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The Cumberland Islander Dec 18, 1925

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Array A^ifl
Give the Store Clerks a chance-SHOP   EARLY  ri
mE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
(-
With wtaleb ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 51.
CUMBERLAND,  BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1925.
<UNION(aMt»BEr> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Largest Still In
B.C. Raided At
Hornby Island
A sensational raid waB made last
Sunday by Provincial police officers
and Mr. George Norris, of thc Victoria Customs preventive service, on
Hornby Island, resulting In the seizing of a valuable still and a large
quantity of litjiior, while Provincial
police made three raids In different
parts of Nanaimo, gathering In large
quantities of bootleg liquor and a
valuable cache  of  opium.
Ostensibly running a ranch on
Hornby Island, a Chinaman named
Ah Yick. it Is stated made beer and
liquor at his own distillery and
shipped the products of the still to
Vancouver aud other Mainland ports
by motorboat. The police nnd Mr.
Norris captured the Chinaman "red
handed," and took Ills motorboat,
liquor and still to Nanaimo.
The raids were actuated from the
belief by the Provincial police that a
considerable quantity of liquor was
finding Its way Into Nanaimo Illegally
and that It was thought the liquor
was homemade. All the places raided Sunday were found to be operated
by Chinese.
The net result of the raid on
Hornby sland was the finding of a
complete still, twelve thlrty-six-gallon
barrels and eight,--four gallon
barrels of bootleg liquor, three tons
of rice, a quantity of mash and a
thlrty-flvc-fnot   gasoline launch.
The Nanaimo raids resulted in the
seizing ot $801) worth of unsealed
liquor and moonshine, together with
opium and smoking paraphernalia.
Six Chinese, alleged Inmates or keepers of the raided places, were placed
under arrest. A number of others
are to be summoned as a result of the
discoveries. Those arrested in the
case will be brought before Magistrate neevor-Potts ln Nanaimo this
week.
HOLIDAY DANCES
TO BE HELD BY
FOOTBALL CLUB
Two special Holiday dances will
be held hy the Cumberland United
Football Club, one on Christmas
night and one on New Year's night
in the Ilo-llo Hall. At the dance on
Christinas night the Football Club
drawing will take place when a large
number of valuable and seasonable
prizes will bc drawn for. Plump's
Orchestra will supply the best and
latest music. Dancing commences
at 9:30 und continues until—well,
come and see. The price of admission
at both these dances wlll be Gents,
$1.00   and   Ladles,   25   cents.
P.C. League Game
Scheduled For
Sunday Postponed
The Pacilic Coast Football League
game scheduled for Sunday morning
on the local ground, when Cumberland United should have met Victoria Veterans, has been postponed.
We understand the reason given is
the so-called International game to
be played In Nanaimo on Sunday
afternoon when several of the Cumberland players are expected to
travel to the Hub City and earn nn
"International cap." It seems rather
ridiculous to postpone an Important
league game for a so-called International game. The writer has seen
these kind of games pulled off In the
terminal city and has yet to see one
that proved successful, either from
a playing or financial point of view.
For the good of soccer let the league
games continue.
Cumberland United
Eliminate Nanaimo
From Competition
Cumberland United put Nanaimo
out of tbo running for the McDonald
Cup on Sunday afternoon last on the
Central Sports ground, Nanaimo, win
ning handsomely by a score of five
goals to two.
Cumberland scored their first goal
after twelve minutes of play In the
opening half, after a corner, taken by
Fowler was well placed to Hitchens.
who in turn passed to Graham, the
centre forward made no mistake, scor
ing a nice goal. This success was,
however, short-lived as Alex. Thompson made it an even score 5 minutes
later. With about fifteen minutes to
play of the first half. Graham scored
number two for Cumberland on a
passs from Fowler. Nanaimo fans
claimed Fowler handled the ball, but
the referee did not see It and the incident was allowed to pass. Right
from the centre kick Cumberland
made tracks for the Nanaimo goal,
so bard pressed was Grainger that he
gave awa.. a penalty. Jock Stewart
| converting with a magnificent drive.
Cumberland led at half-time 3-1.
Five minutes after the opening of
file second half Plump made it 4-1 In
favor of Cumberland, scoring the best
earned goal of the day. After twenty
minutes play Wilson scored for Nanaimo. hut a few minutes later McDonald put Cumberland further ahead,
the game finishing with the Blue and
Whiles easily masters of the game
and well worth their 5-2 win.
"THE FARM GARDEN" AND
"FRUIT POSSIBILITIES IN
THE COMOX VALLEY"
Two Interesting Lectures at Courtenay Delivered by Mr. W. H.
Robertson and Mr. E. W. White Were Appreciated by Large
Audience in Agricultural Association^ Lecture Hall.
SOCIAL EVENING WAS
GREATLY ENJOYED
I    Fred Deluce, who last week-end ar-
: rived in town from New Zealand, has,
1 we understand signed for the Cumber
j land  United  Football  club.      Deluco
f will he remembered as the flash outside   right of   the day  of  .Milligan,
Turner and Graham, part of the local
team of eighteen months ago.
COURTENAY. Dec. 12—Under the
good offices of Comox Agricultural
and Industrial Association, whose activities along educational lines have
been marked during the present season, two interesting lectures were
heard in the lecture hall of the associ
ation last night. The lecturers, Mr.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist and Mr. E. W. WhKe, District
Horticultuist, under the Department
of Agriculture, took for their subjects
respectively, "The Farm Garden"
and "Fruit Possibilities in the Comox
Valley." In opening his remarks relative to the farm garden. Mr. Robertson described himself as merely a
horticulturist, and said that the Court
enay-Comox district was an outstanding agricultural area particularly as
regards potato growing and dairying.
Of first importance was the location
of the farm garden. It should be con
veniently situated to the house so
that the housewife could obtain garden produce when required, but she
should not be expected to do the hard
manual work. Location was even
more important than soil. Owing to
the great variety of soils-throughout
the district, fertilizers were a matter
of Individual study. The use of chem
icals was explained and the necessity
of maintaining or building up the
fibre content (humus) was pointed
out. For this purpose barnyard manure, straw, seaweed or cover crops
would, the speaker said keep up the
physical condition of the soil; and
where chemical fertilizers only were,
used there was a danger of the land
loosing its humus unless this method
was adopted. Chicken manure with
straw or bracken was an excellent
fertilizer also. Hot beds and cold
frames were discussed showing the
advantage of early crops raised under
glass. Besides the very early vegetables being most used iu the house,
the cash returns from this source,
particularly at the early season of tlie
year when the farm income may he
at its lowest, were usually very acceptable.
Plant pests well known to all gar-
deiu-vs such as the cabbage root maggot, cut worms and flea hectles all
came in I'or R good deal of attention
and remedies were given. The growing of rhubarb for very early trade
was shown lo be a profitable undertaking and detailed instructions as to
how lo proceed were clearly explained. This forcing of rhubarb would
also produce a cash return at a very
needful time (January-February) and
the average returns have shown a
price of 13c. to 15c. per pound to the
grower.
Mr. White commenced his remarks
by commenting ou the growth of the
poultry industry in this district which
he said, is noticeable every time he
visits the Courtenay area. He believes
however, that the Comox Valley lias
great possibilities for fruit. Although
Vancouver Island is not looked upon
as a commercial fruit growing district
every farm should have a home orchard. There is probably no farm which
is not adapted to the growing of an
acre of fruit trees. The speaker had
evidently given this subject a good
deal of thought and had made a clear
plan of one acre cotaining 48 trees in
eight rows of six trees each. Five of
these rows were devoted to apple
trees, one to pears, one to plums and
sour cherries and the last to sweet
cherrie::. Logan berries and Himalayan blackberries came in for some
attention, hut the speaker did not encourage any extensive planting of
Logans. With regard to strawberries
however, he firtnly believed that there
were excellent opportunities for marketing these in more extensive quantities. He showed how the picking
acreage on the Island had decreseed
in the last year or so while the price
for both jam and crate berries had
been very fair for tlie last season. He
predicted a severe shortage of strawberries for next two or three years.
During these addresses many questions were asked and answered. Mr.
R. U. Hurford acted as chairman. The
hall was well filled and at the close
a very hearty vote of thanks was tendered the speakers.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Hitchens, Maryport
Avenue,   entertained    last   Saturday
evening at an enjoyable card party
j and social evening, some eighteen or
j twenty guests being in attendance,
i Whist occupied a greater part of the
levelling and  several  oilier  entertain*
Ing games brought forth much amuse-
served.
Those'' present Included .Mr. ami
I ment. Di.iniy refreshments were
i Mrs. J. 11.  Robertson, Mr. and  Mrs,
it.  Stevenson,  Mr,  and  Mrs.  it.  n.
Stiachan, junr., Mr ,and Mrs. j. j);.
|monte, junr., Mr. and Mrs. II. Peters,
| Miss J. Stevenson, Miss II. Lockhart,
Mr. A. Farmer. .Mr. li. Stewart, Mr.
|c. Brown and Mr. W. Hutchinson.
Duncan Badminton
Club Made Clean
Sweep At Royston
I Tho visit of tlu* Duncan Badminton
'Club to Royston on Saturday after-
■ noon last produced n big surprise to
j the many players in the district. The
I visitors won every name with com-
; paritlve ease, as the following figures
will   show.    Players   from   Royston.
Cumberland and Comox took part, tho
! Cumberland players being .Mrs. !•'. K.
j Shenstone. .Miss ('. .McKinnon and Mr.
II. B. Murray and Mr. P. It. Shenstone
| Murray and Miss McKinnon lost their
I doubles games 15-0, 15-0; whilst Shell
I stone  and   .Mrs.  Shenstone lost 16-2,
15-0.    The   following   Is   a   complete
list  of tiie  scores witli the names ol"
! the Duncan  placers lirst:
	
| Royston versus Duncan-Men's Singles
J Bazzett bent Ash 15-0, 15-2; King-
Iston beat H. ldiens 15-3. 15-2; Craig
| beat Blunt 15-4. 15-0; Hall beat Brook
' 15-0, 15-2.
Ladies' Singles
.Mrs. Sheridan Hire beat  .Mrs. Ash
11-1. 11-2;  .Miss'rilce beat  .Mrs. Cook
ll-». 11-1;
ladles'   doubles
.Mrs, Rice and .Miss Rice boat  Mrs.
Ash and  Mrs. Cook  15-0, 15-5;   .Mis.-;
Bazzett and .Miss Blythe beat .Mrs. I'ot
linger ami Miss Slllenee 15-2. 15-1.
■ Men's Doubles
Bazzett and Kingston beat Asli anil
II. Idlens 15-11, 16-8; Craig and Hail
Endeavoring To
Revive Soccer In
Nanaimo City
The following paragraphs were
culled from tiie columns of the Free
Press, of N'anaimo. in its Issue for
last   Wednesday:
"Football   is   once   more   coming
into   its   own   as   tiie   most   popular
sporl  In Nniiimo and local fans wlll
be pleased to hear that  In the very
near future they will have the oppor-
ttiuily   of  seeing   a   u-ani   ill   action
equally as  good  as  those that have
won honors for the City in past years.
An  announcement    In    connection
with  the  above  was  made  today  by
the  management of the  new  organization,    witli   the   assurance   that
j many of the players In the last Connaught    Cup   series    will   again   be
sporting the black and  white strips.
|     McFarlane,     wiio    is    witlioul     a
j doubt   the  peer  of center  halves  In
I the West, will again fill that position
on tlie local team.   Edmunds, who at
j the  beginning  of  the  season  trans-
[ feiToil   his   services   to   the   St.   Andrews of Vancouver, has returned to
i his  lirst   love,   while Jimmie  Knight
'has also consented to return,to his
i home team.
I'lie   management   is   also   taking
steps to secure tiie services of sev-
eral  good  mainland  players  to help
strengthen  tiie forward line and rc-
j port   tliat   satisfactory   progress   lias
j been made.
'Dickie' Stobbart will be the man-
| ager of the new team, und will, no
: doubt, make a big success of his new
| venture as he lias of his soccer
j career.
The officers of the recently-organized cluli are: President! Mr. Nat
j Bevis; Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. P:j
! Seggle."
15-1.
Fred roster another of Cumberland's
old-time players hns returned from
the prairies and has signified his Intention of signing for his old club, the
Cumberland I'nlted.
"Aunt Susan's Visit" Proved
To Be Sparkling Comedy
bent  Blunt and Brock 15
Mixed Doubles
| Bazzett and Mrs, Rice bent Ash and
S .Mrs. Ash 15-0, 15-8:Klngston ti Miss
j Bazzett heat II. Idlens and Mrs. Cook
16-1, 16-3;Cralg and Miss Blythe beat
liiuiit and Mrs. Pottlnger 15-1. 15-2;
! Hall and Miss Rice beat Brock and
I Miss Slllenee 15-5. 16-6.
HOLIDAY CARNIVAL
DANCE AT ROYSTON
The management of the Royston
Imperial Pavilion anounce that on
Saturday, December 30th, a monster
Carnival Dance wlll be held with Ihe
music supplied by the famous "Jazz-
arlnibo"  Orchestra,   of  Nanaimo.
Horns, paper hats, ticklers, balloons, serpentine, etc.. will lie a big
feature of this dance, which commences at 9 p.m. sharp. (Icntlemen.
11.00; Ladles, 25 cents. ••
Word was also received this last
week of another of the old-time players In the person of Tommy Heyland.
who Is now located In Brandon. Man.
He sends Christmas Greetings lo all
his old friends In Cumberland and
also sends the hope along that Cumberland will go back east lu quest of
the Connaught cup. Tommy Is making preparations right now to be In
Winnipeg on that occasion. He does
not seem to doubt for one single mom
out Ihat any other team but Cumberland wlll make Ibe (rip—Its up to you
boys not to disappoint our old friend
Tommy Heyland.
MUSICAL CONTEST REVEALS
SURPRISING YOUTHFUL TALENT
The muslcnl contest held In the
Ilo-llo Theatre last evening for child-'
ren under 14 years of age brought '■
forth a deal of keen competition and
musical ability that one would hardly think could be found In Cumberland, so that nn the whole tlle Judges
hnd a very difficult Insk In choosing
the prize winners. Preference however was given Robert Cossar, Mary
Sweeney, and Jack Hill who were
awarded respectively the first, second
and   third  prizes.
The excellent  performance  of the
competitors came as a great surprise;
to the audience, more especially those
who understand the teclinlc.il points
of music. It must Indeed be gratifying lo all music lovers to find so
much unsuspected talent amongst the
young people of our City, and lt Is
only through sucli contests or concerts us that held In lhe Ilo-llo Inst
evening Hint the publlc can hear and
appreciate the musical talent that Is
around us every day. This latent
talent certainly should not remain
Intent.   (Iron! credit Is due the tench-
(Contlnued on Page Flvo)
Aunt Susan's visit, heralded for the
past   three   weeks   through   the   columns of the   Islander and    on    the I
street by word of mouth, materialized
finally Wednesday evening.   The old
lady from Pepper Corners was introduced to a packed auditorium In St.
George's   United   Church   and   before
many minutes had elapsed it became
quite  evident   to   her  curious   spec-'
tutors tliat the press reports had far
from over-rated her ability, her originality, her bliintiiess and her charm, i
She was a scream, a riot, or in common   parlance,   a   knockout.     Those
who could not gain admittance, and
there must have been many for the1
church   was  crowded   so   that   many
had to stand, certainly missed a play
that  has  never  been   surpassed   In
Cumberland  by a  cast  composed  of'
purely amateurs.   To Mr. A. J. Tay-
lor, under whose direction  the piny j
was produced, must go the credit for j
its   great  success.
The play opened at the breakfast
table of John Thomas Tllibs In his [
home In Golden Cily. The morning
mall brought a letter from his Aunt |
Susan saying that she was nrriving
Saturday morning for a long visit,
and she did arrive—eggs, pumpkin
pie, cookies, feather bed and all.
Thinking this Ignorant old lady
would hinder her elder daughter's
debut In society ns well us her chance
to catch n rich husband, Mrs, Tiblis,
assisted by the daughter, Rebecca
Jane, tried every artful means lo
keep Aunt Susan from meeting lhe
rich and titled guests that called,
but Auntie would have none of It.
When anything was going on she
was right In the midst of It. but nn.
things turned out she captured  the
hearts rather than disgusted the
visitors so that in the end Rebecca
did get her rich husband, Mr. Guy de
Mnre.hmont Coggs. and in addition
the other daughter. Mary Alice, became the blushing bride of a rich
senator. Hon. Samuel Smith, whom
Aunt Susan lind known iu Pepper
Corners as "little Sammy Smith."
Even tlie poor of the neighborhood
benefitted from contact wit li tliis
blunt old lady and the play closes
with both poor and rich alike giving
a farewell party for their benefactress
liefore she departs  for her  home.
Mrs. II. Conrod carried off tlie
name role in perfect style It Is safe
lo say that no one could have filled
the pari better. The part of Rebecca
Jane was doubtless the hardest of
tlie whole play, with the exception of
the main character, of course, but
Miss Edith Hood's rendition of this
rather snobbish person was very
creditable; In fact all tbe characters
were extremely good. The members
of the cast were as follows: .Mrs.
H. Conrod. Mr. and Mrs. I). MacLean.
Miss Edith and Miss Ettn Hood. .Mr.
and Mis. Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. J.
C. Brown, Mrs. Hood. Mrs. Whyte.
Mrs. Lockner. Mrs. II. Brown. Miss
A. Conrod and Miss Llllle Banks.
At the end of the play the actors
gathered on the stage and delighted
the audience with several well-rendered songs. Those assisting in
tliis part of the entertainment were
Mrs. J. Ledlngham, the Misses Etta
and Edith Hood. Miss Alma Conrod.
and Messrs. R. Goodall. G. Ramsell.
C. Edwards aud Dr, 10. It. Hicks.
Miss Conrod's contribution was a
recitation entitled "The Ladles Aid"
and   wns   perhaps   more   truth   than
Comox is. Diiiicuii   Hen's Doubles
Craig and Hall heal Downey and .1.
ldiens  15-2.  15-n.
Mixed Doubles
Craig and Miss Blythe beal Downey
and Jllss Wood 15-2. 15-2; Hall an.I
Miss Rice beal .1. ldiens and .Mrs. Kaii-
bairn  151.  15-2.
Ladies' Doubles
j    Miss Bazzett ami Miss Blythe beat
! Miss Lyche and Mrs. Falrbalm  15-1.
: 16-8;   .Mrs.   Hlc- and  Miss   Rice  beal
Mrs.   .McLellan   and   Mrs   Cliffe   15-1
16-3.
1.mill".' singles
Miss Blythe heal Miss Wood 11-2. 11-2
Cumberland versus Duncan '
I.aides' Doubles
Mrs   Rice and  Miss  Rice  beal   Mis.
Shcnsi    and   Miss   McKinnon   16-8,
15-0;
Ladles'  Singles
Miss  Blythe  beal   Mis.  Shenstone
U-o. U-3; Miss Hnzzcti beal Miss Mc
Kiniion  11-0,  u-o.
Men's  Doubles
llazzeit   and Kingston beat  Murray
and Shenstone 15-2. 15-:;.
Mixed  Doubles
Bazzeii and Mrs. Rice beal Shenstone and Mrs. Shenstone 15-2.  16-0.
Kingston and Miss Bazzett beal Mur-
. ray and Miss McKinnon  16-0,16-0,
The members of tlie Cumberland,
Royston and Comox clubs served lea
during the nfternoon ami after the
games the visitors were entertained
'al dinner at the Nelson Hotel. Union
Bay.
poetry.   Several  orchestra  selections
were    rendered    between    acts,    by
.Messrs. C. J. Parnham, A. Pilling, C.
Newman  and   II.  Murdock.
I
McKenzie Adds To
String of Knockouts
in'!! McKenzie. tiie Comox youth
who is making quite a name for himself in the cauliflower industry In
Seattle, added yel another to his
growing list of Itayoos when lie put
Bob Corbett, of Yakima, to sleep in
Hi" third nl* a scheduled six-round
boul ai the American city last Tuesday  evening.
In* the ligin the Vancouver Daily
Province says: "Bob Corbett, 180-
pounder from Yakima, opened skilfully against McKenzie. 240 pounds.
Corbetl drove in his left persistently
and avoided tiie big man's fist, but
McKenzie, his face covered witli
blood, kept on Irving with his right
hook to the jaw, and when the bell
ended tlie second round Referee Ad
Schachl was counting over the Yakima man. I'orbett's seconds worked
hard on him and lie came to just as
tin- nong sounded lo open lhe third.
Bui Uie boxers had hardly put up
their lists when Cornell's second.
Denver i-'d Martin, a negro benvy-
wi ighl ni old-time fame, tossed in a
towel. 'I'll,* boul was set for six
rounds."
NOTED STAGE SUCCESS
IS FILM MASTERPIECE
—"THE MERRY WIDOW"
When Erich von Strohelm Aimed
lhe Ambassadors' Hall episode of the
noted masterpelce, "Tlie Merry Widow" which ((lines to the llo-Ilo The-
ytiv mi Christmas Day and Saturday,
December 26th, he Btagod icenes tlint
nre reproductions ot Incidents out of
his former life. When von Strohelm
was an officer in a Continental army
lie was present ai many court functions in his own country, and then
when lie became a military attache
in other nations lie was present at
: man.,   such  affairs  as  he lias  ropro-
> dnced  for Ihe modernized  version of
j the famous stage play.
In the Bcenes lie staged were five
■ hundred extra people. Among them
were the foreign representatives of
every nation of tho globe, in full regalia. These witli ihe uniforms of
ihe officers,  royalty and  nobility of
I the country thfll serves us the background   nf   "lhe   Merry   Widow."   In
I which  Mae   Murray   plays   the   title
j role wilh John Gilbert opposite her.
p**ri entetl a scene iremendous in plo,-
I torlal effect.
Mae Mum-ay. in the title role,
wears a gown thai is extreme nnd
typifies the character Bhe portrays, PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1925.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY I*'RII)AY  AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 18.  1025.
WHAT CHRISTMAS
MEANS
Christmas is the time of
unselfishness, the season
of kindness. Through
most of the year we are all too silent with those
who are most near and dear to us. We seldom
pause to say the things which lie just beneath
the commonplace of common things. But Christmas comes at the end of the year to give us all
a brief time of thinking of others. Greetings
are more cordial, candles gleam in the windows
and the carol singers seek out the sick and shut-
in to bring cheer to their lonely lives. There
is something about Christmas that burns up the
ashes of selfishness. December 25th is not unlike all the other days in the year, so far as the
sunrise and sunset are concerned, but the spirit
of the Christchild, whose birth we celebrate, is
abroad on that day and somehow we feel there
is truly "peace on earth, good will toward men."
Throughout the rest of the year the cold
glacier of matter-of-factness creeps gradually
over the heart. As children we often express
the love we feel for those about us. But as we
grow older we begin to take things for granted.
Too often we become ashamed of the tenderness
we feel. Everywhere men and women are looking for kindness, for tenderness, for "someone
who cares." Nothing is more terrible than
feeling yourself utterly alone. And then comes
Christmas, the great holiday of the Christian1
religion, offering a Savior born in Bethlehem, a
father in Heaven, a personal God. "Someone
who cares," a refuge for the lonely.
So begin now to say the full sweet word to
those in your home. Speak cheerfully to the
friend you meet upon the street and even give
a smile of recognition to the stranger. Soon
out of sight one of these will go, those dear
familiar ones who have trudged by your side so
long wfll drop beside the way, and sitting alone
with loneliness, you will think of some kind word
you might have said and they might have heard.
For some people this is easier than for others.
Some, like those in Holmes' poem "The Voiceless," feel deeply but are unable to put their
sentiments into words. But there is one way in
which everyone can express his affection for
others. This is by the universal language of
actions, for actions, says Emerson, are after all
a kind of words. We all can say "A Merry
Christmas." We all can forget for one day in
the year the ordinary things of life and be good
and kind to someone else.
DOING THE
SHOPPING
NOTICE
The Annual General Meeting of the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association will be held In the the
club building on Saturday. December
20th, 1925 at 8.30 p.m. Prize drawing
will take place at meeting and tickets
must be produced there to obtain
prizes. Several bundles ot Scientific
Perodlcals will be offered for auction
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of a beloved
husband and father, John Burghiner.
who passed away December 21st,
1924.   "Rest  in  Peace."
Ever remembered by his wife and
children.
Last Week of Sale
FURTHER REDUCTIONS IN SHOE PRICES!
Buy your Christmas Slippers Now
PATERSON BOOT SHOP
Courtenay, B. C.
■ SS^^S
COMOX  BUTTER, EGGS
Comox Potatoes (" •*£ & &J")
Comox Whole Wheat Flour
Some  of the lines we handle:  Drag Saws
and Repair Parts. Woven and Electric Weld
Field  and   Poultry   Fencing.     Incubators,
Brooders and Farm Machinery
Comox Creamery Association
I
If human nature were not what
it is, the Christmas season perhaps might not be one of rush
and worry over what to buy, and sales forces
in stores would not be rushed to exhaustion in
the one or two weeks before the event. If
people did their shopping when it could be done
under the least congested conditions, it might
extend over months instead of weeks, and it
would be not the less seasonable.
However, none but the exceptional person
thinks of doing shopping until it cannot be put
oil' longer. Then it becomes an ordeal and is
so strenuous that it tends to rob the season of
the "cheer and good will" that attach to it sentimentally. The "good will" might actually pervade the shoppers were they not overworked
trying to find what they want and struggling to
get it. Yet it would not be Christmas for a lot
of people were it otherwise. They have become
so accustomed to waiting and then making a
hurry-up job of it that they would not feel right
were it done betime.
Human nature is a peculiar thing despite the
fact that all of us have it.     It wouldn't be hum-1
an nature if it wasn't odd.     If we did every- j
thing in a reasonable and sane way we would;
not be human  beings.     We  would  be super-
human and that is too much to expect.     It is j
the prerogative of human beings to do as they j
please and of course most of us please to delay j
as long as we can the doing of what we cannot
avoid.     There may be those who are forehand |
in Christmas shoping but they are rare and so
different from the mass that they are odd, too.
By the way, we must do our shopping very
soon, next Friday is Christmas.
*****
Science gives us artificial rain and synthetic I
lightning when what we want is some means of |
making winter merely hypothetical.
*****
There are no statues of men who felt sorry
for themselves.
Cumberland
Xmas   Holiday!
Goods on display
Gift Hdkfs.—Gift Hdkfs, Hand
embroidered in fancy boxes and
priced from 35c to $1.25 per box
Silk Lingerie—Ladies' Silk and
Wash Satin Lingerie in Crepe-:
de-chene Nightgowns, Step-ins, I
Bloomers, Camisoles, and Bou-i
doir Caps.
Special values in Ladies' Silk!
Bloomers in all shades, priced
at each   $3.50
Silk Hosiery—Pure Silk Hose!
in all the wanted shades in Ve-j
nus, Mercury, Monarch makes.
per pair   $1.75
Dresses—Ladies'   and   Misses'
Dresses in fine flannels with the
Broadcloth   finish;  also  Trico-
tine and Crepe-de-chene dresses
at popular prices.
Coats — Ladies',   Misses'   and
Children's   fur-trimmed   Coats
at the lowest possible prices.
Dress Goods—The newest novelty Cloths in fancy dress goods I
Suitable   for   evening wear, in
Wool   Satins,   Satin   Cantons,'
Flat Crepes and Brocaded Tin-i
sel Cloths.
Special value in novelty Silk
Crepes in all shades d»-|   PA
per yard     tJ/leUU
Fur and Marabou Trimming in
all shades. Corsage Bouquets
and Tinsel Ribbons and Hair
Bandeaus.
Everything   in   Infants'
Wear
Ladies' Scarfs—in fancy wool
knit Silks, Crepe-de-chene, and
Georgette Crepes in the newest
color combinations.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Hand-bags and Felt Slippers,
Cut Glass and China ware, Bureau Scarfs, Tea Cloths, Cushion
Tops, fancy Towels, Eiderdown
Quilts, Lace and Silk Bed
Spreads
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Clothing—Men's Suits in Tweed
Plain and Neat Stripe Worsteds
and Serges, in Brown, Navy,
Grey and Black in the popular
2   Button   Sack.   Styles from
$18.00 to.  $35.00
in all sizes to fit all figures.
Overcoats—Men's and Youths'
Overcoats in light and dark
Heather Mixtures, Tweeds and
Chinchilla Cloths with Satin
quilted and leather-lined Yokes
in the three-way belt styles, at
$18.00  to  $35.00
Hats and Caps—Men's Best
Quality Velour and Felt Hats
in all the newest shades and
styles.
Men's Shirts—Newest patterns
in Men's Broadcloth, Percale
Silk Striped and All-Silk Shirts
with the new Reversible Cuff.
Neckwear—Newest Christmas
Novelties in Men's Ties. Special
values at our Special Price Tie
Tables of 75c, $1.00, $1.50, and
.$1.75.
New lines in Men's Dressing
Gowns and Smoking Jackets &
Felt House Slippers.
Special values in Boys' Suits,
Sweaters, and Sweater Coats.
Men's Suspender Sets, Belts,
Armbands, Gloves, Hdks., Silk
and Wool Mufflers, Fancy Embroidered Cashmere and novelty patterns in Silk Socks, Collar
Boxes, Military Brushes and
Safety Razors.
Suit Cases
Trunks Club Bags
-   GROCERY DEP'T.
New Season's stock of—
Currants, bleached and seedless Raisins, Fancy Puffed and
seeded Raisins, whole and cut
mixed Peel, ground Almonds,
Almond Paste, Candied Caraway Seeds, Caschous (silver
candy), Glace and Crystalized
Cherries.
Cluster Raisins, whole mxd.
Nuts, dainty Dates, candied
Honey, table Figs and Cordials.
Just arrived an assortment of
Robertson's plain and fancy
iced Xmas Cakes, Scotch Short
Bread, Plum Puddings and Oat
Cakes.
Cranberries, California Head
Lettuce and Jap Oranges now
in Stock.
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Special orders for Xmas Cakes will be carefully
attended to.
GET YOUR BREAD AND CAKES AT
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
(First-class Certificate for Cake and Confectionery.)
Courtenay, B. C.
 M31BiaMi!Hi!Iffl
BUILDING
MATERIAL  OF  ANY  DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks       Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOHS.
8HINQLES,
KILN   DRIED   FLOORINUS,
AND     FUltNlSHINOS.
WB DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Cuurttuay
Office  16!) Cuniberlmid
A Christmas She
Will Never
Forget!
GIVE HER THE WORLD FAMOUS
GRAND PRIZE
Eureka Vacuum Cleaner
$65.00   w"hit.r"   $65.00
$10.00 SET FREE
of Eureka Attachments—With Every Grand Prize
Eureka Vacuum Cleaner Purchased! Special Christmas Terms.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Va-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18. 192.1.
iif
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM. MERRIFIELD, Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunamuir Avenue, Cumberland
COMMITTEE REJECTS
PROPOSAL MADE BY
TRADES COUNCIL
VICTORIA, Dec. 17—The Municipal
Committee  ot  the    Legislature    has
been considering a proposal made by
the Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council that the property qualifications be abolished (or candidates (or
municipal office. The committee rejected this proposal, holding that it
was not desirable that persons
without any stake In the community
should be placed In the position ol
being able to commit the taxpayers
to outlays.
CANADA
WARNING to USERS of RADIO
ALL RADIO RECEIVING SETS
MUST BE LICENSED
Penalty on summary conviction is a fine not exceeding
$50.00
License Fee SI .00 per annum
Licenses, valid to 31st March, 1926, may be obtained
from:   Staff Post Offices, Radio Dealers, Radio Inspectors, or from Radio Branch, Department of Marine
and Fisheries, Ottawa
The proceeds (rom license (ees nre used to control broadcasting
and to improve broadcast reception conditions
A. Johnston, Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries
ATTENDANCE OF JAPS
IN WHITE SCHOOLS
SHOWS BIG INCREASE
fii«y.
mtmmt-nvmim.
VICTORIA, Dec. 17—Some illuminating Information with regard to the
growth   o( the  Japanese  population
In British Columbia ls contained in
1 answers given by the    Minister    o(
I Education   to  questions  put   in   the
| Legislature. The Minister stated that
; whereas there were 1422 young Japs
attending the public schools In 1923
and 1725 In 1924 there are no less
than    2414    enrolled    ln    1926.   The
Chinese   attendance,   on   the   other
hand, is going down slightly,   lt was
1346  in   1923  and  1423  in   1924  but
this year It is 1313.   Of Hindu children there are 26 as compared  with
30   last  year  and  16  In   1923.   The
white school population, which would
naturally be expected to be increasing at a greater ratio, ls relatively
standing still.   It was 92,120 In 1923', I POULTRY   BREEDERS j havl!  ■><-«» 8l" days shorter."
93.156 In 1924 and Is this year 94,228.1 RPOIT? T« FROM C"n  y°U t<S" °n  wlmt day °' the
In other words, the. number ol white "k1  KkoULffc fKUM weelt  Da,,,,,.  popped the question?
children attending the public schools; THEIR ADVERTISING j p__u *,„   ,,
of British Columbia ln  1925 has In-:   „,     „    „™   ,,    "    .f   .     .    ,
,   ,     , *   .*!     .. .. , , Charlie  Chaplin   handed  the  bank
creased   by   two  and  one-third   per-,  The   necord-of.Perfonn.nce   Pou.tr*-I,,„„,„,. ■   v        „ank „ote and
cent over 1923   while the attendance, Breeders' Association of British Col-1    ,.p|eaae break Mg ,„,„ ,8malulme.
of  Japanese  children   has   Increased; umbia have  received  an  order (rom   ch G|ye  mg   mme
by seventy per-cent. -Denmark   for  seven   hen«  nml   three
INSURANCE ACTS TO
BE CONSOLIDATED IN
mange.   (Jive  me   some  ones,   twice
Denmark   for  seven  hens  and  three a9 many U} g t|mM fls manv ^ aa
cockerels. The hens must have a rec-;^.   ,„   ^  afl   many   m  u  5>|
ord ol 250  eggs a year, while males  am, ^    balance |B ^
must be (rom a 300-egg strain.   The,    Now    wha[   |g  ^  ^^   „   g
price Is $40 per bird. The association   ^   ^   (ha[  ^^  QoM   have
ONE GENERAL ACT j as a result of  advertising,  has  been   furnl8he(1 (o pay fm ^ j^,
  • making shipments to various parts of
VICTORIA,  Dec. 17—The Attorney  the globe during lhe past few months i Puzzle No. 13
General has Introduced in the Legls-j   j    Down at the Park  we crawled up
lature a bill to consolidate the.var.' NAVAL  VESSELS  TO tlll!  "Shoot the Chutes" at  the rate
lous  Insurance acts  In  one  general| irei*** nniTr>i ao tfin  of 2 fe<!t pcr 8eco'"* ana 8,10t (lown
Uhfc UOUULAh HU at  the   ra[e  of 20  feet  per  gecono
so It took us just one minute to make
act, the only classes of Insurance not
included In the bill being marine and ,,.„.,,.       , . ' so it, took us Just one minute to make
.    ,    m, . ■ »  ...    ■ In future British Columbia Douglas  ,,,„ _,,„„,, ,_,„    „,.   , _,_   ...    .    —.
mutual.   The  provisions  of  the  law   „        . . .   ,,       „ , , ,.   ,he round trip.   What was the length
,...., .i    ,        flr will bc  used   (or derklng  British  „,   ,   . ,.,„„.,
are tightened up In many particulars ..     .„       , <" that chute?
.  ... I naval vessels.     It  will  roolace nine
Puzzle No. 14
An   apple   and   a   half  are   worth
-     ..     ,. ,. ...        ... I nava   vessc a.     It  w      replace pine |
for tho better protection of  the as-  . , ,        „ ... \
.    „   .       , .   ,.  .       ,1 from the Southern States, which has
sured.   It  has   been   decided   not  to  ,   ,
..... , ,        ,, . ! hitherto been used for tils  purpose., -,,—       .   ......   ».=   wu.au
prohibit Insurance In unlicensed com- .   .       .    .   ,"      .,   ,   . I,.
, . ,   t ..      , .,,    It sexpected that the British Admiral   three quarters of an apple and ha f
panles  so  as  to  protect  the  public I ,„ ,„ .   . , „ . .    „ ,. ,   , Z   .
... ,., .a*,   a. a        u   ly  wlll  steadily extend the use of B.   a cent.    Half an app e Is worth three
against possible monopoly, but such i , |
##>%  ": A^
Leave your order at
WILCOCK
BROS.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
For Local or Eastern
Turkeys
Geese, Ducks and
Chickens
Phone 66
Cumberland
k**»i»)»i*»i*i*rifc%^^
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
infill
COPPER TRAILS
Extending to various parts of southwestern British
Columbia, the copper trails which we call telephone
lines are ready to carry long-distance conversations
at speeds ranging from 8,000 to 178,000 miles per
second.      When speed counts —Long Distance.
CHRISTMAS DELICACIES AT
FRELONE'S AT PRICES
THAT WILL ASTOUND
YOU
Call and Investigate
New Stock of
Christmas Fruits
Just Arrived
Luxury Cake, 2 1-2 lbs.; Sultana, Cherry, Genoa, and Dark
Fruit Cake, 3 lbs.
Fancy Iced Cakes and Fancy
Iced Shortbread.
Fig Puddings, Xmas Stockings,
Fancy boxes of Chocolates,
Xmas Crackers, Fancy wrapped
Cigarettes, Tobacco, etc.
I Xmas Candy, Mixed Nuts, and
l Chestnuts and Jap Oranges.
Apples from $2.00 to $3.75 per
box.
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cor. 5lh and Punsmulr.
CUMBERLAND
companies are prohibited from soliciting In the province and the tax on
premiums Is to be 6% Instead of
lrU. In spite of a strong demand
by insurance Interests against the
part-time agent, it has been decided
not to change the law permitting
these. Hereafter Insurance societies
and clubs will have to Incorporate
under the Societies Act. Automobile
insurance must In future be written
by resident agents.
The best things beyond their measure  cloy.—Homer.
C. flr in the Imperial naval yards
THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 11
Dann/ went over to urge Kate to |
name the day.
"Ths is entirely unexpected," gasped the maiden; "but I will marry
you when the week after next Is
the week before last."
"Had I received this promise yester
day," said Danny, "the waiting would
quarters o( a  pear;  so what Is the
| (ewest   number o(  whole  pears that
*   1 can buy with an even number of
I I pennies?
L Additional puzzlos. aa well aa the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
' ln our next issue.
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHAND - TYPEWRITING — BOOK KEEPING
BUSINESS METHODS
New Location Opposite Corfield's Garage.
CUMBERLAND UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB
will hold
2-
EXTRA
SPECIAL
-2
DANCES
Christmas Night
AND
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY       M
liiiiiiiiiii][||iiii!]i!^.;;;i ■-■.."hi;.: , n'lihi'iiiiiii'iJiirciiiiMii.'iiiiiNiiiiii.'iiiiijiiijjM
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos fer Hire,     goal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
TAXI
TAXI
Safety andComfort
Day or Night
CAR   SERVICE
84 TELEPHONE WO
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel
at 8:00 o'clock every Sunday
morning   and   meets    boat   at
Union Bay.
TOI KING PARTIES CATERED
TO  AT REASONABLE   RATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
LTAXI
TAXI
New Year's Night
A REAL HOLIDAY TIME FOR ALL!
Dancing from 9:30 p.m.
PLUMP'S ORCHESTRA PLAYING TANTALIZING
TUNES
Gents, $1.00
Ladies, 25c
The Christmas Prize Drawing of the Football Club
will be held Christmas nightat the Dance.
Answers to last week's Pules
No. 6—Thc landlady placed 20c on
the counter to pay for the 1% pounds
of bologna. Louis cut 1% pounds.
She took 1% pounds for 15c and Invested the remaining 5c ln pickles.
No. 7—The young man was 19 years
of age and figured his yearly keep at
$228. Therefore, on his 21st birth-
da.,   he would owe his dad $4,788.
No. 8—We went to Philadelphia at
the rate of one mile In 4 minutes and
returned at the rate of one mile in
3 minutes, the average speed thus
being 17 1-7 miles per hour, and
not 17 i-i. as would appear at Bret
blush.
No. 9—Butte, Washington, Easton.
Oregon. Denver.
No. io—His mixture consisted of
10 pounds of the 15c tea and 10
pounds  of the 25c tea.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style Mi:
Children's hair cut any style 86c
LUXURIOUS COMFORT
ON THE
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
^/JJt'Steel Standard and
7bunU Sleeping Cars, Dinin
Can Drawing mom-Campari
ment- l.ibrdru- Observation
Cars Radio t~outpped
Baggage  Checked
Through
For   Further   Information,   Fares,  Reservations,
etc., apply to
EDWARD W. BICKLE, Agent
Cumberland,  B. C. Telephone 35
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDAGTANENDMENTS
PRE-EVPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-eayte* by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declarlac liMielM
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, eccapatlw,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full informant! conceraiaf regulations regarding Pre-eaftlou la
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," oob4*s of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., ar to any Oof-
ernment Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for sgrlcoltnral
purposes, and wblch is ut Uaber-
land, i.e., carrying over i,(H board
feet per acre west of the Coast Raage
and S.OOe feet per acre east tf that
Range.
Applications for pre-captlone art
to be addressed to the laad Ce**a-
missloner of the Land Recording Division, In which the land applied ttr
Is situated, and are made tt printed
forms, copies of which ou ht attained from the Land Cemmlselner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied tor
live years and lmproveeaeata Bade
to value of $10 per acre, laclodtag
clearing and cultivating at least Ive
acres, before a Crowa Oram cat ht
received.
For more detailed lafor-aatlta MO
the Bulletin "Hew tt Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applicstioiis are received ftr per*
clikse of vacant aad unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlaberlaad,
for agricultural purposes; Blaliu*
price of first-class 'arable) land it If
per acre. and. second-class (gratlag)
land $2.50 per acre. Further later-
■nation regarding purchase tr lease
of Crown lands Is given 11 lulletls
No. 10, Land Series, "Pdrchaat aid
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites ft
timber land, nol eineediag 4$ aorat,
may be purchased er leased, the conditions Including paymeat rf
stumpage.
HOVBRTE.ll> LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding js
acres,  may  be  leased  as  hemesltee,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected In the- first year, title being
obtained    after    residence    and    Improvement    conditions   are   fulfilled
and land liss been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   Industrial   purposes areas not exceeding (44 acres
may he  leased  by one persta er a
companv.
liRAZINfl
Under  the Orating Act the  Province Is divided Into grating districts
.and the range administered under a
Crazing     Commissioner. Annual
I grazing permits are Issued based ia
i numbers ranged, priority being given
io established owners. Sleek-owners
; may form associations for range
niannRemeni. Free, er partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
< snipers and travellers, up fa ten
head. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1925.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
^•i^p-PSMee-^cMp*'*^^
The Office Cat
By "Junius"
"Why so depressed, Jimmy?"
"The horrible cost ot living, old chap; constant
bills for materials, paint and shingling."
"What, house?"
"No, daughters."
0
A Cumberland man was fishing In Comox Lake
recently. He cuuglit a big fish, the biggest he had
ever landed In his long anil busy life. Crazed
with joy. he ran to No. 4 Mine and telephoned his
wife: "I've got one. weighs seven pounds and is
a beauty." anil his wire replied: "So have I, weighs
ten pounds. Not a beauty—looks like you. Come
home."
——0	
Man:    I  would  like—ah—you see—I want to—
Salesman In jewelry store: Take the elevator,
diamond rings on third floor.
 0	
POME
The shades of night were falling fast,
When for a kiss we asked her,
She must have answered 'yes' because
The shades came down still faster.
 0	
Don't discard that worn-out lawn mower. Lend
lt to your neighbor next time he comes to borrow
things.     This will soon discourage the habit.
 0=	
The man who says honesty is the best policy,
never tried telling an ugly girl how she looked,
mutters Heck.
If a man loses his money he may get more, but
"Sheik" says If he loses his nerve Its gone forever.
Sign in phonograph department of Cumberland
store:    "Kiss the Girl Vou Love" and many others.
 0
A father wrote to a country boy who had gone to
work in a city bank: "I hope you acQUlt yourself
well," and the boy replied, "I had nothing to do with
lt."
 Or--	
A husband Is a person who begins to love shoes
about the time his wife tells him they are disreputable.
A wise man knows he Is acting foolish to fall lu
love this close to Christmas.
 0	
Christmas Is one day that requires no organized
drive to assure its observance.
At Christmas
A man is at his finest towards the finish of
the year;
He is almost what he should be when the
Christmas season's here;
Then he's thinking more of others than he's
thought the months before,
And the laughter of his children is a joy
worth toiling for,,
He is less a selfish creature than at any other time;
When the Christmas spirit rules him he
comes close to the sublime.
When it's Christmas man is bigger and is bet
ter in his part;
He is keener for the service that is prompted
by the heart.
All the petty thoughts and narrow seem to
vanish for awhile
And the true reward he's seeking is the glory
of a smile.
Then for others he is toiling and somehow
it seems to me
That at Christmas he is almost what God
wanted him to be.
If I had to paint a picture of a man I think
I'd wait
Till he'd fought his selfish battles and put
aside his hate.
I'd not catch him at his labors when his
thoughts are all of self,
On the long days and dreary when he's striving for himself.
I'd not take him when he's sneering, when
he's scornful or depressed,
But I'd look for him at Christmas when he's
shining at his best.
Man is ever in a struggle and he's oft misunderstood ;
There are days the worst that's in him is the
master of the good,
But at Christmas kindness rules him and he
puts himself aside
And his petty hates are vanquished and his
heart is opened wide.
Oh, I don't know how to say it, but somehow
it seems to me
That at Christmas man is almost what God
sent him here to be.
—EDGAR A. GUEST
After We Pass
WE are told that visitors to the Mosque
of St. Sophia, Constantinople, are at
once greeted with fragrance when
they enter the building. This fragrance
pervades the building because, when the
mosque was built a thousand years ago, the
stones and bricks were laid in mortar mixed
with a solution of musk. If we, in our
youth, build our years out of helpful,
friendly, neighborly acts, we will offer to
the world the fragrance of lovable personalities when we go down the Western Slope.
We are thinking too, even after we have
passed away, our works will go on living
for us and praising us.
Children's Day in Zuni Land
AMONG the stories which are told of
the gentle, child-loving people known
as the Zuni Indians in Western America is one concerning what is called
Christmas Day in Zuni Land.
This wonder day for all the three-year-
old children comes in the late autumn, when
the harvests, "the gifts of the beloved gods
of the wind and rain," have been gathered.
Fully dressed as little men and women, they
are taken by their mothers into the square
dance-court, one side of which has been
especially reserved for them. Presently
appears a line of dancers gorgeously dressed
and masked to represent the gods of creation, marching to the music of rattle and
drum, and carrying mysterious packages
decked with evergreen and strings of popcorn.
They place the packages in careful rows
on the smooth-beaten ground, and then begin a drama, the story of creation. Following them are ten clowns—grotesque and
horrible-looking creatures, but in reality
some of the gravest priests of the tribes—
whose duty it is to amuse the spectators
while the dramatists are resting, and to
teach the children the meaning of the performances. They pick up the bundles and
pretend to guess at their contents, and finally, when the drama is ended, discover the
presents for this little one or that.
Fur the boys are painted boys and arrows
to which are tied little loaves of bread or
cake made into symbols of deer and antelope and mountain sheep; for the girls, tiny
cradle-boards upon which are laced carved
and painted figures of the dancers, each rep
resenting the clan of the child for whom it
is intended.
Dangling the toys in the air, the clowns
advance towards the children with the most
ludicrous postures and gestures, The tiny
men and women, remembering their dignity,
will not cry, although some of them cannot
resist the tempting refuge of their mothers'
skirts. But finally, after much coaxing,
one little brown hand is stretched out and
then another, and the priests pass the presents over, never failing to repeat many
proverbs and to teach the prayers and rituals to be used in connection with them.
Then at last, when all have received their
gifts, the great event is over.
But for the Zuni children the day is a
beginning, not a consummation. The toys
are to be their teachers for the great lessons of life. Day by day, as the boys play
at hunting or the girls nurse their queer
painted dolls, the mothers remind them of
the instructions of the "good ancient ones,"
and show them by means of rimes how to
care for their playthings, thus teaching
them the arts and ways of life that they are
to follow by and by. So, hundreds of years
before Froebel, this Indian people had discovered the methods of the kindergarten.
ttn^j»mmMminmM*mmiit^me^.xr>»i*HMf*ti#^
^::v»: :■.:
Any Ford model may be purchased
on easy payments from your local
authorized Ford dealer. The moderate down payment entitles you
to take immediate delivery of your
car and you can pay for it at
your convenience during the year.
-sYour local Ford dealer will gladly
show you the Ford Christmas Gift
Certificate which enables the giver
of a Ford to announce the gift in
the most fitting manner. Delivery
can also be arranged for any desired time on Christmas morning.
SEE   YOUR   NEAREST   AUTHORIZED   FORD    DEALER    If
MPf«f««««iC«VC«*«l€HMPi««MW Cotfteld Motors, Limited,
Ford Dealer
Phone 46, Courtenay, B.C. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1925.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
i7 i
PAGE FIVE
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
COURTENAY FARM
WINS PRIZE AT FOX
BREEDERS' SHOW
Vancouver Island foxbreeders
firmly established thc reputation ot
the Island as the prospective centre
ln the West of a rapidly developing
industry by their successes in the
show held at Vancouver. Three
Island breeders carried off premier
honors. ,T. W^ Bell, who a year ago
opened a fox ranch at Wittier Ave.,
Victoria,  where   he  now   has   thirty
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBEULANI', It. C.
Comfort   aud   Homellks   ssrvlos.
20   rooms,   electrically   heated
Excellent cuisine —
For reservations Phons 16.
It.  YATR8, Manager
When you are In nesd of a
1'lumliliiK S Monllnir Knglneer, Seo
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124 Phone 167
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your  needs   will   receive   Immediate
attention.
(Alt CAR
Mason's Taxi
24 HOURS SERVICE
At Very Reasonable Prices
I meet all  trains and boats.
A few cents extra will bring
you at your bouse or from your
house to the station in Comfort
and Style.
ANYWHERE nt ANY TIME
See Geo. Mason
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
(Alt CAR
pairs of handsome silver blacks, took
three firsts, two seconds and a fifth.
His animals were shown in compe-
| titlon with 200 others from Manitoba,
' Alberta, Saskatchewan, and British
Columbia. Included among his prizes
was the championship prize for the
best female in the open class. An
indication of the value of high bred
foxes is given by the fact that Mr.
Bell wus offered and declined $2,000
for one of the animals. W. Doyle of
the All-Star Ranch. Winnipeg, de- j
clined $7,500 for a valuable male.
Other Island breeders also carried
off prizes. The Rev. Montague
Bruce won honors for the best female
silver black on Vancouver Island.
W. Stephenson of Courtenay also won
n prize for Vancouver Island silver
blacks.
It Is Interesting to note that Dr.
Church of Winnipeg, fox Inspector
for the Dominion Government In a
speech he made during the exhibition said hu believed fox pelts from
the Pacific Coast would prove of the
best quality produced in Canada.
The conditions were Ideal, he said,
anil because of the absence of real
cold weather the fur was not so
coarse, but was of a smoother liner
texture.
SAYWARD RESIDENTS
FAVOR ONE FAIR ONLY
tlements   be   Invited    to   appoint   a'
resident   to  represent    their    settle-,
ment  on   the   fair    committee    andj
TO BE HELD ANNUALLY Jthat  Ral(1  settlements  be  invited   to
co-operate In making the fair a success.   And   be   it    further    resolved
that   the   committee   invite   all   local
associations   to  co-operate   with   the i
committee."
prizes for cows at the Agassiz, B, C.
fall   fair.
P. P. HARRISON
KAltliiSTEK   and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
NANAUIO   LAND   RECORDING
DISTRICT, NANAIMO
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jean Treu
nor, of Calgary, Alta., housewife, intend to apply for a lease of the following described lands, situated tn
Henry Bay on Denman Island, as
follows: commencing at post located
about three chains north of wharf
thence about three chains ln westerly direction to low water mark, thence
fifty  chains  In  northernly  direction
Dated Sept. 5, 1926.
Sayward, Dec. 15.—A well-attended
publlc meeting was held ln the community hall Saturday. The business
consisted of reading of correspondence on the extension of the Island
Highway Into this district and the
holding of an agricultural fair. F.
Harris presided. The secretary, William Milne, read several letters, including one from Hon. John Oliver
and one from the Vancouver Auto
Association.
The question of the holding of an
agricultural fair was taken up and
the following resolution was adopted:
"Whereas It Is the opinion of this
meeting that It ls In the best Interest of this district that only one
agricultural fair be held in the valley, therefore be It resolved that In
order to make this fair a fully representative fair a committee be appointed at this meeting to have full
charge of making all arrangements
for the holding of the fair and to
make apllcatlon on behalf of the
residents of Sayward and district for
judges, money grant, etc., from the
Department of Agriculture at Victoria. That the fair shall be held
under the auspices of the Department of Agriculture and the B. C.
Pall Fairs Association and shall be
called the Sayward and District Annual Agricultural Fair. And be it
further resolved that all nearby set-
MUSICAL CONTEST
REVEALS SURPRISING
YOUTHFUL TALENT
(Continued   from   Page   One)
RECENT ARRIVAL
WINS PRIZES IOR
BUTTER AND CHEESE
In just four months from the time
of her arrival In Canada, Mrs. VV. N.J
Smith became a prize-winner for
butter and cheese making. Accord-
(ng lo ollicials of the Canadian Na-j
tional Railways colonization depart-:
ment, .Mrs. Smith came to this
country with her husband and six I
children under the British Family
Farm Settlement scheme last spring
and settled at Fort Langley, B. C.
At Ihe fall fair held recently at
Mllner, B. C, she won first prize
for fresh butter, first for fancy butter, first for cream cheese and second
for clotted cream. Mrs. Smith was
an expert butter and cheese maker
on their farm lu the Old Country
and she was not long In Canada before she began to put her knowledge
of the craft to good use.
Robert J. Alway. another British
settler who came to Canada last
April, recently won a first prize for
a   horse,   one   first   and   two   second
14-51
JEAN TREANOR
fm/mial
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies.
Plain and Decorated Christmas
Cakes
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give tht best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Druf Store.
ers who have brought these pupils
forward so rapidly, for when we remember that thc concert was for
those only of 14 years and under the
ability displayed by the youngsters |
can only reflect credit on tlle ability
und patience of their Instructors.
The management of the Theatre
wishes to congratulate each and
everyone of the performers and also
Ihelr Instructors and Is only too willing to repeat such contests at frequent Intervals in the future, and to
assist in every way possible In raising the standard of music amongst
the young people of thetown.
Following are the judges' very fair
criticisms:
No.l. J. Hill—Trombone solo, "All
those endearing young charms" Very
fair. Inclined to go flat. Third prize.
No. 2. D. Baird—Piano Solo. "Selections of Scotch Airs". Execution
fair, but no harmony, needless frills.
No. 3. Robert Cossar—Cornet solo,
Tone very good, playing accurate,
time and accent good, expression very
good.   First  Prize.
No. 4. M. McLeod—Violin solo. "Ln
Travlata Selection". Tone and execution Indifferent, lime very good.
Cornet solo, Scotch song, very good.
No. 5. —II. McLeod—Cornet solo.
Breathing poor, tone very good.
No. li. Mary Sweeney—Piano solo.
"Andante." Time erratic, execution
fair, too much pedal. Second prize.
No. 7. Cyril Davis—Piano solo.
Composition poor, execution fair,
lime good.
No. S. Earl Bannerman—Mandolin
solo.Instrument not in tune, otherwise good.
No. 9. Normnn Freloni—Piano solo.
".Military Descriptive Number." Poor
selection, very fair playing, inaccurate at times.
Rnhert Cossar, winner nf the first
prize, will be an added attraction at
tbe Theatre tomorrow night (Saturday). He will bc heard In another of
his faultless cornet  solos.
HAWTHORNTHWAITE
NOW HEADS GOLD
MINE COMPANY
; J. H. Hawthornthwaite. president
'of Stewart Consolidated Cold Mines
Limited, announces that his company
contemplates building a railway from
Telegraph Creek or Glenora to Dease
lake to be operated in connection with
mining enterprises. He has Just returned from u visit to the Cassiar region with a parly ot* railroad and mining engineers, anil slates that tlie reports he lias received from lhe engine
ers have convinced blm Ihat lhe plan
to build a railway is nol only feasible
but probable. Construction work
would be facilitated by easy grades
along the entire proposed route, he
says. Mr. Hawtboriuiiwaite was formerly a member of the Canadian parliament, and has been Interested In
mining industry for forty years, particularly In the Cassiar country. The
Stewart Consolidated Qold Mines Is
a British Columbia corporation, with
an authorized capital of (2,000,000, It
Is reported tliat there is unlimited
British capital behind It.
TEACHERS' PENSION
IS PROVIDED FOR
Victoria. Dec. 1(1.—An amendment
favoring old age pensions for teachers, moved by It, II. Neelamls, Labor
member for Vancouver South, was
approved by lhe Legislature today.
It gives the Council of the Puhlic
I list ructions power "to make provision, by agreement with such teachers
as desiei' to become a party thereto,
for creation and maintaining nf a
fund, oul of whlllch shall be paid old
age pensions to those who, having
rendered long service in Ihe profession are unable to continue on account of ill-health  or old age.
At least thirty-five herring packing
plants nre operating tills season on
the British Columbia const. In the
1984-1925 season these plants put up
43,689 tons, and practically the entire
output wns shipped to Jupan and
China, where lhe fish found a market
ni approximately $45.00 per ton to
the shipper.
It was slated lu the British Columbia
Legislature, a few days ago, that during the pasl year the number of Industries In the province had Increased by 'Kill, employees by 1(1.000 and
payrolls   by   $12,000,000.
A large quantity of potatoes has
been purchased in llritish Columbia
for Ihe United Sfalcs naval sinfion at
Mare's island. California.
The apple crop In the Okanagan
valley, this year amounts to a llllle
less  than 8,000,000  boxes.
CHRISTMAS and NEW YEAR
MANN'S BAKERY
The Home of Good Bread, High Class Cakes & Pastry.
Christmas and New Year Cakes are—
Sultana,   Cherry, Light  Fruit, Dark   Fruit, Genoa,
Pound and Butter Sponge.
Our real Scotch Bun is delicious.
Scotch Shortbread, Plain and Ornamental.
AH made from the finest materials.
Order  now   and   avoid   disappointment.   All   orders
delivered.
SATURDAY SPECIALS AS USUAL AT
MANN'S
Phone 18
^1^—ggTLaa^TTCMiT^TajBC.S:--''' n\^MMt\n^J
Have You Your!
Christmas
Cake?
Made from fine, luscious fruits and
wholesome ingredients Shelly's 4X
Christmas Cakes maintain the standard you have always set, leaving you
free to devote your time to those
countless errands of love and charity
we enjoy so much at Christmas.
Order with tomorrow's bread or
groceries from your local store or
write Shelly's.
SEE OUR STOCK OF "PRICED"
USED CARS
$60.oo Up
Cumberland, B.C.
==381
\*W€
Christmas Cakes
and Puddings
High in Quality—Delicious in Flavor
wm
SEE THE "KING" IN QUALITY RADIO
$102.50
"King" 5-tube tuned R. F
with tubes
"King" NEUTRODYNE d»f j»rt  PA
with tubes  vlu^tOu
Compare these prices and then compare the quality
of Reception.
Demonstrations by
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone IG
Courtenay, B. ('. PAGE olX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1925.
SV*^««*«M^*-4>?S«€^^
SS^^i-;
Suggestions
LADIES* GIFTS—
Ladies' Umbrellas, smart new handles, covered with
guaranteed silk covers.   Presentation Umbrellas, and
priced at $6.50 and   $6.95
Ladies' Sweater Chappie Coats make a most acceptable gift for Xmas and are   useful   and   seasonal.
Prices $6.95 to   $8.95
Ladies' Venus Silk Hose are always appreciated and
the name VENUS on Hose is a guarantee of quality.
per pair   $1.75
Ladies' Penman's Silk Hose in Black and a good variety of the popular shades.   Per pair   $1.50
Ladies' Art Silk and Wool Hose just arrived; they are
made of a heavy quality such as you would desire for
present wear.   In new shades, per pair   $1.00
Ladies' Scarves are in great demand and make a gift
that would be appreciated by most Ladies. The colors, the styles and the variety we have on hand are
a very choice assortment. From $1.25 to .... $5.50
Hand Made Lace Table centres and Doyleys are an
acquisition to the home. Prices from 50c to $4.50
Ladies' Handkerchiefs put up in individual boxes;
many new colorings with lace trimmings. Come and
see our Handkerchief table and we feel you will be
able to make a good choice.
Ladies' Gloves, with gauntlet tops, in shades of fawn
and brown.   Prices, 95c, $1.25 and   $1.50
Ladies' Wool Gloves with long gauntlets, in new shades
and priced at   $1.50
Ladies' Garters are now being shown in a wide assortment of colorings and qualities.   The prices are from
25c. per pair to   $1.25
Ladies' Art Silk Bloomers, made of heavy grade silk,
in Pink, Mauve and White. Prices, pair $1.95 & $2.50
Ladies' Art Silk Slips and Night Dresses in shades of
Pink, from per garment   $3.50
Ladies' Waists in the new shades of mixed heathers,
as well as in White and the wanted colors; priced
from   $3.95
Special Snap of Ladies' Flannel
Dresses
We have just received per express a shipment of
Ladies' Flannel Dresses which we consider the best
value we have seen for a long time, and as we bought
them at reduced prices we are passing the advantage
along to our Customers, so we have marked them all
at ONE PRICE.    Sizes IG to 40 d» A  At
For quick sale, each only   (J)T:»5/0
Special in Ladies' Hats
If you are considering buying a Hat for Xmas we
suggest that you call and see our stock, as we have
reduced them to a point where you will appreciate
the value.
MEN'S GIFTS
Forsyth Shirts are advertised all over Canada as one
of the most appropriate Gifts you could give. See our
choice assortment and be convinced; as having worn
a Forsyth Shirt it will be a pleasure to remember the
name "Forsyth."   Prices from $2.25 to   $5.50
Men's Sox are always in order and always come at an
opportune time.   You will find our stock worthy of
consideration.   Prices from 50c. to   $1.50
Men's Sets Comprising Arm Bands and Garters, come
in neat Boxes at moderate prices.
Men's Braces done up in boxes with Garters to match.
Prices from   $1.25
Men's Ties in a profusion of colorings and at a number
of reasonable prices within the reach of all   Priced
from 75c. to   $2.25
Men's Suit Cases make something of a gift that most
men would appreciate, and our stock is ready for
your inspection.
Men's Caps, some of the new lines are just to hand,
in small checks and plain colors. From $1.50 to $2.95
Men's Sweaters, both in Coat style and the pullover,
warm and cosy, and a gift to be desired. Prices are
according to Quality.
Men's Umbrellas during the wet days are acceptable.
Get a nice one.   The price is within reach of all.
Men's Irish Lawn Handkerchiefs done up in boxes,
with an assortment of colors, per box   85*r)
GIFTS FOR BOYS and GIRLS
Boys' and Girls' Hose in the wanted colors are most
useful as well as appreciated by Mother.
Handkerchiefs are useful, artistic and something that
appeals to the young folks.
Footballs for the little Boys.   Teach them to play the
game.   See our special Football at each   $1.75
Girls Purses with small mirror enclosed.     See the
line at each   95<f>
Fancy Garters for the Little Tots in shades of Pink
and Blue at per pair  25^
Dolls to be cleared out at less than cost. We do not
intend stocking Dolls.
FOR CHRISTMAS SUGGESTIONS call at Sutherland's. Walk around the various counters and see the
assortment of Goods suitable for the festive season,
laid out, and let us help you to select your Gifts.
Sutherland's, Cumberland
Personal Mention
Mr. H. E. Murray, of the teaching
staff of tlie Cumberland Public
School, left today for Vancouver en
rout for his home in Armstrong,
where he will spend the Christmas
vacation.
Miss Annie Logie, of Vancouver,
will arrive Saturday as the guest of
Dr. and Mrs. G, K. MacNaughton.
Mr. Frank and Mr. James Bond
went to Vuncouver during the week
for the purpose of attending the
Canary Show held in the terminal
city.
Mrs. G. Apps lel't Monday morning
last for Vancouver, being called on
account of the serious illness of her
sister. On Wednesday evening Mr.
Apps received word that the young
lady had passed away. Mr. Apps left
the following morning to attend the
funeral which wlll be held In Vancouver.
Thomas Graham, jr., student at the
University of B. C. arrived In Cumberland last evening to spend the
Yuletide   vacation   with   his   parents.
Mr. Douglas Partridge, who has
been studying at the University of
B. C„ is in Ibe city to spend the
Christmas holiday with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. P. Partridge.
WEDDING BELLS
A quiet wedding was solemnized
on Tuesday afternoon. December 1st,
at the home of Rev. W. T. Beattie,
pastor of St. George's United Church,
Courtenay, when Edith Mable, eldest
daughter of Mr. and M.rs. Evan
Thomas, of Cumberland, became the
bride of Mr. George A. Holden, son
of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Holden, Los
Angeles, California. After a Bhort
honeymoon to Island cities Mr, and
Mrs. Holden will take up their residence  In Courtenay.
FORESTERS TO HOLD
SOCIAL WHIST DRIVE
WEDNESDAY EVENING
After the regular meeting next
Wednesday evening, Dec. 23rd, ql
Court Bevan of the Ancient Order of
Foresters, a whist drive and social
will he held in the lodge rooms. All
Foresters and ' their friends nre invited. Admission 25 cents; refreshments wlll be provided. Whist wlll
commence at approximately 8:00 p.m.
I
NOTICE
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. M. Cavallero and family wish
to extend their sincere thanks to the
committee of the Cumberland Relief
Fund for its generous Christmas gift.
On and after this date any person
! or persons found removing coal or
jollier material from the yards, cars
j or property of the Canadian Collieries
I (Dunsmuir) Limited without a per-
, rait will be prosecuted to the full
'extent of the law.
CANADIAN  COLLIERIES
(DUNSMUIR) LIMITED.
Xmas Sale
AT   LANG'S
Still Continues
Fancy Boxes of Chocolates,
Moir's, Neilson's and
Sweetest Maid
Ess
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's
2nd Old Time Dance
GAIETY THEATRE, DEC. 28th, at 8:30 p.m.
Monday after Christmas
ALL OLD TIME DANCES
EVERYBODY WELCOME   —   NO INVITATIONS
Admission:
Gents, $1.00 Supper Extra Ladies, 25c.
Cumberland Supply   Co.
Rickson's Old Stand — Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland
5r/c Discount for Cash
Every day sees new additions to our stock; every day
our business increases; every day assures us the wisdom of carrying out our policy in allowing you five
per cent discount on Cash Purchases.
Heinz's famous (ioods featured this week-end:
Heinz Tomato Ketchup   35**?
Heinz Cooked Spaghetti   25<£
Heinz Malt Vinegar, 16 oz  30-f>
Heinz Olive Oil   50r
Heinz Beefsteak -Sauce   35f
Heinz Worcestershire Sauce   50£
Heinz India Relish   40£
Heinz Baked Beans with Tomato Sauce, small,
2 for   25£
Heinz Baked Beans with Tom. Sauce, lge  SJOp
Mince Meat in bulk, 2 lbs. for   35<j>
Special—Mcintosh Pied and Jonathan Apples,
per crate  $1.95
Lemons,    Oranges,    Bananas,    Cranberries,    Dates,
Grapes, Onions, Canadian Cheese and Canadian   Kraft   Cheese.     Agent   for
Shelly's Bread and Cakes.
Our Men's Furnishings have been a success among
Cumberland men because they like Quality combined
with reasonable prices.
Our Men's Work Pants at $2.45 are the best you can
buy—why pay more?
Our Men's Fleece-lined Underwear at $2.35 Suit are
heavy and warm garments.
Our AU-Wool Flannel Shirts at $3.35 have been given
praise by all.     Even the Chinaman says:   "Heap
Good Shirt."
Our Work Gloves at $1.25 protect your hands while
you make the coin.
Our 8-pair-for-one-dollar Socks are as good as many
sold at SOc. per pair.
^Alii-iillllAMA^'Al!!!!' AIAIA! !AiiiA:l A il!i!i A:i! 'lilililllili!,;,,!,!!;,;!!:!1:^;:! i!![:;AL^
§§ GIFTS FOR EVERYONE g
§H An early visit will be of interest to you as our new *■***=
§H season's stocks are now complete and out for your |p
==    inspection at very reasonable prices. ==
*= Including many numerous items Mi
H Full stock of all well-known brands of Cigars, Cigar-
Is ettes, Tobaccos, Cigarette Holders & Tobacco Pouches.
ip Fancy box Chocolates, Ganongs and Robertsons, in
*==*= all sizes from 1-211) up to 5tbs.
H| Special family boxes of Chocolates and Mixed Can's dies in 31b and 51b boxes, also bulk Xmas mixed
fH Candies from 25c. per lb up to 50c. per lb.
H Bon-Bons—All English products in baskets, fancy
|H boxes, etc. Full of novelties and games, etc Just
§=   the thing to put a kick in your parties, etc.
"Glass-Ware" Tumblers, Wine  Glasses,  Table  Sets,
Fruit Sets, Water Sets, *Vases, Bowls and Bon-Bon
Dishes, etc.
"Crockery" Dinner Sets, Tea Sets, Toilet Sets, Tea
Pots, Jugs, Sugars and Creams, Platters, Cups and
Saucers, Plates and Bowls all sizes, and fancy dishes.
"Cutlery"—Stainless Knives, Forks and Spoons, etc.
Cabinet Sets and Carving Sets, Pocket Knives, Safety
Razors, etc.
Christmas Stockings and Bags in all sizes.
Fancy Glace and Crystallized Ginger, Pineapple and
Mixed Fruits, Almond Paste and Ground Almonds,
Fancy table Figs, Raisins, Shelled and Whole Nuts,
Popping Corn, etc.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE, PHONE 38
*£W#«««MP^^P«-W«<* ^^ffeWP***-**********
The Best
Is The
Cheapest
Jumble Auction
AGRICULTURAL HALL, COURTENAY, B. C.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23rd.
commencing promptly at 1:30 p.m.
To augment the funds of the Comox Agricultural and
Industrial Association
Useful articles and necessities—The Ladies Agricultural Auxiliary will serve afternoon teas.
Anything saleable acceptable—(Produce preferred).
Articles gladly accepted at Hall on day of Sale before
1 o'clock. Goods may be left with any member of
the Collection Committee, as under:—
Messrs. P. L. Anderton, Courtenay; Butler Brothers,
Comox; W. E. Mantle, Sandwick; England and Gunn,
Lake Trail, Courtenay; D. M. Isenor, Merville; C. W.
Leedham, Comox; A, H. Pattinson, Merville; Norman
Pritchard, Comox; J. W. Stalker, Minto; or the Boy
Scouts of Courtenay.
Transportation for Goods has licen kindly offered by the managers of the local I'eeil Compiinles.
Sale Wednesday, Dec. 23   Come aud join the crowd.
The  Comox   Agricultural &  Industrial   Association.
E.  FELIX  THOMAS,  Secretary.
WE HAVE PURCHASED THE BEST OF
THE LOCAL TURKEYS, GEESE AND
CHICKENS IN THE COMOX VALLEY.
IF YOU REALLY WANT A GOOD XMAS
DINNER, PURCHASE YOUR POULTRY
AT THE
City Meat
Market
W. P. Symons Phone 111
Cumberland
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