of First Aid—Dr. Geo. K.
MacNaughton, Dr. E. R. Hicks, Dr. J.
H. Gillespie and Dr. Millard.
Starters—Mr. Thomas Graham. Dr.
G. K. MacNaughton, Mr. Jack Quinn.
Judges—Messrs. J. Sutherland, Tom
I'tiiililte. Geo. Sheurer, A. Auchlnvole,
Sandy Walker.
Judge of Quotllng—Dave Wilson.
The merry-go-round hardly stopped
going all day, more than necessary to
allow a new lot to get seats. It would
huve delighted the heart of Henry
Ford to have seen how much enjoyment was given with one of his autos
iis the motive power.
In the place kick competition C.
Hitchens came first, with C. Harrison
and S. Conti second and third.
Tlie Canadian Collieries stood all
Ihe expenses of the picnic, the employees each contributing one dollar
to the sports prizes.
The picnic was undoubtedly one of
the most successful and enjoyable ever
held in tlie district and passed off
without a hitch of any kind to mar
the pleasure.
LADYSMITH TEAM
REACHES WINNIPEG
WINNIPEG—The Ladysmith football team arrived in this city Tuesday
morning to prepart for the series with
Keglna Post this week to decide which
team will represent the west in the
Canadian championship at Toronto.
Tlie westerners are all ln good shape
after the long jaunt and are confident
of success.
WAR  MEDALS
Quite a number of returned men
have lately received the British War
Service medals and a few have also
received their Victory medals. The
fact of these coming through alphabetically accounts for the fact of some
men receiving them earlier than
others.
G.W.V.A. Notes
Comrades are asked to note that it  as
was decided at the last regular meeting to continue to meet each  week,
and not monthly as arranged at a previous meeting.
The next meeting will be held on
Tuesdoy, August 2, at 7 p.m. A full
attendance Is requested, as there are
several Items ot Importance to be discussed.
Comrades who wish to get a loan
for building under the Returned Soldiers' Better Housing Scheme should
get their applications in at once.
The G. W. V. A. wish to publicly
thank their friends for the generous
donations of cakes, pies, etc., for their
refreshment booth at the picnic.
TIN LIZZIE LOST BALANCE
A product of one of Henry Ford's
factories, while rushing down to Royston on Saturday, got into trouble on
the loose gravel on the rosy! and
turned over on its side, breaking thc
windshield, mudguard and bending
some rods, etc. Fortunately no one
was hurt. The car was eventually
righted, when a turn of the crank
started her off as usual—as becomes
a Ford. Had* It been any other make
of car, we wonder what would have
happened. ':'■**..
LADYSMITH CITY MAY
PURCHASE WATERWORKS
The city of Ladysmith may purchase the waterworks which supply
that progressive town. The ratepayers will be asked to vote on a bylaw
to borrow $50,000 for the purpose.
MONSTER BEAR ON
COURTENAY ROAD
Attracted by the abundance of berries of various kinds the bears are
leaving the high hills and coming
down to feast on a pleasing diet.
On Sunday afternoon an automobile
party coming up the Courtenay road,
whon near the old slaughter-house,
nearly ran Into a monster black bear
which was leisurely sauntering along
the middle of the road. Bruin was
very fat, showing the results of high
living. He slowly wandered off Ihe
road and up the side of the hill. No
one in the party thought it worth
while to follow him and investigate.
Special Clearance Sale
LADIES' DEPARTMENT
CREPE AND VOILE WAISTS
■15 Per Cent. Discount on our entire stock of
Ladles' Georgette and Embroidered Voile Waists
UNDER VESTS
Ladies' Summer Under Vests, Watson's make.
Regular 76c each. ^\t\o
Sale Price    OWJXu
MIDDIES
The balance of our stock of Ladles' and Misses'
Middy Coats at HALF REGULAR PRICE.
WASH GOODS
SPECIALS IN FIGURED ORGANDIE MUSLIN—
About 75 yards in this lot, assorted patterns.
Regular value 75c per yard. O yds. CI AA
Special Clearance Price  O   for »Di.«vU
STRIPED AND CHECK GINGHAMS, about 150
yards.   Special Sale Price, Qftn
per yard   0\t\s
BLUE AND WHITE CHECK APRON GINGHAMS
—40 Inches wide. Extra special value. Regular
to 60 per yard. Q yds. (P*|   A/V
Special Sale Price  O  for  U>.I.«UU
OUTING HATS
The balance of our stock of Ladies' and Children's
Panama and Outing Hats to clear at. QKp
each   «'«H*
HOSIERY
Extra Special Values in Ladies' Black aud White
Silk Hose; values to $1.50 a pair. Qftn
Special price  vO\s
Children's Silk Lisle Socks, self colors, fancy
tops.   Regular 75 per pair. PkOf*
Special Rale Price  OUL
NIGHT DRESSES
The balance of our stock of Ladles' White Ual-
brlggan Night Dresses. Watson's <J»0 Of*
make. $3.50 values; special at  tSU.sVO
WASH SKIRTS
Special Values in Ladies' Wash Skirts. In Gabardines, Piques. Repps and Duck. These are
good bargains. <P*|   PA up &A  AA
Sale Price  OlttlU   to «Bit.J/U
WASH DRESSES
The balance of our stock of Misses' and Children's
Gingham. Muslin and Voile Dresses to clear at
greatly reduced prices.
COVERALLS
Children's Coveralls, in Khaki. Light and Dark
Blue Chambroy's and Striped Ginghams. Values
to $1.90 each. fl»*|   OP
Sale Price  nVL.titO
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Abbey's Fruit Salts, per box   99c
Holbrook's Custard Powder, large tins   ul)c
Bird's Custard Powder, pkts 20c
Canned Corn   0 tins tlM
English Rice Flour, per packet SOc
Farina, per packet  .'.  15c
Prunes, special value   2 lbs. 23c
Horseshoe Brand Salmon  2 tins 55c
Parowax, packet    25c
Maplelne, per bottle   45c
C. & B. Pickled Walnuts, per bottle   90c
Yorkshire Relish, per bottle   40c
Local Dairy Butter, per lb  40c
Lemonade Crystals, per tin   itOc
Sherbet, per tin •  80c
FOR THE PRESERVING SEASON
FRUIT JARS — FRUIT JAR RUBBERS — ECONOMY CAPS AND SPRINGS
MASON JAR CAPS, ETC.
The Studebaker
Light-Six
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an eflieient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and*freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks   Motors
LIMITED
=     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.
911 July SO, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
!«?
New Cars for Old
Make that Car look like a. new one
Phone 135 Courtenay
AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE
11 LADYSMITH TEAM AGAIN
DEFEATED CALGARY
Won by Score of 4 Goals to 0—
Left Sunday Morning to Compete in Semi-Finals.
| K. P. Auto Painting Co. j
jj ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY jj
S ALL WORK GUARANTEED
II
BANK OF COMMERCE
MEMORIAL TABLET
Unveiling Ceremony Took Place
Wednesday Afternoon, Mayor
MacDonald Officiating.
In. memory of tbe men of the Canadian Bank of Commerce who served
iu the Great War, the management at
the head office have supplied each
branch with a bronze memorial tablet
containing the names of the men enlisting from that particular branch.
The tablet for Cumberland arrived
early this week and Manager Jas.
Grainger arranged an unveiling ceremony on Wednesday afternoon, when
there were present His Worship D. R.
MacDonald, Capt. J. C. Brown, Rev.
Jas. Hood, Rev. W. Leversedge, Mr.
F. A McCarthy, Manager of the Cumberland Branch of the Royal Bank of
Canada, Mr. T. W. Scott, and others.
Mr. Grainger, in explaining the object of the gathering, said the tablet
was one of many very thoughtful acts
directed by the bank officials towards
the bank men who enlisted for service
during the European War.. Throughout the lirst year of the war, said the
. speaker, all the men who left the
batik's service to join the colors received a retiring allowance of six
months' salary, together with the
assurance that their bank positions
would be awaiting them on- their return. Later, when the strain of able-
bodied men leaving the service be-
■ came too great, the assistance of the
fair sex was sought and girl bank
clerks were then really introduced,
with what success we all know.
During the entire war, said Mr.
Grainger, the bank kept In close touch
with tlie boys, and on tbe return of
those who wero lucky enough to come
hack every consideration was extended to them.
Recently a substantially bound
volume of "Letters From the Front."
being letters from men of the bank
who had gone overseas, had been presented to the braches, returned men
and next of kin. These were forwarded hy the General Manager, Sir John
Aird. And now this lasting memorial,
the bronze tablet, was dedicated to
the 1701 men who had served overseas.
Mr. Grainger gave a brief history ot
the two officers who had left the Cumberland branch to enlist in the Great
War, Fl. Cadet H. M. Glazbrook and
Gun. D. R. Hunter, who had fortunately returned to the service. '
Mr. Grainger then called upon the
Mayor for a few words.
Mayor Unveils Tablet.
Mayor MacDonald, In removing the
Canadian Flag from the tablet, said
they were met there that afternoon to
unveil the tablet In memory of the
men of the Canadian Bank of Commerce who had served in the Great
War. Fortunately the two men who
had enlisted from the Cumberland
branch had returned to resume their
duties. The tablet was a lasting and
litting memorial to all those who enlisted from tbe bank's service, no less
than 1701, of whom IliiS had paid the
supreme sacrifice. We were very
proud of these men, said the Mayor,
and it was a litting memoral to their
memory. The action of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce In supplying these
tablets to all Its branches wus very
laudable.
Rev. Jas. Hood, called upon for a
few words, said he was very much impressed with the action of the Canadian Bank of Commerce In supplying
each branch with one of these bronze
tablets ln memory of those who had
enlisted. All those who had gone
to the war had placed themselves lu
the place of supreme sacrifice—fortunately they were not all called upon
to pay It, but they were there just
the same, and all honor was due to
them. The speaker said it gave him
pleasure to be present at the unveiling.
The occasion was one which was
worthy of a great deal, said Rev. W.
Leversedge, in the course of a brief
but very earnest speech. The action of
these men In giving themselves to
fight for the cause of freedom and Justice was worthy of all honor. Their
glory was unique. Their glory lies ln
that they were quick to recognize the
call for service. They gave themselves until the giving was no longer
necessary. Quite apart from the
glory of the tablet, they have a glory
no man can take from them—the glory
tbat lies in tbe hearts of those for
whom they fought.
NEWS IN BRIEF
Five thousand families in Vancouver
have pledged themselves to give preference to the products of this province in order to give employment to
those out of work.
Tenders have beeu called for by the
Canadian National Railway for the
construction of a brick station at
Prince George. The handsome structure will be modern ln every respect,
and will be in keeping with the ambit inns of the progressive central B.
C. city.
Milling development In the vicinity
of  Stewart  is  progressing  so  favor-..    ---.
ably  that  residents  of  the northern | as ln an oven,
town are optimistic for its future.
By again defeating the Calgary
soccer team in the Connaught Cup
elimination series, when they beat
tbe Albcrtans by four goals to nil,
at Vancouver ou Saturday afternoon,
tbe Ladysmith team earned the right
to meet the winners in the Manitoba-
Saskatchewan game in the semi-finals
for the Connaught Cup. The winners
of that game will play the easterners
lor the championship of Canada.
Tbe Island team left on Sunday
morning for tbe East.
It was the second meeting between
the teams, the British Columbia candidates having beaten the invaders at
Nanaimo earlier in the week by a
score of two to one.
Saturday's Game.
The game was hard fought throughout, but tbe Calgary team was outclassed. But for the steady and ar-
tlstic display of the Calgary goal
tender tbe result would have been
even more decisive.
Calgary won the toss and set the
Ladysmith team to face a stiff breeze
and the glaring sun. but desuite these
handicaps Ladysmith immediately became dangerous and Calgary was
penalized twice ln quick succession
for fouls.
Calgary had but four or five shots
at tbe opposition net during the game,
and the four goals scored by Ladysmith were all earned In the second
half. Davles, at centre-forward for
the Island team, was the outstanding
star. Dickie Stobbart and Joe Brown
were also good.
Five
FAMINE AND PLAGUE
IN CHINA RESULT OF
DEFORESTATION
DO VOU   LOOK   FOR   FOOD
VALUES IN THE FOODS
YOU  BUY?
You should.
You cannot be happy unless
you are healthy and you cannot
be healthy unless you eat food
with real nourishment in it.
Bread is the best of foods, because it's flour and milk and
compressed yeast combined into
a loaf that has an appetite satisfaction in every slice.
Bread is your Best Food—Eal
more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
is always pure
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Th.
Rexall Store
For Rexall Quality
WE  BUY  NOTHING  BUT THE  BEST  FOR OUR
DISPENSING   DEPARTMENT
THERE IS NOTHING TOO GOOD FOR THE SICK
Dunsmuir Arenuo
Cum l-H-rlii ml
According to the estimate of the
Vernon News, tlie fruit crops of the
Okanagan, Salmon Arm and Sorrento,
and Keremeos districts, will aggre
gate about 4360 carloads this year
Of this large total, 4069 cars will be
apples, 302'tars crabs, 87 cars pears,
253 cars prunes and plums, 62 cars
cherries, 140 cars peaches and 42 cars
apricots.
Despite the hostile attitude of the
Indians, a miniature gold stampede is
on to the lands of the Indiun Reserve
at Douglas Lake.
A concern is being started in British Columbia to manufacture battery
separators. In the past British Columbia cedar has been shipped east
for this purpose.
Tweed cloth and woolen blankets
are now being manufactured in British Columbia from the wool off the
backs of British Columbia sheep.
FRED BROMLEY DIED
AT NANAIMO TUESDAY
The deatli occurred in tlie Nanaimo
Hospital on Tuesday afternoon of Fred
Bromley, a resident of that city for
the past 35 years. The deceased was
ti native of Lancashire, England, and
was 110 years of age at the time of bis
death. For many yearn be had followed his occupation of miner lu tlie
mines of Nanaimo and district.
Magistrate: "Do you prefer charges
against this man?"
Murphy; "Sure, yer honor, I prefer
damages."
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
For months  past there have  been
reports   that   so   many   hundreds   or
thousands must be added to the long
since appalling total of deaths caused
by the Chinese famine. The bounty of
Canada and America has   been   sufficient to save   millions   from  almost
certain deatli—from a death  that Is
almost certain  unless tbe bounty ls
long continued or rain comes ln time
to make tlie next planting a success
Instead of the failure that   the   last
three crops have been.   For months
and months the skies have withheld
the life-giving water from a thirsty,
land, and the hope of bread has died
again and   again   as   seed-time   has
passed with the fields dusty or baked
God sleeps, say the
stricken ones, meaning whatever deity
they worship; but God cannot change
the laws that he bas made and that
China has broken, down to the last
Jot and tittle.
When the Soil does Man .Mont Go Also
No less an authority than the United
States   Department    of   Agriculture
gives the ruthless destruction of their
forests by the Chinese  as   a reason
wby  famine  and  plague today  hold
that  nation   ln   their  sinister   grip.
They have broken the law; they must
pay, and we must pay If we continue
with our ruthless destruction of our
forests.   Everywhere the trees are going; tbe eye can now reach for miles
where only a few years ago woodland
sulticient for the needs of nature and
tbe needs of man ringed  one  round
about.   No ill effect is as yet apparent
over any wide district, but it is bound
to   come,   for   denudation,   wherever
practised, whether in Ohio or China,
leaves naked soli.   Floods and erosion
follow, and wheu the soil Is gone, men
must go also, and the process does not
take long.   Forests not only play an
Important part in the distribution ol
mankind   over   the   earth's   surface,
they deeply affect the spiritual, pby-
slcal and economic life of any people
A  nation that  recklessly  wastes  Its
herltagle of natural resources In Its
scramble for the pleasures of riches
faces ultimate poverty and decadence
The lesson for what deforestation
means is one which mankind has had
many opportunities to learn.    It can
learn It now In the parched acres ol
China where millions have three times
sowed    without   reaping,   where   the
pitiless skies leer brazenly down at n
starving people.   The Chinese masses
are ignorant and have not read history;    they   should   be   pitied    and
helped.     What   will   our  children's
children say of us If we do not soon
call a halt to methods that we know
are leading us straight towards bankruptcy?  Many ot our western mountains are as bare as the hills of China:
they He naked to the .storms.    If a\\
our   mountains   become   like   that.
America will hardly be worth inheriting.—W. F. Bigelow in Good Housekeeping.
Hay - Fever
SUMMED COLDS, ASTHMA,
tpoil many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively slops these troubles >
Sneezing, weezing, coughing,
weeping eyes aren't necessary—
unless you like being that way.
|1.00 at your druggist's, or write
Templetons, Toronto, for a tree trial
Sold by R. E. FJIOST
"WE'LL SAY SO"
By Adam Nuisance in Kitsilano Times,
MoBt any girt can get a man to
teach her to swim, says the lady nexl
door.
One drink of home brew makes tlie
whole world swim.
Some of tbe magazine covers should
be barred from'the males!
The Girl Next Door says it's not so
much a question of what to wear as
a question of what to leave oil'.
Some   men   are
others can't He!
good    fishermen;
The lens sees with you—the autographic record remembers for
you when you
Kodak as you go
Our store is so conveniently located that it is
pretty sure to be "right on your way." Stop off a
few minutes.   The Kodak you want is here.
Kodaks from $9.00 up
Brownies from $2.00 up
Frost's Pharrtiacy
THE REXALL STORE
A Gull City woman has sued for
divorce, and charged that her husband had given her only one cent
during the five years they were mar-
ried.
Top o* the afternoon! Do you remember when you could buy a toll,
cool ono for a jit?
No  wife  ever   interrupts   her  bus
'jand when he's talkin' in his sleep.
If rouge on the knees is coming to
stay, we wonder if they'll powder them
11 public.
There  fs UBUally a  woman  in  'lie
:ase—and too often she is the wrong
Harris: "So Charley is sick of hit
bargain already? He ought to haye
known enough not to fall in live with
a pretty face."
Betram: "I know; but it happened,
you see, that the face was in repose
when he fell in love witli it."
The difference betwen a woman and
un umbrella ib. that you cau shut up
an umbrella.
"So he really said he thought me
very witty?"
"Not exactly. He said he had to
laugh every time he saw you,"
Mother: "What are you crying for,
George?"
"Johnny hurt me."
"How,  pray?"
"I wa3 goirt'g to hit him with my
(1st., when he ducked his head—and I
struck tha wall,"
There was a miin named Costello
Who was a most stingy old fello,
To church he once went,
Donated a cent,
And brought home a fine silk mn-
brello.
Absent-minded professor, meeting
lis son: "Hello, George, how's your
.uther?"
"I give It up. .Mr. Huues," said the
interlucutor. "What am do dlffrunce
jetween a young man, an old man.
tnd a worm?"
"There ain't no dlffrunce; d8
:hickeus get 'em all,"
BIG BEAR SIZLS UP
MOOSE LODGE MEMIJEKS
Decides They  Are O.  K. and
Does Not Molest Them—Take
This Lesson to Heart.
Another great reason for joining tin;
Moose, which protects the Imme. safeguards the children and widows—is
hat it protects those who aro JIoo.se
ight here on this mortal sphere,'as
fhe following incident bears out.
Two young men, whose names are
m the charier list of tho Moose for a
'odge which is being organized by the
Bull .Moose, Tom Baker and Norman
Battersby, were returning home one
lay this week with a nice string of
trout from a wee lake over the hills.
>vhen they were suddenly startled by
i grunt and a growl from a great big
!)lack mother bear. After giving them
a long stare she shook her head and
uttered a sware, muttering: "If they
had been elks, lions, wolves, tigers,
beavers, or even bears, or the I gathered tribe of fowls, eagles or owl.., I
How Do You
Telephone?
send in
that he
When you fall on a busy man at his ofiice,
your card, and then, when he had indicated
could see you, keep him waiting while you finished
reading ;i magazine in his outer oilice?
it is just as important when you telephone that you
he ready to talk when your party answers. It shows
consideration of the other person's time.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
might have stood a chance, hut wlrfll's
li" use ill gang right hack to me
boose, for they are Moose, Moose, and
what show would we have against that
^reat order of one million Moose."
So, people, take a lesson from the
bear—beware the Moose and take on
uot only the family, social, sickness,
financial and accident benefits they
[lye, but take on the added protec-
mn of looking after you when you
ne going nr Coming from fishing!
Don't say. "Oh. this is only a fish
tory!" The facts can be vouched
or by the above young Moose.
So wives, mothers, sisters, father?.
irbthers, cousins, aunts—counsel your
loving relatives and sweethearts to
oin this great order of Moose. Also
icar in mind Hint when there Is es-
ablislo'd hero a lodge of Moose, that
■he women cau huve their Legion of
Moose.
What's the use? Be a man, be a
Vfoose! And feel safe whether you're
fishing or at home in the noose!
ONE SHOW NIGHTLY
I OK "ALFS BUTTON"
As the super-comedy "Alfs Button"
is the biggest comedy ever filmed, having smashed all records In the big
cities, it will be presented here in the
same way it is played In the larger
centres of population—like a road
show—one show each night, on Thursday and Friday, starting at 8.15 and
closing about 10.311.
Wife: "John. If you keep on you will
drive me lo drink."
Husband: "Now, Mary, lia^e vou got
anything in the house you're hiding
from me?"
The doCtor In some ways is strange.
For Instance," said Bill Knott,
'He tells you what you need Is change.
And then lakes all you've got."   -
' The bole In the pocket through
which we lose most of our money is
the one at the top. TH8   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 30, 1921.
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON  SALE AT
H
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt and hops only.
Guaranteed Strength, 12 Per Cent.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS. DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Courtenay, B. C.        -       -        Phone 60L
YOUR TEETH
HEAD INFECTIONS
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
By REA PROCTOR McGEE, Editor ol
"Oral Hygiene."
The great majority o[ bodily Infections are due to abscesses in some
part of tlie head, usually in thc nose,
throat, mouth or in the little cavities
that are located fn a chain from the
base of the nose backward to the under surface of the skull.
These cavities are called sinueses.
Whenever there is an abscess that
causes absorption of the poisonous
material into the blood, it is called a
focus—*a focus of infection.
The reason so much attention ls
given to mouth infections is not because they are worse than any other
Infections, but because there are so
many opportunities for infection In
the mouth.
There are twenty temporary teeth
which, in the normal course of lite,
are followed by thirty-two permanent
teeth. Consequently, every one of us
has the possibility of fifty-two sources
of Infection in the mouth alone, unless
the teeth, both temporary and permanent, are properly cared for.
Every infection shortens life either
very slightly or very considerably. In
order to keep a clean blood stream,
points of infection must be removed,
but how much better it is, and how
much more sensible it ls, to avoid
these infections.
So tar as the mouth is concerned,
infection can almost always be avoided by proper care, in time.
The best time to begin preserving
your health for the future is now
Just think of the wonderful opportunities ahead ot us in this country.
Only those who have health and
energy can have the success of which
they are capable. Pus is the enemy
of success.
=E
39
EVENTUALLY:
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why not get the best now?  It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Besides, the price is little more, and we can
arrange terms to suit any customer.   Write us.
Heint
zman
& Co.
GIDEON HICKS, .Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
anadian NaNonalRailiuaqs
!,£   T,
ON
SII'NM
SEAS
ON
«*-«*\l    STEEL
TRAINS
Victoria to Prince Rupert
PALATIAL STEAMERS
SS; PRINCE  RUPERT
Sundays 11 n.m.
FROM VICTORIA "aSlES1
(Standard Time)
CONNECTING WITH TRAINS FOR
PRAIRIE POINTS ANI) EASTERN CANADA
SUMMER TOURIST FARES
COMBINE RAIL, LAKE ANI) OCEAN FEATURES
E. W. BICKLE, Agent
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
SCOTLAND'S SUPERIOR SCENERY
An American tourist rushing through
Scotland with a guide book in one
hand and a map In the other, employed
an old local worthy to act as guide.
Much to the old Scotchman's disgust,
the American kept remarking that
they had scenery just as line as this in
the United States of America. At last
tht worthy said, "I'll show ye something ye hae' no got in Ameriky."
So he took the Yankee to the top of
Ben Lomond and pointing out numerous buildings he said, "Do ye see yon
building, and that ane and this ane?"
"Waal!" said the Yankee, "what
about it? What are they?"
"Distilleries! an' a' workin'!" triumphantly announced the Scotchman.
A school teacher was endeavoring to
convey the idea of pity to the members ot his class. "Now, supposing,"
he said, "a man working on the river
bank fell ln. He could not swim and
would be in danger of drowning. Picture, the scene, boys and girls. The
man's sudden fall, the cry for help.
His wife, knowing his peril and hearing his screams, rushes immediately
to the bank. Why does she rush to the
bank?"
After a pause a small voice piped
forth: "Please, sir, to draw his insurance money."
WOMAN
According to Hindu legends, the ego
Vulcan, of Hindu mythology, created
the world. When he started on woman
he found he had used up all available
materials, but knew that the world
would be nothing without woman, so
he took—
The roundness of the moon,
The undulating curve of the serpent,
The graceful twist of thc creeping
plant,
The slenderness of the willow,
The velvet of the flowers,
The lightness of tlie feather,
The gentle gaze of the doe,
The   frolicsome   reflection   of   the
dancing sunbeam,
The tears of tlie cloud,
The inconsistency of the wind,
The timidity ot the hare,
The vanity of the peacock,
The hardness of the diamond,
The chill of the snow,
The cooing of tho turtle dove,
And all these he combined to form
thlB glorious being—woman.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEHBIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland. B.C
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First ClHi Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES. Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
Battery
Foresight
It pays to look ahead when
you buy a battery.
It only takes a minute or two
to be sure you are getting a
Willard Threaded Rubber Battery with insulation—instead
of separators — between the
plates.
Threaded Rubber Insulation
will save you dollars and hours
later, because it keeps on doing
its work as long as the plates
last. No bills for replacing
insulation—as there always are
for replacing wooer! separators.
Drive in. Let us tell you tho
whole story.
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
NANAIMO   nnd  DUNCAN
Two more logging camps have shut
down in this district. Pidcock Bros.
have shut their logging camps down,
as also have the International Logging Company.
Many parties are camping on the
river and at Campbell Lake.
The house that is being built for
Mr. Vanstone on Campbell River is
nearly cmopleted.
A big crowd from Merville were up
Iii two big trucks on Sunday. They
went as far as Campbell Lake.
This is a great year for blackberries, which grow in great profusion.
Big crops of hay are the rule all
over tlie district.
The Indians have logged off 90
acres of their reserve, selling the logs
to tlie International Logging Co.
Among tlie many visitors to Forbes'
Landing recently were: Wm. Blackie
and family from Denman Island; C. A.
C. A. Crosbie and wife of Vancouver;
Jus. Ferguson, E. C. Hatch, C. B.
Stephens, I). J. Errington, C. Bradbury, C. J. Wynn, Montague Caples
and Harold Caples. all of Vancouver;
J. A. Knight, Ladysmith; S. lukster.
Portland; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Maynard
and family of Victoria, and many
others.
Campbell Lake Is becoming a favorite resort for campers and ilsher-
mon.
Dr. and Mrs. Roberts, who have
bought Mr, Herbert l'ldcock's property
in Qunthlaskl Cove, have moved up
from Duncan, where they formerly
lived.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day anil Night.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
.$8..r)0 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Mlard
Batteries
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Wait
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, ■BE
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offlce 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
REGULAR INSPECTION
OF CAR SAVES TROUBLE
Regular care and inspection of the
automobile will save tlie motorist
heaps of trouble. A simple schedule,
if followed, will ensure tliat the car
will be kept in fair running order and
be ready for service without annoying delays that often occur when
either owner or driver omits attending to simple matters that should receive regular attention.
Tlie following schedule Is worth
keeping for handy reference:
Once a Week
Lubricate springs and other parts
thoroughly.
Inspect oil and gasoline connections
carefully.
Give steering mechanism careful
inspection.
Examine tlie condition of Ihe storage battery and see that it lias suf
ficient distilled water to cover the
plates.
Clean out tlie carburetor.
Test the brakes and have them
equalized.
Check up on the alignment of the
wheels.
Inspect the car bearings and linve
them looked after if they appear to
need attention.
Other Precautions.
Drain and wash out the crank case
after every 500 miles.
Turn down grease cups after every
1000 miles.
Jack universal points with grease
after every 1000 miles.
Give differential and transmission
lubrication special attention after
every 1000 miles.
Valves generally require grinding
after SOW) miles.
Carbon should be removed from the
cylinders ordinarily about twice i
year.
New piston rings are generally needed about every IS months.
Cloth Hud for Finish of Cur.
Never use a cloth to wipe dust off
the tine finish of a car. This dust is a
line grit, and tlie cloth grinds it into
tlie surface so that It soon becomes
dull Use a fine hair duster if you are
in a hurry, but the best way to remove
dust is to flow water over it. The
lirst (low softens the dust and mud,
and tlie second How removes most of
ot. Then a solution of a high-grade
linseed oil soap is used to finish tlie
cleaning, the whole surface being
thoroughly rinsed before drying with
a chamois cloth.
A    pound    of   eolfee   will   produce
tbout 40 cups.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned, and endorsed "Tend
der for Customs and Telegraph Building, Bumlleld, Vancouver Island, B.C.,
will be received until 12 o'clock noon,
Wednesday, August 1(1, 1921, for the
construction of a Customs and Telegraph Building, Bamfleld, Vancouver
Island, B.C.
Plans and specifications can be seen
and forms of tender obtained at the
olllces of the Chief Architect, Department of Public Works, Ottawa, the
Resident Architect, Victoria, B. C,
tlie Superintendent of Doin. Bldgs.,
Dept. of Public Works, Vancouver, B.
C, and the Dominion Telegraph Agent,
Bamfleld, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the forms supplied by
(he Department nnd in accordance
with tlie conditions set forth therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by au accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order ot the Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
f the amount of tlie tender. War Loan
Bonds of the Dominion will also be
accepted as security, or war bonds
and cheques if required to make up
an odd amount.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, July 13, 1921. 2-31
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Ofllce:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 110 Cumberland, B. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■  B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone CO
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Snusago
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Hani Bologna
Headcheese,
Have yon tried our Pickled Pork
und Corned llecf I It In delicious.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00 id
July 30, 1921.
TBE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
Music and Plwtoplays
FARNUM'S NEW PLAY
GRIPPINGLY DRAMATIC
A Thrilling Story of Love, Hate
And a Fortune—And it All
Began on a Fishing Trip
Is William Farnum more pleasing
when he laughs with Joy or when, in
the darker moments on the screen,
his expressive features take on a look
of seriousness or sadness? The question is prompted by his performance
in "The Joyous Troublemakers," a
new William Fox production which
shows 4t tho Ilo-llo Theatre Saturday
night.
As the title suggests, this Is a picture lu which the famous Farnum
smile predominates. But it contains
grippingly dramatic passages. There
are thrills as well as laughs.
"The Joyous Troublemakers" ls a
very line production from every point
of view. The story Is of a youth who
finds gold by accident where men
have long sought it in vain. The
greed and Jealousy of the thwarted
seekers make wealth a dangerous
possession; but the possessor in this
case smiles through it all, until, one
day, something happens that Involves
the girl he loves. Then he frowns,
and stirring events follow fast and
furious.
A great majority of film lovers are
William Farnum fans, and make a
point of seeing every picture in which
this star appears. "The Joyous
Troublemakers" adds one more great
success to Farnum's long list of motion picture triumphs. In many ways
his characterization of William Steele
is one of the best things he ever has
done, ln spite of the fact that it is a
.very different sort of role from any
In which he has been seen recently.
The story Is fresh and bright, and
It lives up to Its merry title. But It
ls not all laughter; the tears that
sometimes lie behind a smile have
their place, for it is a story of love
and gold—both dangerous things.
"ALPS BUTTON IS RIOT
OF HILARIOUS COMEDY
Somehow a man feels much worse
the day after he's lost an hour's sleep
on account ot the baby, than he does
the day after he has lost five hours'
sleep at cards.
Showing in Cumberland Thursday and Friday Next—The
Great British Success.
It is doubtful if any comedy ou the
screen since (lie advent of motion
pictures contains more laughter than
does "Alfs Button," the lutest British picture to be released in Canada,
and which will be at the Ilo-llo
Theatre on Thursday and Friday of
next week.
S. Morgan-Powell, of tlie Montreal
Star, said: "It is a product of tlie Hep-
worth firm, and in it there will be
found more fun, and more clean.
wholesome, Irresistible mirth than lu
"The Better 'Ole" and Chaplin's best
combined. It Is, indeed, a model of
healthy humor cleverly sustained, and
presented In pictorial form of astonishing variety, alike In setting and in
photographic resourcefulness.
" 'Alfs Button' takes the place of
Aladdin's wonderful lamp. Whenever
Alt needs anything, he Just polishes
UP his tunic button with his sleeve
and up rises tlie genie, whom Alt dubs
Eustace, and who does his bidding ln
every conceivable direction, making
some comical errors at times. Imagine the possibilities! They are illimitable. And tlie genius of Cecil Hep-
worth has directed them Into paths so
rich in that kind of fun which makes
people laugh until their sides ache
aud tears roll down their cheeks, that
he has created a picture which is destined to mark a new era in the history of the film in Canada, even as it
marks the beginning of the introduction of a series of releases from the
best British motion picture concerns.
"The photography is admirable.
Moreover, the artistes have been allowed to think for themselves—the
all-significant difference between tlie
English and American method ol making motion pictures—and tlie result
is a triumph for the artistes and producer alike. 'Alfs Button' should not
be missed. Its equal in comedy is
likely to be a long time coming along."
There will be one show each night,
starting at 8.15. The feature will
start about 8.45.
Charlie Chaplin has a new hobby;
lie is breaking forth as a composer of
music. The comedian has written a
number of original compositions
which are being played by a Los Angeles orchestra, to the amazement of
the movie colony.
"The Last Days of Pompeii," Bul-
war Lyttou's famous novel, is about
to be filmed. Barbara Bedford will
play the blind girl while other in the
cast include William Conklin and Raymond Cannon. A staff ls to be sent
to Hawaii to film the volcanic eruption.
Marshal Neilan has at last secured
George Adc, the famous humorist and
author, to handle the titles of the
John Barrymore picture. "The Lotus
Eater." Mr. Ade has been sought after for motion picture work by many
producers during the past Ave years
without success.
Members of the International committee of the Y. M. C. A., after viewing "The Sky Pilot," by Ralph Connor,
In which John Bowers and Colleen
Moors are featured, have written Associated First National an unsolicited
appreciation of the picture. The reverent author of "The Sky Pilot"—with
one of the most sensational light
scenes ln fllmdom—has been elected
Moderator of the Presbyterian Gen.
eral Assembly of Canada.
I do not fear a siren
With a mass of midnight hair,
With wicked drooping eyelids
And a blase, worldly air;
But, oh, I cross my fingers
Aud I breathe a little prayer
When I meet a blonde-haired cutle
With a blue-eyed baby stare!
The lady was waiting to buy a ticket
at the picture show when a stranger
bumped her shoulder. She glared at
him. feeling it was done intentionally.
"Well," he growled, "don't eat me
up."
"You are in no danger, sir," she
said.   "I am a Jewess."
Henpeck'. "I want   to sue   for  divorce."
Lawyer: "Has your wife left you?"
Henpeck: "No, she won't!"
IB
ILOIL0 THEATRE
Saturday, July 30th
William
Farnum's
Greatest
Picture
The Joyous
Troublemakers
A STORY OF A BATTLE FOR GOLD AND A MAID
Farnum's Greatest PicturelThe Happiest Role in which the Great Actor
Has Appeared—Full of Pep—Replete With Action, Comedy and Drama,
Thrills and Suspense—A Gripping Play of a Man, a Maid and a Million!
The Screen's greatest lover at his best.
TOO MUCH DETAIL
A critic saya that suggestion rather
than detail makes the mosi vivid picture. Detail, indeed, may spoil a picture completely, A preacher was
describing Heaven, he says, to a widow
whose husband had just died. He said
that tlie separation of dear ones was
not for long, and then with elaborate
detail he painted the happiness of
those whom death reunites in Paradise.
When the preacher stopped for
breath the widow observed thoughtfully:
"Well, I suppose his lirst wife has
got him again, then."
n
"Better Than
The Better Ole"
THAT'S  WHAT  MORGAN-POWELL  OF THE MONTREAL STAR, CANADA'S
GREATEST CRITIC,   SAID   OF   THE  SUPER - FEATURE    FILM    COMEDY
ALFS BUTTON
7 Hilarious Rib-Tickling Reels
SPECIAL NOTICE.—THE MANAGEMENT OF THE ILO-
ILO THEATRE CALLS ATTENTION TO THE FACT THAI'
"ALF'S BUTTON" HAS BEEN ACCLAIMED THE GREATEST FILM
COMEDY EVER PRODUCED, AND HAS SMASHED ALL RECORDS
IN THE BIG CITIES OF CANADA AND ALL OVER THE EMPIRE.
2 DAYS com. THURSDAY, Aug. 4th
ONE  SHOW   NIGHTLY-STARTS   8.15   P.M.
Two Hours of Riotous Mirth
PRICES:  Loges,  75c.     All  Other  Seats,   50c.
NOW    IN    ITS    THIRD   WEEK   IN   THE   CITY   OF   VANCOUVER
1L0-IL0   THEATRE
TODAY'S  RELIGION
Religion Is telling the truth in a trade,
Without even counting the cost,
And having the courage to stand by
the right,
Though fortune and friends may he
lost.
Religiqn is :*ij inches per yard.
And 1G full ounces per pound.
And 60 whole minutes of other men's
time.
Not  watching   those   minutes   roll
'round.
Religion is meeting tlie world with a
smile,
Then bringing a bright smile back
home—
A joy tu the 'loved ones who wait for
your step,
No matter how far you may roam.
Religion is turning your hack on the
wrong,
With a prayer in your heart to do
right;
Ten stepping forth boldly to conquer
yourself
With your face ever facing the light.
Religion  is giving a bright word or
more,
To  those   whose dark clouds  hide
their sun;
if you've got tbe kind of religion 1 mean
You  will  hear  the Great  Master's
"Well done."
—Marshall-Wells "Zenith."
"Tlie idea of getting a monument
over your pet dog!" exclaimed Mr.
Graybeard. "I'll warrant you wouldn't
do so much for me."
"indeed," replied his young wife,
"I'd be glad to."
Oflicer in charge of rifle range—
"Don't you know any bettor than to
point an empty gun at me?"
Raw Volunteer—"But it isn't empty
—it's loaded!"
Plant Home
Grown FruitTrees
Shrubs/ Roses
and place yo»r order with the
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
who have a large lot of splendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coming on for Fall delivery.
OUR ROSES are specially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the finest in the
laud, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WHITE  US TODAY.
A.DDIUD88--
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
SAUDIS, B. C.
Dopiirtineul ('.      ' .Mention tills paper vtlitm nrltlni?.
THE EDUCATION OF YOUR CHILDREN
Have you the money with which to do it ?
Start to save wliile they are young—let them
commence life knowing you are at the back
of them.
Savings Accounts are a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch
y Eight
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
July 30, 1921.
BOYS' AND GIRLS' BATHING SUITS—
Regular price $1.50. QKp
Saturday price  UOKu
MEN'S BATHING SUITS—All sizes 34 to
42. Regular price $1.95. d»-| PA
Saturday price     «P!••«!"
BOYS' KHAKI PANTS—Long legs; just
what the growing boys (3»i QF
want. Saturday price, pair   *J)A%.i/tJ
GIRLS' MIDDIES, with colored collars,
for ages 8 to 14 years. QP»/»
Saturday price  t/tlL-
LADIES' WAISTS—Only ten in the lot;
sizes 40, 42 and 44. White Voile and
Striped White and Black Voile. (\fc0
GIRLS' HATS—Only a few left. Regular
price $2.50 each. QfXn
Saturday price  V*J\u
LADIES' HATS—Your choice of any hat,
prices up to $9.50. Out d»0 QF
they go Saturday at    ^tCtUO
65c
LADIES' VESTS — Interchangeable, can
be made into a V-neck or round neck as
desired.
Saturday price	
CAMISOLES—See our leading line in
White and Pink Camisoles, OKf*
trimmed with val lace   UtfXu
LADIES' EXTRA SPECIAL VOILE
WAISTS—Regular values (!»/» QP
$9.50 to $12.50, reduced to  «P"»*Vtl
OUR LEADING LINE IN LADIES* HOSE
—Black, White and Brown.        QP»f»
Per pair QO\>
Or three pairs $1.00
EXTRA SPECIAL IN TOWELS
We think we have the bst value on the
market in Bath Towels; English make;
striped Grey and White. Very      H\\p
large size, each    I til*
Phone 134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISfflNGS
NOTICE
Simon Leiser & Co. Ltd. will be obliged if those still owing the firm will pay same to
J. Sutherland at Sutherland's Dry Goods Store at their very earliest, so that the complete closing of their interests may be done as speedily as possible.
SIMON LEISER & CO., LTD.
ODD FELLOWS' PICNIC
AT ROYSTON SATURDAY
Members of Union Lodge Xo. 11,
1 O. O. P., and Rebeltah Lodges, to-
jether with their families, will hold
the second annual picnic at Royston
n:i Saturday. They are requested to
meet at the Fraternity Hall at 0.30.
DANCE AT BEVAN CHIEF WHITE ELK
SATURDAW NIGHT DREW BIG HOUSE
The newly organized baseball club
of lievan are holding a dance on Saturday night, commencing at 9 o'clock, the
proceeds from which go towards furnishing the team with equipment. A
good time is assured.
■ The  teacher asked  hor  to  explain
' ■•   word   "bachelor,"  and   was  very
amused when a little girl an-
■   c I, "A bachelor is a very happy
' an."
"Where did you learn that?" asked
the teacher.
"Father told me."
RAFFLE PRIZES MUST BE
CLAIMED BY SATURDAY
Holders of tickets in the grand
raffle 111 connection with the Colliery
picnic are reminded that these prizes
must he claimed by Saturday, July 30,
or they will be forfeited and sent to
Ladysmith to be used there.
"Look 'ere, Eustace," says Alt to the genie, "we likes a little privacy when
.i*o lakes a bloomin' sluice." One of a thousand comedy Incidents In "Alfs
Button," the super-feature British film comedy at the Ilo-llo next Thursday
and Friday—ono show each night.
Tonight is Last Show in Cum
berland—To Be Followed By
Dance in Ilo-llo Hall.
"Before the White Man Came" drew
a big audience at the Ilo-llo Theatre
on Thursday evening, and those who
attended thoroughly enjoyed the en-
tertainment provided by Chief White
Elk and his wife, Princess Ab-Tra-
Ali-Saun. The entertainment consisted of the famous Indian lllm, "Before
the White Man Came" with an all-
Indian caste, Chief White Elk himselt
being one of the principals, and pro
logues and epilogues by the Chief and
Princess.
Tonight (Friday) another performance will be held in Cumberland, and
immediately following the show, chief
White Elk will give a dance in the Ilo-
llo dance hall. At this dance there
will be a four-piece orchestra, and
the dances will be interspersed with
singing by Chief White Elk, who has
a very fine voice. His singing last
night was a treat in itself.
Chief White Elk Is a highly educated Indian who obtained his degree in
medicine at the Chicago University,
and afterwards took a post-graduate
course in surgery under thc famous
Mayo Brothers. Unfortunately, being
a ward of the government, he is not
allowed to practice his profession unless he relinquishes all rights as an
Indian, and as these rights include
some very valuable property he declines to relinquish them. He has
travelled all over the world and
claims to speak twenty-one languages
Evidently Scotch Is not one of these,
for on a Cumberland citizen asking
him if he could speak Scotch lie replied, "No, but I can drink It!"
Chief White Elk Is an Interesting
entertainer, his talks being Interspersed with gems of wit which keep
his audience in good humor, hut Ills
principal talent Is his singing. Dressed
in the fantastic full regalia of an Indian chief, even to the war paint, he
sings many of the old favorites In a
voice that is sweet and true.
The Princess Is an able assistant
to the Chief. She Is a demure little
woman of attractive appearance and
delivers her addresses on the customs
of her people In a clear decisive manner, also reciting poems of her own
composing.
There was a man who did not approve of foreign missions. One Sunday at church a collector approached
him and held out the bag.
"I never give to missions," whispered the man.
"Then take some out of the bag, sir,"
whispered the collector, "the money
is for the heathen."
Composer: "How much do you think
1 ought to get for this song?"
Critic (without hesitation): "Six
mouths."
Personal Mention
Miss M. Picketti, of the Cumberland
Electric Light Co. staff, has gone to
Seattle and other coast cities for two
weeks' vacation. During her absence
her place is being filled by Miss G.
McFadyen.
Miss Bannerman of the local teaching staff arrived home Thursday after
having spent four weeks' vacation in
Vancouver and Portland, Ore.
Mr. Chas. Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Victoria
Friday morning.
Miss Gladys Hutchinson left for
Vancouver Tuesday morning on a
short vacation.
Miss Campbell, former matron of
the General Hospital, is visiting Mr.
and Mrs. C. H. Tarbell at Gartley
Point.
Mr. Thos It. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, and Mrs. Jackson, will make
Cumberland their headquarters In future. Mr. Jackson is on his usual visit
of inspection of the local mines.
Mr. P. Rowe spent last week-end ill
Nanaimo.
Mrs. Montgomery, formerly of Cumberland, is visiting friends In town
and at Gartley Point.
Mr. John Bryden arrived in Cumberland Wednesday on a short visit
to relatives and friends.
Mr. D. T. Bulger, Fair Wage Olllcer,
accompanied by Mrs. Bulger, spent
the week-end in town.
Miss F. Wilson, Mr. Rodden and Miss
Rodden will arrive Saturday on a visit
to Mr. W. S. Wilson. They will camp
at Gartley Point.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
If the Cow Bylaw is still in force?
Cows are becoming us numerous as
flies in some quarters and a good deal
nuire objectionable.
If the City Park is a good place to
burn refuse? The disagreeable smell
from the decaying rubbish is a source
of annoyance to nearby residents.
Who got so excited about losing his
nice badge at the picnic?
Who were the fishermen who fished
all day in the hot sun minus trousers,
and have been under medical treatment? Too civilized for cave men
fellows.
If "Mechanical Joe" intends to join
tlie ranks of the Benedicts on the 13th?
Whose teeth2 made the best impression?
How can a man be "Dunrobin'
when he is in the dry goods business'
Why all the sparks at Royston
Beach? We don't mean the sparks
from the camp fire?
Why John Walton gets so mad
when mistaken for Chief White Elk?
Change your complexion powder, old
boy.
Who thought Father Neptune called
her to go ou a visit to Davy Jones
locker lust Saturday afternoon? Ask
Frank!
If a walk to Chinatown to buy peanuts is tlie only attraction? Please
put us wise.
If "she" managed to get all those
splinters out without any assistance
last Saturday afternoon?
PERSONAL MENTION
WE CLEAN OR DYE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housefurnlshlngs,
etc. Let us send you our price list.
Waterproofs "reproofed." Perman
ent Dye Works Limited, 1641 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, B. C.
FOUND
CAP OF AUTOMOBILE GAS TANK
on Thursday. Owner can have same
on applying to Islander and paying
for this advertisement. 1-31
FOR SALE
ENGLISH BABY BUGGY FOR SALE
—Apply Mrs. O. W. Roberts, opposite Methodist Church. 1-31
I92f CHEVROLET, IN GOOD SHAPE
—Good tiros and spare tire; cheap
for cash or terms   to suit   reliable
party.   Apply Union   Bay   Garage.
2-30
1920 MITCHELL ROADSTER FOR
sale—Equipped with cord tires and
one spare tire; 11050 cash, or $2000
on terms. Car Insured for $2700.
For particulars telephone 16, Courtenay.
SINGER SEWING MACHINE —AS
good as new. Cheap for cash. Apply Laver's Store. 1-29
TWO B-ACRE LOTS FOR SALE—
$175 for both. Lots 1 and 2, Trent
Road, on Royston Road. For further particulars apply P. O. Box 79,
Cumberland. 4-29
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month, in
the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F. Slaughter,
Treasurer,
KEEP   COOL
Summer Drinks
SHERBET AND LEMONADE POWDERS
RASPBERRY VINEGAR
GRAPE JUICE
LOGANBERRY JUICE
'   LIMEADE AND LEMONADE CORDIAL
LIME JUICE AND HIRES ROOT BEER
SPECIALS
Potted Meats 2 tins for 25c and 3 tins for 25c
Lobster, '4-lb. tins, 30c  i/fc-lb. tins 55c
Sardines   3 tins 25c
LIBBY'S PICKLES
Chow, Sweet Chow,  Relish,  Sour Mixed  and  Sweet
Mixed and Gherkins
3  for  $1.00	
Libby's Salad Dressing, bottle 35c
Libby's Prepared Mustard, bottle  25c
Sodas, per package 35c 3 for $1.00
Pilchards, flats 2 lor 25c tails, each 25c
Pink Salmon, flats 2 for 25c tails, each 25c
Squirrel Brand Peanut Butter, tin  25c
Corn Flakes   2 pkgs. 25c
Post Toasties, pkt. 15c 7 for $1.00
FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUIT
Plums, Peaches, Cherries, Bananas, Lemons, Oranges,
Grape Fruit, New Apples, Cantaloupes.
VEGETABLES
Fresh Tomatoes and Cucumbers, Celery Head Lettuce,
Green Cabbage, Onions, Beets, Carrots and Turnips.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR
PRESERVING PEACHES
AND APRICOTS
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
July 21—Francis-Cutting, coastwise;
Tartar, coastwise; Talthybius, Seattle.
July 22—Spray and Scow, Victoria;
Dola, Vancouver; Masset and Storm
King, coastwsie; Melanope, Vancouver; Protective and Scow, New Westminster.
July 23—Katahdin and Scow, Seattle.
July 24—Charmer, Peerless, coastwise.
July 25—Moresby, P. W., Chieftain,
Chemainus, coastwise.
July 26—Achates, coastwise; Ka-
tori Maru, Seattle; Glenboro, coastwise.
July 27—Progressive, coastwise;
Clayburn and Scow, Vancouver;
Charmer, Vancouver; Reliance and
Ellen McNeil, coastwise.
NOTICE
Canadian Colliery Employees'
Picnic Committee
All claims against tho Canadian
Collieries' Picnic Committee must bo
in the hands of tho Secretary not later
than August 6th, 1921.
CHAS. O'BRIEN, Secretary.
NOTICE
A meeting of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. Picnic Committee will
he hold on Similar ninruiiig, July ill, at
III o'clock.
A full attendance Is desired.
CHAS. O'BRIEN, Sec.
Helen had a Oeorge eat,
It warbled like Caruso;
A neighbor swung a baseball bat
Now George doesn't do so.
DANCE
Capt. Maurice DeBray presents the
WINTER GARDEN  FOUR
HIGH-CLASS TRAVELLING DANCE ORCHESTRA
Also featuring
ADRIAN LERUE, BLIND ACCORDIONIST
Ilo-llo Hall,Tues., Aug. 2nd
Come and Dance the Latest Dances to the Best Jazz
Music by this famous organization.
POPULAR PRICES

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