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The Islander Oct 23, 1915

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Array Imhtt
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
V
VOL. VI., No. 30        THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, OCT. 23. 1915.        Subscription price, $1.50 per year
VITAL STRATEGIC POINT IN BALKAN SITUATION
iuu ,c mm
B-rotSs?
This  map shows tte railroad from Belgrade to Saloniki,
where an Anglo-French force is being landed.    Also are
shown the mountains and rivers over which an  Austro-
German force must pass before effecting a junction with,
their Turkish allies. -
TOO MUCH FUEL OIL COMING
The forty odd miners of this
city who consented to return to
Britain to work in the coal mines,
during the recent visit of Thomas
Richardson,   M. P., and Robert
Baird expect to leave/ on Thursday, Oct. 28th and join the Nanaimo contingent at that city and
travel together across the continent.   It would not be necessary
for coal miners to leave Vancouver
Island for   the British Isles in
Search for work or the provincial
authorities to give  government
relief Were the Dominion Government to give the coal industry the
protection it demands. California
fuel oil is coming into this  pro-1
vince duty free thus compelling!
the wheels of the »coal industry!
to remain idle While cur miners'
must migrate across the Atlantic!
to earn a living.
Thomas Richardson, member
of parliament in the British House
of Commons, when visiting this
city recently, said he was sent
out by the Imperial authorities
to look for British coal miners
and upon being asked if he had
anything tp state for publication
said, that it was a reflection on
our Canadian system that British
coal miners should leave the province and return to England.
When asked to explain how it
was a reflection he positively
refused to make any further
statement. But we presume that
he meant the tremendous quantity of fuel oil pumped into this
province from California should
be taxed and allow the coal industry to exist.
WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC SOCIETY
FINANCIAL STATEMENT:
Oc*. 20.—Bal. in hand____$ 2 05
"   21,—Collection at Red
Cross Tea Mrs.Parnham   18.50
Total.... $20.55
Oct. 22.-Sent to British
):ed Cross Society, $15.00
Balance in hand  $ 5.55
Wool has been obtained for
socks to the value of $5.80, which
i3 owing at Campbell Bros.
NOTICE
A meeting of the collectors for
the Machine Gun Fund will be
held in the Council Chambers on
Tuesday evening, October 26,
1915, at 7.30 p.m. All collectors
are reqursted to attend.
By order of the City Council,
A. McKinnon, City Clerk.
City Hall, Oct. 18, 1915.
LAID AT REST
The funeral of the late Alfred
William Saunders, aged 16 years
8 months and four days, and
only son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L.
Saunders, of West Cumberland,
took place on Monday afternoon
at 3 o'clock.
The sad cortege left the family
residence, the West Cumberland
Conservative Band, of which the
father of the deceased is an esteemed member, lead ng the procession, and playing the Dead
March in Saul. Next came the
funeral car containing the remains covered with flowers from
friends and those who were desirous to show some token of
respect to one who had endeared
himself to all that had the pleasure of his company during his
short stay on this earth.
The «route of the procession
was up Union street down Duhs-
muuir Avenue and up Third
Street to the Cumberland Cemetery.
Rev. Henry Wilson,, pastor of
Grace Methodist Church, officiat-*
ed at the residence and graveside
and gave a very impressive service on each ocassion. The funeral arrangements were in charge
of Mr. T. E. Banks of this city.
It is sad to give up one whose
influence among men would
doubtless have been for good;
who by precept and example
was so well calculated to spread
abroad the blessed influence of
godly living. Yet He who doeth
all things well, makes no mis
takes. The human link snapped
asunder on earth is forged anew
in heaven. The yearning parents
mourn not as one without hope.
It is true that when beautiful
youth is gone not much of life
remains, hence the dear one's
eyes are closed to all earthly
trials. In his spring-time of enthusiasm and tenderness, ere the
sunshine of hope and joy was extinguished, he passed to the
glorious beyond.
No bronze or marble shaft, no
splendor of ancient or modern
tombs and no play of immortal
genius can adorn the memory of
such manly young men. Their
lives, their deeds, their influence
living or dead, and their pure
aspirations are the monuments
that will keep their names burning in the home and hearts of
kindred and brethren, while the
flying moments are dimming
with their dust and rust the
brightest obelisk, in the cemetery.
While the silence of death wraps
and chills us at this moment,
memories, sweet and precious,
come crowding in.
Death is a hard master. He
would take from us of our brightest and best, but he cannot even
mar memory, It will serve as a
balm to our wounded hearts.
Thus closed the early life of
one who, being dead, yet speak-
eth.
May time bring its resignation,
and may the shores of eternity
that receives his soul, surround
it with everlasting sunshine and
flowers.
ANOTHER MAP OF THE BALKAN SITUATION
♦JVir o ?■■  ■L**»<'., ■-.,' o *.;■•■ 7     *$
y ^\Hv.v , '.V.wK *L
VIENNA
Bunw»4$f   t fi,f,r£'«'-te.'*iff*,s *,j
j-^£',dsjmwitmv*afi
il§T^t^NG.\Rm|
rRiterr
«
i/
, IN ASIA
This map shows how narrow is the neck of Serbian territory which
separates Austria from Bulgaria. TWO
THE 1SLANDEK,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
Qlh* Mantor
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Cihada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23rd, 1915.
The report of the Minister of
Agriculture for Canada for the
year ending March 31st. 1915. is
a full and complete story of the
operations of the Department in
all its divisions and branches. It
is conseguently a very informative publication. Indeed there
is a deal in the Report of which
every mnuicpal officer as well as
everyone interested in agriculture and the public health might
advantageously become possessed
In particular has this reference
to the regulations relating to tuberculosis formulated for the
purpose of ensuring a pure and
wholesome milk supply for cities
and town and especially to prevent the sale of tuberculous cows.
In this connection it might be
mentioned that the Department
undertakes, through the Vetin-
ary Director-General, to aid any
city or town acting under the
regulations to carry them out
and to control bovine tuberculosis.
Owners and managers of cold
storage plants aro'reminded that
under an order in council of 20th
of June, 1914, they must give
the public the preference in the
use of refrigerated space and
must not contract to give said
space to one firm to the exclusion
of the said general public. Particulars are given of amendments
to the Destructive Insects and
Pest Act. Information is also
conveyed relative to trading with
the enemy. Summaries of reports
regarding dairy operations will
be found of value, especially as
regards arrangements for refrigerator car service, for the proper
carrying out of which by the
railway companies the Department holds itself responsible.
From May to October the railways
in Ontario,    Quebec and Nova
Railroad and Teamsters' Coats
Special in Railroad and Teamsters' Coats, in Clive Khaki, a coat
that keeps out the water all the time. You cannot get the legs
of your pants wet in this coat.    Its waterproof qualities are
exceptional.
Fall Overcoats
Men's heavy Overcoats in Curly Cloths and Tweeds, in the
newest cuts.
Raincoats
Men's English Rainproof Coats, in all sizes, at popular prices.
Sweaters
Special values in Ladies Hand-knit Sweater Sets, made-to-order
with Sweater Coat and Toque to match, in shades of reds,
browns, greens, blues, tango white and black.
Ladies' Raincoats
Ladies' Card  Velvet Raincoats in fawns and greys, in new
styles at popular prices.
Coatings
Coatings suitable for Ladies and Children's Coats, in Checks,
Serges, Astrachans and Bearskins.
Dress Goods
Newest fabrics and novelty weaves in Dress Goods in all the
leading shades.    Serges, Poplins, Ladies' Cloths, Satin Cloths,
Ratines' Novelty  Stripes in silk mixture fabrics in all light'
shades suitable for evening wear.
Scotia must run refrigerator cars
weekly or fortnightly for the
carriage of butter at regular rates
and without extra charge for icing. Commencing from the middle of June and for eleven weeks
hence the Department pays icing
charges up to $5 per car for the
conveyance of cheese. Similar
arrangements are in force for the
carriage of fruit from August 1st
to Oct. 1st. The work of the
Seed Commissioners' Branch,
which gains in importance yearly,
is told in detail, as is that of the
live stock branch, the- activities
of which are farther reaching
than ever they were. A full
account of the grading of wool
is given. Reports from all the
Dominion Experimental Farms
and Stations indicate the wide
scope of the work which is being
done and the remarkable variety
of tests and experiments that are
taken. Thispartof the report will
be found especially enlightening
relative to the comprehensive
nature of the operations at the
farms and stations, Details of
the Proceedings of the Fruit and
Entomological branches are de
serving of minute attention,
being both instructive and useful.
The Publication Branch, from
which the complete report can be
obtained free, also receives attention as does the Branch of the
Canadian Commissioner of thn
International Institute of Agriculture. Particulars are given
regarding the issuing of patents
of invention and a summary of
the work of the Public Health
and also of the Health of Animals
Branch under the direction of
the veterinary inspector general,
Dr. Torrance. An appendix contains the reports of the Director
General of Public Health and
his staff and of Canadian Exhibition Commissioner, William
Hutchison, relating to Canada's
exhibit at the Panama Exposition, San Francisco. It also gives
the text of the importation of
dogs, all of which have now to
be licensed to land.
Lieut. A. N. V. H. Ommundson,
of Edinburgh, champion shot of
the British Empire, is reported
to have been killed while fighting
in Flanders. Lieut Ommundson
was winner of the chief prizes at
the shooting tourneys held at
Bisley, including the King'sPrize,
which he took at the meeting of
the National Rifle Association in
1901. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
,<i
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[established 24 years.]
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
TH0S.E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
AUx Ht dei son, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS.
(grocers and Bakers
Agents for PiieiKiB Bob
Cumberland    Coubtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
|)      Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights .of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tories and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,500 aores
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or leqal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaut himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied ferare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mino at the
rate of live cents per ton. ,
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for tbe working; of the mine at the rate of
flO.OOanaore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Aeent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
DIRECT
INSTANT
SATISFACTORY
You put in a long distance call, we do the rest. We
hunt up the party you want wherever he may be, so long as
he can be reached.
By long distance telephone you go direct to the person
you want to reach and you get instant, personal action.
You can telephone any time, day or night. Special rates
between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m.
British Columbia Telephone Company, Limited
A TOUCH OF HUMOR.
A lady entered a railroad coach
in which all the seats were filled
with the exception of two of
which one man had taken possession. The lady stopped near the
man thinking that he would gallantly turn one of the seats for
her and thus permit her to sit
down. Perhaps there was a look
of annoyance on her face since
the man did not show a disposition to show her any courtesy
for he said, "Why are you looking at me so angrily, do you wish
to eat me up?" The lady answered: "No! I do not like pork."
There was a man in western
Iowa who suddenly became rich
and built a big house. He decided to adorn it with statuary
from Italy and so he ordered a
copy of the "Venus de Milo." In
due time it arrived, executed in
the finest Carrara marble, but
no sooner did the millionaire receive it than he sued the railroad
for $2000 damages for mutilation
and what's more he won the suit.
A preacher who went to a Kentucky parish was asked to invite
the prayers of the congregation
for Lucy Gray. He did so—They
prayed three Sundays for Lucy
Grey, On the fourth he was told
that he need not do it any more,
"Why" said the preacher, "is
she dead?" "No," answered the
man, "she has won the Derby."
A young man had called upon
his best girl the .night before. As
a result he had but poorly prepared his Virgil lesson. In spite
of this fact he translated fai-ly
for a short time but after reading "and I put my arms around
her" he suddenly stopped unable
to translate farther and said:
"That is as far as I got Professor." The instructor's reply was
"That is far enough young man."
John was devorced from his
first wife, William, his friend
was an infidel. They were walking together near St. Martin's
church. "Ha!"' said John, "I was
married in that church." "In
deed!" said William, "and I was
christened in ic."
"It is not a good shop,'' reflected John, "their work don't last,"
"Is your father coming to
church this morning, Henry?"
asked the minister of a small boy
whom he met in the streets
"I guess so," replied Henry,
"Somebody stole his fishing tackle last night and I heard him
tell ma at the breakfast table this
morning that his fun for today
was spoiled and he supposed he
might as well go to church.
A school boy's definition of a
vaccuum: "A large empty space
where the Pope lives."
"Charity" said Uncle Eben.
"will kiver up a multitude of sins
and yit most of us doan seem ter
hab much mo' dan'll go roun' fob.
our own pus'nal uses."
Little Willie was missed by
his motherone day for some time,
and when he reappeared she
asked:
"Where have you been, my
pet?"
"Playing postman," replied
her "pet." I gave a letter to all
the houses in our road. Real letters, too."
"Where on earth did you get
them?" questioned the mother
in amazement.
"They are those old ones in
your wardrobe drawer, tied up
with ribbon," was the innocent
reply.
To keep a cigar lighted one
must not talk too much, This is
one of the reasons why women
do not smoke.
Brother: "How can a girl be
so vain as not to know man is
not lying when he tells her she
is the prettiest girl in the world."
The sister: "She does know it,
or should have no respect for his
intellect; but she thinks how
much he must love her to tell
such a whopper." *
Mr. Dooley: "Whiskey is the
standard of value, It never fluctuates, and that's funny too, seeing that so much of it goes down."
Treating Not Allowed in London
King George has already signed an order, which will be issued
this week, applying the clauses
of the Control of Liquor Act to
the London area. The order will
prevent 'treating' in public-houses, ciubs and hotels in London.
A similar order, which has been
applied to other areas under nhe
powers conferred by the Defence
of the Realm Act' has decreased
the number of cases of di unken-
ness dealt with by the police by
forty per cent.
London paper learns from reliable sources in Friedrichstaa.. n
that the -German headquarters
staff admits the loss of 33 Zeppelins and. nine Parseval airsh >s
since the war began up to August
1. 1915. Since that date, a further
report states two Zeppelins and
,one Parseval are missing.   Tte
'majority of the airships   were
j brought down by the allies' atrial
! guns, and the rest suffered accidents while landing.
Capt. Von Papen, the notorious
military attache of the Gem an
legation at Washington, is i qw
in Mexico. As a strife breed«.-r he
will probably be watched by those
whom it most concerns. FOUR
THE    ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
!LWJ_ OB
How Bank Was Saved in Face
of Frantic Mob of De-
1 positors.
By GEORGE ELMER COBB.
ft *
Randal Webster, the young and
[handsome president of the Bank of
klreenville,   opened   the   door  of  his
Erivate office. He glanced into tho
ounting room, and beyond lt at the
(jostling crowds ln the street outside.
rThen with a groan he sank to a chair,
jthe picture of despairing misery.
"It has come," he told himself in a
(harsh, racking whisper—"the worst,
the end!"
There came a tap at the door. The
{young financier sprang to his feet.
A brief, vague hope gave him momentary energy. Then his soul seemed to
)dle within him, as his cashier entered the room with a face blanched and
iear-crossed as his own.
"Any word?" projected Webster,
[hoarsely.
"None. Mr. Webster, we muBt face
lhe crisis, the worst of rumors as to
'the solvency of the institution have
got abroad. A mob of depositors from
the mills is in front of the bank. They
-are wrought up and dangerous. They
<hreaten to smash every window and
jblow up the bank with dynamite, if
•their money is not paid them prompt-
jly at ten o'clock."
"Impossible!" gasped Webster.
"No one knows that better than my-
iteelf," responded the cashier in a hollow tone. "There ls no promise what,
-ever that your messenger to the city
•will arrive before night. Then it is
too late. The train is Just ln, and
'neither man nor money has ap-
jjeared."
"How much is there ln the bank ln
ready cash?"
"Leas than $10,000."
"Pay it out to the last dollar as
•lowly as you can.    If we can .tide
•over for a few hours the expected help
may come."     .   .
"And if it does not—and when the
money gives out?" questioned the
«ashier, fearsomely.
1 "Put up a sign and close the bank."
1 Left to himself, the young banker
reviewed the situation. Energetic, im*
With a Groan He Sank to a Chair.
1'
petuous, ambitious, he had gene beyond his depth in an Investment aure
to turn out profitable ia the end.   A
temporary complication, However, nao.
tied it up. He could not realize in
ready cash under a week. A heavy
draft came upon the surplus funds, depleting the bank reserve to a dangerously low figure. Somehow a public
rumor of all this got out. The report
'was current that the bank was going
to fail. Result: The frantic, desperate
mob of frightened depositors now
.clamoring at the great locked doors.
Webster had sent a trusted employe
of the bank to * rich relative in the
city. He carried an urgent appeal for
succor. The messenger had not reported.
I A graver shade of feeling covered
the features of the young financier as
he thought of the one dearest to him
in all the world—Ethel Morris. They
were to have been wedded in a month,
but If the bank broke—then Webster
well knew her proud, exclusive family would scarcely favor a discredited
bankrupt. It was a forlorn fight for
[business preservation and love.
, Webster hurried Into the counting
jroom as a great outcry arose. He
hoped It waB his messenger arrived;
!he feared it was new riot. It lacked
ljust five minutes ot ten. A remarkable
scene greeted his sight.
A whiskered, farmer-looking man
was talking to the excited crowd. He
was waving a great bundle of bank
notes ln one hand. There was a
cheer. In his other hand the stranger
carried an old battered satchel. With
it he now pounded on the door.
"Let me in. I must get in!" the as>
tonished Webster heard him shout out,
and then to the people: "Don't get
■cared. Randal Webster ls an honest
man, and the Bank of Greenville is
solid as a rock!"
: Something in the determined manner of the visitor caused the watchman to open the door for lilm. The
stranger helped him reclose it against
the eager, crushing crowd.
"Where ls Mr. Webster?" he de-
jmanded. "Ah, there he is," and he
[approached the counter and nodded
to the wondering banker. "Remember
me. Mr Webster?"
"Why, I can't say that I do," was
the hesitating reply.
"Never mind. I've changed. Had
to, wanted to," rattled on the stranger.
"See here," and he negan to bring
from his pockets bundle after bundle
of bank notes. "There's $20,000.
Use it."
"But, my dear sir—" began the bewildered cashier.
"Use it, I said, didn't I?" interrupted the stranger, unceremoniously.
"But we have no right; the condition the bank Is ln—to receive deposits," stammered the cashier.
"Call it a loan, then," said the stranger. "I know all about your worry
here. It won't laat. Keep the crowd
goodnatured. Pay them' off smiling.
I'll guarantee the run will soon stop."
Then he lifted the satchel. As it
opened, the startled cashier, used as
he was to the sight of money, uttered
a great cry. The man piled up bundle
after bundle of crisp green bank notes.
"Shove them up against the glass
where they will show," ordered the
stranger. "Only, don't pay out any of
thla heap. You won't need to. That
pile, the real cash paid out right along,
will soon tame that unruly mob."
"Ten o'clock," announced the dumbfounded cashier.  "Open up."
The stranger drew to one side, as if
enjoying the scene. The astounded
Webster waa soon too busy to notice
him. The eager crowd filed in;
everybody was paid promptly. The
eight of the great bundles of bills began to have an effect. Some, shamed,
redeposlted their money. Others,
•Batching the infection of restored confidence, did not aak for their money
jat all. Within an hour the news went
all over town that the bank was safe.
With a great sigh ot relief Randal
Webster beckoned the stranger into
fciz ~rirsf° ********
"Now, then," he said, "wnat aoes
this all mean?"
The stranger laughed. Then he
seized the banker's hand in a friendly
grip.
"You don't know me, eh?" he said.
"Well, I'm bringing you back some of
the bread you cast upon the waters
five years ago." }
"I don't understand you," murmured
the puzzled banker. .
"You was a lawyer then, and you defended in the city a member of a gang
of counterfeiters. Now do you remember?"
"Why, yes," answered Webster,
slowly.
"My name was Dallas—not now;
I've changed It. You got me free, you
gave me a great lecture. It was my
life chance, and I improved it. I went
to my folks fifty miles from here. A
relative left me a fortune. I have
kept track of you. I heard of your
trouble."
"And you have saved the bank!"
cried the grateful Webster.
"The gang believed a large amount
of their counterfeits destroyed. I
saved the satchel containing them,"
went on the man. "I buried it. That
show money I took from the satchel
la counterfeit. The real money I drew
from my bank early today to loan to
you. We will burn the counterfeits,
now they have served their purpose."
An hour later the bank messenger
came rushing up in an automobile,
with plenty of money to safely tide
the bank ower.
Webster paid back his grateful
friend ln need. He did not tell even
Ethel the story. Down deep ln his
heart, however, he fervently cherished the gratitude of the reformed criminal who had saved the bank at a
critical Juncture.
(Copyright, 1918, by W. O. Chapman.)
FOOD WE ALL USED TO HAVE
Remembrance   of   Childhood   Feasts
Spoiled Wealthy Man's Expensive
and Well-Ordered Dinner.
Zona Gale, writing a story called
"The Bridge" in the American magazine, presents a broker named Cassoday dining at his club in New York.
While he diner, Cassoday is visited by
a mental reincarnation of himself
called Littlechild. The story then goes
on:
" 'What'B this?' said Littlechild over
the soup.  'Green turtle.   But I remem
ber the chicken soup we used to have
the day after mother had had boiled
chicken dinner and dumplings. What'?
that? I don't know "sole." The fish we
used to have was baked browner outside and whiter Inside, with no hot
gravy—oh, not like this at all.   What's
that?   Mother wouldn't have done any
filet tricks.   But I can smell the roast
beef when she  was   thickening   the
.brown gravy Just after she took the
pan out of the wood stove oven—don't
you know  how we  stopped to  sniff
with every armful of wood We brought
in?  Endive?   I  can't place  tt---you
know we used to run out and pick the
jlettuce last thing before we sat down
jat table—we got it from the shady part
jof the patch toward the well-house.
iGlace what?   Yes, but don't you re-
'member her apple puddings with cinnamon in the sauce?   Apples oft the
seedlingthat grew by the corn crib—1',
i   "Cassoday pushed back his chair.   ■
:   " 'Wasn't it right, sir?'" asked the
'waiter anxiously.
i   '"Devilish   right,   thanks,'"   said
iCassoday.
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study (Sunday School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 21st Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m., Holy Communion
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M. Forces on Wednesday at 8-30 p. m.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
Dance to the perfect rhythm of the
Edison
Diamond Disc
Phonograph
If you are just flearning^the
new dances, start right. Get
the rhythm of them firmly fixed
ln your mind through the well-
choseri, well - played records
rendered by Mr.Edison's latest
invention.
If you are already an .expert
you will appreciate thef splendid interpretation which the
mellow, fully-rounded tone of
this wonderful instrument pro-,
duces.
No Needles to Change. A Permanent Diamond is the
Reproducing'Point.
Mr.  Edison's perfect mechanism  insures uniform pitch
and uniform speed from the
first revolution to the last.
Hear the new dance records
which we have just received.
Come in any time and  hear
as many as you like.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor. THE ISLANDKR, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
AMATEUR NURSES
Not Always dseful In Hospitals—Declined to Tend Nobleman
Amateur nursing of "war heroes"
has developed some amusing things.
Some professional English nurses
were in a hospital run by a strange
crowd of English society and artistic
folk. There was a titled poetess
among them; also a poet of undoubted
genius who is noted for the poetic
license of both his language and
metre.
The amateur nurses had a way of
-crowding around the beds while the
genuine nurses were washing their
patients and changing their bandages.
"We are above such prejudices," said
the poet. The other amateurs seemed to agree with them. "But we
aren't," said the professionals. So
the poetical and artistic ones had to
go away and let the patients be bathed without a gallery.
A wounded man, covered with dirt,
was brought into a, hospital. Not
•only was he muddy but as a result
of a m'onth in the trenches he offended the nose, as well as the eyes
of certain society nurses, who managed to palm him off on some accommodating Sisters of Charity
among the nursing staff. They 'elt
rather foolish the next day when the
wounded man was washed up and
•discovered to be the Marquis de Z—,
one of the oldest names and greatest
fortunes in France.
GAS BOMBS FRIGHTFUL
Cause Slow Suffocation Like Prolong.
,   ed Drowning and Great Pain
The following description of the
-effect of the gas is told by a responsible British officer who visited some
ot the men who wore disabled by gas
on Hill 60. The letter of this responsible officer, which flrst appeared in
the London Chronicle, follows:
"The whole of England and the
civilized vfori&r" he says, "ought <o
have the truth fully brought beior
them in vivid detail, and not wraptti.
up as a present. When we got to uk
hospital we had no difficulty in nuu
ing out in -vhich ward the men Wci't,
as the noise of the poor devi.s iry.i.:,
to get breath was sufficient to di.e~.
us.
"There were about 20 of the' worb.,
cases in the ward, on mattresses, ail
more or leas in a sitting position
strapped up against the walls. Tuew
faces, arms, and hands were oi *
shiny, grey black color. With theli
mouths open and leaden glazed eyes
all were swaying slightly backward
and forward trying to get breath, i,
wa,s a most appalling sight. All these
poor black faces struggling for life,
the groaning and the noise of the efforts for breath is awful.
"There vas practically nothing to
be done tor them except to give them
salt and water and try to make them
sick. The effect the gas has is to fill
the lungs with a watery frothy matter, which gradually increases and
rises until it fills up the whole lungs
and comes to the mouth—then they
die. It is suffocation, slow drowning,
taking in cases one or two days.
Eight died last night out of twenty
I saw, and the most ot the others I
saw will die, while these who get
over the gas Invariably develop acuta
pneumonia.
"It is without doubt the most awful
form of scientific torture. Not ons
of the men I saw in the hospital had
a scratch or wound. The Germans
bave given 'out tkat It Is a rapid, painless death—the liars. No torture
could be worse thaa to give them a
-dose ot their awn gas."
ft'/, CUT
IN LAMPS
e*
Beginning SATURDAY, Oct. 23rd, 1915, the following scale of prices will go into effect:
10,15 and 25 watt. Tungstens, each - - - - SOc.
40 and 60 watt. Tungstens, each - - - - - 30a
10 tp 60 watt. Tungstens, per doz., each, - - 25c.'
100 watt. Tungstens, each    ------- 70c
150 watt. Tungstens, each r.   -   -   -   -   -    $f.25
_ ■ /'-*"■■'-
Corresponding reductions on Ruby, Hylo Orbon,  /
Dimbrite Tungsten Argon and Nitro Lamps.
Argon and Nitro Lamps are guaranteed for
700 HOUR LIFE
CUMBERLAND ELEGTRIG LIGHTING COMPANY
PHONE 75 LIMITED P.O. BOX 314
Card of Thanks.
To the friends who came to us
in our hour of trouble and contributed all that human kindness
could suggest, to help and comfort, w,e return most heartfelt
thanks and although such devoted friendship cannot remove the
sad memories that linger around
our vacant chair it brings into
view the brightest side of humanity and throws the pure light
of an unselfish friendship into
darkened homes. ■ May the day
be far distant when those friends
who gathered around us will
need similar attention. But when
the time comes, may they receive
the same full measure of generous aid and tender sympathy *hey
brought to our home when death
was an inmate there.
mr. and Mrs. E. L. Saunders.
The Red Cross Tea under the
auspices of the Women's Patriotic
Socisty held at the home of Mrs.
Charles Parnham" on Thursday
Oct. 21st was a splendid success.
The receipts for the afternoon
were $18.50
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P.O.Bax279 ..." Chop* 31
...»
I SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Ladysmith Conditions Improve.
Ladysmith Oct. 16th-Today
is the biggest payday in Ladysmith since August, 1912. This
taken in connection with the
fact that the output of the mines
has now reached 1,000 tons a day
must give encouragement, to the
citizens and business men cf
Ladysmith, who for more than
three years have suffered from
the disastrous strike which started in September, 1912. The in-
proved feeling is everywhere
noticeable, and there is every
reason to believe that the'output
will increase. There is an increasing demand for coal, [as will be
seen by the following list of ships
which called at this port during
the week: Berquist and scow!
Butte, bunkers, Cascade, bunkers; Dover and 2 scows; Dola,
bunkers; Respond and scow;
Protective and scow; Peters and
scow; Gleeful, bunkers; Princess
Royal, bunkers; Naide, bunkers;
Bail, bunkers;; Spray and scow;
Princess Sophia, cargo; Native,
bunkers: Santa Anna, cargo;
Western, bunker and cargo; Clay-
burn, bunkers; Clayburnand two
scows.
The town of Levis, Que., has
by a vote of 565 to 71 decided for
piohibition.
BOY SCOUTS
Cumberland Troop No. 1 will
parade at 6.30 p.m. on Friday,
October 29, in the ClubRoom for
the following practices:
Knot-tying, Ambulance, Gymnastic Practice, Stave Drill and
Signalling.
Orderly Patrol—Foxes.
,   Orderly  Officer — Assist an t
Scoutmaster W. W! yte.
Boys between the ages of 11
and 18 years are eligible to join
the troop, accompanying a written consent by their parents.
Scouts must te in full uniform.
By order,
A. J. Taylor,
Acting Scoutmaster.
The Indian Government has
refused the request of Dr. Frederick A. Cook of Brooklyn, for
permission to climb Mount Everest. Dr. Cook announced in Chicago last May that he would sail
from San Francisco on May 27th
with a party of twelve fer the
purpose of climbing Mount Everest. He expected to reach Nepal,
in northern India, in July, and
figured the time required for the
expedition at seven months. It
appears there is an agreement
between the Indian Government
and the State of Nepal which bars
Everest to foreign intrusion.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, eo pure; so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling. Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY   1st.   1915.
READ  UP
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
4.10
4.05
4.00
3.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
Fri.
P.M.
7.35
7.10
7.05
.7.00
6.55
6.50
6.45
6.30
Thur.
P.M.
4.35
4.10
4.05
4.00
3.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
Wed.
P.M.
7.35
7.10
7.05
7.00
6.55
6.50
6.45
6.30
Tue i Mon.
P.M.
4.35
4.10
P.M.
4,35
4.10
4.05  ; 4.05
4.00  I 4.00
I
3.55  , 3.55
3.50
3.45
3.30
_«_
3.50
3.45
3.30
Sun.
A.M.     P.M.
9.35     3.35
9.10 3.10
9.05 3.05
9.00 3.00
8.55 2.55
8.50 2.50
8.45 2.45
8.30 2.30
STATIONS
Cumberland
Bevan
Puntledge
(f) Lake Trail Road
(f) Courtenay Road
(f)    Minto Road
Royston
Union Bay
READ   DOWN
Sun.
A.M     P.M.
7.00     1.00
7.25 1.25
7.30 1.30
7.35 1.35
7.40 1.40
7.45 1.45
7.50 1.50
8.00 2.00
Mon,
A.M.
10:30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Tues.
P.M.
2.00
2.25
2:30
2.35
2.40
2.45
2:50
3,00
Wed.
A.M.
1030
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Thurs
A.M.
7:00
7:25.
7:30
7:35.
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
Fri.
A.M.
10;30
10:55
11:00
11:05
11:10
11:15
11:20
11:35
Sat.
A.M,
7:00
7:25
7:30
7;35
t
7:40
7:45
7:50
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY TH*.  1SLANDEK, LU 1K«ki,»»;n
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.,LL.D.,D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Manager JOHN AIRD. Aaat General Manager
SEVEN
A
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers unsurpassed facilities to those doing business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.   .
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che.
ques and Letters of Credit issued and available In all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates. S22
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
'.DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOWJFULLY STOCKEB AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN B© MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phone* Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT TO CUSTOMERS:--No  Orientals, Agents,  or Solicitor.!
employed.
ChowLee&Sons
Importers and Dealers in Silks
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Underwear
and Negligee Shirts, Whitewear,
Silk Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc.
Chow Lee & Sons,
CHINATOWN,     West Cumberland
**
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, «, C.
M
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
WOMAN'S  PLACE  IN NATURE
Man With the Grouch Draws His Con-
elusions From Observation of
Pet Pair of Geese.
"I don't believe in suffragettes nor
in the so-called new woman," said the
man with the grouch. "They're against
the law of nature!
"I'll tell you why it isn't natural,"
he went on. "I've been observing life
in the barynard, arid I've learned by
analogy the real place of woman in
the economy of life.
"My wife has started in to raise
a couple of geese, and they are the
most hifman things you ever set eyes
on.   She calls 'em Darby and Joan.
"We have no goose pond, so we've
sunk a tub in the backyard for the
recreation of the two geese.
"Well, Darby simply owns that tub!
He waddles up to it very solemnly
thfe flrst thing in the morning and
takes an eye-opener.
"Joan comes waddling behind him,
meek and wife-like, and tries to follow
i her lord's example. He scolds her and
| drives her back. She obeys with becoming feminine gentleness,
v "Then, with the utmost care and deliberation, Darby proceeds to take his
morning bath and make himself beau,
tiful. He sputters in the tub, preens
himself and has a beautiful time in his
lordly, masculine way.
"When he has entirely finished he
cackles with glee, comes out of the
sunken tub and waddles oft to graze
on the new shoots of grass.
"Now that he is through with the
tub Joan may have her turn. She may
have what is left, now that her lord
and master ls quite finished.
"It's a lesson in wifely subjection
to see Joan make her toilet and then
waddle around contentedly in the
wake of her proud, domineering mate.
"It goes to show what woman's
place in the world really should be, according to the law of nature."—New
York Telegram.
New York Verdict.
The North Dakota man who spent
his last dollar for a taxi to take him
to the poorhouse is the champion
game sport of the western world.-—
New York Press.
Badly Mixed ^ncestry
Count Berchtold who resigned the
post of Minister of foreign Affairs for
Austria after playing such a b g part
ln bringing about the war, comes of
an uncommonly mixed ancestry ard
(s related to many of the reigning
families of Europe. le has in his
veins strains of German, Hungarian,
Bohefnian, Italian, Polish, Rntheman
and Southern Slav Wood. In his so
cial relations, although of an Austrian
peasant family, he is ninth cousin of
Emperor Francis Joneph, the Czar
and the Kaiser are his eighth cousins
and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria is
hia fifth cousin.
Hot Coffee Saved Lives
The idol of Brixham (Devon) Is
"Little Dan." He is just a boy, and
very modest, but he has played a
hero's part in the great war. "Little
Dan" ls the boy cook of the flfty-ton
Brixham rawler, Providence, which
saved seventy of the crew of the ill-
fated Formidable. As the ice-cold,
half-drowned British bluejackets were
dragged on board, "Little Dan," assisted by the twelve-year-old son of
the captain, did his little bit nobly.
How many lots of hot coffee he brewed he cannot remember, but when the
men were carried ashore, the doctors
said that "Little Dan," with his hot
coffee, had saved many lives.   '
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick.
So don t you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter  and    Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY    .
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Baric of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C.
NOTICE.
Effective from-oct. 1st, , 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Edward W. Bickle
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL. AND  INSURANCE   AOENT
PHONE* OFFICE, 3-0    RESIDENCE 7-B
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG.,
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND am*
EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mrs. H. Hatten left this morning for Butte, Montana.
MreS James Ward left for Van-
cojver on Sunday.
Mr?. Pcllard left for Nanaimo
on Monday Mcrning.
Mrs. J. A. Ollieleft on Monday
for Powell River.
James Price left for Nanaimo
on Wednesday.
Mr." Clark, boiler inspector was
here cn an official visit during
the week.
Mr. Millend. reoresentative of
the New York Coal Age was here
during/the week.
Mrs P. S. Fagan returned from
a visit to Victoria on Tuesday
evening.
Mrs, B. Mellado of Victoria,
mother of Mrs. R.iH. Robertson
is here on a visit.
J. R. Lockard.ggeneral superintendent for-theuGanadian Collieries limited left, on Monday
evening for Seattle.
A meeting of the; committees of
the People's Prohibition Movement will be held in the council
chambers on Monday evening at
So 'clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Valentine of Lady-
sun.n arrived on Sunday to attend the funeral of the late Alfred
Saunders and returned on Wednesday.
The stormy weather prevented
the Charmer from calling at
Union Bay on Wednesday but
cilled on her way south on
Thursday morning.        t
Found—At Campbell's Beach, a
water spaniel, heavy built, long
ears, anb two white spotted front
leet. Owner can have same by
paying expenses and applying at
Campbell's Farm.
John J. Wier of the Cumberland News returned from Victoria on Tuesday and left again on
Friday havifig received an urgent
cell from Mrs, Wier who is in Victoria that her father was dying.
The Wellingtcn Colliery Railway train connecting with the
E. & N. Railway at Royston row
carries Dominion Express giving
this city an additional express
service. Express parcels now
arrive every day in the week but
Monday and leaves every day but
Tuesday.
On Thursday evening at 7.30
Mrs. William Potter died at her
home in this city in her 64th
year, after a lingering i llness.
All the care and love that skilled physicians and an anxious
husband could devise and apply
for. her comfort and assistance
were brought into p'ay but she
died despite the prayers of all
those whe knew and loved her.
The deceased lady leaves a husband and several relatives in
this city to mourn her loss.
The funeral will take place
from Roman Catholic Church
to-morrow  afternoon at.2 p. m.
r
C •rf^.-^^SN^NSN
THE   BIG   STORE
Real Ayrshire Blankets
When you buy a genuine Ayrshire
blanket you are purchasing one of
flie best that money can buy. We
have a new stock of this line of blan
kets. For comfort, wear and value,
try a pair^   Prices, $7.50 to $9.50.
Penman's Sweater Coats
the coat with a guarantee. The name
of 'Penman' on your coat is the best
recommendation. Today we received
a shipment of the latest in Ladies'
and Gents' Sweater Coate.
A specially good Sweater, made of heavy wool, with
a beautiful roll collar, made to fit; shades (Jj'y CA
Cardinal. Maroon, White, Grey andMole *ip I **j\J
Boys'
Suit
Department:
Our stock comprises the most
complete showing of Boys'
Suits we have ever shown.
If it price you want we have
suits at
$2.95
Up to size 28.
If you want quality we can
equally meet your approval,
and we are prepared to give
you the best price on all our
suits.
Leckie's Boots for
Men and Boys:
Again and again we'ask you to
give Leckie's Boots a trial, and
so add another to our list of sat
isfied customers who have got a
shoe they can depend on.
give
The " Eclipse Shoe " will
you satisfaction.    See our new
line delivered this week ^q /\C
„ in Misses' Patent Button ipZ.yo
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
*1**t***mt**\***tat***m* l-*-*^S*V**>*W -

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