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The Islander May 27, 1916

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Array 1\
The Newspaper with the Largest Circulation in the Comtx District.
iegislatiun Library
VOL. VII., No. 9
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY. MAY 27. 1916.
Subscription price, $1.50 per year
BEST PARADE EVER
HELD IN THE CITY
Crowds Gather at City Hall  to
Witness Unveiling of Cumberland's Roll of Honour.
Empire Day was one of the
most enjoyable holidays Cumberland has seen. The holiday
crowds from various parts of the
district were never greater and
the opportunities for enjoyment
were equal to those of any former 24th of May. The special free
train of five coaches generously
donated by tbe Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd., arrived at
half past nine in the morning
with the usual decorations from
Union Bay and intermediate
points loaded with holiday seekers. The sports on the recreation
grounds commenced on time as
published in the previous issue
of the Islander and was carried
ont in all.its details very successfully somewhat different than
previous years, as each and every
event was started on time. This
was due to the active part played
by the secretary of the sports,
Thomas Mordy. The prominent
feature of the day was the parade and the unveilingof Cumberland's Honor Roll, Crowds gathered around the City Hall at fifteen minutes to one in the afternoon, the appointed time for the
parade to commence. The Honor
Roll was placed outside tbe Council Chambers, covered with an
immense Union Jack, flag of the
British Empire. Immediately in
front and at thc edge of the side
walk stood tlie representative
group of Uiii Guides dressed in
the various colors of thu Allied
Nations, each representing an
Ally. The girls, who were mostly
city school teachers,made a good
appearance and thrilled the soul
of every British subject, as they
stood there in front of the Honor
Roll of the men who had left for
the front, and reprefenting the
nations at war lighting today for
liberty and justice. Immediately
behind the representative group
of the Allies stood the GirlGuides,
the largest organization of its
kind in British Columbia. These
girls, dressed in their uniforms,
stood there to attention and made
a good impression on the vast
assembly there to witness the
unveiling of the Honor Roll.
Then further back and lined up
in the middle of the street and
extending almost to the head
office of the Canadian Collieiies
the Boy scouts took their stand
with their able leader, Scout
Master A. J. Taylor, and the
West Cumberland Conservative
Band playing patrioticsel ictions,
school children, citizens and visitors thronged thestreet. Traffic
was at a standstill.
At the appointed time Wesley
Willard, chairman of the Cumberland Patriotic Society in a few
well chosen remarks unveiled the
Roll of Honor and called upon
the Rev, Arthur Bischlager, vicar of Holy Trinity church in this
city, who said:—
' 'To-day we are met to do honor
to the men who have made the
great sacrifice, and have gone
forth to fight for the cause of
truth and justice and righteousness.
Let us make no mistake about
it—this war is not one of wanton aggression on our part, but a
war of necessity because we
must be true to the principles of
right and liberty for which the
British Empire has ever stood.
We do well to honor these men
today, for every one of them is
a hero, and if any should fall on
the field of the battle they will
die as martyrs— martyrs of liberty and truth. As we look upon
this Roll of Honor two feelings
should fill our minds—feelings
of pride and envy. Pride in the
men who have gone, pride in the
women who spared them, and
pride in the city to which they
belong, and envy because our
names are not insribed  thereon.
I am not a recruiting officei
but I feel that tbis is an occasion
on which one should deliver a
recruiting address. There
are thousands of single young
men in Canada today. Why dont
they enlist? When one reads of
the frightful atrocities committed
by the Germans in Belgium, of
the rape of women and the murder of innocent babes, of the a\v-
fulness of the Lusitania crime,
one is amazed that any single
man holds back from the task of
retribution. There are numbers
of single, husky young men still
in Cumberland. Why won't they
go? Is it that they have not realised the tremendous issues that
hang on the result of this war?
Have they realised that we are
not making the headway we
should? Have they not heard
the call for more men, and still
more men? Have they never
heard the words of the poet,
"Who lives if England dies. ?"
Oris it that they are craven?
Surely not, Yet when one sees
them content to let other men
fight for them one cannot help
thinking that they have no stomach for •fighting. The name of
every single young man in Cumberland ought to be on the city's
Honor Roll,
Perhaps someone will say,
"Well, you tell others to go, why
don't you go yourself?" I wish
to Heaven I could. But I am a
man under discipline. When I
was ordained priest of the Church
of England I took oath of obedience to my Bishop. Now the
Bishops have forbidden priests
to bear arms, but they may enlist as chaplains, Within the first
month of the war I offered to go
as a chaplain but things were so
disorganized that the Chaplain
General told me that my name
would have to go on the waiting
list. Then I came out here, and
since I have been in Cumberland
I have applied to five different
battalions for the post of chaplain, but so far other men have
been before me. Now my name
is up again for a vacant post.
What can I do more. Ifl were a
layman I would have gone ere
this in spite of the fact that I am
a married man. And now I ask
you—"What have you done?"
Have you even thought seriously
about it? I urge you to give the
matter your most urgent consideration.
In conclusion may I quote two
verses of the poem that appeared
some time last year in the Cumberland News:
And yuu thai loaf where the skies are blue
And play liyn petticoat hem.
These are the men who ate fighting for you
Whal are you doing for them?
Bravo, then, for Ihe men who fight!
To hang wilh lhe men who play!
Il's a fight to the end for honor and friend
It's a fight for our lives today.
The following are the names
of the men of this district who
enlisted in the Expeditionary
Forces for active service in the
great European War:
BRITISH   EXPEDITIONARY FORCES.
C. Macintosh R. Rushford
R. P. Fogg J. Wilson
H. A Fourache A. H. Sclliers
J, Bird
CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES
J. Brown W. Brown
(J. Brown *M. Brown
II. Brown J. Scougali
Hy. Stant Hd. Stunt
A. Haywood A. Peacock
R. Herd P. Sioddart
F. Hurford D. Waldron
NOT HIGH ENOUGH.
Crown Prince:—"We must have a higher pile to see Verdun,
father."—Louis Raemaekers of Holland in New York Times.
A. Pickard
L. Piket
H. Simms
G. Burns
R. B. Boyle
A. MacCulloch
H. Hewlett
H. Ponder
R. Ray,
• G. Bailey
P. Harvey
C. McTaggart
A. Pearson
J. Connors
C. Jewitt
J. M. Gillespie
H. Goss
J. Ellison
A. Bird
E. Brentnall
J., Anderson
E. W. Jackson
T. Scolt
H. Whyte
T. Kilmartin
R. Peters
W. Wright
J. R. Stewart
J. Murphy
T. Hart
I.. Coe
A. Walker
A. Grant
D. Ferrero
J. Walls
W. McLellan
A. A. Glov.;r
S. Glover
H. Hillier
A. Lang
J. Spiers
A. Ward
D. McClean
J. Stewart
R. Stiles
A. Randall
A. Dennis
J. Murphy
J. Mclnulty
S. Minich
B. Nicholas
H. Thomson
J. Sutherland
A. Hutchinson
A. J. Cassidy
E. Jackson
A. Norman
A. E. Last
F. Cope
D. Irvine
E. Horwood
H. Thornley
P. Anderson
H. Conrod
R. Thomson
C. Thomson
R. Mitchell
H. King
W. Halcrow
W. Campbell
H. Reid
J. Lawler
P. Mitchell
S. Sullivan
S. Watson
F. Watson
A. H. MacFarlane
J. Beveridge
J. Foran
V. Bulatovich
N. Zindich
W. Wilson
Abe Haywood
Jno. Vaughn
Alf. G. Jones
H. Urquhart
The chairman of the Patriotic
Society then called upon Dr. Geo.
K. MacNaughton, who also gave
an able patriotic address, The
Band struck up "God Save the
King," then the "Maple Leaf
Forever," and the procession began to move, following the Band,
and consisting of Girl Guides,
Boy Scouts and School children,
decorated motorcars, and representative groups of the Allied
Nations. It was an imposing
procession marching towards
West Cumberland the Boys and
Girls in their uniforms keeping
perfect step, a Military parade
of children. The line of march
was then through the main
streets of Cumberland to the
Kecreation grounds, where the
judges awarded the prizes. Cumberland feels proud of the men
who assembled and took a prominent part in making the parade
a success.
On the grounds Wm. McFadyen
won the prize of ten dollars for
the best decorated motor car and
Miss Bessie Stewart of the Girl
Guides won a special prize for
the best vehicle drawn by horses.
U.S. MEN OBTAIN OPTION
ON WESTERN FUEL CO.
San Francisco, Cal., May 23.—
The first step in a deal for a controlling interest in the Western
Fuel Company by Thomas E. and
R.R.Pollock, bankers and mining
mon of Arizona, andC.P. Heaton
of Los Angeles, was taken here
today when payment was made
for an option on a majority interest in the company's stock,
The new deal, if it goes through,
will retire the interest of the estate of the late John L. Howard,
who was president of the company. James B. Smith, Vice-
president and general manager
of the company, will retain his
interest and continue his active
participation in the management.
The Western Fuel Company is
capitalized for $1,000,000, but the
purchase of control, involving GO
per cent of the stock, was said to
involve a considerably larger sum.
The property involved includes
40,000 acres of coal land in British Columbia with a present output of from 50,000 to 60,000 tons
of coal a month. The company
recently opened a new mine at
Nanaimo, B. C, ntan installatioi
expense of $1,250,000 which, it
was said, would increase the output about 2000 tons a day. The
company also owns yards and
bunkers here and in Oakland.
James B. Smith, who confirmed
the payment of theoption money,
was one of the three officials of
the company convicted in 1913 of
conspiracy to defraud the government out of duties and drawbacks
on imported coal and sentenced
to penitentiary terms, but who
are still at liberty pending the
result of appeal to the United
States Supreme Court.
MRS. WALTER H. WHITE
PASSES AWAY SUDDENLY
The sad news of the death of
Mrs. Minnie White passed through the city on Sunday morning. The deceased lady was the
wife of Wafer H. White, Electrical Engineer of the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Limited, and
was born in Chatham, New
Brunswick, forty-five years ago.
She was the daughter of the late
Alexander K. MacDougall, of the
same place, and made a host of
friends during a residence of four
years in this city.
In the death of Mrs. White we
fully and keenly realize our loss.
She was a true friend, and her
devotion fo those she loved would
make a bright chapter in any
life. Nothing but the thought
of the loving hand that has removed her can reconcile us to her
absence. While she has gone
from the scenes, the conflicts,
the sorrows and pleasures of life,
she will stbl live in the hearts of
those who knew her best. Her
retiring nature led her to hide her
best qualities from public gaze,
but they were revealed to those
who enjoyed her acquaintance,
yet it was in her home that her
true worth was most conspicuous. "God touched her with
His finger and she slept," but
not until a beautiful life was
lived, a noble example of patience, fidelity to truth and faith
was given, and now that she
sleeps memory takes up the harp
of life and smiting the strings
finds that her virtues melt into
music. So it ever is when a life
is nobly and divinely lived.
The remains of the late Mrs.
White were interred in Holy
Cross Cemetery, Cumberland, on
Tuesday morning, May 23rd.
Floral offerings as follows were
sent to the residence of the deceased :
Wreaths: Mr. and Mrs. Dalby, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. J. Gillespie, The Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir
Limited Office Staff, Mr. and Mrs. E.
Jones, Jas. and Wm. White.
Pillow: Mr. and Mrs. F. Sawford.
Basket: Mr. and Mrs. J. Fraser.
Globe: Members of the West Cumberland Conservative Band.
Sprays: Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, Mr.
and Mrs. Lockard, Mr. and Mrs. P. P.
Harrison, Mr. and Mrs. T, Bennett, Mr.
and Mrs. F. Jaynes, Mr. and Mrs. McFarlane, Mrs. Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. T.
Hudson, Mr. and Mrs. Merrilield, Mr. and
Mrs. I). McMillan, Mrs. Murdock, Mrs.
Vaughn, Mr. H. Leilhead, Mr. C. Dalton,
Mr. C- De Couer, Mr. and Mrs. T. Carey,
Mr. and Mrs. T. Carey, Mr. and Mrs. E.
Bickle, Mrs. H. Reese Miss E. Reese, Mr.
and Mrs. A. Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. J.
Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. 11. E. Drew, Mr.
and Mrs. Win. Haggari, Mr. and Mrs. A.
Hugo, Mr and Mrs. D. Walker.
Cross: Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Clinton, A.
J. Edwards, R. Gray, H. Winningham, F.
Martin, !•'. Pickard, J. Hransfield. R. Shaw,
Mrs. D. Pikel, Mr. and Mrs. T. Bickle
am! family, Mr. and Mrs. W. Jones and
family, Mr. and Mrs. J. McLeod, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. W. Hudson.
CONVICTED OF MIS-
Estimated Financial Report.
The Treasurer's estimated  report for the 24tb of May  Sports,
held on the Recreation Grounds,
Cumberland, are as follows:--
Total  receipts, cash  and
goods. ....$561.30
Expenditure: Cup&Shield$ 45.00
Band    75.00
Umpires  10.00
Flags, balls, etc  37.20
Cash prizes   222.50
Value prizes in goods  63.50
Balance on hand  108.10
Total  . $501.30
W. Wesley Willard, Treas.
A complete report will be published when the total receipts and
expenditures are at hand.
RED CROSS RECEIPTS
AMOUNT TO $239.45
The total receipts for the Red
Cross Tea held at the home of
Mrs. Edward W. Bickle and the
Red Cross Dance at the Ilo Iiu
Dance Hall are as follows:
Sale of 10c. tickets $ 92.2"
Red Cross Tea money..' 33.2U
Sale of ice ci earn on lawn 13.8(1
Red Cross Dance  100.25
Total $23!). 45
The Royal Bank of Canada,
Cumberland, B.C., May 27, 1.11(1.
We hereby  certify that Mrs.
Edward W. Bickle has this daj
deposited with this office for the
credit of the treasurer of thi
Women's   Patriotic   Society  tb'
sum of two hundred and thirty
nine dollars and  forty-five cents
($230,451.    T. B. O'Connell,
Manager.
I J. R. Lockard, General Superintendent of thc Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Lid. is expected to arrive this evening from an
official visit to New York and San
Francisco.
Jury Find Nesbit Guilty of Using
Funds of Mrs. Simms for his
Own Benefit.
All the eloquence of his attorney couldn't persuade the jury
against convicting John Nesbitt,
lhe real estate man, on two of
the three counts of which he has
been arraigned, before Chief Justice Hunter and jury in the assizes. But he gave the jury enough to keep them thinking from
4.30 in the afternoon until 9.10
o'clock last night before they
were able to agree.
The two charges on whicli the
jury found Nesbitt guilty are:
First, stealing and converting to
his own use $475.75 from Mrs.
A. E. Simms: second, theft while
acting in the capacity of an agent.
They acquitted him on the third
charge of obtaining a release of
property by false pretenses,
ft ese charges arose out of real
estate transactions Nesbitt had
in 1911 and 1912 with Mrs. Simms,
who considered him a shrewd
and honest business man and entrusted her money to him for investment.
Nesbitt refused to take the
stand in his own defence yesterday afternoon. This fact seemed
to count very much against him
with the jury. Before the jury
retired some of the jurymen asked pertinent questions about the
accused's reticence.
Chief Justice Hunter, however,
told them tf at the prisoner was
entitled to every privilege and
there might be a thousand and
one reasons why he might not
wish totake the stand. Oneof the
jury men said he thought so, too.
Mr. 1). S. 'fait, for the defence,
called only one witness, Mr. J.
C. Mcintosh, a solicitor, who
had acted for Nesbitt during part
of the time he had been conducting bis real estate and building
adventures in Victoria's building
boom days.
Mr. Mcintosh said that Nesbitt had put through at least 100
real estate transactions, both buying and selling. He had no hesitation in calling Nesbitt an illiterate man who had the peculiar
habit of carrying everything in
his head and consequently taking
a longtime to separate his transactions. Once Mr. Mcintosh,
acting for Nesbitt, was called on
to sec the solicitors of Mrs. Simms
He accordingly weni down to
Eberts & Taylor, where he found
a man called Robert Nelson, who
said he bad charge of all tin' business of Mrs. Simms. Nelson
showed Mr. Mcintosh a statement of accounts and a volume
of correspondence on the basis
of which a release was drawn for
Mrs. Simms. A settlement was
drawn whereby Nesbitt was lo
pay $100 cash and give two promissory notes.one for $200al two
months and one for $130 for four
months. This agreement was
signed by each parly.
Nelson was I hen called and admitted thai he had banked lhe
money in his own account, but
lhat he had finally settled even •
thing. He told the court lhat
■-■7011 was due to Mrs. Simms, but
he said that he had told her that
Nesbitt's affairs were in a pitiable state because of tbe boom
collapse, and lhat she would he
very lucky lo gel out of all her
transactions with Nesbitt wilb
even thc money she had put in.
It developed later that Nesbitt
received money for the lots which
he had not paid over. This was
learned when a suit was started
against Mrs. Simms, and it was
this that resulted in bringing the
action against Nesbitt..  Colonist TWO
THE ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOftOWS
TKE FUG.
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year In advance. $1.50;
Single copies. 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, MAY 27th, 1916.
Wash Dresses for Girls in smart novelty styles.
Middy Waists for Girls, with white drill shirts to match.
Wash Hats — Boys' and Girls' wash hats.
Wash Suits — Boys' wash suits and straw Hats.
One-Strap Slippers Boys and Girls patent boots and strap
slippers, barefoot sandals and vacation rubber shoes.
Sunshades Misses' Sunshades in pretty novelty patterns
ELECTION METHODS
(From tlie Victoria Daily Colonist.)
The evidence given before the
House Committee in regard to the
Vancouver Election brings home
closely to the public the existence
of a state of things of which some
people were already aware, others
suspected and of which no one
was wholly ignorant. The very
large majority secured by Mr.
Macdonald precludes the supposition that he owed Jiis election to
corrupt methods and affoids an
excellent reason wby the whole
system of election campaigning
might now receive tbe very careful consideration of all right-
thinking citizens. Il is evident
that if the contest had been very
close the Liberal candidate would
have owed his election to illegal
voting. We are not going to ask
anyone to believe the Conservatives never use illegal methods
to secure the marking of ballots
in favor of their candidates. For
the purpose of what we are about
to say we will admit that it is a
case of 50-50, although as far as
our information on such matters
goes, the Vancouver case is in a
class by itself. But conceding
for the sake of the argument that
one party is, as a general proposition, quite as bad as the other,
no one will claim that the continuance of methods, under which
decisions of a character most
vital to the public welfare may
depend upon on how many persons can be got to vote illegally,
ought not to be rendered impossible. In the Vancouver case we
have Mr. Macdonald, the successful candidate, linked up with Mr.
Scott, wbo is linked up with Mr.
Annancc, who is in jail for violation of the election law in a
manner that was legally andean election campaign, they
mindly wrong. The chain is! do so to win if they can, and
complete from the House of when the pinch becomes hard
Assembly to the House of Correct- they are not disinclined to. wink
on. It is idle for the Liberals to ■ at things they would not openly
say, as they doubtless will, that! countenance. But reform is nec-
ther i have been occasions in I essal'>' to K° as far as to make
whi ha similar chain could have i canvassing illegal and punish
been established in other cases ifiwith flne or imprisonment the
all the farts had been brought \ man wno ?eeks by personal can
out. If that is true, it only
makes the case worse. If we
had any reason to think the Vancouver case  to  be   unique,   we
$w*%
m
Ladies Dept.
SUNSHADES A fine assortment in   all   the   leading
shades and stripe   effects,
-*"~ from $2.00 to $3.50.
WASH SHIRTS in white rep, pique and white drill, from $1.25 to $3.50.
SATIN UNDERSKIRTS in assorted shades in good quality satin, from $1.75
WAISTS These are very attractive and come in voiles beautifully embroidered, also in fancy stripe silks, price from $1.50
SILK GLOVES Ladies' elbow silk gloves of a very fine quality, in pop*
ular shades, from 75c.
MILLINERY in up-to-date styles at popular prices.
NECKWEAR A fine display in latest styles in eastern novelty neckwear
HOSIERY Super combed silk lustre hose, full fashioned, highgrade quality
Men's Dept.
For Summer Underwear in  all Styles.
NECKWEAR made of finest of silk in a big variety of good colors and
designs,
TENNIS PANTS:- White Drill and Tennis Pants with belt loops, side
straps, and cuff bottoms, $3.50.   Tennis and Vacation shoes.
STRAW HATS and Belts in all styles, also a big range of Caps.
OUTING SHIRTS, Excellent quality cloths, neat fancy stripe, self-striped
and self-figured: a!so the new County Club shirt, with wide open neck.
SHOES- Invictus, "the best good shoe," in grey and black vestings.
SILK SOX These come in Oxford, Black, Steel Grey and Tan.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O.. LL.D. D.C.L.. President
JOHN A1RD, General Minuet. H. V. F. JONES. As.'l General Mnnajer
Children's
Dept.
CAPITAL, $15,000,000    RESERVE FUND, $13,500,000
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts
are welcomed.    Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons, with-
draw,ils to be made by any one of them or by the survivor. 5150
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
Wo Una y%£******* B^ty maybe on'yskin cleeP;
VV cUipapci S but don't buy your wallpapers
before you have examined our stock, ranging in price
from 1*V a double roll, to the best ingrains.
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMRI.Kl.AND, «, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
they would not tolerate. The
man who talks about reforming
election methods and shuts his
eyes to the fact that there is a
lot of human nature in politicians
no matter to what party they be-
long nor how personally respectable they might be, might save
his energy for some other sphere
of activity.   When men set ab-
vass to influence another to vote
in anv particular way. But a
lot of good can be accomplished
if candidates and the public 1 ec-
would hope that its nefarWsnes8|0Bnized I)artl' Naders  who will
set their faces sternly against illegal methods.
would   prevent
and would  say
about it.
We di ul with the
Its    repetition
nothing   more
matter only
because it affords a conspicuous
illustration of wicked ancl cor
rupt methods which may, and
possibly have, not Infrequently
and to the election of candidates
who would not have been the
choice of the electorate if Improper means had not been resorted
to.
We speak of this matter at the
present time because a general
election is not very far away and
in the hope that the facts brought
about may uroiise the sober;
thinking voters to a realization
of their duty to prevent such
campaign methods in the future,
That New Auto
you intend buying will have to
possess certain qualities you insist
on. The engine must be utterly
reliable, efficient in every detail and
instantly responsive. Other features
such as bearings, upholstery, and
design, must also measure up to
your ideal. In short, you want a
thoroughly good car, moderately
priced, nnd easy to run:—that's the
Chevrolet. For further information
see or write
LOUIS L. GRANT
Agent fur Cbtvtolel and Dodge Cars.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
[f you can ride a bicycle and
talk intelligently about a Motor
In drive it, I can offer you a means
We know how apt people are in
the heat of a contest to do things ,,)' making money. Write Fred A
whicli in their calmer momentsICaton,611 View St.,Victoria,B,C.
WHY
THE GREAT-WEST LIFE
Assurance Company
has for nine successive years written
The Largest Canadian Business
of all companies operating in Canada.
ITS PREMIUMS JRE THE LOWEST
ITS POLICIES JRG THE MOST LIBERAL
ITS DIVIDENDS ARtS THg HIGHEST
Investigate for yourself before insuring elsewhere.
VANCOUVER ISLAND BRANCH OFFICE
J. Burtt Morgan, Manager.
109 Union Bank Building, Victoria, B.C.
The Crowning Achievement I
■ ■. ""■,-:. s'; ,--v  '. ■ . . wv'>';':    ;*, "'"■' ' ' *'*■?
:-:..p>.'-'*-*i,r.*J\-s.:)r^.*^t
The latest submarine victim may be the last.—From Philadelphia Ledger.
Q
ueen
Beer
Good Beer is a substantial food in itself.    It
supplies energy.    Is a
fine tonic.
USE QUEEN BEER
With your meals.    It aids digestion.    It is the ideal
temperance drink.   Good beer is enjoyed by thousands
of ardent advocates of real temperance.   Drink beer
and be temperate.    Always ask for Queen Beer.
<$><H>
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
T. D. McLEAN
Watchmaker and Jeweller
A COMPLETE   SUPPLY OF RAILROAD WATCHES
OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR FOR THE
Wellington Colliery Railway Company,
[Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited]
Books, Magazines, Periodicals, Etc.
Dunsmuir Ave.,
Cumberland, B.C.
FURS
Get "More Money" for your Foxes
Muskrat, White Weasel, Beaver, Lynx, Wolves,
Marten and other Fur bearers collected in your leollon
SHIP YOUR FUHS DIRECT to"sllllllKIIT"the lament
house In the World dealing exclusively In NORIII AMIKU AN HAH rims
a reliable—responsible—snie Fur House witli an unlilemislir.l reputation existinK for more than a third of a cent nrv," 11 lonir successful record ofsendinK Fnr Shippers prnnipt,SATISFACTORY
ANU PROFITABLE returns. Write for "ttlir aiiunm «*i>»tr"
the only reliable, accurate market report anil price list published
Writa far It-NOW-ii'. FREK
A B SHUBERT Inc Is"WESTaustinave.
«.o. jnuDuni,inc d.bi.c69Chicago,u.s.a!
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
, n p
THE ISLANDER CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Get Your
Spring Sewing
Done NOW!
And let the
Singer Sewing
Machine   Co.
Help You.
We will sell you a Singer Sewing
Machine on very easy payments,
and no interest. We will demonstrate thoroughly each machine sold,
and will give the Guarantee of the
Singer Sewing Machine Co.
NEEDLES,   OIL    AND   ALL   ACCESSORIES
See Our Windows at=——
Mrs. Alex. King's
Ice Cream Parlor and Candy Store
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has been renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
in every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
Silver Spring Beer
Contains backbone and
stamina, and gives you
back the appetite that
you have lost. Drink the
Beer that's pure at the
UNION HOTEL
Cumberland,   B. C.
When I Come to
Your House
Don't think I am a bill-collector
or   peddler;   my   business   is
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
By the best of modern equipments and up-to-date methods
I can press for you and keep
your clothes in perfect condition at a low price. We never
disappoint our customers.
Cleaning, Pressing and Dyeing
is an economy, not a luxury.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Works,
Victoria, B C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAljinittiug ughta of thu Dominior.
in Manitoba, S»BkntchnwHn sn.l Albert*,
lie Yuk*.n Territory. theN rthweit Teiri
•"HtwHuiiina portion <f .he Province <-f
British Columbia, nrny l*e ended fur a term
■i tweii'y-une yeara at >u Mutual rental **f
Slaiiaoro. N«.t more than 12,-500*crea
»ill be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made hj
lieaptilioaut in persun to the Agent ->raub
\geutnf the district in which the rights
.■(■lied fur are situated.
In eurveyed territory the laud must be
■■-uribed by sections, ur legal sub <• in ona
1 - i-'i'ina, ..ml in uu U'\t-yed .erritory
he tact applied fur shall he staked . ut by
heapu lOaUt himself.
K ten applioation must be auemnpaiiii'd
-iy «fre .-f |6 ft hich will berefumiel if ihe
uli(supplied furareiiutHV-ailab'e, but nut
tberwise. A royalty ahall he paid un 'he
in rcliHiiuhltn.u'put of the mine at he
ra e uf live cents per tun.
Tie person < perating the mine -dial
•tithish ihe Agent with sworn retuus ao
ouitting fur the full quantity of merah
tuiablecoal mined Htid pay (he royalty
hereon. If the ci al ininiag rights are
mt being operated, such returns shall be
un islicd at least • >nce a year.
The lease will include the coal miniim
ightsnnly, but the 1 sseemay be permit-
td in pmchaee whntever available sur-
t ice ng'ts may be considered necessary
i rthe working of the mine at the rate of
fLO.OOanacie.
For full information applicatiun should
l>e made tu the Secretary of the Depart-
ih'iit uf the Inii'iiur, Ottawa,  or to   any
Vi^etit ■ r SubAtftnt "fDnminion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister uf tlie Interior.
N. li- I'liauhorized publication of this
dvi rii-einetit will not be paid for.
WRECK OF THE 10:10
BY HAROLD CARTER.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p,m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
iCing George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect' :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND.B.C,
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Heiiei»on, Proprietor
Estimates ancl Designs furnislieil
on Application
MAROCCHI BROS
Grocers and Bikers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Spesialty
West Cumberland
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sal. J Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue : Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri.    Sat.
P.M.     P.M.
4.35  i 7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.   | P.M.
4.35     4,35
A.M.     P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.    A.M.
10;.'J0    7:00
4.10     7.10
4.10  , 7.10
4.10     4.10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55     7:25
4.05  ; 7.05
I
4.05     7.0S
4.05     4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00     7.00
4.00 • 7.00
4.00     4,00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55     6.55
3.55     6.55
3.55     3.55
8.55     2,55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50  ! 6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50  : 3.50
8.50     2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45  [ 6.45
3.45     6.45
3.45     3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30     6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30  . 3,30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
.ii extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (if) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
It was a slack evening tn the office,
( remember, and a group of us were
sitting chatting around the reporters"
.able farthest from Dunning, the night
editor, who had looked around rather
rrowningly once or twice, as If the
conversation disturbed him. He was
always busy enough; he was the kind
3f man who made work, silent, uncommunicative, though rather, I think,
Trom shyness than owing to any unsympathetic quality.
Broad's fiancee was to arrive that
evening on the 10:10 .from Washington, and Droad, who had been celebrating in honor of the event, was
telling us all the details of their recent quarrel and reconciliation. She
had gone down to the capital to visit
a sister, and they had parted without
Baying good-hy, for some cause flimsy
enough, hut very scions In the minds
of two lovers. Then she had written
forgiving him. and so—thnt evening
they would be united again. That was
all, but Broad was telling It with . a
whole wealth of detail.
"Dunning Is a Washington man too,"
said Broad, flourishing his hands expressively. "But he doesn't care. If
he knew that I must get off tonight,
likely as not he'd pick a special assignment for me out of spite. But I
don't bear him malice—poor old Dunning! 1 hear his wife and he fight
like dogs and catH."
"Sh-h!" said some one; and Just
then a boy entered with a late edition of the "Planet," wet from the
press, and handed it to Dunning. We
Baw him glance at it, then suddenly
rivet his attention on the staring
black letter that covered one-third of
the front page. He looked round and
his eye searched our ranks.
"Mr. Broad!" he said sharply, and
then, changing his mind, left his sent
and hurried toward us. "Mr. Broad,
I want you to go out to Crayfleld ln-
Btantly. The 10:10 from Washington
has been wrecked outside the station.
Hurry, and telephone all the news.
And say, try to get a list of the dead."
"My God!" said Broad, and sank
down Into his seat. He buried bis
face In his hands and his shoulders
shook convulsively. Somebody explained the situation in a few words,
3SC7
"Yet, I'll Go."
land Dunning's face took on an expression of intense sympathy. He placed
one arm about Broad's shoulders and
drew him to his feet.
"Too bad, old man," he said. "But
I guess you'll be crazy now unless you
get to Crayfleld ns soon as possible,
so perhaps it would be the kindesi
thing to let you cover the assignment
Yon had batter take a taxi from the
office and you ought, to be there in
three quarters of nn hour."
"Yes, I'll go." cried Broad, pulhns
himself together. There was no longer any trace of the influence of liquor
nbout. him. "You're right, Dunning
I'll go at. once and telephone yon alt
particulars. You'll have a good story,
no matter—what happens."
He pulled his overcoat from Its
hook and clapped on his hat. As he
was nearing the door Dunning culled
after him:
"Don't forget to telephone a list—
a full list of the casualties," he said.
"That's the main part, I think. There'll
be many half crazy people in town
tonight until they know. The 'Planet'
says that 14 were killed. But It may
bn exaggerated." And he went back
to his seat, while Broad disappeared
through the doorway.
Then, one after another, he detailed
us; one to the railroad offices, nnoth-
er to the president's house, another to
catch the general manager at his club
I was among the few not assigned
and, retreating to my desk, waited
It was Dunning's custom to throw
the papers upon the floor, when he
had glanced over them, but on this occasion he folded the "Planet" carefully and laid It away in his desk. Thi?
act seemed strangely significant to all
Of UB.
"Do you think her name fs in the
'Planet's' list?" asked Kemp, the newest reporter.   "Good Lord!    IT it were
would he have let Broad go Ihere on
an assignment?"
We did not like to think about tho
subject. It was too ghastly for conversation. There was nobody but liked
Broad, big, generous-hearted, freehanded. Even his occasional lapses
into insobriety hnd never affected his
status with the paper. And some of
<u had met Miss Phayre.    She was
Just the kind of girl wbo would mak»
;i proper wife for Broad ami keep him
straight. I had seen her at dinner
with him; the thought of thai fragile,
high-spirited girl crushed under the
wheels of the Washington Flyer
seemed too sickening to contemplate.
Three-quarters of an hour elapsed.
Dunning sat stiffly at his desk, writing indefatigably. glancing over flimsies and casting copy aside, His face
was blanched; the situation seemed
to have affected him a? much as any
of us. Once in a while the telephone
would ring, but it was always local
news or a report from some of ill-
men on assignment. There was no
word from Broad.
"If she's among them," begun K. tnp
—and we knew he meant the dead —
"Broad won't telephone."
"O yes, he will," 1 answered conti-
dently; and at that moment the tele-
phone rang so sharply that somehow I
knew It wus Broad calling from Cray-
tield. Dunning took up the receiver
and held It to his enr a moment Tin n
he cnlled me.
"It's Broad," he said. "He's calling
and says he has a Rood story Don't
go Into o booth; take it down her.-.
I've told him to go slow And say,"
he added, "don't let him pet away
without giving yon the list of the ens*
ualtles."
I took up the receiver and at the
first sound I knew tbat Miss Phayre
was safe.
"How is she?" I called. "Pine," hi-
swered Hroad'B voice. I thought
there was the suspicion of a sob in It
"Are you ready? O, Miss Phayre?
Just a trivial injury, thanks, obi man.
The 'Planet' story was Incorrect Now
then." I began taking down the story,
while Dunning looked over my shoulder.
"The 10:10 train from Washington
to New York was ditched on ihe tar
side of Crayfleld at 10:02," I wrote "A
broken rail is believed to have been
the cause of the accident. The engine
and the flrst three cars plunged down
an embankment; the remaining cars
left the metals, but did not overturn
The passengers all escaped w\<\\
minor injuries except one unidentified
man who—"
Suddenly Dunning pitched over and
fell to the ground. He had fainted.
Kemp ran to raise him, and. temporal
Ily diverted from the telephone by he
occurrence, I found myself glancing at
the copy of the "Planet" in Dun-
nlng's half-opened drawer of his deal
On the page facing me I read, among
the Hat of the dead:
"Mrs. George Dunning of Washington."
(Copyright, 1913, by W. G. Chapman.)
FENCING A HEALTHY PASTIME
Graceful     Accomplishment,     Writer
Thinks, Is Not Accorded the Position Which It Should Hold.
Fencing as a pastlmo has much to
recommend It. It ia convenient for
men who work in town or country,
doeB not consume as much tlmo as
golf, and ls never stopped by bad
weather.
Hitherto the expense has boon
against Ub popularity. On thn other
hand, were thero moro students of
fencing the high subscriptions charged
by school would show abatement. In
France, for Instance, where tlie art
ls an almoBt universal accomplishment and a compulsory subject, so to
speak, for army men, expenses aro
quite moderate. The lowest estimate
f.» a fencing outfit ls J4.50. This Includes a pair of foils, Jacket, mask
and glove. A pair of small swords
costs from $3.50 to |5. This last
weapon Is more easily managed than
the foil, which calls for a preliminary
training with the sword. Practically
all fencing equipment comes from
France.
It Is suggested that fencing clubB be
established on the lines of similar Institutions of golf and boating. Good
fencing masters can be secured on
the continent of Europe for ten dollars
a week, which It is tho custom to supplement by private lessons. French
teachers are best, not on account of
their nationality, but because they are
carefully taught to teach.—Harper's
Magazine.
Keeping Him Waiting.
She Ib a most irritating specimen
of humanity. Even the best of men
lose their temper wben, time after
time, they are kept wailing by their
sweethearts. Twenty minutes, half
an hour, and even more, hnve they to
wait patiently till her ladyship appears with just n slight apology for
havldg been so long getting ready
nut, really, the time flew so! She
had no idea It was so Into, and it took
her so long getting on her tew hat.
Somehow she couldn't arrange her
curls to suit It,
The patience of man In this respect
Is most marvelous, and he dees tint
get ii quarter nf the praise he deserves Anil whnt girl would wall pa*
liently fnr her lever, even live minutes, without preparing n good senitP
ing for him for daring lo keep her
waiting? And should he, as the reason for his tardiness, blame business,
why. should exclaim as If he had acknowledged to n most dreadful  fnut!
Arabic Letters.
Every letter In Arable has four vnw-
ellngs. and some letters have twenty-
live separate forms So it Is possible for the printer to hnve to deal with
a hundred different forms of a single
letter. Knowing the printers' ?nse ts
not so simple a matter for Arabian
craftsmen as for English.
Undoubtedly.
Who do ynu suppise dared to set
this  new  fashion  of  wenrlng whiskers?"
"Some  man  whose children have
irowu up, 1 suppose.'' _ FOLH
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
RED CROSS TEA AND
DANCE GREAT SUCCESS
The Retl Cross Tea held at the
home of Mrs. Edward W. Bickle
on Tuesday was a tremendous
success and the society (for which
I speak as secretary) wish to
congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Bickle
on the wonderful return they re-
ceivetl for the energy, time and
money devoted by them to this
laudable object.
The house was decorated very
effectively and suitably, tea being
served indoors and ice cream in
thegarden. The Band of the 102nd
Battalion rendered selections,
greatly adding to the enjoyment
of all present. Throngs of people
were coming and going from 3 to
6 so one can hardly judge the
numbers. We were pleased to
welcome Lieut.-Colenel Warden,
officer commanding the Ki2nd and
others from Comox and noticed
that Courtenay was also represented.
A dance was held the same
evening by Mr. Bickle in the Ilo
Ilo dance hall, the music being
provided by the 102nd orchestra
and that was an unqualified suc-
ess. The total receipts from
both events are published elsewhere in the Islander and a
cheque for the amount will be
forwarded to the Red Cross
Society at Vancouver as soon as
possible and will be acknowledged
by them in the Province as usual
Mrs. G. VV. Clinton, secretary
of the Women's Patriotic Society
Cumberland B. C.
James Frame, Brother of John
Frame of this City, Killed.
Struck down by a B. C. E. R
train while walking along the
railroad track yesterday afternoon at 2:10 o'clock, near the
corner of Second avenue and Fir
street, James Frame, of 127C
Fourteenth avenue west was instantly killed, the car passing
over his body as he lay across
the rails.
According tothei;eport of Con
ductor Pugsley of the interuban
freight train, Frame was walking along the track from Third
avenue north to Second avenue,
and was about one hundred and
' fifty feet from the avenue when
struck by the car. The conduct
or reports that the whistle was
blowing and the bell ringing
after the car crossed Third aven
tie. Brakeman Spears, who was
on the rear of the car which was
moving rear first, shouted, but
the man did not take any heed.
Geo. Buckley, another brake-
man, who saw the man after the
car had passed over him, shouted
to the man at the wheel to stop.
The ambulance was called and
the body was taken to the morgue
in the General hospital, -where
an inquesl will be held either today or tomorrow
t he deceased was about 57 yrs
of age, and lived with his sister,
Mrs. Mounce, at 1270 Fourteenth
avenue west. Whether the man
was deaf or not, will be determined at the inquest; the train
crew being of the opinion that
the man was deaf or he would
have heard the signals.-Van.Sun
Methodist Tennis Court.
With the arrival of the gooil
weather the Methodist tennis
club opened Inr the season last
Saturday afternoon. All thosi
who take an interest in tennis
are cordially invited to join.
Membership fee, ladies$1, gents
$1.60.
Fur Sale I'll;', Big Twin Indian motorcycle, fully equipped,
fine condition.    Apply  Box  1314.
Mrs. .1. Coleman, left for Nanaimo on Monday.
Removal Notice
To  the  People of Cumberland
and Distiht:
Leslie.). Aston, Pratical Shoemaker has removed his business
to more suitable premises, oppos-
itelheKing George Hotel. Dunsmuir Ave, Repairs neatly and
promptly executed. Prices consistent with the times.
r
THE   BIG   STORE
The Latest Summer Goods
Ladies' Skirts made in the very latest style, all new cloths, and the prices
are right.   Every one is stamped "Northway," which is the " Hall-mark"
of fashion.
Ladies' Suits, "Northway" Garments, in some very smart designs, made
of beautiful cloth, and excellently finished.   Prices $17.50 to $30.00.
Ladies' Sport Coats, new checks, latest styles and moderate prices.
Ladies' Millinery. We have a very comprehensive stock of ladies' and
children's Hats on view. We specialize on Read-to-wear Hats from
$1.25 to $2.50.
Children's Smart Hats. A splendid variety to choose from. Prices 25c.
to $1.50.
Fancy Parasols for the Little Tots, at 25^f each.
" Oliver Twist" Suits for the Little Tots, guaranteed to give splendid
wear.    Price 85^ each.
Blue Stripe Overalls, from size 3 to 10, made from a good quality cloth,
Price 35^ a pair.
Khaki Boy Scout Overalls, with red band down each side, all sizes. Price
$1.00 each.
Infants' and Children's white Muslin Dresses, made of the daintiest sheer
lawn embroidery, beautifully worked.   Prices $1.50 to $3.50.
Middy Waists for girls and ladies, fast colors, 95^ and $1.50 each.
D. & A. Corsets. We are sole agents for this well known brand of
corsets. We can save you money. It will pay you to see our line of these
guaranteed Corsets.    Prices from 75^ to $6.50 a pair.
Groceries:
Our Grocery Department is crowded with the best lines obtainable of
choice quality goods. Price is not the only consideration; we put Quality
first and Service second, and on these you will find we excel.
In our Grocery Department we guarantee our goods; satisfaction or your
money back.   $fg=* Our aim is to please our customers.
EXTRA SPECIALS   Half cases of extra fancy navel oranges, large and
delicious, §1.70 per half case. '
Boxes of small winesap apples, just the thing forthe
children, regular §2.50 per box. Special price $1.95
per box, 5^ per lb.
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
LOCALS
Harry Wilson and J. H. Stevens, motored to Nanaimo on
Monday evening.
house to Rent—Six rooms with
bath room and hot water. Apply
to J. Foster, Box 173 Cumberland
B. C,
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. E. ,1.
Searle at Union street, Union, on
Friday May 19th, a daughter.
A. G. King, surveyor, arrived
from Victoria on Thursday evetv
ing.
Mr. Suga, Japanese Methodist
Minister has left for Chicago
where he will reside in future.
r. A. Sprouston and party, also John Dando and party motored
to Nanaimo and spent Empire
Day in that city.
Colin Campbell,the painter and
paper hanger.is in town and can
be found at the Union Hotel. He
is prepared to do all kinds of
work at reasonable rates.
Telephone No. 1-5
Bush fires in the vicinity of the
Royston Saw Mill caused considerable alarm on Wednesday. The
mill at one time was in danger
of being burned down. Volunteer firemen rushed from Cumberland and saved the situation.
Ticket No. 1C2A won the five
dollar gold peice at the Ked Cross
Tea on Tuesday. The person
holding the winning ticket will
receive the piece of gold by presenting <he ticket to Scout Master A. J. Taylor,
J. Burtt Morgan, of Victoria,
manager of the Vancouver Island
Branch of the Great West Life
Assurance Co. spent the week in
this city in the interests of the
company.
Daniel Marsh was slightly in
jured at No. 4 mine on Monday.
Canada's
Best
Piano
Throughout this wide Dominion
the GERHARD HEINTZMAN
stands pre-eminent. Behind its
marvellous popularity stands
half a century of unceasing
efforts and unswerving loyalty
to the highest standard of design and workmanship.
77ie Gerhard Heintzman
is made by Canadians with Canadian capital. If you want a
Piano secure the finest instrument procurable, which is undoubtedly the Gerhard Heintzman.
WRITE US ABOUT THE GERHARD
HEINTZMAN.     WE ARE OFFERING   EXCEPTIONALLY   EASY
TERMS.
G. A. FLETCHER MUSIC Co.,
"Nanaimo's Music House"
11 Commercial St., NANAIMO, B.C,
n
Jt«3tlOI)O<IOI<O>»Ot*O>0*CT*O-*-»***»**-»*O-«-»-O''O>«3!»
FIRE   INSURANCE     0
fi
fi
6
9
Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford. \
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO
EDWARD   W.   BICKLE
OFFICE;   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND
:-«w«wwwwwttw»o.o.oiw.o.**»io..oi<o.
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
DRY CELLS!
Class A, Number 6 COLUMBIA
IGNITORS for General Ignition
purposes. Absolutely fresh stock
Every battery tested before being
sold.
Price 45^ each.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday evening 7.30.
Pastor, Hev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible  Study:  Adult Bible Class
at 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev, Henry Wilson, Pastor
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services    for  Fifth    Sunday
after Easter.
8.30 a.m., Holy Communion.
2,30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service   of   Intercession   on
Ascension Day at 7.45 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $2.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.   Phone
.   95 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamel ware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphopli.mes
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
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8
When you do a thing by telephone, you do it now.     ■?
Not tomorrow or a couple of days hence, but
rigght at the moment.
A telegram means another telegram, and at the
jj     best a wait of part a day.   A letter means further    Q
X     correspondence, and a delay of days. x
1     The Telephone is Instantaneous!    It gives direct    jj
x     action!   You get your answer in a moment! *
0 I
The telephone will take you far or near.   Appoint-    H
ments can be made to talk at any time.    Special     £
rstes between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. J
9
i . 9
jj BritishColumbiaTelephoneCo.,Ltd. «
6
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