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The Cumberland Islander Oct 20, 1923

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Array Provincial Library    Jaal|S3
in
E CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
tn
With which is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR — No. 42
CUMBERLAND,. BRITISH COLUM BIA, SATURDAY OCTOBER 20, 192,1
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PBR ANNUM.
Locals Lucky In
Game With The
Vets Of Nanaimo
Winning Goal Scored In Dying Minutes of Game—Local Forwards
Run Hint but Weak In
Front of Ileal
NOTED STAGE SUCCESS
FILMED BY FRED NIBLO
The "Veterans" of Nanaimo came
vory nenr to sharing the points In tho
Upper Island League game held on
the local grounds last Sunday. Tucker James won the game for the home
team in the last few minutes when he
got his head to a beautiful cross from
Bannerman giving the visitor's goalie
no chance to save.
Blair won tha toss for Cumberland
and decided to defend the town end
goal. Right from the kick-off the
home forwards made tracks for the
Nanaimo" goal and came almost scoring, the ball being forced over the
line for a goal kick. Again and ag'iin
the home forwards raided the visitor's
and lt was a miracle that two or throe
goalB did not accrue. Deluce on the
extreme right was playing a wonderful game and hail the hardest of luck
on several occasions. He struck the
side rigging with a hot shot, he had
beautiful centres either charged down
by a defender or spoiled Tiy the over
anxiety of his team mates. The visitors began to expi't themselves ti little
as half time drew nenr, hut the halts
and backs were well able to hold them
incheck, Blair not being troubled once
during the first half. Bannerman anil
Plump on the left were'worklng nicely together, the outside man getting
In some lovely crosses, which" should
have been turned to good account.
Bannerman at the present time ls
right at the top of his form and is an
extremely hard man to hold. Outside
left appears to be his place after the
display he gave last Sunday. As halj,
time drew near the locals made desperate efforts to gain the lend but all
their brilliant runs up the field produced nothing better than goal kicks.
Half time arrived with a blank sheet;
neither side finding the net.
The sun came out good and strong
at the commencement of the second
half which bothered the visitor's defence considerably, the fans making
sure that It wits going to be an easy
thing for Cumberland during this half.
But not so, the Veterans got going In
good style and were having a fair
share of the game, without getting
dangerous, their efforts being like thc
home forwards, weak ln front of the
goal. Time after time the right wing
of Cumberland went through at will,
and on several occasions missed scoring by IncheB only. The play apppear-
ed from the side lines to be too much
bunched, and Instead of the ball being
kept continually on the 'wings there
was a tendency to keep it in the centre, all players being jumbled up like
a bran dip. Time was drawing to a
close and many fans left the field
thinking that a draw was a sure thing.
Bannerman and Plump by brilliant
work carried the ball down the field,
the outside man getting in a beautiful cross which Tucker James converted, five or six minutes from the
close. The last few minutes of play
were all In favor of Cumberland, who
were pressing heavily as the whistle
sounded.
All the Cumberland forwards played
a good game, with the exeption of
Tucker James. The centre forward
did not play a bad game, however, but
appeared to be a little too anxious. Ilo
evened things up by scoring the winning goal. The halfs and backs wero
steady with Blair nn Interested spectator for the biggest portion of the
game.
STANDING OF LEAGUE
P. W. L.    D. Pts.
Cumberland 5 4 10 8
Nanaimo City .13 117
Ladysmlth 4 3 10 6
Davenports 4 112 1
0. W. V. A. 4 II 3     1 1
Northfleld 4 0 4     0 0
A famous stage play, Walter Hack-
ett's "Captain Applejack," filmed under the title of "Strangers of the
Night," Is coming to the llo-Ilo Thoa-
tre on Friday and Saturday. It has
been produced by Fred Nlblo, who directed "The Three Musketeers," "Blood
and Sand" and "The Famous Mrs.
Fair," and Is presented by Louis B.
Mayer through Metro.
Nlblo was given free reign to build
magnificent settings and the cast ls
made up exclusively of players entitled to he classed as stars. Matt
Moore, Enid Beimel. Barbara La Marr
and Robert McKim hove the four prin-
clpol roles while such favorites as
Emily Fltzroy, Otto Hoffman, Mathllce
Brundoge and Thomas Ricketts shar^
honor* in the secondary group of
popular players.
The story concern,) a timid Britisher into whose life comes pirate romance on the crest of a storm. Bess
Meredytli adapted the story to tlle
screen and it was photographed by
Alvin Wyckoff.
PENAL PROBLEM THEME
OF "BOSTON BLACKIE"
■ Recent revelations of prison co:i-
tlitous throughout the country, made
public In newspapers and In books
wrUten by men who have Investigated
tlle facts, offer a timely subject for
the motion picture screen. The matter is presented In particularly Interesting narrative form In the Fox production, "Boston Blackie."' starring
William Russell, which will be shown
at the Ilo-llo Theatre Monday anil
Tuesday.
The film was adapted from the
story hy Jack Boyle. "The Water
Cross." It deals with the punishment
of prisoners by a method as torturous as any of the refinements used
during tli5 Spanish Inquisition. Tho
water cross advocates tied a man upright against a wall with arms outspread and then turned a high pressure hose against his midsection. This
treatment tore the tissues under the
prisoner's flesh and disabled him for
weeks, if not permanently. Just suoli
inhuman handling of men- hns caused
the searchlight of the press to be
thrown on the cruelties still in practice In various prisons. Each community has its own pennl problem to
solve.
After an unusually exciting series
of adventures, which include the
pleasing performance of Eva Novak,
Boston Blackie effects a prison reform that argues a convincing brief
for humanitarian methods in American prisons.
Badminton Club
Elect Officers
The Cumberland Badminton Club
held their annual meeting in the Anglican Hall on Monday evening when
it was decided to go ahead and re-organize'for the coming season. Mr. A.
H.. Wsbb was elected president with
Mr. T. Mordy as Vice-President, and
Mrs. C. R. Drader Secretary-Treasurer. Those officers with the addition
of Rov. W. Leversedge and Miss Ida
McFadyen will form the Executive.
After considerable discussion It was
decided to place the duos as follows:
$4.00 for the-season, and In the case
or married couples, $6.00 for the season. Anyone paying by the month
will be charged 75 cents per month,
all fees payable In advance. The
club find all the necessary equipment, rackets, not, shuttlecocks etc.
and it Is hoped that the extremely low
dues will be an Inducement for a good
many to take up this most fascinating
Indoor game. Anyone desirous of
joining the club are cordially Invited
to the Anglican Hall on Tuesday or
Saturday evenings, these nights hav-
nlg been decided upon as most convenient for the majority of the mem
hers,
Interesting Session Of The
Cumberland City Fathers
ROYSTON SCHOOL REPORT
AMBULANCE ASSOC'N.
ELECT OFFICERS
The St. John's Ambulance Association held their annual meeting on
Friday October 4th, whicli proved very
successful.
The election of officers for the coming year took pluce and those holding
office nre as follows: President James
Quinn, VIce-Pres. II. Waterfield, Scc-
Treas. J. J. Kirkbrlde, Finance committee, W. Beveridge, J. Mutters,
Hail committee, J. Muttors, Jonathan
Taylor and Robert Reid.
The following Is the Royston School
Report for the month of September of
the pupils ranking first and second
Grade 8: Grace Trail, Laurence Edwards; Grade 7, Gladys Idiens, Doreen Ogilvie; Grade 6, Bert Carey, Edgar Kelly; Grade 5, Jack Hilton,
Margaret Dunn; Grade 4, Annie McLeod, Irene Kelly; Grade 3, Jean Og-
ilve, Theodore Rodwell; Grade 2 olid
1, Tom Hilton, George Watts.
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held at the Council
Chambers on October 15th, Present
His Worship, Mayor C. J. Parnham,
and Aldermen A. Maxwell, T. H. Mumford, F. Partridge, J. J. Potter, F. Dallos and J. Ledinghan.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and adopted as read.
Communications were read from
Mr. E .Perodl applying for a club licence in respect of the premises known
as "Shorty's Poolroom." As Aid. Partridge and Mr. Mumford had not arrived at the lime the application'was deferred to a full meeting of the Council.
A communication was received from
Mr. Wesley Willard, soliciting the
placing of an Insurance policy on the
Fire Hall.
On the motion of Aid. Maxwell, seconded by Aid. Dallos, It was decided
to leave the matter over until the alterations to the Fire Hoir'were completed.
An account was received from G. W.
McMynn, Warden of Okalla Prison
Farm for $39.50 being the cost ot
maintenance of prisoners for the
years 1921 and 1922. The account
was ordered paid.
Dr. E. R. Hicks, had a letter before
the Board applying for salary due
him as Medical Health Officer for tbe
year 1919. Although several applications had been made to previous
Councils the salary had not been paid.
The City Clerk reported'having made
a thorough search of the records but
could find no trace of the salary having been paid, and on motion of Aid.
Maxwell, seconded by Aid. Mumford
it was ordered that the amount be
paid subject to adjustment should the
Clerk subsequently find that It had
been previously paid.
The Cumberland Electric Lighting
Company wrote submitting a tender
for- the wiring of the Fire Truck room
with one 200 watt, and one 2500 watt,
heaters, and one 2500 watt heater for
the Recreation room. The tender being $182.00 for wiring Installation and
$105.00 for heaters, plus duty atid
freight. This does not Include carpenter labour, cutting, trimming etc,
nor a meter loop of any description.
It was moved by Aid. Ledingham
and seconded by Aid Dallos that the
tender be accepted and the work proceeded with.
The resignation of Mr. Frederick
D. Pickard as Police Commissioner
was also received.
His Worship the Mayor, as chairman of the Police Commissioners, reported that due notice of Mr. Plckardu
resignation hud been frowarded to
the Provincial Secretary, together
with a recommendation that tt was
considered inexpedient to incur the
cost of art election for the appointment
of a successor to Mr. Plckrd for the
short period that remains to the end
of the year, and that a Police Commissioner for the remainder of the
term should be apponlted by His Excellency, the Lleut.-Governor in Council.
A communication was read from Mr.
P.  P.  Harrison,  City  Solicitor,  em
bodying the following recommendations which were approved at a meeting on the 8th of October of the ex-
soldiors who purchased houses under
the Better Housing Scheme, and members of the City Council. The recommendations were as follows:—
"That the nett amount owing by
each purchaser as of the 1st of October instant, Including insurance, past
taxes, and the amount owing on notes
given by them to cover monies expended by the City Council in defraying
part of the cost ot construction etc.
be totalled; and the sum total thereof
be taken as the principal sum owing
as of that date, compute the same by
amortization table to arrive at month,
ly instalments required. Prepare
fresh agreements in lieu of present
ones and date same October 1st, 1923,
including therein the aforesaid sum
total as the purchase price of the
premises, payable In Instalments as
ascertained by the Table In question.
From, and after the first of October
1923 Insurance and Taxes can be split
up into monthly payments and entered In a book acquired fr that purpose,
taxes to be entered therein from year
to year, allowance to be made in the
book for any fluctuation In amount
of taxes."
It was moved hy Aid. Mumford and
seconded by Aid. Ledingham. and carried,—that fresh Agreements be made
in accordance with the recommenda-
tons of the City Solicitor, and that
the cost of preparing such fresh agreements be charged against the holders
thereof.
Aid. J. J. Potter for the Board of
Works reported that since last meeting the chimneys of the Council Chamber and the Police Office had been
repaired. Three alley ways had been
regraded, four 66 feet sluice boxes
had been placed in Fourth Street, a
culvert had been put ln on Fifth St.
catch-basins had been placed in Second Street and in Penrith Ave. and
workmen had been employed In digging' ditches ui Derwent Avenue.
Health Committee. Aid. Ledingham
reported that the case of measles was
progressing favorably, no further outbreak having been repoted.
Fire Wardens'. Aid. Ledingham reported progress In tho additions to tho
City Fire Hall.
Finance. Aid. Maxwell reported a
Bank balance of $10,863.08.
Bills and Accounts. The following
bills and accounts wore referred to
the Finance Committee, and it found
correct were ordered pnld.
A. A. Brown, repairs to chimney, $18.
K. Abe, rent ot house occupied by Mrs.
Bradley, |M. Dr. E. R. Hicks, salary
for year 1919, $100. L. H. Finch, Instalment on Fire Hall contract $300. G.
Leighton & Sons, shoeing and black-
smithing $17.75, Royston Lumber Co.
lumber for sluices, $02.89. B. C. Telephone, rent and calls $6.80, Okalla
Prison Farm, for maintenance of prisoners 1921—22 $39.50, Joe Tobacco,
13 days work at $4.30 per diem $55.50.
John Burghener, 13 days work, $56.90,
James Potter $55.90.
Hail! The Champions Are Coming
Poppies for "■ Armistice Day
have arrived and may be obtained from Mr. J. Walton, secretary
of the Great War Veterans.
On Sunday next the Nanaimo foot-1
ball team, champions of Canada, will
Invade Cumberland with the sole oh-1
jeet of taking away from the locals j
those two valuable points, which ls
credited to the winners.
Cumberland needless to say will not
only be on hand to try and stop them,
but will also do their best to try and
get them.    The Nanaimo team who
have' only met one defeat since their;
glorious victory, when they won the
Connaught Cup, are to be out In full j
strength to have revenge for that defeat, which was handed to them only
last week at Ladysmlth the team that!
tell prey to the locals three weeks |
ago.
This  undoubtedly makes an inter-;
eating state of afffiars and to say a [
large crowd of   enthusiastic   soccer
fans will be present at 3 o'clock on j
Sunday,  is only putting it mild, as
Nanaimo fans will no doubt make a
fair sized crowd, while Cumberland
supporters will be out in masses.
Those who have watched both teams |
in action do not venture their opinion
as to who will be victor, although
they all anticipate a very keen match,
which will be worth going some distance to see.
During the last two or three games
tliat have been played on the local
grounds, while not altogether ot a
runaway nature,, still they have not
tested the defence and especially
Blair, who last Sunday failed to have
a shot of any Importance lo stop, but
those who saw him at Ladysmlth are
confident of his ablliiy to save anything In the miveable line. This is I Ik
spot In the local team that; the Cumberland supporters are anxious to see
work and expect Nanaimo to glvo
ihcni a chance to see It.
With the locnl""eam somewhat rearranged from the way it was when
they last met Nanaimo, the management are full of confidence of their
team being able to carry the day while
they still realize the boys must have
their shooting boots on to penetrate
the Nanaimo defence.
Tiie Cumberland team wlll line up
as follows:— Blair, Stewart, Gough,
Hitchens, Conti, Monahan, 'Deluce
Milligan, James, Plump and Banner-
man.
(1. W. V. A. WHIST DRIVE
AMI DANCE MIVKMBKR 2nd.
TWO WELL-KNOWN
RESIDENTS LAID
TO THEIR REST
STEVENSON— The funeral of the
late John Stevenson, who died In the
local hospital on Friday last, took
place from the family residence Allen
Avenue, ou Sunday at 1 p.m., the Rev.
J. R. Butler officiating at the home
und graveside.
The late Mr. Stevenson was born
in Dairy, Ayrshire, and came to Wellington over thirty years ago, later
coming to Cumberland, being a resident of this city for twenty-five years,
where he made a host of friends.
The pallberers were Messrs. J. C.
Brown, J. L. Brown, J. Bennie, D.
Stewart, T. Lewis, and J. R. Gray.
The following is the list of floral
tributes.—Wreaths, The family, Mrs.
D. Stevenson and Jessie; sprays, Mr.
and Mrs. S. Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs.
Thos. Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. Gibb, Mrs L. W.
Nunns, Mr. and Mrs. T. Lewis, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Grey, Mr. and Mrs. R.-S.
Robertson (Royston) Mr. and Mrs. D.
Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. D. Walker;
cross, Mrs. G. Robertson and family.
* * • *
M1CHELL—The funeral of the late
Mrs. Isabel Mlchell, who passed away
at Cumberland last Saturday, took
place Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock
at the B. C. Funeral Company's Chapel, Victoria. The Rev. F. Comley officiated in the presence ot many friends.
Many beautiful floral designs covered
the casket and hearse. The hymns
sung were/"Nearer My God to Thee"
and "Jesus Lover of My Soul." The
following acted as pallbearers:
Messrs. J. R. Saunders, W. A. Nlblock,
L. A. Grogan and D. Gray. The remains were laid to rest at the Ro.-.s
Bay Cemetery.
GIRLS' SEWING CLUB
BEGINS AT ROYSTON
The G. W. V. A. and tho Ladles'
Auxiliary will hold another of tlielr
popular whlst drives and dances on
November 2nd.
The Sewlftg Club In connection
with the Royston School started their
term's work by meeting at the home
of Mrs. Idiens. Fourteen girls were
present and each showed that 3he
was keen for the work. Tea was afterwards served by Mrs. Idlens with
Mrs. Thomas nn Mrs. Kelly as helpers.
The girls sewed for about an hour
and at the same time took turns In
rending Kipllngs "Jungle Tales."
These meetings are to be held at
the homes of the parents and should
prove both helpful and pleasant.
Miss Clara Dalton
Becomes Bride Of
Mr. H. Knappett
Well Known Young Couple lilted la
I'n't'lj- Ceremony at Vancouver
Large Audience
Greets Lecturers
Two most Interesting lectures were
delivered nt thc Anglican Church Hull
on Thursday evening last, bringing to
a close the Rurl-Diocanal Conference
of Comox Deanery, Diocese of Columbia.
Tho hall was crowded when the
Rev. W. Leversedge took the chair
nnd In a few well chosen words introduced to the audience the Rev. A. W.
Corker, of Alert Bay, and Rev. A. D.
Greene of Quathlaska Cove. Thc Rov.
Greene deliveied the first address,
which was fully Illustrated by means
of lantern slides. He look for his subject "Scattered Settlers" and portrayed in a very vivid manner the work I
of God that is being carried ou among- \
st the settlers in isolated places along
the British Columbia Coast. He was I
listened to wltn rapt attention by all
present and at tho (dose of his add-1
ross  was heartily applauded.
Tho second address was delivered
by the Rev. A. W. Corker, a pioneer
missionary of B.C., who has been lali-
orlng for the past 34 years. He took
for his subject "Indian Work." In ii
brilliant manner, yet easily understood
by the youngest member of the audience, he gave an account ot the work
amongst tho Indians. Manners, customs, their aims and objects and the
progress Christianity had made amoim
st them was told In a very touching
manner by tho speaker. Space wlll not
permit us to give a detailed report nf
these interesting lectures, but we
hope and sincerely trust that another
opportunity will be given to heor
these two lecturers who have labored
so long, so earnestly and successfully
In an effort to spread lhe Gospel Ot
the Master.
A wedding of great interest to
many in the district took place recently In Vancouver, when Miss Clara
11. Dalton became the bride of Mr. H.
O, Knappett. , MIbs Dalton waa, for
two years a teacher on the staff of
ihe Cumberland High School, resigning her position last June.
Mr. Knappett is also well known ln
the district, having resided here a few
years. Thc many friends of the young
couple iu Cumberland extend to them
best wishes for their future happi-
ne.s.
The following account of the wedding is reprinted from the Vancouver
Sunday Sun ot October 14th.—
A .wedding of interest to many took
place Wednesday in Holy Trinity
church. Rev. C. B. Clarke officiating,
when Miss Clara Belle Dalton, daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Dalton, became the bride of Mr. Herbert George
Knappett younger son of the late Mr.
James Knappett and Mrs. Knappett of
Victoria. The bride Is a native daughter of Vancouver and graduate of the
University ot British Columbia. The
church was decorated for the occasion with flowers, ferns and wax berries. The service was fully choral
nnd was under the leadership of Mr.
J. C. Welch, choirmaster. The wedding chorus from Lohengrin, by Wagner, was played by Paul Dougherty.
The youthful bride was a charming
picture In her gown of white kittens-
car satin with chenille and pearl embroidery. She wore a veil of Brussels net, with lace butterflies inset,
und a wreath of orange blossoms. Her
only ornament was a necklace of
pearls, the gift of the groom, and she
carried a shower of ophelia rose buds
and maiden hair fern, tied with white
ribbon streamers.
The bride waB given in marriage by
her father and was attended by her
sister. Miss Elsie Dalton, aa maid of
honor and Miss Maude Knappett as
bridesmaid. Miss Dalton wore a
frock of jade green satin with steel
cut beads enmbroidery. and black jet
hat faced with green. Her boquet
was of pale pink and white carnation-".
Miss Knappett wore an attractive
frock of pale pink crepe de chene, a
black hat, and carried a boquet of
rose pink carnations. Mr. Arthur
Knappett of Portland, Oregon, wns
best man, and Mr. Gordon Fowler was
usher. The bride's gift to the groom
was a gold watch chain with masonic
fob. The groom's gift to the bride's
attendants was gold pencils and to
the best man a gold signet ring. During the signing of the register Miss
Emily Evemy sang "My World."
A reception was held later at the
home of the bride's parents, 1534 Third
avenue west. After a honeymoon
spent in motoring to Portland and up
the Columbia highway, Mr. and Mrs.
Knappett will reside at 8849 Oak St.
SILK OK WORK
The Ladies Aid of Grace Methodist
Church wlll hold a sale ot work on
November 21st. Keep tills dnte open
as some wonderful bargains wlll be
on  sale.
Soccer Champions
Are Defeated
Nanaimo City lost to Ladysmlth by
one goal to nil in an Upper Island
League fixture at Ladysmith on Sunday before a very large crowd of apec-
rtitors. Rain fell for hours before
the game, but ceased just a few minutes to three o'clock, the time set for
the start of the game. Tnklng everything Into consideration the ground
was In fairly good condition, except
ii few alternate places on the low side
of tho field which seemed that the
players on that side had some difficulty In keeping their feet- This Is
Die first time that Nanaimo City have
been defeated since they won the Connaught Cup and championship of Canada. The Nanaimo City was under
ihelr usual strength being minus the
redoubtable Tommy Dickinson, who
having cried off at the last moment
through an Injured foot. The teams
took the field ob follows: —
Ladysmlth—Boyd, G. Anderson, and
Campbell; McCormlck. Orr and Battle; A. Strang, Matheson, Sneddon,
Houston, Gibbons. The Ladysmlth
team wore black bands on their arms
in respect tor Joe Travers, a late
member of their team.
Nanaimo City— Routledge; Linn
and Bell; McMillan, McDougall and
Faulds; Mlnto, Adams, Stobbart, Appleby and Husband.
Referee, J. Rogers, Ladysmlth.
McDougall won the toss and decided to defend the south goal, Sneddon
(Continued  on   Page  Bight)
I t TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER  20th.,  1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1'uhlished every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER  20th.,   1923
WAR TIME   FINANCING
TREES
The trees at this season of the year
exert an influence over those who
love them and all things that grow
under them, or around them.
You know you can love tho trees,
.not alone when they are in ther summer glory, hut in what over state they
are—in ion!, or ruined by frost, or
powdered with snow, or crystal
sheutlied In sleet, or in severe outline
and hare against a November sky—
you can love them,
'fo many people a wood is a wood
si ii (1 all woods arc alike.   But no two
.   woods are  really alike.    There is a
marked difference between forests as
between  different    communties    and
towns. A pine forest without underbrush carpeted with the fine-fingered
russet needles of the pine, and odorous of resinous gums, has scarcely
a trace of likeness to a maple grove
either in the insects, the birds, the
shrubs, tlie light "and shade, or the
sound of the caressing wind.
It is easy to listen to the whispering of the pine and imagine one can
hear the chanting of the Druids of
old or the Imprisoned spirits of water
nymphs sighing for the limpid depth*. For the first pines must have
grown on tlio seashore and learned
their first whisperings from the surf
and the waves, and all their poster-
it, have inherited the sound, and
borne it Inland to the mountains.
Ol' equal interest to the lover of
trees is the forest of mingled trees,
ash, maple, oak, beech, hickory and
evergreen, with birches growing along
the edges of the brook that carries
itself through the roots and stones, toward lhe willows that grow In yonder
meadow, In such a wood the trees
breathe many voices and among the
stalwart trunks and gnarled branches
we see likenesses lo old and trusted
friends. What is sweeter than a murmur of leaves, unless it be the patter
of rain on the root'? Where will you
Hnd such peace and rest as among
God's trees, the temples in which thc
song birds worship,
We have been profligate in the sacrifice of our trees and there are many
remorseless men crawling yet upon
tlio surface of the earth, smitten
blind und inwardly dead, whose only
thought of a fine old tree, that has
Weathered the storm for ages, is thnt
it is food for the ux und the saw. But
to those who see above the ordinary
things of life, n grnnd old tree will always he a priceless possession, a
thing of beauty und u joy forever.
Sir Thomas White, Minister of Finance during the war period, recently
gave the press the following statement:— "In a recent speech at Quebec, Right Hon. MacKenzie King, the
Prime Minister ot Canada/is reported
in the press as follows:—
" 'The tremendous increase in the
uncontrollable expenditure has been
due in the main to the vicious policy
of the late Government in financing
the war by loans rather than by taxation during the war of those who did
not go on active service. It is true
that the debt of the country Is enormous; that the interest payable on the
debt is larger than the entire cost of
Government only a few years ago;
that the taxes are high. But why is
this? ls it because we are now trying
to meet our obligations arising out of
tiie colossal expenditures of the four
years of the war, not a dollar of which
was met by the Government of the day
out of the taxes of the people. This
is an appalling statement and one
which the people of Canada cannot
take too much to heart, in viewing the
burdens which they are called upon to
bear, but it is none the less true.' "
Commenting on this Sir Thomas
White continued as follows:—
"It Is clear either that the Prime
Minister was misreported or that iu
making the statement ho was wholly
misinformed as to the fifeta concerning our wartime finance. As 1 was
Minister of Finance during the per
lod of the war and as the statement
in question is a serious reflection upon my administration and upon the
Government of which I was a member.
I feel that I must place the facts as to
taxation and expenditures from 1914
to 1019 before the Canadian people.
As To War Taxes
"In my Budget speech of June, 1911
I made the following statement
'Leaving capital expenditure aside and
applying the surplus available from
our revenues (from April 1, i914, to
March 31, 1919) over and above the
amount required to meet current outlays, lt will appear that we have met
the principal cost of the War from
taxation to a total aggregate amount
or $275,943,977. If we take into account the amount contributed during
the five-year period for interest upon
war debt, and for the pension charges,
the total paid from revenue on account of the war to March 31, 1919,
is $438,293,248.'
Our war expenditure to March, 31
1919, was $1,323,793,200.
"From the official Year Book of the
Government it appears that the total
revenues of Canada rose from ono
hundred and seventy-three million
dollars in 1914 to three hundred and
twelve millions in 1919; to three hull
dred and forty-nine millions in 1920
and to rour hundred and thirty-four
millions in 1921.
"In addition to raising the customs
tariff in 1915, the Business Profits
and Income Tax were Imposed in 1916
and 17. The latter were entirely new
modes of taxation In Canada. During
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
The Last 3 Days
Greater   Sale
Saturday,    Monday,    Tuesday
MASTER
BARGAINS
DRY GOODS - — SHOES — STOVES — HEATERS
FURNITURE — CARPETS — RUGS — CROCKERY
ON SALE AT PRICE REDUCTIONS THAT STAGG-
ER BELIEF	
THE RETAILERS SALES SERVICE IN FULL
CONTROL— NOW.
Its currency the Business Profits Tax
yielded over two hundred- million dollars and the Income Tax to date about
two hundred and twenty-five million
dollars.
"The Year Book also shows what
was done during the war to reduce
the ordinary expenditures ot the Dominion. Public Works expenditure
in 1914 was nineteen million dollars;
ln 1915, nineteen millions; in 191 li,
twelve millions; in 1917, eight millions; in 1918, soven millions; in 1919,
six millions. Capital expenditure.was
reduced from forty-one millions in
1915 to twenty-five millions in 1919.
Large works such as the Wellund Canal were suspended, but we felt we
must proceed with the new Parliament
Buildings.
"I fully realize that my successors
have hod heavy responsibilities—Sir
Henry Drayton with the enormous expenditures arising out of demobilization, and Hon. Mr. Fielding with greatly Increased Interest charges upon the
public debt, and the large yearly expenditures for pensions. Both have
also had to meet heavy railway deficits and engage in financing on a.scale
unknown before the war. My purpose tn making this statement is not
to minimize in any way the burdens
which they have had to assume.
"It Is true that our national debt
has been greatly increased by the war,
but it is also true that if we exercise
strict economy In our public administration it need cause no grave anxiety
to the Canadian people. It is about
half the sum which Great Britain
owes the United States, and which she
Is now engaged in liquidating, principal and interest, by annual payments. Moreover, the domestic Aiht
of Great Britain is fifteen times that
of Canada, and she is reducing it annually. In comparison with other Dominions of the Empire and other
countries engaged in the war (wi'h
the exception of the United States,
which was a billigerent for only 15
months,) our public debt Is by far the
least burdensome of all. Our public
issues during the war were made
principally to our own people, and, as
to maturities spread over periods
which make refunding comparatively
easy. If our national debt had been
incurred to foreigners and we wore
consequently obliged to pay tlle annual Interest upon it abroad, there
would indeed be cause for anxiety. As
it is, it is principally owed by the nation as a whole to millions of individual citizens. Payments on account
ot interest and principal are made to
UND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, .surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 .'.ears of agei
md by aliens on declaring Intention
in become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupatlqn,
md   Improvement   fur    agricultural
purposes.
Ku.l Information concerning reflations   regarding    pre-emptions    (3
given In Bulletin No.  1, Lund Series.
HuW  to  lJro-enii>t  Lund,"  copies  ol
liii-li can be obtained free »if cliarg-
...   addressing   Un*    Department   ot
-mids, Victoria, B.C. or to any Gov-
nment Agent.
Records will be grained covering
inly land suitable fur agricultural
purposes, and which is nol Umbor-
uitd; i.e., carrying ovev y.000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
md 8,000 feet per acre cast of that
Kange.
Applications for pre-emptions are,
u  be addressed  tu  the  Land Com-
ilssloner of the UlmcI B-'cnrdiny: JJi
Isloii, in which the land applied foi,
s situated, and are made on printed
.'orms, copies uf which  can  be ou-
alnetl from the Land Commissioner.
(Jre-cniptit.i.n must be occupied foi
five  years  and   improvements   made
tu  value uf $11) per acre,  including
clearing aud cultivating at least five
■tcreH, iiefore a Crown Grant can lu
eeelved.
H*Of inure detailed Information see
he Bulletin "Mow t" I're-enTpt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications uie received for pur-
chuso oi' vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being limber land.
for agricultural put poses:  m'ntmum
price of first-class (arable) landis $5
per acre, und second-class i^uizlm)
land ^.TtO pel- acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given In Bulletin
N'u. 10, Lbnd Series. "I'urcliase and
Lease uf Crown  Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites ou
limber land, not exceeding 4U acres,
may he purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
a i.mpage.
HOMESITE LEASES
L'nsurveyed areas, nut exceeding HO
ueYes, may be leased as houicsltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
elected in the first year, title being
nbtalnab'e after residence and improvement, conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
Kor grazing und industrial pur-
jmikos areas not exceeding '.40 acres
may be leased hy one person or u
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing district.-:
and the range administered under -t
Grazing Commissioner, Annua!
grazing permits ure Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners, sink-owners
may form associations foi* ritnge
management, Free, or partially Tree,
permits are available for settlers,
campers nnd travellers, up to t"n
head.
Special Showing
 — 7^/j Week
THE FAMOUS "ST. MARGARET" BRAND
Made in England
All Wool Children's Knitted Costumes
MISSES AND CHILDREN'S BLACK AND COLORED ALL WOOL HOSIERY, SCARFS
AND GLOVES
Special Values in Ladies Winceyette Night Gowns
MILLINERY:
Fall Hats
Just received this week another shipment of the newest Creations in
COATS:—Ladies, All Wool VELOUR COATS in the newest New York Models, Silk Embroidered with Self Collar, also with Fur Cuffs and Collars from $19.50 to"$47.50
New Models in Ladies English Tweed Coats at $21.50
SPECIALS IN GROCERY DEPARTMENT
The frosty mornings are coming. Try
"Horlicks" malted milk at 95 cents. Its
good for the whole family.
Frys Cocoa   30c
Fels Naptha Soap  90c.
Del Monte Beans, 3 tins for 25c
Swifts Washing Compound 30c
Daddy's Sauce  25c
Sunkist Oranges, 3 dozen for $1.00
B. Sardines, three tins for   25c
Holbrook's Custard Powder  40c
Slab Cake, Cherry, Rich Lamon, Society
at 60 cents per pound. Sultanas 50 cents
Ridgeways Tea, 3s. Fancy Tins ...:....$3.25
Ridgeways Tea, ls. ..' $1.00
Sweet Potatoes, Grapes, Apples, Oranges,
Pumpkins, Swede Turnips, Carrots, Parsnips, Green Cabbage, Tomatoes, Lemo is
Citron.
m
Canadians and are thus available for
lhe ordinary trade and business ot the
Dominion.
"Of till the nations engaged in the
war (not excepting United States)
Canada has, I believe, enjoyed the
most favorable conditions since the
Armistice and has the least cause for
anxiety as to the future. For this fortunate position I believe our war-time
finance to have been In no small degree responsible. We appealed to thc
Canadian people to produce aud save
their money for our war loan Issues,
the proceeds of which were largely
used to finance our agricultural, commercial and industrial production,
which would otherwise have failed of
a market owing to the almost complete breakdown of international exchange due to the war. If we had
stifled enterprise by crushing taxation we should have been unable to j
participate to the extent we did in the
war and our after condition would'
have been very different from what
it has been."
An announcement made by Hon. J.
I).  .MacLean. provincial secretary, is
to the effect that following the confer-!
ence of deputy ministers of education <
of the four western  provinces,    the i
curricula of public schools  will be
revised.   Other   important   changes,
calculated    to    Improve    the    public
schools    system,    including    longer
training periods for teachrs, also are
expected to result from the conference.
The text-books of geography, grammar, arithmetic and spellng will be revised and lt Is expected that each
province may manufacture its own
text-books.
Taken all ln all the revisions In
the school system are the result of a
long period of investigation and a
material improvement in general educational methods Is anticipated.
With The
Churches
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
(UMBEHLAND, SUNDAY OCT. Slut.
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Sunday School 2:30 p.m.
7. p.m.—Evensong.
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN TIIE HEAD,
AND NA.NAI, CATARRH.
GRACE METHODIST (III 1ISII
Rev. J. R. Butler, Pastor.
Services: 11. a.m. and 7. p.m.
Sabbath School 11:45 a. m.
7:00 p.m.—A Special Service of
Songs, solos, Duet, and Choruses.
Short address by the Pastor "If 1
Were Eighteen."
Everybody welcome.
I The new Continental remedy culled
"LARMALENE"  (Regd.)
I Is a simple harmless hnmc-trentiueiil
which absolutely cures dcnliiess, mils-
j en in tiie head, etc. No Expensive Ap-
I pliunces Needed for tills   new   Olul-
| ment, iiistiintly operates upon Hie nf-
' fected purls wilh complete and permanent success. Score: ol Wonderful
Cures Reported.
Grand Row.
The couple were married and traveled to the lakes for their honeymoon.
As soon as they arrived they took a
boat out upon the lake. The following morning the bride's mother got a
postcard, which read. "Arrived safely.
Grand row before supper."
"My," she muttered, "I didn't think
they'd begin quarreling so booh."
♦   *   *
Better be happy,, now while you
can: you may be rich some day and
St. George's Presbyterian Church
Rev. James Hood, Pastor.
11:00  a.m.—Morning Service.
1:30 p.m.—Adult Bible Class.
2:30 p.m.—Sunday School.
7:00 p.m.—Evening Service.
Everybody   Welcome.
An old bogy Is a man who believes
he knows better than some old maid
welfare worker how to raise Ills own
children.
* ♦   *
Moreover, an apple a day keeps the
castor oil away.
* *   .
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, of Slnil Road,
Stroud, miles: "Please could I
trouble Jim to scud me another box of
the Ointment. It Is not for myself, but
for a friend of mine who is us bud us
I was, und cannot get nny rest for the
noises in the head. I feel u new woman, and eun go to bed now nnd get n
good night's rest, which 1 had not
been utile lo do for man)' months. It
Is a wonderful remedy und tint most
delighted to reconiinciiile It."
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Whllehiirse liiiuil,
Croydon, writes:—HI mil pleased tn
fell you Hint tho small tin of ointment
you sent to me ut Vcntimr, has proved
it complete success, my hearing is
now unite normal, nnd thc horrible
head noises have censed. The iicllon
of this new remedy must he very- remarkable, for I hnve been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years, nnd hate hnd some of Ihe very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instrument* nil
lo nn purpose. 1 need hardly say how
very grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an entire change."
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.80—7 to 9p.m.
! Try one box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address ou receipt
; of money order for #1.00. There 1*
Nothing Belter at any Price.
j    Address orders to:—
THE "LARMALENE" CO,
10, South   View,  Walling St.,  Hartford, Kent, England.
For Results Try
The Cumberland
Islander &
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER 20tli..  li>23
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
THREE
It's Very Simple
A CAMEL has an easy job making her getaway through the
eye of a needle compared with the fellow who tries to get
results from poorly printed advertising matter. Our staff
is composed of specialists in their respective lines who will be
glad to help you get results worth while.
PHONE
35       The   Cumberland   Islander
DUNSMUIR  AVENUE, CUMBERLAND
I
WINTER
Is Coming
Why not be prepared by repairing those leaky roofs
and sides nf your house and barn with
Gwilt's Famous Shingles
$2.00 per Thousand
Second Grade
While they last.—Terms strictly cash
Gwilt Lumber Co., Ltd.
PHONE 79L
COURTENAY, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAM!
SPECIALLY CATEREI
IPS   I
ID TO I
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
—AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting with Boat at Union Bay
every Sundi.y Morning. Leave Cumberland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
— .
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    ■    Repairs
Telephone 1.    •    P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. V,
JOS.   DAMONTE
j      GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered to All Parts of District
| Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TEI.RPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
The
Farmers, Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
•**•
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
News Of British Columbia
British Columbia's credit in Great I
Britain Is higher than at any time in
the past, states Hon. John Hart, mln- j
ister of finance, who has Just returned from a two month's visit to the Old
Country.    While there the minister j
studied the financial   situation   and
found Interest in British Columbia se- j
curities rapidly increasing.   At pres- j
ent, said Hon. Mr. Hart. Great Britain j
in   common   with   other   European!
countries, had a great many involved
financial problems to solve and until I
some of these had   been   dealt   with
Canada cannot expect a tremendous
Inflow of British capital.    However, j
he predicts that within a short time
British money will seek invesment In
this country and particularly in Brit- j
ish Columbia, where the great wealth
of natural  resources  promises  such
big returns from development enterprises.
When laying the corner-stone of
the new science building of the British Columbia University group ou
Friday, Hon J. I). Mac Lean, minister
of education, gave out some interesting information regarding this provincial institution. Some criticism had
been directed against the government
for proceeding with the construction
of the new university, chiefly'from
centres far removed from Vancouver.
But even this criticism has been turned to praise when lt was considered
that the university offered the same
advantages to the student from outside points as It did from Vancouver.
There are 1,200 students in attendance, as well as several hundred taking short courses. These came from
ninety-nine points outside of Vancouver, as well as from the city. The occupations of parents or guardians
Bending students to the university
are:—
Professional men, 247; merchants.
178; manual laborers, 155; farmers,
102; book-keepers and clerks, 101;
retired, 101; brokers, 54; miscellaneous, 189.
The University of British Columbia
ls only eight years old, but In • thnt
time the enrollment has Increased
from 369 students In 1915 to 1200 In.
1923. At present thirty-eight graduates of the university are taking postgraduate courses In British, Canadian and American universities.
The erection of the new buildings
was made possible by the policy laid
down by Hon. Dr. MacLean ln 1920,
a policy which received the unanimous support of the Legislature.
Answering charges of Mr. W. J.
Bowser, leader of the opposition in
the Legislature, that the government
officials were spending $1,U00 a day
i mining around the country iu automobiles, Hon. W. H. Sutherland, minister of public works, has prepared a
statement in refutation. This shows
the dally cost to he $273, or one-quarter the figure mentioned by Mr. Bown-
er. The cost is small considering the
amount of work done, contends tho
public works minister.
Hon. E. D. Barrow, minister of agriculture, after an inspection of the
Sumas reclamation project, claim*
that the venture promises to prove
one of the most important of its kind
In America. By winter the big lake
will have been pumped dry, and next
spring nearly 30,000 acres of slendid
farmlands will be available for cultivation.
Hon. E. D. Barrow, minister of agriculture, Is home from the Old Country and reports that conditions are
most promising for the securing by
British Columbia of a large number
of selected settlers from Great Britain.
The British Columbia government
is pushing forward the work ot creating forest reserves, says Hon. T.D.
I'atullo, minister of lands, and every
effort Is being made to ensure the reforestation of logged-off lands and
the conservation of the immense Umber wealth of the province.
JOHN HATE TELLS COURT
WHY HE LEFT WIFE
The people of British Columbia
through the Government have sent
the stricken citizens of Japan a gift
of $45,000 worth of shingles aud lumber. A special warrant for this amount  was   passed.
Through Hon. William Sloan, minister of mines, negotiations have been
re-opened with the C. P. R. for a settlement of the long standing settlers'
rights problem on Vancouver Island.
Dual control of minerals In the 2.000,
000-acre E. & N. belt have made It
difficult for mining to develop, and
recently President E. W. Beatty went
Into the matter fully, with the result
that a solution is ln sight.
Denial is given the statement made
in Lethbrldge recently by President
E. W. Beatty, of the C. P. R„ to the
effect that the public debt in British
Columbia has Increased 239 per cent,
since 1918. Hon J. D. MacLean, provincial secretary and acting premier,
shows that the increase was only 113
per cent, and the increase was cau:ied
largely because the government had
to raise huge sums of money to pay
interest and losses In operation on
debts inherited from the late Conservative administration. For instance,
$3,000,000 is required annually tor Interest and operating deficit on the P.
G. E. Railway, an expenditure for
which the minister claims the present
government Is in no way responsible..
"Mr. Bealty talks of business administration and ' compares governments with private enterprises." ad.l-
ed Hon. Dr. MacLean. "that is exactly
the way this government conducts the
nffoirs of the province. No money
has been spent excepting upon productive enterprises and the proof of
our government's businesslike methods Is shown when I state that up to
the end of 1922 British Columbia had
a larger total in sinking funds than
all the rest of the provinces of Canada combined. Sinking funds provide
for the taking care of obligations and
surely that statement shows that no
stone has been left unturned to protect the public."
The minister maintained that the
final test of the stability of a province
or of a business was the financial
standing of either. In this regard,
he pointed out, British Columbia
bonds sold for a higher price In tho
world markets than thnt obtained by
any other province.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR  TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       -       -       .       .        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
John Bate, wbo disappeared August
20 and was located Tuesday working
on a farm near Chilllwack, appeared
in Police Court this morning charged
ivltli non-suppurt. Bate was ordered
to pay his wife eight dollars a week
beginning to-day.
Airs. Hall Bate, whose child was by
u former marriage, Isobel Hall, disappeared October 3 and wsb found a
week later in New Westminster, appeared in court with her small daughter Gladys, two and a half.
Confronted with the woman he had
deserted a little more than two months after marriage, Bate listened to
her accusations iu silence. Then <.e
tiled to explain. He admitted that
they had never got along after marriage, and said that Mrs. Bate had refused to live in Union Bay, where he
had a job as carpenter when they were
married.
Growing surfeited with what he
termed her nagging he had simply
gone oft to work one morning and disappeared.
As the discussion gave promise of
I.miming a heated argument, John
Hates, brother of Mrs. Hall Bate,
whose name Is, by coincidence, almost the same as that of the man his
sister married, sat In the back of the
court and watched grimly. He has
been supporting MrB. Bate since her
husband disappeared. He was not
called to the witness box.
Bate has been working on a farm
since he disappeared where he earns
$.",0 a month with board. Ordered by
the court to pay eight dollars a week
toward the support of his wife and
step-family, Bate stepped out of the
witness box with something like relief
on his face. Little Gladys insisted upon Interrupting the court to say: "Is
that my daddy?" smiling and waving
In the friendliest fashion at him as he
spoke. She was hushed by her mother
but finally she caught his eye, and he
smiled at her.
"I'm awfully fond of tbat little kid''
Hate said, when, after the court's derision, he was seen down stairs. "We
have decided to seperate," he said.
"She wouldn't live ln Union Bay, and
I have never lived In the city, so I had
a hard time getting workhere. Her
brother was good about trying to
help me get a job, and I liked him first
rate" —Vancouver World.
Horrible Accident,
There was a drummer who was bo
thin
He wouldn't go home alone,
For fear some great big hungry dawg
Might take him for a bone,
Ono day when he was walking out
And got all out of breath,
Ile fell through a hole in the seat of
his pants
And choked himself to death.
MANN'S
BAKERY
FOR BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection — See our Window
HOT PIES A SPECIALTY
Once you try them, you always prefer them.—Order
early and do not be disappointed.
Wedding:, Christening and Birthday Cakes to Order
— Phone 18 —
DUNSMUIR AVE. CUMBERLAND, B. C.
LUMBER
ALL BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
«**-,, r
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $450
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 : Night—134-X Courtenay
SPORTSMEN
SEE US ABOUT YOUR SUPER—X,— IMPERIAL
LONG RANGE, CANUCK, SHELLS, IN 12—16—20
GUAGE, ALL SIZES SHOT.
Carbide Lamps for the Camp, with convenient Carbide
Containers.
Flash Lights and Batteries of all Kinds
Hot-Shots — Unit Cells — B. Batteries
RADIO SETS AND PARTS IN STOCK
Latest Radio Handbook
You are invited to call and "Listen In" to the R2000
with loud Speaker, any evening.
Everything Electrical
WIRING CONTRACTING
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71 THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER  20th.,  1023
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
hi
Christmas
WE INTERPRET THE OLD MASTERS OF THE
7th CENTURY AND DESIGNERS OF TO-DAY
IN OUR CHRISTMAS GREETING CARDS AND
ANNOUNCEMENTS      :: :: :: ::
The Exclusive Cards we are showing this year
outclass all previous efforts. Embossed and
handsomely colored Greeting Cards from $2.50
per dozen up. We invite you to inspect samples
at
The Islander Office
5 Distinct Sample Books to Select from.
"The living voice affects men more
than what they rend."—Pliny, the Younger.
Your voice conducts your business. Directions
that you give personally are quickly and accurately
executed, because your associates cannot fail to understand.   Each inflection has a meaning for them.
Remember the telephone when you would confer
with those interested with you in business. Do not
trust the cold written word—send your voice, yourself
by long distance telephone.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
We Give the Best—■--
Electrical Installations
There Is no doubt about it.   We are here to prove it.
On the 19th of May 1921 we received from the Provincial
Inspector of Electrical Energy a set of RuleB and Regulations
governing the installation of Electrical Wiring were Immediately adopted and have been lived up to In every smallest de-
lull.
We carry the largest and most complete stock of any
Company or firm of Its size ln B. C. and bo can take Immediate
cure of your job without subjecting you to any annoying delay
waiting for special material, etc.
Wc gladly invite inspection b ythe highest Electrical
Authorities of any Installation we have made since the Provincial Regulations were Inaugurated and our most convincing
argument as to why we Bhould do your wiring is the fact that
of lhe Jobs we have had Inspected ALL have been pronounced
perfect. And then we have the knowledge of Electricity acquired through' many years of experience an dtbls should
surely count for something with you when you are selecting an
Electrical Contractor.
A man may know how to drive a nail precisely, but he ls
a dangerous man unless he knows the effect of the driving
upon the material Into which the nail enters and so lt Ib ln the
Eleotrleal Contracting business, lt is not only necessary to
understand the practical installation of wires, switches, fittings, etc., but It is doubly necessary to be able to make the
calculations thnt will ensure maximum safety, economy of
operation, and the proper functioning of the Electrical Energy
for which the wires, switches, etc., are meryly paths.
It you want High Class Electrical Installations, go to the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
SPURRILL BURIED
ON MONDAY
The funeral of the late Frederick
Spurrill, who passed away at the
family residence, Little River Road
laBt Saturday wns held on Monday
morning from his late home to the
Roman Catholic cemetery, Comox.
Service at the church and graveside
was conducted by the Rev. Father
Beaton and the funeral was attended
by a large number of friends of U12
family. The late Mr. Spurrill had
been ill for nearly three years, practically the full length of time he had
lived In thc Comox Valley where he
come from the prairies. He leaves to
mourn his loss a widow and five children. The pallbearers at the funeral
were Messrs. Paul Downey, Michael
Downey, Thomas Knight, L. Hiles, H.
Helm and Edmund Whalen.
PRESBYTERIAN
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE
Anniversary services were held at
St. George's Presbyterian church,
Courtenay, last Sunday, tlle ministers
for thc day being the Rev. Mr. Ogdon,
of Vancouver. The pretty little
church was filled at both services
and the congregation listened with
wrapt attention to two excellent sermons. On Monday the Ladies' Aid
Society of the church gave a chicken
supper in the basement of the church,
and needless to say It was patronized
so extensively that the purveyors almost ran out of chicken. After supper an illustrated lecture was delivered in the church by the Rev. Mr. Og-
den who, in a bright, educational travelogue took his audience with him
from England to the Bay of Biscay,
down the coast of Portugal, through
the straits of Gibraltar and along the
Southern European coast to Pompeii,
the city of the dead, which was buried by an outburst of Mount Vesuvius
in the year 79. Never have more interesting pictures been thrown on tlio
screen In Courtenny. Slides illustrating phases of life in the small principality of Monaco where is located tbe
world celebrated Monte Carlo gambling casino, were particularly interesting and the lecturer's explanation of
what became of the gamblers who
lost their all in the games was particularly impressive. From Monte Carlo
the lecturer led his audience to Naples and in his description of the various phases of life among the Neapolitans showed narrow dirty streets,
dirty seaside places and many of the
great unwashed. On the other hand
were shown some magnificent views,
pictures of marvelous landscape studded with magnificent historic buildings and vineyards. Perhaps the most
impressive views were those of the
old buried city of Pompeii now being
excavated by the Italian government,
showing that the old Romans had advanced to a wonderful state of civilisation with their stone paved roads,
water systems and artistic architecture. Before the lecture Mr. Leslie
Mooille rendered a most ncceptuble solo on the trombone and Mr. Herbert
Smith sang a solo. Before the audience dispersed the Rev. Mr. Beattle,
on their behalf, tendered the Rev. Mr.
Ogden a hearty vote of thanks.
WEDDING.
BRIDGE THROWN
OPEN TO PUBLIC
Last Saturday night the new bridge
over the Courtenny River was thrown
open to tlle public and this act signalized the immediate use of the structure by a long expectant public, esp ic-
ially residents of the Valley who have
had, perforce, to use the long detour
in reaching or leaving the city of
Courtenay, On Saturday the bridge
received a test by the use of the Government's fifteen ton steam road roller and did not even vibrate under the
strain. This week the sidewalk on
the bridge is being completed. While
use of the bridge has been allowed
since last Saturday motor car drlveis
| and others are warned that until lt is
finally accepted by the Government
from the contractors, they crosss at
\ their own risk.   This is merely a' for"
; inulity because the bridge is the finest
on the Island and the first steel
bridge to be constructed.
lt is a structure of which any community may well feel proud and no
; doubt the people of the Valley will appreciate the action of the authorities
i in placing such a magnificent bridge
I at their disposal.
It's the best thing in England
or America!
The ONE CENT
SALE
SATURDAY MONDAY
TUESDAY
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
MAYER—ROOL
Ob Monday last at the home of the
bridegroom's parents, Nanaimo, a
marriage of much interest to residents of Comox District was solemnized, the contracting young people being Miss Constance Patricia Mayer,
and Mr. Charles Henry Bool.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. H. Mayer, of Port Alberni,
and Is one the west const city's most
popular young ladies. The bridegroom is a member of the firm of
Bool & Wilson, Courtenay, and lias n
host of friends in the District, The
bride wns assisted by Miss B. Smith,
of Alberni, and Miss Agnes Sinter, of
Nanaimo as bridesmaids. Mr. Walter
Pearson, of Courtenny, supported the
bridegroom.
The ceremony was performed by the
Rev. Mr. Kelly, of the Methodist
Church, Nanaimo, and was witnessed
by' a large number of Intimate acquaintances of the two principals. After a sumptuous. wedding breakfast
Mr. and Mrs. Bool left for Victoria,
Vancouver and other points on a short
wedding tour, after which they will
reside at Courtenay.
Mr. H. J. Bool, Nanaimo, has been
looking after the business of the Tire
Shop at Courtenay, during the absence of his son Charles.
After several months spent at Vancouver, Mr. and Mrs. John McMillan
have returned to their home ot Perez
Park.
In the latest list of Jerseys qualifying for Record of performance two
animals, the property of Mr. George
Hornby, Sandwlck, have their names.
They are "Fern of Sandwlck" a four
year old with a milk production of
11,81)9 pounds, and "Fern of Sandwick 2nd." with a milk production as
a two year old of 7883 pounds. (Theio
were only six cows in the latest British Columbia list and those named
above were two.
the time is not far distant when, with
more adequate safeguards, small passenger steamers as well as freighters
will make Courtenny a calling point.
WHIST DRIVE AT
DOVE CREEK
Last Friday evening- the people of
Dove Creek enjoyed themselves at a
Community Whlst Drive that was attended by visitors from Courtenay and
other places. Gentlemen's prizes
were won by Mr. John Williamson
and Mr. James Copp. Ladies' prizes
were, won by Mrs. Thomas C. Woods
and Mrs. w. T. Wain. Fourteen tables were In the piny and a pleasant
evening wus certainly enjoyed by nil
present.
75,000 WORDS IN
A SCENARIO
There may he those who think that
writing a scenario means merely sitting down at a typewriter and dashing
off a few palpitating pages. iWIth
such persons Waldemar Young, now
preparing thescript for Mary Pick-
ford's "Dorothy Vernon of Ilaildon
Hall," desires to pick a quarrel.
"1 wonder," said he, "if most folks
realize that about the same number
of words are required for a scenario
ns are included In the average novel.
By that 1 mean for both the detailed
synopsis and the continuity. Oh. yes,
you must have both. You first do the
synopsis to get the story properly
arranged from a dramatic standpoint.
Then you break the story into scenes
for the camera.. This means a continuity. And believe me, much midnight oil is burned In the process.
About 75,000 words are pounded Jilt
before the job Is complete."
MERCHANTS WELCOME
FREIGHT SERVICE
The freighter Etta Mac was In on
her regular schedule from Vancouver
last Saturday despite the unfavorable
weather conditions prevailing last
week end. Her cargoes are continuing to grow and it does seem as
though the merchants of Courtenny
and other Industrial concerns operating In the Valley have welcomed the
regular freight service as a thing to
be greatly desired. The freight steamer Qralner, owner by the Brackman-
Ker Milling and Grain Company was
also In port on Sunday with a full
cargo for the local branch of the' big
firm. The importance of the Courtenny Rfver as a means of developing
commerce Is being realized more and
more as the time goes by.    Perhaps
Vancouver,—Intention to "cleanup" the beer-club situation in this
city wns given by Attorney-General
Manson following" lite arrest ot over
two hundred beer-club proprietors
nnd assistants by officers of his department. In his statement Hon. Mr.
Manson following the arrest of over
a method devised by the City Council
to evade the Liquor Control Act and
to bring the administration of the Ll.
quor Laws to nothing, the men virtually being licensed by the civic authorities for $300 a license to sell beer.
Attorney-General Manson also assailed President Beatty of the C. P. R. for
his reference to the public debt of
British Columbia. He said that the
sinking fund of British Columbia Is
four times greater than that of Ontario, although Ontario's public debt
is three times greater, and that President Bentty's reference to British Columbia showed that he was Ignorant
of fundamentals of British Columbia's
financial situation. -H. S. Wood who
has been County prosecutor for some
years past, a former fellow student
with Atton.ey-General Manson at Os-
goode Hall, was elected president of
thc Vancouver Liberal Association.
For Results Advertise in The Islander!
Hallow'een Masquerade
Gaiety
Theatre
Courtenay
^^   '   B.C.
REMEMHER THE DATE
31st October
McLeod's Store
Be WESTERN!
STETSON HATS
Rlue
New Styles in
Black — Iron-Grey — Brown
These Hats are selling very fast.   Come in early and
get a good choice
J. McLEOD
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Courtenay, B.C.
m
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for au estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHWTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 2(120 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C. SATURDAY,    OCTOBER   20th.,   1123
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
U!
FIVE
Bs
■
Ho=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday. October  19th and 20th
...A GREAT PLAY, A GREAT PICTURE... A Romance of Thrilling Mystery
"STRANGERS of
THE NIGHT"
The Hon Ambrose Applejohn steps
from his immaculate patent leather
pumps into the swashbuckling hoots
of his pirate ancestor, Captain Applejack—"as mild a mannered man as
ever scuttled ship or cut a throat."
Only the versatile screen—with
magnificent settings and a big splendid cast—could have created a BIGGER, finer entertainment from the
sensational stage success, "Captain
Applejack" that ran a year ln Now
York, a year In London, and kept audiences in all the principal cities In
paroxysms of laughs and thrills.
.    A Fbt* Sew* From "STRANCSRS OF THE NIGHT"
Extra Attractions
ROUND FOUR OF THE "NEW LEATHER PUSHERS" and FOX   Sunshine   Comedy
MATINEE SATURDAY 2:30 p.m.       USUAL SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE 9:30
MONDAY   AND   TUESDAY
WILLIAM RUSSELL IN
BOSTON BLACKIE
A Drama of Action and Romance ■
-A Man's Courage and a Woman's Love.
"Hearts Of Oak"
A Lumberjack Story
"DANGER" Mermaid Comedy
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY
Viola Dana in "ROUGED LIPS"
Next Friday and Saturday "TO THE LAST MAN" by Zane Grey
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
~ ~*       PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES	
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Hom«-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKKKIFIKLD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience..
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Cumberland  and  Courtenay.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest aud Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, wbo
wlll advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Onr   Work  nnd  Service
Will Please You t :     : :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, n.C.     -      Phone 8802
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
SHORTAGE OF COAL
IS POSSIBLE
City Dealers Warn   The
Order Early.
•ubllc   To
There may be a coal famine in Vancouver this year, a real famine in the
chief city of one of the greatest conl
producing districts in the world.
Veteran coal dealers made this prediction.
The reason? Not that the coal field
base been depleted—far from It. But
the public has not been ordering winter supplies of coal In anything like
the usual late summer and early fall
quantities, and the coal men find tliat
they are unable to lay ln the usual
large quantities and cannot finance
the expected late rush of orders. Consequently there will he much less conl
than usual ou hand when the rush
sets in.
"The only solution," they suy, "Is
for the public to place orders for win- ]
ter supplies at once and make it poss-'
ible for us  to contract immediately
for supplies."
Jt Is the same old story." said one
prominent coal dealer. "Every year
we advise people to lay in a stock of
fuel early, but usually they suspect
us of a desire to 'put something over'
and in many coses do riot buy until
the cold weather sets in.
"For tiie last few years the situation has not been so bad. The trying
experiences of the severe winters of
1917 and 1918 proved a warning to a
good many people, and our summer
deliveries for two or three years have
been comparatively heavy.
"This year it is different, and only
a few people have taken our advice.
During June. July and August of this
year only about one-quarter of the
usual supply of coal has been delivered."
Continuing this dealer said that il
took something more than 200.(1(10
tons of coal every year to supply
Vancouver residents' needs. Usually
most of this went out in lhe last aix
months of the year.
"The facilities for handling fuel in
tlle city are limited, and a sudden
cold snap would mean that the dealers
would he swamped with orders, lt
will simply be impossible for them to
lake care of all orders, and many
people are going to suffer."
According to this dealer there is
also danger of supplies running out.
Only limited storage spare is available, and in any cose even (he largest
dealers could not afford to carry (he
tremendous quantities of coal needed
to take care of a big rush.
would contract for the entire output
of all anthracite coal mine on the
llrltish Columbia mainland, and they
would sell the fuel to the citizens at
cost. He declares that power to enter
Into the business of selling commodities was incorporated in the city
charter by the Legislature ln 1921.
The alderman proposes that the
City Council authorize the appointment of iin engineer to investigate the
mine in conjunction with a committee
of tiie Council. He believes it wilt be
shown Hint with such a plan In operation, citizens could lie supplied with
ihe highest grade of coul at a cost lu-
'.le more than that now charged for
bituminous coal.
AMI. PETT1PIECE OUT FOB
ESTABLISHMENT OE
uTNH'IPAL COAL VAKI)
Aid. 11. P. Pettiplece wants Vancouver to go into the coal business.
At the next meeting of Hie City Council he says he will outline a scheme
under which    tho   city    government
Do Your Shopping Early and
Avoid the Crowd
SATURDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
One Cent
Sale
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
GORDON'S
New Shipment of Boy's and Men's Heavy Winter
Overcoats just A*rivecl.
These goods have opened up to our satisfaction, and
you will be surprised at the values we are offering.
Boy's Heavy Overcoats with Belt, from $13.50 In S1!>..">0
Men's Heavy Overcoats with belt from $22.5(1 to $27..">0
We will sell these quick at these prices.   Come early
and have your choice.
Coupons with all Merchandise
$200.00 WORTH OF PRIZES FREE
Don't miss this Chance 	
EjaiEiFraiwij^^
GORDON'S
Cumberland
23
EIIO.H THE PEN OE THE      *
• PltlM'EK'S   IIEVIL *
• '      *~-       • *.       . . a
Tlle Itiiudhog.
I hud a dream the other night
Tliat gave me courag new.
1 caught a brief and fleeting sight
Of one greatly earthly wrong set
right.
I only wish 'twas true.
I dreamed I saw a roadhog sent
To his eternal punishment.
Itight In the middle of a street
They tied him hard and fast,
Where all the streams of traffic meet
With driving wheels and plodding
feet
And each that hurried past,
Would scratch his shin or bump his
head,
And there lie stayed while ages sped.
* *    *
Whineliel is It that when spaids Ib
iriimp 1 alius have a phstful of harts?
* *   *
A Helpful Sermon.
Minister (closng Sunday sermon)—
"And. brothers, don't run around with
other men's wives."
.Man In the congregation jumps up
and snaps his fingers.
(Later after church.)
Same .Man— "Preacher, I'm sorry I
made that commotion in church, but
that sentence of yours Just reminded
me where I left my umbrella last
night."
* •   *
"Oh!"
She always pulls the blinds down
When she's dressing, you can bet.
Hut 1 don't give a doggone—
She still has a silhouette.
* *   •
As A Pill Sees Es.
Some folks on the outside,
Are ugly as sin,
Hut perfectly beautiful
Viewed from within.
* *   •
She Pools Vou, Son.
There once was a girlie named Maude,
Who they say was a social fraude,
In the ball room, I'm told,
She was haughty and cold,
Hut alone, on the sofa—Oh, Oaude!
* *   *
Dog-gone Good Stuff.
Be thrifty—oven a dog banks the
bones he does not need.
A man shouldn't growl just because
his wife puts on a little dog.
Puppy love Is the beginning of a
dog's life.
Puppy love sends some people lo
(lie dogs.
The cats have the night, but every
dog has his day.
If you go to the dogs—don't howl.
A good ninny "old dogs" act like
"young pups."
SEALED TENDERS addressed to the
undersigned, and endorsed "Tender
im- Boom, etc at Hagged Islands, B.C.
will be rccelcd at this office until IS
o'clock noon, Wednesday, October .11,
llhlll, for a hoom etc. at Hagged Islands
nx-Albernl District. H.C.
nnd anchorages at Grief Point, Com-
Plons and forms of contract can be
seen mid specification and forms of
lender obtained nt (Ills Department, at
I the Offices of the District Engineers,
Post Office Building, New Westminster. 111'.;Post Office Building, Victoria
B.C.; and at the Post Office, Vancouver. Hi'.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by lhe Department in accordance with
conditions  contained   therein.
I'.'uch tender must be accompanied
by un accepted cheque on a chartered
bunk payable to the order of thc Minister of Public Works, equal to 10 p.c.
of the amount of the tender. War
Limn Bonds of lhe Dominion will also
be accepted as security, or War Bonds
uud cheques If required to make up
au mid amount
Note.— Blue prints can be obtained
ui this department by depositing nn
accepted hank cheque tor the sum of
110.00, payable lo the order ol the
Minister of Public Works, which wlll
he returned If the Intending bidder
submit a regular hid.
By order,
II. ('. IIESHOI III.IIS	
Secretary
Department  of  Public Works,
Ottawa, October 4, 1923. SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER  20th.,  1923
"MOTHER, why be the family drudge"
"Other women get some fun
out of life. They are keeping their
charm, their family's admiration
and their friends.
"Why dull your mind by hard
labor over the wash tub? It's so
unnecessary nowadays to be a
drudge.. Take Dad down to
the electric shop today
and look at one of
those Gainaday Electric
Washers."
QfcUO
Come ace tiie
Ohio in action.
It takes the
drudgery out of
.leanuiii
The Gurney
Electric Pange
—made by the
old and fumoun
stove milkers,
in co-operation
with the Northern Electric or-
gwii/tmtm.
See the big copper tub, heavy
sheet steel cabinet, 8-position
wringer and strong, simple
mechanism of the Gainaday.
You will instantly understand
why we chose the Gainaday
as the best. You will see why
the Gainaday is so much easier
to   understand   and
to use.
Come in and see
it today.
k>SfBMMPJTOR
Boiling, steaming hot water
—any time.   Juat turn the
switch of the Thermo-Elec-
trit Heater
Northern Electric Appliances
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
i.i mm)
nrxsuTiii ave.
t milERLAXI), B.C.
\m
NOTICE TO
THE  PUBLIC
The Comox Creamery Association hereby gives
notice that only its employees are authorized to sell
milk or cream in bottles stamped with the name of the
Comox Creamery Association, and that all such bottles
tire the property of the Association.
Hereafter proceedings will be taken against any
person improperly using any such bottles or in whose
possession they may be found.
R.U. HURFORD, Manager
Private Greeting
m Christmas Cards
Order Early at The Islander Office
,*. rs  s nr* *e-*r% .fr WA*k^A%wmA*k*k**u**.   «*———■. ■*■ ——.^— S .—555
THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
The annual election ot a Rhodes
Scholar to represent the Province ot
British Columbia at Oxford University
will be be made not later than November 25th ot this year. The scholar
elected this year will go to Oxford
and take up his studies there in October 1924.
Thc following are the conditions under which candidates are eligible for
lhe Scholarship. A candidate must be
n British subject with at least five
years residence in Canada, and unmarried. He must have passed his
19th birthday, but not have passed
his 25th birthday, on October 1924.
He must be at least in his Second
Year In some degree granting University of Canada.
Under the terms Bet for by Mr.
Uhcdes in his Will, the Committee of
appointment must have regard not only to scolaBtic ability and attainments
in' candidates, but also to their physical vigour, capacity for leadership,
force of character.
force of character, devotion to duty,
courage, sympathy, and other moral
qualities.
Thc Scholarship Is ot the annual
value of £350 a year, and Is tenable
for three years.
Applications should be in the hands
of the Secretary of the Selection Committee, H. T. Logan, University of
British Columbia, not later than October 20th.
cl'rahfor.env.tlia 1
this annihilation. They came on the
lot the other day all lit up in bright
blazers and long pants, and now all
Hollywood is doing it. Your not sar-
torlally right a-tall around the studios these days unless a blazor's emblazoned upon you. "Just another Idea
I stole from "The Thief ot Bagdad,"
Doug explained whon asked about it.
MILLIONS OF ACRES
LAID BARE BY FIRE
KNICKERBOCKERS TO
GO SAYS "DOUG."
The deathknell Iiub been "wrung"
lor knickerbockers ln Hollywood.
For more than a year no director,
cameraman, prop boy or studio what,
not has been properly garbed unless
lie sported a pair of knickerbockers.
The epidemic even went so far as to
involve actors. But now it is ended--
crushed to earth never to rise again,
ns 'twere.
Douglas Fairbanks and his director,
llaoul  WalBh,  are    responsible    for
Forest fireB In Canada during the
five years   between 1918—1922   laid
bore 3,616,000 acres of merchantahle
timber   growing   on     public-owned
lands.   The value of this timber, as it
stood in the forests, was over 35 million dollars.   In addition to this enormous fire-swept area over 4 million
acres of young growth wns swept out
of existence, valued at J17.921.000. On
what are called cut-over lands from
whicli the matured timber has been
taken but containing considerable val.
ue in young growth, 2,500,000 acres
were destroyed by fire with a conservative  valuation  of   $2,700,000.      The
Dominion Forestry Branch makes the
total of destroyed forests in excess oi
110 million acres, with a valuation of
! $56,560,000.   Added to this is a prop
, erty loss in excess   of$13,000,000, also
j cost of fire fighting, $2,500,000, mak
| ing a grand total of $72,806,000 in the
j five year period.
:    These figures, while bad enough in
| themselves are not a complete state-
! ment of the economic, loss to Canada
> through forest fires.   In the forest In
dustr.,- more than 111 any   other   the
I cost of the manufactured product is
' made up of labor charges.   Hence de-
: structlon of present and future timber
1 cropB Involves direct loss of the means
' of sustenance nf an Important part of
our population..   Soil detonation foll-
! owing forest fires has never been estl-
i mated, but decreased production over
enormous areas  means a great set-
back to the future prosperity of Canada.
The Beer Without a Peer
and
U.B.C. BEER
100 Per Cent. Canadian
Albert* barley, Fraior Valley hops,
Canadian - mad* bottles, crowni,
labels, wrapper* and boxes go to
the making of these all-Canadian
products.
Order Today
'   Free Delivery lo your Home »Mf iliSKP:;'
Vancouver Breweries
This advertisement is not published or
displayed by the Liquor Control Board
or   by   the   Government .of   British
Columbia.
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
These lossee cannot go on Indefinitely if Canada's forest industries, accounting for a production of wealth
amounting to 500 million dollars a
year, are to remain in operation. The
present way we are travelling leads
straight to destruction as far as our
forest resources are concerned.
JACK PICKFORD
FINISHING FILM
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
Jack Plcktord is placing the final
touches ou his second Allied Distributors and Producers Corporation release, "Valley of the Wolf," at tlle
rickford-Fairbanks Studio In Hollywood this week.
On completion of the filming, Jack
wlll begin titling, cutting and editing
ll In order to have It ready for late
Fall release.
When the first print Is completely
ready, Jack will stick It in his suitcase mid catch the California Limited
for New York City, where he wlll rejoin his wife, Marilyn Miller, now
starring on Broadway in "Sally."
The young star and Independent
producer contemplates producing a
picture while In the East. The title
haB not been announced.
Deacon Boggs was    looking    very
glum.    Yon see. he prayed    to    the..
Lord to deliver him from temptation
when  he went to the city, and  the
Lord did.
H
ere an
dTh
ere
A grant of $25,700 to the Salvation Army to aid Canadian emigration work in Great Britain has been
authorized by a Canadian Order in
Council.
According to information received
by the Canadian Pacific Railway at
Winnipeg, sixty-three bushels of
wheat to the acre has been harvested
on the farm of T. M. Ballantyne,
three miles north of Lacombe, Alberta. The wheat graded No. 1
and weighed 64 pounds to the bushel.
Weighing 3,170 pounds, a steer,
said to be the largest ever received
in Winnipeg, arrived at the union
stockyards from Wainwright, Alberta. It was sold for $260, the
highest selling price of any steer
in Winnipeg since the wor.
The Canadian Pacific S.S. "Bra-
ton," which arrived in Liverpool on
September 5th, put up what is considered to be a record in the speedy
discharge uf cargo when she sailed
the following day, Sept. 6th, at 7
p.m., having discharged over 2,000
tons of cargo.
It is announced that the Canadian
Pacific Railway will increase the
Bine of its irrigation headgates at
Kimball, in southern Alberta, by 60
per cent in anticipation of an increase in area of 40,000 acres in the
Lethbridge district. Water will be
turned into the ditches of the Lethbridge Northern project, it is expected, some time this fall.
Buffalo steak will be abundant in
Canada this fall. A herd of 2,000
surplus Buffalo wandering on the
range in the National Park at
Wainwright will be slaughtered by
an Order-in-Council, and the meat
and skins sold. For several years
the Government has paid special attention to the preservation of tht
buffalo and the work has been so
successful that the National Parka
are now overstocked.
At a dinner given in his honor by
the Vancouver Board of Trade, E.
W. Beatty, President of the Canadian Pacific Railway, announced
that the Company proposed immediately to add two large modern
steamers to its coast fleet in order
te take care of its increasing tourist traffic over the Company's Pacific Coastal lines. He also announced the early completion of a
new pier at Vancouver at a cost of
several millions.
There have been large increases
in the number of pure bred animals
in Canada during the decade between
tht last two censuses. The increase
in tht number of pure bred horses
between 1911 and 1921 was 44 per
cent; of cattle, 139 per cent; of
sheep, 75 per cent, and of swine,
nearly 44 per cent.   The number of
fiure bred horses in the Dominion
n 1921 was 47,782; cattle, 296,656;
theep, 93,643, and of swine, 81,143.
A conservative estimate of tht
amount of money spent in Quebec
by tourists reaches $2,358,750. From
the beginning of May until the first
of September, 15,000 motor tourists
had called for information at the
offices of the Quebec Auto Club.
Taking an average of four people
to each car, this meant that at least
60,000 people had come to the city
by automobiles. Of this number
then were approximately 3,000
camping parties, or 12,000 people.
At the Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, recently, Colonel J. S. Dennis,
Chief-Commissioner of Colonization
of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
outlined in a detailed speech existing conditions in Canada and prospects for the future. Ho emphatically stated that there was no cause
for discouragement, but, on the contrary, every prospect of a renewal
of rapid development, Including an
increase In our population and tho
development• of our latent natural
resources in such a way as to insure, in the comparatively near
f iture, that we should be out of
the woods, and progressing rapidly
to a large population and favorably
business and financial condition*, SATURDAY,'   OCTOBER  20th.,   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEh
1
tt
>>
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People Trade
Tea Has Advanced Again
WHILST OUR PRESENT STOCK LASTS
Old Drury Tea will
remain the same.
75c. 1
Mumford's Grocery
T. H. Mum ford J. Walton
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
DUNSMUIR AVENUE CUMBERLAND
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION
Cumberland Centre
ANNUAL
Whist Drive and
DANCE
AND
PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES AND
MEDALLIONS
ILO-ILO DANCE HALL
Wed., Nov. 7th
Whist 7:30—9:80
GENTS $1.00
LADIES 50c.
Dancing 9:30—2:00 a.m.
REFRESHMENTS
SERVED
craft, other than photography; 11011-
nicmbers to four In each class. '
An entry fee of $1.00 will be charged
to uon-members and members who
have not paid ther dues, to cover the
number of Exhibits iu each class, as
mentioned in the preceding paragraph
All Exhibits must be sent In on
Thursday, October 18th and delivered
unpacked, at the Exhibitor's expenses
to the Hudson's Bay Company Building between the hours of 10 a.m. and
5 p.m.
All Exhibits must be removed ou
Thursday, November 1st between the
hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Exhibits
not removed by this date remain at
the owner's risk.
Two labels must be provided with
each Exhibit, one pasted on the back,
and the other loosely attached to the
Exhibit. Each label to contain the
name and address of the artist, the
title of the Exhibit and—if for sale—
the price.
All pictures must be fitted wiih
screw-eyeB and wire ready for hanging.
All work Bent in will be subject to
a Committee of Selection; and no picture will be hung which ere received
after Thursday, October 18th.
The Society will not hold itself responsible for any damage which
Works of Art may sustain, by fire or
otherwise, while under their care;
though every effort will, of course, be
made to secure their safety.
Twenty-five cents will be chargtd
for admission to the Exhibition; Children fifteen cents; Season Tickets
Fifty cents.
All pictures must be framed, and all
Exhibits must be the original work
of the Exhibitors; but in the case of
Craft Work, the design need not be
original. Whether the design is original or not must be stated.
No work that has been exhibited at a
a previous Exhibition of this Society
will be accepted.
Ten per cent, will be deductod ou
all exhibits sold.
For further Information apply to
the Hon. Secretary, J. S. McMillan,
201 Union Bank Building, Phone 1470.
Also to Mr. T. S. Gore, Hon. Treasurer, 1219 Langley Street, Phone 2377.
Note: In order to assist Exhibitors
from a distance, the Society will undertake to unpack and repack goods
delivered freight paid to the Hudson's
Bay Company Building>and addressed
to the Hon. Secretary, Island Arts and
Crafts Society.
ters and medical, were in full sympathy with the evangelical effort put
forth. As a committee they were required to pass upon the physically
curative aspect only.
The commltte consists of eleven
ministers, seven physicians, one lawyer and three university professors.
ADDITIONAL  COURTKNAV    NKWS
MONEY IN "SITUS"
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Off ce:   Cor.   of  Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite   llo-Ilo  Theatre
njMBERLAND, B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, 11. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
20   moms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
Foil reservations Phono 15.
II. YATES, Manager.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
OHice  and  Residence:   fVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
1101) B.C. I'orniltnont Loiin lildg.
PHONE 2«I8      VICTOBIA, BX,
THE ISLAND ARTS
AND CRAFTS SOCIETY
An exhibition of original work:
Paintings, Drawings, DeBlgns, Architectural and otherwise, and Crafts,
will be held by the Island Arts aud
Crafts Society, In the Private Dining
room of the Hudson's Bay Company
Building, Victoria, from Tuesday October 23rd. to Tuesday October 30th,
from 12 noon to li p.m. dully.
Members are limited to eight works
In each class: Oils, Watercolors, miu-
aturcs and Pastels, and Black and
While, or specniens of any kind of
SUB-COMMITTEE WILL
RECEIVE REPORT ON
PRICE CURES
It is understood that the special
committee of medical men and ministers to whom was entrusted the
task of Investigating the cures effected by Dr. C. S. Price, the evangelist
who was here last spring, has It3
findings in an advanced state of preparation.
It Is learned that the committee has
found that cures were effected in a
large number of cases of functional
derangement but has had some difficulty In establishing instances of positive cure ln caseB of organic disease.
That there waa some amelioration In
such cases, however, is considered
proved.
As against these the committee is
said to be compelled to find that more
than twenty patients who had been
pronounced cured have since passed
away and that several who wero
treated shortly afterwards had to be
Immured in mental hospitals where
they still  remain.
The committee Is Inclined to complain of non-receipt from Dr. Price
of a promised list of cases dealt with.
The fact that this was not available
mnde It much more difficult to ascertain and collate the cases to be considered.
The commltte in no way Impugns
the religious side of Dr. Price's work.
Individually the members, lay, tnlnls-
The potato growers of Prince Edward Island who use only certified
sed sell a great deal of their product
to the state of New York and rports
state that the farmers ot the Island
cannot supply the demand. We have
Instances right here in Comox Valley
of the profitableness of growing po-
tutos from certified seed stock. Spuds
produced from certified seed are realizing from six to ten dollars per ton
more than the product of just potatoes. In the open market "potatoes"
nre selling for fifteen dollars a ton
while "certified potatoes" are realizing from thirty to thirty-two dollars
per ton. The success that has attended the growing of certified seed potatoes in this valley should be incentive enough to encourage every grower to increase his acreage of high
grade spuds. One grower has said
that there is profit ln potatoes only
if certified seed is planted and that
there is no reason why the Comox
Valley cannot supply the whole of
Vancouver Island.
RESUME OPERATIONS
The logging camp of Messrs. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch is preparing to
resume operations on the first of November after s shutdown of several
weeks. It Is also said that the camps
of the International Timber Company
nt Campbell River, are preparing to
resume operations.
BACHELORS* DANCE
Great interest is being taken in the
opening season dance by the Jolly Bachelors' Club to be held ln the Gaiety
Theatre on Thursday October 26th.
A strong commttee is working on
the arrangements and the dance promises to be their best yet.
Dancing will start at 9 o'clock and
continue to 2 a.m.
Miss Winnie Good has returned to
Courtenay from Qualicum and has accepted a position ln the store of the
Marshall Music Company.
Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Moore, of
Ladysmith, are spending a vacation
at the home of Mr. Moore's parents,
Mr, and Mrs. C. J. Moore, Comox.
Mr. L. J. Rutherford has left for
Vancouver where he will in future reside.
Mr. A. T. Hyland, who has been accountant at the Canadian Bank of
Commerce, Courlenay, has gone to
Ladysmith, where he will remain with
the branch of the bank for a short
time, after which he will go to Cumberland to remain indefinitely.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive evary
two weeks, ensuring trash goods
all th* time.
Henderson's
NEW LAMP
BURNS 94% AIR
Bents Electric or Una
DONT
00 -
THIS!
Use
LEONARD
EAR OIL
IT DOES RELIEVE DEAFNESS
•nd HEAD NOISES. Simply rab
lt in back of the eare and Iniert
innontrili.
SpeeUl lutraettoM kr • aetei
tw specUlUt la ee*k poekue.
MADE IN CANADA *
DttcrivHot circular mmtnrtm.rl
A. a Leonard, Inc.
Tim* Ann* New Tee*
For sale In Cumberland   hy
Lung's   Drug   Store   und   nil
Reliable Druggists.
A new oil lamp that gives an amaz
Ingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the U. S. Government
and 35 leading universities and found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps
It burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, ls simple, clean
safe. Burns 94% air and H% common kerosene (coal oil.)
The Inventor, J. B. Johnson, 579 Mc.
Dermot Ave., Winnipeg, Is offering lo
send a lamp on 10 days' KREE trial,
or even to give one FREE fo the first
user In each locality who wlll help
him introduce it. Write him to-dny
for particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
$250 to $500 per month. —39-17.-1923.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • - B. C.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
The Gerhard Heintzman
Canada's Greatest Piano
There are many reasons why the Piano of your
choice should be a Gerhard Heintzman.
Your most careful consideration should be given
to the details that will later on spell satisfaction, or
otherwise in the instrument you select.
A piano is something you want to enjoy now and
in the years to come.
If you choose the Canadian Piano of Quality—The
Gerhard Heintzman— a full measure of satisfaction
will be yours. Its exterior appointments are artistic
and pleasing; its tone is mellow, sweet, and above all
lasting. Its durability is based on quality built into
every detail of its construction.
Write us to-day for catalog and particulars of our
easy payment plan.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
LIMITED
"Nanaimo's Music House"
22 COMMERCIAL STREET NANAIMO, B.C.
J. WESTOVER,     MARYPORT AVENUE
— District Representative
LADIES!
We would draw your attention to the fact that we are
now showing a nice line of Strap Slippers and Oxfords
for evening wear; Priced Right at—
$4.50 — $5.50 — $5.75 and $6.50
Nothing newer, with Fancy Buckles if desired
TheNational Shoe week is over, but you will still be
needing shoes.—See our lines of boy's and girl's shoes
all reliable makes and satisfaction guaranteed. Leckies
Weston and Amherst Brands at $2.95, $3.50 and $3.95
Boy's Serviceable School Suits at Wholesale Prices
$7.50 to $11.50
Boy's Navy Serge Bloomer Pants at $2.50. AH Wool,
Boy's Tweed Bloomer Pants. $1.75, $2.50 and $3.50
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT— Ladies' All Wool Black
Cashmere Hose Priced at 75 cents. —Ladies' Black
Lisle and Mercerized Hose in all Colors at 35c. and 50c
Men's Soft Fedora Felt Hats in the   Latest   Shapes
Priced at $3.50 and $4.50
GREY WOOL BLANKETS, Good heavy weight   at
$0.95 and $7.95 a Pair
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
Box 343 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Opposite Post Office
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
C»urtenay, B.C.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   llo-Ilo  Theatre
I I'MBKRI.ASI),  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical   Barber,  and  Hairdresser.  Shampooing,  Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
I
Christmas Cards at
The Islander Office EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,    OCTOBER 20th.,  1933
News From Sutherland's
Local Briefs
1JOVS SWEATERS, a large shipment of boy's and youth's sweaters,
with rolled collar, combination stripes
in colors. Navy and Green, Navy and
Tan, Brown und Fawn, Maroon and
Grey, Grey and Emerald, and Black
und Orange; sizes 21 to 2S. $3.75. and
sizes 30 to 114 (3.95. Get them at
Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
MENS WHITE JUMBO SWEATERS, a new consignment of Men's
While Jumbo Sweaters, roll collar,
this is u real sweater, Price $9.95.
Get them at Sutherland's Dry tloods
Store.
MEN'S KHAKI HEADLIGHT PANTS
We have received tbe agency for this
world famous linu of goods and desire
to introduce this line as the first number of lines we will handle hade by
this firm. Guaranteed. Purchase a
pair of these "Headlight" Khaki
Trousers und wear stinie GO days, If
the cloth does not give satisfactory
wear your money refunded or a new
pair free. Price per pair $3.95. Ot
them ai Sutherland's Dry tloods Store.
MEAN'S UNDERWEAR. We have
placed in stock a full line of "TIGER
BRAND" men's and Boy's underwear,
mens ribbed underwear in shirts uud
pants, all sizes at one price, $2.50 per
garment. Will give you every satisfaction. Procure them at Sutherland's
Dry Goods Store.
BOY'S COMBINATIONS. A full
line of boy's "Tiger Brand" Combinations made in knee length only, from
sizes 20 to 32. Price $1.50 to $2.25.
Compare the prices with anything
you have seen. Procure them atSutll-
erliind's Dry Goods Store. '
HOY'S COMBINATIONS made In
natural wool with either knee length
or ankle length, Prices from $1.75 to
$1.95. Procure them at Sutherland's
Dry Goods Store.
LADIES' REAL ' IRISH LINEN
Handkerchiefs. A shipment of handkerchiefs arrived on Thursday and
two conspicuous lines are 1st. A real
linen handkerchief made of good
quality linen in Ladies size. Price 15c
each. Get them at Sutherland's Dry
Goods Store.
LADIES FINE LINEN HANDKER.
chiefs. This lot are made from a very
fine quality of Irish Linen
and are really very fine in appearance
Price 25c. each. To be purchased at
Sutherland's  Dry Goods Store.
SILVER LACE. A very smart design of silver over a fine net about
9 inches wide. Price $1.75 per yard
Both in black as well as Silver. Get It
at Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
AYRSHIRE BLANKETS. The famous Skeldon Blankets mnde on the
Banks and Braes of Bonnie Doon, are
still featured with a very special quality and price, and now the cold nights
have arrived it will be n good Investment to have an extra pair of Skeldon blankets. Get them nt Sutherland's Dry Goods Store.
BOY'S MACKINAW COATS. A new,
assortment of Boys Mackinaws have
just come forward and are ready for
sale at very reasonable prices. Procure them at Sutherland's Dry Goods
Store.
LADIES' UNDERWEAR. We handle the well known line of "Peerless"
Underwear for Ladies and have a
very full assortment of the wanted
lines in Vests, Combinations, and
Bloomers, at the right prices. Get
them at Sutherland's Dry Goods
Store.
Mrs. Fred Dallos is visiting relatives [
and. friends in town.
Mr.  Earl   Stevenson   arrived  home!
from California on Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Horwood left for j
their home in Sooke on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon who have been
visiting Mr. and Mrs. John Frame,
left for their home on Wednesday.
Rev. A. D. Greene of Quathlaska
Cove was tbe guest of Rev. and Mrs.
Leversedge from Wednesday until
Friday morning, when he left fur
Vancouver.
Rev. A. W. Corker of Alert Bay arrived on Wednesday, and left for Vancouver on Friday morning. While in
the city he was the guesli of .Mr. and
Mrs. J. Wjalton.
W. T. Jago, Provincial Grand Organizer for the Loyal Orungc Lodge,
paid an official visit to the local lodge
on Thursday night.   He gave a very
interesting address on the progress of
the Order. He left for Courtenay on
Friday morning where lie will visit
their lodge.
FOR SALE- YOUNG B1UKSIURE
Pigs, unequalled for early maturity
und ready for the block ut 3Vfe mou-
llis. $5. each. —It Waddell, R. R. 1,
Cumberland; —40-3
FOR SALE— 1 YEARLING % TOG-
genberg buck goat from Elbar
Ranch, Price $15. delivered in
Cumberland or near vicinity. Apply
Mis. W. Hanna, R.R.No. 1, Comox.
FOR SALE— THOROUGHBRED
Cocker Spaniel Pups, Splendid Re-
treavers. C. II. Sturrup, opposite
Urquhort's Mill, Courtenay Road,
Aiden,  Phone 162F.
FOR SALE— TWILIGHT HERALD
Healer, Practically New. Good appearance, $12. 202 Derwent Ave.
WANTED
WANTED— IM.MEDIATELY^POSIT-
lon us mother's help, care of children, light housework, or as housekeeper to old lady etc. Small remuneration in return for good
home, apply to Mrs. James E. Whlt-
worth, R. R. No. 1, Cumberland or
tbe Islander Office.
CLAMS WANTED— SAAN1CH CAN-
nlng Company, Limited., Sidney
Wharf. 40.
ENJOYABLE BIRTHDAY PARTY
WANTED— TO HEAR FROM OWN-
er of good Farm for sale. State
Cash Price, full particulars. D. F.
Bush, Minneapolis, Minn.      —40-ti.
MUNICIPAL
ELECTION ACT
On or before October 31st, every
house-holder or license-holder must
register with the City Clerk to secure
u vote ut. the coining Municipal elections to be held in January, 1924, under Uie Municipal Elections Act The
qualifications lor registration are:
Must be a British subject of the full
nge of 21 years;
Have resided in the city    (or school
district, for school vole), ulnce Jan.
1st, 1923.  (This does not apply   to
license-holders.)
Must have paid  taxes   tool  indUdng
dog lax), to lhe amount of at least
$2.00, or a trade's license fee of at
least $5.1)11.
Ownera of property who have not
yet registered their property in their
own name, may get on the list as
house-holders under this section II
they have paid the current year's
luxes, and register before the end of
this month.
Tho declaration must be made before a J.I'., notary public, stipendiary
magistrate or the City Clerk.
The City Clerk's office will be open
from 10 lo 12 a. m. and from 3 to 5
p, in. daily.
A very pleasant surprise birthday
party was given Alden Francescini on
Saturday last, the occasion being his
ninth  birthday.
About twelve of his young playmates were present and spent an enjoyable evening in games and songs.
Alden who was taken by surprise was
the recipient of many gifts.
Mrs. Francescini served dainty refreshments which were much enjoyed
by the youngsters, whose appetites
never fail them.
Among those present were Norman
Frelonl, Second Marletti, Lena Merlettl, Cyril Davis, Gertrude Davis, Eleanor Davis, May Beveridge, Annie
Beveridge, Josie Burghiner, John
Burghiner, Viola Reese and Joe Wylle.
NEILL GETS A SIX
MONTH'S TERM
Wesley H. Neill of Cumberland
went to Vancouver, two weeks ago
and purchased a big supply of bootleg liquor. On the same boat on
which he returned to Vancouver Island was Provincial Constable Matthews, who scented something wrong
and placed Neill under arrest just before they reached Cumberland. Neill
offered him $50 to "fix the thing up,"
but the magistrate attended to that in
the form of a six month's sentence
WIS. T. E. BANKS
ELECTED AS DELEGATE
At a meeting of the Cumberland
School Board on Monday last Mrs. T.
E. Banks was selected as a delegate
to the Duncan convention of the B.C.
School Trustees'  Association.
The Board also discussed various
resolutions and instructed the delegate, who will give a report of the
convention at the next meeting.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cunliffe and
family left for Ladysmith on Tuesday, where they will reside.
Instead of cutting off her nose to
spite Ijer face tlle modern woman often cuts off her hair tn spile her rel-
uilves
Tbe other day we ran across a prayerful poem in a cotemp which was entitled "Lord. Make Me a Man." Sounds
as if it might have been written by a
discouraged splnlster, doesn't lt?
NOTICE
Tho next regular meeting of L.O.O.
M. No. 1070 will be held Monday Oct.
22nd. nt 7:30 p.m. After the meeting
a social will be held. All brothers are
requested to attend. The Charter Is
now open, Initiation fees being $10.
J. II. Robertson, Sec.
WOOLENS
Imported Scotch and Irish Woollens
in Suit lengths for Ladles and Gentlemen's Suitings.— Unexcelled quality.
Lowest prices. Agusslz Si Co. 111!) I'ein.
Iierton Bldg. Victoria, II.C.
CHRISTMAS CARDS
In selected packets &c. also Personal
Greeting cards.— Lowest Prices.
Agnsslz Si Co. i:i:t   lYnilierton   Bldg.
Victoria, B. ('.
ffl^^uoA
OLD-
COUNTRY
for
CHRISTMAS
AND NEW YEAR
Citnndhm  National   Railways
Wlll  Operate
SPECIAL TRAIN
To Ship's Side, Halifax, for sailing of
Ss. "Doric" to Liverpool
December 9, 1923
Ss. "Ausonia" to Liverpool
December 9,1923
Ss. "Pittsburgh" to Southampton
December 14, 1923
Ss. "Canada"   to Glasgow
and Liverpool
December 15, 1923
Ss. "Andania" to   London
December 10, 1923
Make  your   reservations   early
E. W. BICKLE
Agent
Ciunhcrlnnil II.C.
VICTOR EDMONDS IN
CLASSICAL SONGS
On Thursday night in the Gaiety
Theatre at Courtenay Mr. Victor Edmonds, Canada's premier tenor soloist
rendered a program of classical songs
that enthralled an audience of close-)
on 200 people who came from Cumberland. Uniou Bay and other parts of
the district. It was without doubt the
most excellent program ever rendered
in Coniox Valley, The artist of the
evening lias a particularly strong tenor voice with a wide range and the
encores to which he had to submit,
certainly proved thut he had won a
warm place in the heart of the audience.
The local artists on the program
were Mrs. M. B. Tribe, who has never
been heard to better advantage, won
a particularly well deserved encore.
Mr. W. A. Owen of Cumberland assisted iu the evening entertainment by
rendering a violin solo to which he
was forced to an encore.
'After the concert a danco was held
and thoroughly enjoyed, and all who
attended are loud In their praises of
the efforts of the Native Sons of Canada in bringing Mr. Edmonds to Courtenay.
SUCCESSFUL IVllllW'
DRIVE  AND  DANCE
Thc whist drive and dance held in
the Memorial Hall of the G.W.V.A.
on Friday last was an outstanding
success, a large number being present. The Veterans have gained an
enviable reputation ns promotors of
popular whist drives and dances, and
last Friday's affair added greatly to
their long list of successes. Amon^
the ladies Mrs. A. Gatz was the successful winner, with Miss Robertson
gaining the consolation prize; whilst
Mr. R. P. Mitchell and Mr. T. Rickson gained the first and consolation
prizes, respectively, amongst the
gentlemen. After refreshments had
been served by the Ladies' Auxiliaiy
of the G. W. V. A., adjournment was
made to the dance room, where the
large crowd thoroughly enjoyed themselves until midnight.
FINED $50,001 WILL APPEAL
On Wednesday morning Mr. Joe
Damonte appeared before Magistrate
Baird, on a charge of having unsealed
liquor in his possession and" was fined
$50. Three five gallon demijohns of
rye and seventeen bottles of claret
were seized by Constables Matthews
and  Russell, and confiscated.
Mr. Damonte will appeal the case
saying that he had reported the liquor,
which had been bought before government control and had asked for seals
but none had been sent. Mr. P. P.
Harrison prosecuted.
Mr.' Thos. Menzles, supervisor of
the Coniox Valley Cow Testing Association has received notification of
his transfer to Abbotsford and expects
lo leave for the scene of his new duties on the fiist qf November.
PALM OLIVE
WEEK
Bring your postcards in, I cake free with a purchase
of one cake at 10 cents
Lys Toilet Soap, Large Cake, Lemon, Rose and Almond
2 Cakes for 25c
Caravan Castile Soap, Large bars 25c. 2 for 45c.
Palmolive Shampoo in bottles 50c and 75c
Palmolive Cold Cream per jar 35c and 65c
Palm Olive Shaving Cream per tube 35c
Palmolive Talcum Powder per tin 35c
Palmolive Face Powder Flesh or white per box       50c
Palmolive Face Powder Flesh or white per box        75c
Buy Apples and Pears by the Box
Eating or Preserving Pears 501b. box $2.50
King and Gravenstein Apples per box $2.25
Cooking Apples per box       . $1.50
Oranges — 4 doz. for 95c and 3 doz. for $1.00
Grapefruit, Large Size 4 for 35c
Full stock of seasonable Fruits and Vegetables
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
NANAIMO CITY lost PARENT-TEACHER
LEAGUE GAME TO LADYSMITH
ACTIVITIES
NOVELTY ADVERTISING
Calendars — Metal Signs — Stickers
—Labels &c. — Lowest Prices. Agus*'
alt & Co. IH1I I'emberton Bldg. Victoria
IT TOPS THEM   ALL!
The ONE CENT
O aC\        MmJk        JLLi
SATURDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
3E
(Continued from page One)
kicked off for Ladysmlth and passed
to Houston and they Immediately
pressed Nanaimo's defence. Bell
cleared when Matthews looked dangerous, and for the first five minutes
Dell and company had some lively
moments to keep their lines clear.
Stobbart then got away, sent a pass
to Husband, this player eluding Anderson nnd had the goal at his mercy
hut kicked past, Boyd seeming very
much relieved. Ldaysmith then turned
the tide, Sneddon kicked past the side
when he seemed right through the defence and missed a good opportunity,
play was of a give and take nature
for some time, a fast pace being set
by both teams. Boyd had to exert
himself on several occasions ' with
shots from all the Nanalnfo forwards,
but he was equal to all occasions, he
seemed to be iu good form. Half time
arrived with no scoring and Nanaimo
having tlic best of the encounter so
Jar,
The second half started oft ln ding
dong fashion, the Ladysmith forwards
went off with great dash for the Nanaimo goal and tested Routledge three
times in succession with difficult
shots from Strang, Sneddon and Mut-
heson. After five minutes play,
Strang sent in another shot from thc
right wing. Routledge handled and
partially cleared, the ball slipped out
of his hands, but Bell kicked clear on
the goal line, but Gibbons received
the ball and sent In a grounder and
registered the only goal of the game.
Ladysmith now had the edge- on the
Canadian champions for the rest of
the game, and the final result was
Ladysmlth 1 Nanaimo City 0.
Notes on lhe Giune.
Boyd had to exert himself on several occasions In the first halt to clear
his lines with shots from Stobbart,
Adams and Appleby.
Routledge had to perform likewise
ln the second (half to save the shots
from all the Ladysmlth forwards. In
the second half Nanaimo City was
very weak in the attack.
J. Orr of Ladysmtih wns a tower of
strength to his side, being prominent
with his tackling and placing. Orr
wns the best player on the field.
The Nanaimo team lacked their usual combination nnd a few weak positions were easily seen.
The Ladysmlth team were well balanced and played throughout the 90
minutes with determination.
Notes on Clubs and Players
Through Nanaimo City's defeat at
Ladysmith and Cumberland's win over the G. W. V. A. the league table
takes a change.
The Davenports went on a scoring
rampage against Northfleld, scoring
three goals, their first this season.
Nanaimo City met their first defeat this season at Ladysmlth, In /act
On Tuesday evening the members
of the local Parent-Teacher Association gathered together to enjoy, their
first social evening of the season.
' Cards and dancing, together with
solos by Mrs. W. Wood, and Mr. 11.
Splttal formed an excellent entertainment, while the ladies served delicious
refreshments. Dr. Lamb, Travelling
Medical Health Officer for II. C, who
was to have given a lecture prior tc
the social, was, owing to illness, unfortunately not able to be present,
thereby causing great disappointment. We can but hope that Dr.
Lamb will be able, at some future
date, to deliver his Instructive address.
*   e   •
The Executive of our progressive
P.-T. Association has prepared a programme for the coming season, which
should not only attract an appreciative audience, but result in some very
Interesting an enlightening discussion. The present system of education
In Public and High Schools and the
way in which It prepares the child
for later life will form Interesting
themes for the November and December meetings, with Miss I. A. Gallivan
and Mr. Hamilton as the respective
speakers, while tt is hoped that Mr.
John Kyle, of Victoria, wlll be here
to take charge of a meeting In the
early part of the year. Dr. MacNaughton has promised to address
the members, while Immediate measures are being taken to secure Rev.
It. Sovereign of St. Mark's, Vancouver, to deliver one of his excellent lectures. It was decided also, If possible,
to Invite n member of both the Forestry Dept., and of the Faculty of the
University of B.C. to address the
meeting.
At this meeting, too, It waa agreed
that a campaign tor the canvassing
of new members should be begun, so
that parent and teacher might meet
together and discuss the all-absorbing question of the clhld.
their first defeat since they won the
Canadian championship.
The Veterans were again unlucky
losing out to Cumberland again by the
odd goal. Don't get downhearted,
Vets, your turn is sure to come.
Ladysmith tried out a new centre
forward named Sneddon, who created
a good Impression.
Toots Plump of Cumberland Is the
high goal scorer this year, having five
goals to his credit. City boys keep
your eye on Plump next Sunday.
Will Nanaimo City check the winning streak of the Cumberland team
next Sunday at Cumberland! it they
do the-league will be all the more Interesting, ln fact a draw will do.
Northfleld has secured a good man
tn Green, a new Inside right.

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