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The Cumberland Islander Sep 24, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
/Le,fl   S / 0 ■     ■ u
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
\P
With which Is consolidated tha Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 39
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1921, -
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Parent-Teacher Association
Outlines Work for Season
  ^
Mrs. Hood Elected President—Proposals for Playground Equipment, Prizes and Gramophone Endorsed—Transportation of
Scholars to Be Taken Up With Government—Deputation Will
Wait on Council for Grant for School Equipment.
The first annual meeting of the
Cumberland Branch of the Parent-
Teacher Association was held on .Monday evening In the High School, when
there was a good attendance, Mr. J.
Sutherland, president, Using iu the
chair.
Mr. Sutherland briefly outlined the
work of tlie association, after which
the-minutes of tlle last meeting were
read and adopted. The chairman said
the lirst business of the meeting would
be the election of oflicers for the new.
term, and he declared all offices
vacant, stepping out of the chair. Mr.
Ben H. Gowen took the chair for the
time being and called for nominations
for president.
Mrs. James Hood Elected.
In nominating Mrs. James Hood as
president, .Mr. Sutherland said lie
thought they could do no better than
elect last year's vice-president, especially as the association was composed
largely of ladies. This was seconded
by Dr. Hicks, and there being no other'
nomination, Mrs. Hood was declared
elected and took the chair.
The constitution calling for two
vice-presidents, one from the teaching
staff and one tj'om the parents, .Mr. C.
B. Wood, principal of the High Scliool,
and Mr. Colin Campbell, were elected.
Dr. E. R. Hicks was unanimously
re-elected secretary-treasurer.
Committees.
EDUCATIONAL.—Mr. Chas. E. Bur-
bridge (convener), Mrs. F. Oliver and
Mr. J. Sutherland.
BUILDING AND GROUNDS. — Mr.
Thos. E. Bate (convener), Mr. Geo.
Apps aud Mrs. D. P. Marsh.
LIBRARY—Mrs. Redmond (convener), Miss C. li. Dalton and Miss H.
Harrison.
SOCIAL.—Mr. J. Sutherland (convener), Miss Beckwith aud .Miss Colman.
Gramophone for Educational Purposes.
The first clause of the suggested
programme tor the work of the association, the procuring of a gramophone for the schools, brought ou considerable discussion.
Mr. Wood thought the procuring of
the instrument would be a good objective for the present year's work. A
piano had been suggested, but there
was no auditorium, and it was uot so
portable as a gramophone. He said
these instruments had been found to
be exceptionally useful for teaching
modern languages in the higher
classes, and for the teaching folk
dances and rhythm movements in the
lower grades. Special machines anil
records were made for school purposes.
Wants Music Taught In Schools.
Mr. Burbrldge said he was in favor
of a gramophone but wus against the
purchase of one until some system of
music had been adopted; at present
music was not taught in the local
schools. He would like tlie parents to
provide the scholars with music books,
costing about 50 cents, which would
make the teaching of music much
easier.
In reply to a question, Mr. Burbrldge
said each teacher had been taught
music ln the Normal School and was
certificated to teach it. However, it is
an optional subject, and had not been
taught here. He was strongly in favor
of music teaching and would support
the gramophone proposition if this
were done. But he wanted the course
"of study in music carried out as intended by the Department of Education.
Mr. Sutherland did not see why the
question of teaching music and tho
procuring of a gramophone need be
mixed. Encouragement should be
given to each plan, and both stand on
their own merits. The gramophone
was especially suitable for the lower
grades In teaching rhythm, folk
.dances, etc.
Miss Colman explained the methods
■of teaching music. She was in favor
,of the music hooks and also of the
:gramophone. which would help considerably, especially in the junior
classes.
Several other ladles spoke in favor
of the gramophone. Miss Beckwith
said the children would get a chnnio
to hear good music, which was too
seldom the case, popular music being
of the "jazz" variety.
For Its educatloual value, Mrs. Oliver
was strongly in favor of tlie gramophone; it would aid materially In correct enunciation and ln the teaching
<of languages.
_ The meeting was strongly In favor
•of the idea but action waa delayed until next meeting.
School Grounds Equipment.
The qtrtstlon of equipment for tho
school grounds evoked much interest.
Dr. Hicks said that while in Powell
River recently he had seen tlie equipment there and it had been a revelation to him. The grounds there were
supplied with a football Held, horizontal bars, high jumps, slides, seesaws, etc., all of which were of good
quality and kept in Al condition. He
■understood the government paid half
of the cost, the Powell River Paper
Company paying the other. Scattered
(Continued on Page Two)
AMALGAMATION OF
SOLDIER ORGANIZATIONS
G. W. V. A. Vitally Interested in
This and Unemployment and
Settlement Problems.
The special meeting of G. Vi. V. A.
secretaries and presidents of the Island locals held at Victoria on Sunday
and Nanaimo on Monday, were well
represented and great interest was
taken in the various addresses given
by members of tbe Provincial Executive. Among those who addressed the
meetings were Thomas Harnett, president of the Provincial Command, ^'alter Drinnan, provincial secretary-
treasurer. Capt. Carmichael aud Comrade Barnard.
The principal items that came up
for discussion were the existing unemployment among ex-service men,
amalgamation, and the Merville Soldiers' Settlement.
The question of amalgamation came
in for considerable discussion, all
comrades expressing themselves in
favor of amalgamation. It was the
opinion of many of the delegates tliat
it needed very careful consideration,
especially from the G. W. V. A. standpoint, the association having millions
of dollars in assets. It had worked
strenuously for the welfare of ex-
service men, and especially for widows,
orphans and disabled men, therefore
It was felt by the members that the
G. Vi. V. A. had earned the right to
retain its name and control of its
finances, etc.
The G. W. V. A. can take no definite
action toward amalgamation until the
Dominion convention is held at Port
Arthur on October 17: Each local
was urged to send a delegate to that
convention.
Secretary Drinnan informed the
meeting that he was Interviewing
Premier Oliver re the unemployment
among returned men. Also that Capt.
Carmichael and President Harnett
would see the Premier regarding the
Merville Settlement.
SMOKING CONCERT
AT ATHLETIC HALL
Commencing at 7.30 Saturday night
a smoking concert will be held in the
Athletic Hall, under the auspices of
the Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association. There will be a plentiful
supply of smokes as well as liquid and
other refreshments. The Liquor Cou-
trol Board granted a permit for the
liquid refereshments.
A very interesting programme is
being arranged and it is expected
there will be a "full house" of members of the association. There is no
charge whatever in connection with
it.
FINAL BASEBALL
GAME ON SUNDAY
Milkmen   and   Miners   Teams
Both Determined to Win
Last Game of Season
On Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock
the Courtenay and Cumberland ball
tossers and swatters will meet on the
Athletic Grounds for a ding-dong go
to see which team can secure the last
win of tlie season. Tlie rivalry is
keen betwen these teams and a whale
of a game should result.
The Cumberland team will be the
same as did so well on the recent tour.
Easter and Kerr will be the battery,
while Larsen and Downey will manipulate the ball for the milk vendors.
Dunce on Thursday Mght.
The closing event of the season will
be a dance held in the Ilo-llo Hall on
Thursday night next. A big crowd
should turn out to compliment tho
buys on their season's victories.
Cumberland Won
First League Game
Champions Had Little Diffiulty
In Disposing of Their Old
Rivals By Score of 2-0
Cumberland United went down to
Nanaimo lilt Saturday, for their first
league game of the season, with an
experimental team, and the management Is to be congratulated ln their
election of a forward line such as
played against Nanaimo on that day.
To move Toots Plump from the in-
lde right position to outside left was
indeed a bold move, but Toots justified
his inclusion In the team, and in
addition to scoring both goals, he was
the best man In the field.
The Nanniino team also had an experimental forward line, but they were
woefully "weak, and the Cumberland
halves had no difficulty In holding
them.
The game started at 4.46 with
Referee Joe Craig of Vancouver in
charge. Cumberland started with one
of their old time rushes and for sev-
ral minutes kept the Nanaimo defence more than busy. Gradually the
game evened out. and while the home
forwards did not show the combination and team work of the visitors,
they succeeded in getting within
shooting distance of the Cumberland
goal, but Boyd was perfectly safe. He
was never once at fault in his judgment, and he stopped a couple of
dandy shots. One of these, the last
Nanaimo was able to get it, he got
right between the crossbar and the
upright, and his brilliant save was
deservedly applauded.
A combined move by the whole of
the Cumberland forwards was a treat
to watch, in fact the Nanaimo players
were all at sea aud absolutely helpless, the combination between Hitchens, Plump and O'Donnell being
heartily applauded by the crowd.
Tucker James got away on one of
his characteristic rushes, but was
heavily blocked by one of the Nanaimo
half-backs. The ball, however, was
not cleared, and after some exchanges
passed out to Toots, who banged the
ball into the game, giving Routledge
no chance to save. This was the only-
goal in this half, although both teams
played for all they were worth, Nanaimo to even the score and Cumberland to get one more ahead.
The second half was opened strongly
(Continued on Page Five)
ST. JOHNS FIRST AID
MEETING OCTOBER 2
Election of Officers—Paper to Be
Read by J. G. Quinn.
The first meeting since the summer
vacation of the St. John's First Aid
and Mine Rescue Association of the
employees of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd.. will be held in the
First Aid Hall on Sunday, Octolier 2.
at 10.30 a.m.
Mr. J. G. Quinn. manager of No. 7
Mine, will read a paper at this meeting. Election of olllcers for the ensuing term will also take place.
SHOOTING SEASON
SUCCESSFULLY OPENSD
J. W. Cooke and "Bill" Merrifield
and party returned Wednesday from
a very enjoyable and successful hunting trip up the coast In their big
launch the ".Murbos." The party, including "Tommy" Hudson and Mickey
DeCoeur, left Friday morning, going
some seventy miles up the coast and
visiting upper and lower Valdez, Sonora and others of the many islands in
tliat locality. They describe the scenery as really magnificent and the work
of negotiating some of the narrow
channels as "interesting,"
The hunting is described as wonderful—a sportsman's paradise in
fact. There is game of many varieties
in abundance. They shot a large number of blue grouse as well as deer, and
are well pleased with their outing.
"Bill" is particularly enthused, saying
it is one of the best trips he ever made.
Ou account of the storm raging on
Tuesday the party remained in sheltered waters, and delayed their return
until Wednesday. A tug with a big
boom of logs ventured out on Tuesday
and the logs are now scattered far and
wide, tlie "Murbos" passing hundreds
of big cedar logs on the run down.
This is the first long trip the new
owners of the launch have made, and
tbey report her as a splendid sea boat.
Many hunters were out early Saturday morning and subsequent days,
some returning with a fair bag, but
hunting generally was not as good
as anticipated, the game no doubt taking to the tall timbers for the time being.
One intrepid hunter is reported to
have secured three deer1, "with horns,"
so that is his finish in thut line this
year; others also got deer, and one is
reported to have shot a bear, but we
hope this is not the case, the bear
season   not opening  until  November.
In tlle Courtenay Valley willow
grouse are rather plentiful, and the
temptation has been too much for some
hunters, several of whom have got
into trouble in consequence.
BURGLAR  ESCAPES
According to telegraphic advice
from Ottawa. Joseph Short, who was
convicted on charges of robbery in
Cumberland, and sentenced to two
months Imprisonment at the trial In
N'anaimo, has gained a little more notoriety.
Short, who is a native of Scotland,
had served his sentence and was iu
the custody of two Immigration olllcers In the Central Station at Ottawa,
on Friday morning, when he made
good ills escape. He was en route
with the officers to Montreal, where he
was to be deported.
DKOWH.1E PLAYING SPLENDIDLY
Jimmie Brownlle, the Scottish pro-
fessiona lgoalkeeper who toured Canada last summer with the Scottish professionals.' is giving some splendid
displays of goalkeeping for his club.
Third Lanark, in the Scottish League.
Andy Wilson, the famous Scottish
centre forward, is again playing for
Middlesboro In England. He played
in tlie first league game of the season
against West Bromwlch, but did not
score.
Train Service To
Be Reduced Oct. 1
Proposal to Cut Train Service in
Half, Giving Three Trains
Weekly Each Way.
It is proposed to reduce the train
ervlce on the E. and N. Railway to
three days a week each way, beginning
on October 1. The claim is made that
ibe traffic wlll not warrant a dally
ervlce during the winter months,
hence the reduction. If this reduced
service is carried into effect it will
lie a source of great Inconvenience to
business men and the travelling public and will play havoc with tlie mail
service, as well as being very detrimental to the development of tlie island.
Tlle public bodies interested should
get busy and do something in the
matter before tt Is too late.
Previous experience has shown that
when the tri-weekly service is In operation the trains are invariably late,
owing to accumulated freight, and so
mails often arrive too late to be sorted at night.
The population of the Island above
.Nanaimo deserves better treatment at
Ihe hands of the big railway corporation.
LECTURE SUNDAY NIGHT
IN ILO-ILO THEATRE
Mr. Wm. Lewis of Vancouver will
deliver a lecture Sunday night in the
Ilo-llo Theatre, commencing at 7.30
o'clock. The theme of his discourse
will be "Millions Now Llvlug Will
Never Die," and is given under the
auspices of the International Bible
Students' Association. Admission is
free.
MRS. STEWART VISITED
YUKON TERRITORY
Mrs. Hugh Stewart of Courtenay
and her two little daughters have recently returned from a three months'
visit to her mother and sister in White
Horse, Yukon Territory. She reports
a very pleasant holiday and Is quite in
love with the North Country. While
there she was given a very nice set
of Moose horns, which were picked up
near the headwaters of the mighty
Yukon River. They are very large
and exceptionally evenly pronged, and
have been much admired since their
arrival in Courtenay.
OFFICIAL VISIT TO
HIRAM MASONIC LODGE
A very pleasant and profitable time
was spent at the Courtenay Masonic
Lodge on Tuesday evening, when Rt.
Wor. Bro. B. S. Abrams, Deputy District Grand Master of the Grand Lodge
of British Columbia, paid an official
isit to Hiram Lodge No. 14, A F. and
A. M. The visitor was accompanied
by Wor. Bro. Chas. Graham, I. P. M..
G. M., Wor. Bro. T. H. Carey, P.M.,
and Wor. Bro. T. Mordy. P.M.
The distinguished visitor delivered
a very able and inspiring address to
the members and visitors, many of
whom were present from outside
points. Following the lodge meeting
refreshments were served and a pleasant social time spent.
POSTAL RATES INCREASE
Will Cost Four Cents to Send
Letter Outside Canada and
Within British Empire
Beginning October 1, the rate of
postage on letters from Canada to
other places within the Empire will
be increased to four cents an ounce
and three cents for each additional
ounce. The rate Includes the war tax
of one cent each.
Insurance on Parcels.
On the same date the registration
of parcels will be discontinued, and a
scheme of insurance substituted therefor. Thus a parcel can he insured for
Its value up to $100. The rate starts
at three cents for insurance not exceeding $5. six cents for insurance exceeding $5 and not over $25, 12 cents
for over $25 and under $50. and 80c
cents for Insurance exceeding $50 and
not over $100.
WEDDINGS
THE  RIGHT SPIRIT
"So   you   have   made   up   with
Brown?"    "Yes,"  said  Frank, "I
! couldn't resist the spirit in which
his apology was offered. "'hen a
man conies to me and says he's
sorry and unwraps a package
done up to look like a pair of
shoes  ond  says.  'What   we  need
I now   is   a   corkscrew,'   I'm   not !
adamant, sir, and In such clrcum- I
1 stances  I hope I never will be." I
* *
English • Marshall.
James A. English, the well known
sport of Cumberland, surprised a nilm-
ber of his friends this week, when he
entered the ranks of the benedicts,
being married to Miss Margaret Marshall of Bevan. The wedding took
place at Christ Church. Vancouver.
and was performed hy Rev. Swanson.
Mrs. English has but lately arrived
from Scotland.
Clements Wants Resident of
Constituency For Candidate
Member for Comox-Alberni Constituency and M. S. Logan Gave*
Interesting Talks to Cumberland Conservatives Thursday
Night—Preparing for Convention to be Held at Parksville
on Friday, October 7.
A meeting or the Cumberland Conservative Association was held in the
Anglican Hall un Thursday evening.
Mr. T. E. Bate, president of the association, being in the chair.
Mr. H. S. Clements. M. P. in the Dominion House, and Mr. M. S. Logan of
Vancouver, Provincial Organizer ot
the National Liberal and Conservative
Association, both of whom had attended the meeting at Campbell River the
previous day, were present and addressed tbe gathering.
Mr. Logan was the first speaker*,
nd touched on many points affecting
tbe Dominion election to take place
shortly. While a comparatively young
many, Mr. Logan claims to be one of
the old old-timers of B. C. for as a
hoy be lived in what is now Vancouver
away hack in 1876. Following tbat be
was absent from B. C. for a considerable time, but for many years p'ast
has ben a resident of Vancouver.
Speaking of the meeting at Campbell
River he said it was one of tbe finest
gatherings be bad ever attended In B.
C. Tbe meeting was most enthusiastic
and heartily in favor of Mr. Clements
and the Meighan government. Tbe
nominating convention would be held
at Parksville on Friday. October 7.
and he hoped tbe strongest man possible would be nominated.
Melurlitin One of World's lUirircst Men.
There never was a time in the history of Canada, said Mr. Logan, when
it was so necessary to retuqp the government. Arthur Meighan, he said,
is one of the biggest men in Canada
today—he is not only one of the biggest men in Canada, but in tbe Empire. It was very important that they
should have at the bead of tbe government, under the conditions prevailing
today, a very strong and able man to
guide the ship of state and to keep it
ou an even keel.
Speaking of- the tariff question, Mr.
Logan asked are we going to develop
our natural resources for ourselves
or are we going to become an adjunct
of the United States. It was tn the
interests of all, farmers as well as
other producers, that we should have
protection. We must not have legislation of classes, but must legislate for
the whole Dominion, so that we could
become a united and happy Canada.
The speaker characterized Mr. MacKenzie King, the Liberal leader, as a
weakling and a spineless specimen of
humanity.
Warehouseman as Go-Betweeii*
• We have at Vicloria. be said, a government led by Honest John Oliver. In
Vancouver tbe people are now referring to him as the Hon. Ex-Honest
John. Tbe Liberals want to put MacKenzie King in power at Ottawa, and
with Oliver and Farris in charge at
Victoria, and a certain warehouseman
as go-between, can you imagine what
the country would he like with a com
bination like that, asked the speaker.
"Windy" Ihirry.
Incidentally, be said "Windy" Harry
had absolutely no chance against
Harry Stevens—now the Hon. Harry
Stevens. The latter will give the
mayor of Vancouver as guod a political thrashing as he ever got.
Mr. Logan said the Meighan government was composed largely of
hard-thinking, clear-minded, sound
Liberals, men who had no use for
MacKenzie King.
He appealed earnestly for a strong
Conservative organization in Cumberland, as the Dominion must have a
solid, united Conservative party. The
(Continued on Page Two)
CONNAUGHT FINALISTS
PLAY HERE SATURDAY
The Ladysmith soccer eleven, fiual-
sts in the Connaught Cup games, are
lue here this Saturday afternoon to
play tbo locals In an Upper Island
League fixture. Tbe visitors are coming up strongly represented and intend to show tbe fans here tbat it was
"Huke" when they beat tbe Cumberland team in the Connaught Cup
game. They intend to repeat their
performance again, so they say. The
management of the local team have
wisely chosen the same eleven^who so
easily detected Nanaimo last Saturday.
The game is scheduled to start at 3
o'clock, and the management confidently expect a bumper crowd.
As the expenses necessary to run a
successful team are very heavy, local
fans should make a point of tu>rrfg*J
present at all of the home game*. Admission on Saturday is 50 .ccuf*' for
gents and 25 cents for ladies.
Tbe following will be the line-up frfrV
Cumberland: Boyd, goal; 'Mortimer
and Campbell, backs; Irvine, Conti,
O'Donnell, half-backs; Baunerraftn,
Brewster, James, Hitchens and Plump,
forwards. All other players aro requested to hold themselves ill, readiness. ,
.**■»■.,.
C\
W. A. WHIST DRIVE ANB^TC
DANCE ON FRIDAY H^JCT^
The Women's Auxiliary of the O. W.
V.A. will hold a whist drive and danco '
In the Memorial Hall on Friday of
next week. It is hoped all returned
men and the public generally will
turn out in full force to give this
organization good support.
Dancing will he from 8 to 10, and
dancing from 10 to 12.   Refreshments
will be provided; tbe admission is SOc.
Special .Meeting on Thursday,
A special meting of thc auxiliary
will he held in tbe Memorial Hall on
Thursday evening, at 7.30, when a full
attendance is requested, as business
of importance is to he discussed.
Conservatives Held Annual Meeting
At Campbell River on Wednesday
Meeting Unanimously Endorsed H. S. Clements, Praising Him for
Work Done for Constituency and Pledging United Support
If He Consents to Run—Officers Elected—Nominating Convention at Parksville on October 7.
Fletcher - .Mutehlnsoii.
A wedding of considerable local interest took place at Courtenay on Wednesday, when Gladys May, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. F. Hutchinson of Cumberland, was united in marriage to
Earl Keddy, only son of Mr. and Mrs.
Geo. A. Fletcher of Nanaimo. The
ceremony was performed at the Anglican Church by Rev. J. W. Flinton.
The bride was attended by her sister.
Miss Dora Hutchinson, while Mr. K.
Robertson supported tbe groom. Tbe
honeymoon is being spent in coast
cities and afterwards the happy couple
will take up their residence in Nanaimo.
The annual meeting of tbe Comox-
Alberni Conservative Association waa
held at the Willows Hotel, Campbell
River, on Wednesday afternoon, sume
50 delegates from all parts of the big
constituency being present, a dozen
coming from as far away as Alberni
Owing to some misunderstanding or
other, notices calling tbe meeting did
not reach Cumberland delegates and
so this city was not  represented.
Election of Officer*.
The election uf othcers resulted a>
follows:
Honorary Presidents -Hon. Arthur
Meighan. II. S. Clements, W. A, Anderson and M. Manson.
Presideut-A. M. Wastell. Alert Bay.
Vice-President— C. E. Beasley, Courtenay.
Secretary-Treasurer — R. C, Ber-
teaux.
Also an executive committee of
twelve. Mr. Chas. Oraham and Mayor
D. R. Mar Donald are Cumberland
members ol the executive.
Mr. H. S. Clements, member for the
onstituency in the Dominion House,
aud .Mr, M. S. Logan, Provincial Organizer for tlie National Liberal and
Conservative Association, were present aud addressed the gathering.
Both these gentlemen were very
well received, Mr. Clements receiving
the unanimous endorsatlon of a very
enthusiastic meeting, no other name,
being mentioned as candidate.
In the course of bis address Mr.
Clements made it very plain that he
would like a resident of the constituency to be the Conservative candidate
u the forthcoming campaign, and if
a good man was chosen he would spend
bis entire time and energies in working for bis election.
Mr. Clements left tin- impression
that if it was decided at the nominating convention that he was Ibe strongest man, and failing another suitable
candidate as supporter of Hon. Arthur
Meighan, be would probably consent
to be their candidate.
Kcsnluflnl)   of   \|lpreci-l!i"ii.
Tbe delegates present unanimously
passed a resolution nf appreciation ol*
the work tbat Mr. Clements had dorte
for the district and pledging bim their
support in tho coming election if ho
would consent lo be the candidate.
NniiiliiuliiiK Contention ut Turks*) lllc.
It was decided to hold tlie nominating convention at Parksville on Friday, October ", at 3 o'clock, Ninety
delegates are to he appointed, 10 from
upper and lower Comox district, 40
from the Alherni district, and 10 from
the Burrard district, taking iu Howe
Sound and other points.
Liberal Nomination Convention
At Parksville Thursday Next
A meeting of the executive of the Comox District Liberal Association was held at Courtenay on Monday, when matters relative
to the forthcoming Dominion election were taken up. The meeting decided that delegates be elected from the different polling
divisions to attend the nominating convention at Parksville on
Thursday next, September 20. when a candidate to represent thc
Comox-Alberni constituency will be chosen. ■Fwd
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 24, 1921.
PUBLIC   LECTURE
"MILLIONS NOW LIVING WILL NEVER DIE"
SPEAKER
Mr. WM. LEWIS,  Of Vancouver,  B.C.
AT THE
ILO-ILO THEATRE, Sunday, Sept. 25th, 7.30 p.m.
AUSPICES OF THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
SEATS FREE
NO COLLECTION
We have just received a Fresh
Shipment of
Perrin's Biscuits
including a new delicous
Biscuit
CUSTARD CREAM
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
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OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
-      $15,000,000
•     $15,000,000
GRAINGER, Manager.
Plant Home
Grown Fruit Trees
Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with the
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
who have a large lot of splendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coming on fer Fall delivery.
OUR ROSES are specially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the finest in the
land, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WRITE US TODAY.
ADDRESS—
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
SARDIS, B. C.
Department C. Mention thin paper when writing.
UNION HOTEL
OPI'OSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by ElectrlcHy.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Conl, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District.
Hulililsli and Asbes Cleared Away.
.MODERATE  CHARGES
TELEPHONE  M TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome IloteL
Liddell's Orchestra
— is —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions
of all kinds. Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave,
CLEMENTS WANTS
RESIDENT OF CONSTITUENCY FOR CANDIDATE
(Continued from Page One)
best government any country could
I have, said the speaker, was a strong
! party government with a solid opposi-
j tion—not a government composed of
classes—class legislation would ruin
Canada. The Farmers' policy could
not last—such a policy never had and
never will last.
Mr. Logan reminded his hearers tliat
the votes of the women was a big factor in the election, as about 45 per
cent, of voters are women.
Clement* Wants New Man in Field,
Mr. Clements said it gave him very
great pleasure to be present to meet
u number of freinds he knew in 1911.
He was at one time the youngest member in the House, but today he is the
oldest member in tlie House in years
of service.
He said it was his very ardent wish
that some resident of the constituency
could he found to become the Conservative convention's choice for candidate. If a strong man was found, a
supporter of the Meighan government,
Mr, Clements said he would devote his
entire time and energy in helping him
to win the election. He hoped that a
real staunch Britisher would be present at the Parkesvllle convention to
take up the work.
He said the reason he asked for
some young and able man to take hfs
place in the coming election was that
he felt he had spent all the energy
possible, and had sacrificed all that
be could sacrifice.
Mr. Clements thought the coming
fight was probably the most important political battle Canada has had
since Confederation. There wore a
great many problems that must be
solved, and tbey must have a strong
government, beaded by that great man
Arthur Meighan.
Must Trade  Within  Empire.
Speaking of free trade, be said we
must trade within tbe British Empire
—that is where out market is. It's all
very well to talk afiout free trade, hut
if the other fellow will not free trade
witb you, then free trade is no good, j
The United States built'tip their great
country on a policy of protection.
I Every allied country since the war
I had been raising their tariff, and
: Canada must do the same. We must
protect the natural resources. We
are able to live within ourselves and
build our nation up, which we hope
will become one of the great nations
of the world.
So far as Comox-Alberni was concerned, said Mr. Clements, probably
Cumberland had been less trouble to
bim than any othtr place in tbe constituency. He claimed to have done a
great deal to put tho Comox district
on tho map—to assist the outlying
districts in getting in touch with the
outside world,
So far as the widows, orphans and
cripples were concerned, they must
be taken care of in every way.
Doth speakers were heartily applauded at tho conclusion of their remarks, and some time was spent in
! answering question8 and talkin over
business generally.
PARENT-TEACHER
ASSOCIATION OUTLINES
WORK FOR SEASON
(Continued from Page One)
through the town, as well, were similar appliances, the Paper Company
doing much for the welfare of the
children. He had never seen anything
in the province to compare with it.
Mr. Campbell strongly supported
the' proposal. In wet weather a shed
having, say, a long horizontal ladder,
horizontal bars, etc., would be a great
source of amusement and healthy
exercise. Many things could be accomplished for the children, girls as
well as hoys.
One speaker pointed out that if the
association showed earnestness in
their undertakings, he had no doubt
tbey could, in conjunction with the
Board of School Trustees, secure a
grant from tbe City Council, from the
money collected for school and hospital purposes. The playground equipment was a real necessity and would
help iu huilding up healthy young citizens. He was sure the City Fathers
would view with favor this very desirable undertaking. The gramophone,
school prizes and playground equipment would cost at least $luun, and if
ibe association would undertake to
provide the first two there was no
doubt the City Council would grant
money necessary  for the equipment.
A motion was adopted authorizing
tbe Building and Grounds Committee,
in conjunction with the School Trustees, to wait on the City Council with
this end in view.
.'rial's lor Scholars fluking Best A lilt o uml Progress.
The question of giving prizes to
scholars showing the best all-round
progress during the year was heartily
endorsed. Mr. Campbell said not only
would it stimulate and encourage the
scholars in their work, but would also
be a great help to the teachers. The
competitive spirit in children is very
great, and he would like to see good
prizes awarded.
On motion of Mr. Wood a resolution
was carried that the Education Committee be asked to take up the question of prizes and report at next meeting.
Transportation of the Koyston Road
School Children.
The great Inconvenience to children
living on the Koyston Road who attend Cumberland schools was brought
up when one of the residents asked if
the government had given any reply
concerning transportation for the
children. The secretary reported that
no communication had been received,
but that the department was fully
informed of the conditions. A motion
was passed instructing the secretary
to interview Mr. Mackinnon, secretary
ol the School Board, and have the
matter brought to the attention of the
government.
FECHNER BUYS WILSON
HOTEL AT UNION" BAY
The well known Wilson Hotel at
Union Bay, conducted by the Misses
Wilson, has been sold to Mr. H. O.
Fechner, formerly of the Riverside
Hotel, Courtenay,
Courtenay Hotel Changes Hands.
Messrs. Spencer and Passie of Vancouver have taken over the Courtenay
Hotel from Mr. R. B. Dixon, and took
possession this week.
COMOX FALL FAIR
OPENS ON TUESDAY
Lieut.-Governor   Will   Officially
Open Fair at 8 O'clock in
The Evening.
The annual Comox Fall Fair will
take place on Tuesday anil Wednesday
next at Courtenay. His Honor the
Lieut.-Governor will officially open
the Fair at S o'clock on Tuesday evening, when it is hoped to have the judging completed.
Indications point to this being one
of the best fairs ever held in the Co-
.nox district. Entries are pouring in
lo the secretary, the entries in pure-
>red cattt^ being very large and of
ligh grade.
Dunce Wednesday Mght.
The annual dance in connection with
the fair will be held in the Agricultural Hall on Wednesday night, and
following the usual custom it is expected to be one of the biggest of the
year.
NOTICE
Having disposed of the business
conducted by us. we give notice that
ill accounts due and payable to the
Bate Hardware Company should be
paid to Thos. E. Date, Cumberland.
The Bate Hardware
Company
Sept., 15, 1921.
P. O. Box 279,
Cumberland.
NOTICE
The Rexall Store
For Rexall Quality
It can't leak
because it's
made in one
piece—thats
why we guar-
antee satisfac*
tion or your
money back.
Complete line of
Kantleek Rubber
goods. Prices
from 40c to $4.75     f^y
Lord Baltimore 'Portfolio
g   i, ,, -——^——.'-■ .;.J i   .     i --     ,, ■ ',     „ !j .     ,        m„ '.SBS^^^^^»
PAPER  JND  ENVELOPES   TO   MATCH
A Package to please
the   most  fastidious
Tablets and Boxes of excellent quality
at a much reduced price
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
A Pleased Long-Distance
Customer
That the long distance service between Vancouver
Island and the Mainland is better than ever is indicated by the following excerpt from a letter of a user:
"Permit me to compliment you upon the excellence
of your long distance service. I have occasional calls,
one so recent as last evening, and I invariably find the
voices of my friends so extraordinarily clear and distinct and the line so free from any annoying interruptions or noises as to make the telephoning not only a
quick convenience but a real pleasure."
British Columbia Telephone Co.
A I'UIE  MiE.OI.
Sambo: "Say. Rastus, somethln'
.'tinny happened to me last night."
Rastus: "Dat so?"
Sambo: "Yes; las night I dreamed
I was eatin' shredded wheat: an'
when 1 wake up, half my niatrns was
gone."
R.
PETTIPIECE FOR
NEW WESTMINSTER
"Parm" Pottlplece, the well-known
labor man and printer of Vancouver,
has been selected by the Federated
Labor Party in New Westminster.
Even if not elected, "Parm" will make
it decidedly interesting for his opponents.
Parties having houses or camping
sites on Comox Lake are requested to
call and sign a lease at the Companies'
Office on or before October 1st, 1921,
otherwise the Company will take
possession of the property.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DOS-
MC1B), LIMITED.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.001
Ancient Order of Foresters
p.m.
p.m.
Chief Ranger.
"Meetings next month will be as follows
Wednesday, October 12th, at 7
Wednesday, October 26th, at 7
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
HUGH M.. DAVIDSON,
P. EATON, Secretary.
FRANK SLAUGHTER, Treasurer.
Female Court
A few names are still needed to enable a Female Court of the Order
to be opened In this city. This lodge will be a real benefit in case of
sickness, and dues and fees are very low. Think this matter over
carefully, then write to F. G. Eaton, Secretary A. O. F., General Delivery, Cumberland.
"**'- September 24, 1921.
l>
f
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
—building better
bodies
DON'.T just fill your children's stomachs—
make them healthy and hearty—give them
body-building bread made from
Royal Standard Flour
Having greater glutin richness than most flours
—it gives you bread that promotes health,
stimulates energy,' builds bone and hardens the
muscles. It is nature's most complete ration
for big folks, too.
And'for the lightest, mosty tasty loaf.
you bake with Royal Standard
Flour, of course.
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Highet
Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C.
Telephone 83
NEWS IN BRIEF
Tourist business on the P. G. E.
was good this year, according to the
report of the manager, Mr. A. B. Buck-
worth.
Every effort possible ls being made
to bring the*wheat crops of Alberta
and Saskatchewan through British
Columbia for shipment this year.
The Dominion Government has
founded an experimental farm at
Prince George.
Many School Boards throughout the
province are co-operating with the
Made-in-B. C. Campaign Committee by-
purchasing B. C. products and ln other
ways.
The encroachment of the Coldwater
River at Merrltt threatens the safety
of the power house In that city.
A movement to have all churches of
the United States open one hour on
the morning of Armistice Day, November 11, for appropriate service "to
crystallize public opinion In support
of the disarmament conference which
will convene In Washington on that
day," has been started by the National League of Women Voters.
A check-protecting machine, Invented and manufactured In British Columbia, Is being put on the market. Its
feature Is its simplicity and thorough-
The Vancouver Board of Trade
unanimously passed a resolution urging that steps be taken by the government at Ottawa to stop Oriental immigration.
The tramway system of Buenos
Aires is the largest of any city in the
world, there being about three hundred
and fifty miles of line ln operation.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While II Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS, "fez*
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing • Sneclaltr.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
BACK EAST
FOR YOUR HOLIDAYS
TRAVEL
Canadian National
Railways
All Rail or
Lake and Rail
TO
Edmonton, Saskatoon
Winnipeg,  Toronto
Ottawa, Montreal
Quebec, Halifax
and other Eastern Canada and
United States points.
CHOICE  OF  ROUTES"
EXCELLENT SERVICE
E. W. BICKLE, Agent,
CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
will assist ron In arranging* details, quote lowest fares, make
reservations, etc
WHEN TALK ISNT CHEAP
Dr. Barker, of Baltimore, chief surgeon of Johns Hopkins, who has been
spending a vacation at Midland, recently held a consultation, over tho
telephone with home confreres. The
toll was Just (500. t.
Warning Is Posted.
Women's ears will be exposed  tbls
season.—Life. .
YOUR TEETH
DO IT NOW
By REA PROCTOR McGEE, Editor ol
"Oral Hygiene."
It is very encouraging to think that
"it is never too late to mend." but
when mending is postponed too long
there is so much damage done that
there is nothing left but the repair.
The best way to avoid damage is to
take care in the lirst place. If a child
is taught to take care of his babv
teeth from infancy, those teeth will do
their work aud give comfort, health
and beauty.
The teetli, the gums, the tongue
and the cheeks of every child should
be brushed thoroughly twice each
day.
Every child should have Its own
brush and a can of good tooth powder
or a tube of tooth paste.
Tlie brush must be kept very clean.
When the teeth are to be washed, the
brush should be wet in running water
and tlie paste or powder placed on
the brush.
Then tlie chewing surface of the
teeth should be thoroughly brushed,
botli above and below.
Wet the brush again and brush
thoroughly the lingual or tongue side
of the teeth.
First, scrub them well with a circular movement, then place the brush
at the gum margin on each tooth In
turn and brush straight to the chewing surface, paying particular attention to cleansing the spaces between
the teeth.
Repeat this on the labial, or outside,
surface of the teeth, using plenty of
water and dentifrice.
After these movements have been
completed, brush the inside of the
cheeks and lips, then the gums and
finally the tongue.
Rinse the mouth with clean water or
a mild mouthwash, then wash the
tooth brush and hang it up to dry until it is time for the next "tooth bath."
Don't put two or more tooth brushes
in one container.
Hang up every brush by Itself so
that it will not be touched by any
other.
Medicated dentifrices should not be
used by children. What they need Is
just thorough scrubbing of the teeth
twice eacli day with clean water and
a mild, pleasant tooth paste or powder
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Offlce:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C.
NEWS ITEMS OF ONE
HUNDRED YEARS AGO
A correspondent of an exchange
sends the following items from the
Lincoln (Eng.) Mercury of August 24,
1821:
Leicester Assizes — John Johnson
(aged 17) for stealing a horse from
Stoke-upon-Trent; Jos. Godwin and
Wm. Page, for stealing a pony and an
ass; Thomas Allen, for sheep-stealing; Chas. Brown, for a similar offence at Ratcliffe; and Thos. Shaw, for
a similar offence at Ravenstone—were
severally sentenced to death. John
Ward and Samuel Measures, for breaking open the house of John Haines of
Belgrame and stealing lace, etc.; John
Pyner. for returning from transportation before his time; and Thos. West.
Jos. Beale. Robt. Parkinson and
Richard Kirby, for breaking into the
house of Robt. Freer In Leicester and
stealing a large quantity of tea, were
also sentenced to death.
Some schools of mackerel are half
a mile wide and twenty miles long
and are estimated to contain one
million barrels of fish.
No substance that refuses to dissolve in water has any odor.
Point Grey's record breaking bulld-
iug activity, which easily surpasses
any other municipality of tbe same
population anywhere ln Canada, is
shown by the building permits taken
out to date, totalling no less than
$2,072,390. The total for 1920 was
12,192,114.
Considering the domestic cat to be
as great a pest as the cougar In the
destruction of wild life, the provincial
Game Conservation Board have under
consideration tbe offering of a substantial bounty for their hides. Unlike
the cougar, kitty devotes most ot her
attention to birds, and in season and
out of season, preys on the grouse,
pheasant, partridge, snipe and small
game animals.
New Zealand's highest waterfall,
named the Sutherland, ls one thousand nine hundred and four feet high.
On the dark face of a cliff ln Newfoundland can be seen the formation,
in white stone, of a weasel at the
throat of a rooster which it has overcome. The picture which Nature has
drawn is so true to life that the point
has always been known as "The cock
and weasel."
A snail which has been glued to a
card ln a museum for several years
came to life when Immersed In water.
A Long Buckley, Northants, Eng.,
woman bas died from shock following
a wasp sting. A wasp entered her
mouth with some food, and stung her
throat, and she died within twenty
minutes.
Last Mountain lake, north of Regina, Saskatchewan, has been made a
bird sa#tuarv under the Migratory
Bird Act.
There are now 25 creameries In this
province, having a total capitalization
of $219,403 and employing 269 persons.
Not since the days of the most Imaginative ot old-timers has there been
such a buffalo hunt as that which Is to
be staged at Wainwright, Alberta, next
fall. There wlll be upwards of one
thousand of these noble animals disposed of for the purpose of thinning
the vast herd which at present roams
In Buffalo National Park, on the Canadian Northern Railway, at Wainwright. The question has been under
consideration for a long time by the
Dominion Parks and Live Stock departments, and Mr. H. S. Arkel, live
stock commissioner, Is to visit Wainwright to devise ways and means for
the elimination of the surplus numbers.
Repeat orders have been received
from Trinidad, West Indies, for light
horses from Alberta.
There are 45 fruit and vegetable
canning and packing concerns in Britisli Columbia, with a total capitalization of nearly $1,000,000. Employment
is give nto S60 persons.
There are 567 logging companies in
British Columbia, operating In connection with the lumbering Industry. The
aggregate capital is $15,336,155, and
employment is given to 11,250 men.
Canada stands second as an auto-
owning nation. There ls In use one
auto for every twenty-five persons ln
the Dominion.
It is said the Mackenzie river oil
fields are likely to make Canada independent of other countries for oil supplies. Last year $70,000,000 worth of
petroleum products were Imported.
During tbe fiscal year 1920. 275
coal prospecting licences were issued
in British Columbia, covering an area
of 126,500 acres.
A person with a fiery temper is not
necessarily warm-hearted.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Daj and Night
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • •  B. C.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time. *"
Henderson's
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 86
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beefl It is delicious.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERIUFIEI.D,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT   CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B.C
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C
C. R. Mulholland
late   of  Cameron's   Garage,   Cumberland, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton Street,   NANAIMO
and   will   be   pleased   to   have   the
patronage of his old friends and acquaintances when ln Nanaimo.
Repairs (inuriintecd.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Prices Reasonable,
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $15G,673,215.00
Life Funds      58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON,
Special Agent,
Cumberland.
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
District Agent,
Cumberland.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
L
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
WHY YOU SHOULD SAVE
To insure yourself against aa unknown
future.
Tp insure happiness and comfort in your
old age.
To insure provision for your family in
the event of your death.
Commence Saving to-day with
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, antl brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY  PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd. Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September K ld21.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN _ Editor.
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 24. 1921.
PLAYGROUND  EQUIPMENT
The proposal of the Parent-Teacher Association to Install playground equipment at the Cumberland schools is
a worthy one, and should receive the hearty support ot all
who have the welfare of the children at heart. Suitable
apparatus would be very inducive to healthy-giving activity
by tbe scholars, the results of which would be beneficially
reflected In their studies. The Cumberland School Board
has acquired additional grounds, and with a good programme of ornamentation and equipment, the extensive
grounds could be made a source of pleasure and activity.
The work outlined by the Parent-Tcachor Association for
this year calls for much money, and it is to be hoped the
City Council will see the wisdom of ranking an appropriation towards tbe work.
THE ISLAND OF A THOUSAND LAKES
Under the beneficent rule of the Oliver administration
Vancouver Island has developed, in keeping with many
other parts of the province, an elaborate system of miniature lakes. We refer to the hundreds, yes, thousands, of
little lakes and pools so quickly growing, both In size nnd
number, under the no-road-work policy of the Liberal
Government. The heavy rains of the past week brought
vividly to light the utterly deplorable stnte of roads ln this
district—main highways the condition of which Is a shame
and disgrace to those responsible. And this Is only September. What they will be like in winter ls beyond comprehension. No doubt, following their usual practice, a
gang of men will be put on temporarily when things are at
their worst and fill the holes with the almost useless dirt
as done last year.
The Royston and Courtenay roads, both of which carry
heavy traffic, are teeming with holes, holes and more holes.
Filled with water they lend a variety to the scenery—and
are also a prolific source of scenic language as the motoring public hit these indentations with their cars. The road
to N'anaimo is said to be the worst it has ever been,
although below N'anaimo It is in splendid condition.
Notwithstanding that the Premier has a revenue of
$15,000,000, and Is borrowing millions with as little concern as he used to hoe potatoes, practically no money ls
available for road work—one of the most important and
necessary works of a young and growing country. Honest
John may have been a big success as a farmer in the rich
Delta of the Fraser, but as Premier of British Columbia
he leaves much to be desired.
The proposal of the E. & N. Railway to cut its present
service in half on October 1 will work a great hardship and
inconvenience to residents of the up-Island points. The
suggestion Is made that It will not pay to continue the
full service. This is not to be wondered at, considering
the usually poor service rendered by thc line, coupled
witb the high rates. People who have other means of
transportation prefer to use them to the railway whenever
possible. Public bodies should take the matter up and
bring pressure to bear for the retainment of tbe six-day
service. With the up trains cut down to three weekly, the
mall service this winter Is likely to be In a deplorable
condition.
A New York man recently shot himself because of taxes.
After a study of the situation, he probably concluded that
he wouldMje taxed to deatli anyway and decided to hurry
things on a bit.
Enrich Grubert has been arrested In Berlin for marrying 2S women in one year. An English woman smashes his
record by being arrested at Deal, England, for marrying
36 men. The rivalry of Great Britain and Germany seems
uot to have been broken up by the war.
Another "lost battalion" has been found. There has been
missing from the records of the American Navy for more
than three years a battalion of marines, composed of six
officers and 271 men, and nobody in the Navy could tell
what had become of it. When newspapers recently published the story of how an American marine officer had
heen attacked in Cuba in 1917, it was discovered that the
Cuban Government had requested the American state
department to station marines in a small Cuban town to
protect sugar plantations there against pro-German plots,
and tiie lost marines have been there ever since!
The Vancouver Hoard of Trade unanimously passed a
resolution urging tliat steps be taken by tlie government
at Ottawa to stop Oriental Immigration. The Board considered a report that there are over 50,000 Orientals in
Hrltish Columbia.
Members of the Provincial Legislature are being asked
to seriously consider an intensified educational campaign
along tlie lines oi* the .Made-in-B.C. committee's work, as a
means of solving unemployment.
A pessimist Is  a man  who thinks that the world Is
against him.   And he is probably right.—Punch.
Enough liquor prescriptions were issued in San Francisco In twelve months to give every man, woman and
child ln tbe city half a pint of whiskey.
A Chicago newspaper Is being sued for ten million dollars. Such a sum Is a mere trifle to a newspaper, and
doubtless the heart of the editor Is not the least disquieted.
The peculiar point of the action is that the Municipality
of Chicago is the plaintiff, and a question Is said to have
been raised as to the possibility of plastering a libel upon
such a municipality.—Colonist.
" 'To safeguard  peace,  we must  prepare  for war.'    I
know that maxim, It was forged In hell."—Israel Zangwlll.
What the world wants ls insured peace and a chance to
reduce armament expenses. Give us that and this country
can stop taking medicine that does not reach the spot and
it will soon be unnecessary to sell $800,000 ships for $2100
each.—Pendleton East Oregonlan.
It is specifically stated that a hunter may only kill a
male deer with horns. What man ln the bush looks like
a "deer with horns?" But hunters will continue to take
chances and shoot at moving objects in hope that whatever
it is, it will be a deer with horns.
GEMS OF THOUGHT
The sea of knowledge is in the head; of wisdom, ln the
heart. We are sure to judge wrong if we do not feel right.
-Hazlltt.
A friend that you have to buy wont be worth what you
pay for him, no matter what that may be.—G. D. Prentice.
Gentleman is a term that does not apply to any station,
but to the mind and feelings in every station.—Talfourd.
The smallest number, with God and truth on their side,
are weightier than thousands.—O. Simmons.
The sower of the seed Is assuredly the author of the
whole harvest of mischief.—Demosthenes.
The defects of the mind, like those ot the face, grow
worse as they grow old.—Rochefoucauld.
A jealous man always finds more than he looks for.—
Mile. Sardey.
Think What You Owe to the Telephone Girl
The Telephone Girl sits in her chair
And listens to voices from everywhere.
She hears all the gossip, she hears all the news,
She knows who is happy, and who has the blues;
She knows all our sorrows, she knows all our jovs,
She knows every girl who is chasing the boys;
She knows all our troubles, she knows all our strife,
She knows every man who Is mean to his wife;
She knows every time we are out with the boys,
She hears the excuses each fellow emplovs.
She knows every woman who has a dark past,
She knowsevery man who's inclined to be fast;
In fact, there's a secret 'neath each saucy curl,
Of that quiet, demure-looking Telephone Girl.
If the Telephone Girl would tell all she knows
It would turn half our friends into bitterest foes;
She'd start a small wind that would soon be a gale
And engulf us In trouble and land us In jail*
She would let go a story which, gaining ln force
Would cause half our wives to sue for divorce
She would get all tlie churches mixed up in a fight
And turn all our days into sorrowing nights
In fact, she would keep all the world ln a stew
If she told a tenth part of the things she knew '
Now, doesn't It set your head in a whirl
When you think what we owe tlie Telephone Girl?
—Edw. P. F. McCluskv
FALL
OPENING
LADIES' FALL COATS—Newest styles in Velours and Salt's Plushes.
DRESS GOODS—In Gabardines, Broadcloths, Serges and Tweeds.
COATINGS—In Velours, Polo Cloths, Tweeds and Plaids.
NEWEST STYLES IN PLAIDS, PLEATED CLOTH AND SPORT
SKIRTS
MILLINERY—The newest creations in Fall Millinery, in exclusive styles.
FALL FOOTWEAR—The newest styles in Ladies' Shoes, Oxfords, Pumps
and Slippers.
LADIES' DRESSES—The latest styles in Ladies' Dresses, in Silks, Serges
and Tricotines, at popular prices.
Men's Department
SPECIAL SHOWING OF MEN'S FALL SUITS AND OVERCOATS
NEW FALL SAMPLES OF MADE-TO-MEASURE CLOTHING — Style
and fit guaranteed, and pre-war quality and prices.
Your Inspection Invited
illlll;
llii
The Studebaker
Light-Six
Guaranteed
Beer =
Cascade Beer is full strength beer. It is guaranteed
not less than 8 per cent, proof spirit. You will find
every bottle of It the same—uniform strength. There
is more Cascade sold than any other beer in Canada,
Because it is the Best Beer
Cascade Beer
The World's  Greatest  Light-Weight   Automobile   m
■ ■ - -i-
Vancouver  Breweries  Limited
" THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was de-
signed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks   Motors
LIMITED
WALLACE STREET
# NANAIMO, B. C.
J
Illllllllllllllllilll!
I
1
1 /
0
September 24, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do it.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on the subject if you ask us.
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
BREAD!
He's for it first, last and all
the time.
He's a Canadian boy.
He loves plain, wholesome
things.
He loves Bread, the great Canadian food.
In contains double the amount
of nourishment you find in other
foods.
Bread is your best Food—Eat
more of it.
Your boy will like the delicious
wholesome slices of
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offlce 2630 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
White Laundry
Leave orders at
LIDDELL'S  BARBER  SHOP
Dunsmuir Avenue
or Phone 47-F
when   your   requirements   will
receive immediate attention.
THE COURTENAY LAUNDRY
Take tlie ■Md" ont of adversity and
ran It In The Islander -and watch
business grow.
Cumberland Won
First League Game
(Continued from Page One)
in Nanaimo's favor, and for 15 minutes
it looked as though a goal wou'd result, but the Cumberland defence
withstood all attacks. The visitors
then took up the ^running and made
things interesting for Tommy Dickinson and his partners, Ogle and Routledge.
Towards the end of the game Nanaimo tried another rush for Boyd's
charge, but the Nanaimo forwards
were very weak in front of goal. Jock
Campbell and Mortimer having no
difficulty In holding them and eventually transferring play to the other
ened, Toots Jlump receiving the ball
slipped around Ogle and with a* fast
drive, wliieh nearly "busted"the net,
scored No. 2 for Cumberland, Routledge having no earthly chance to
save. A few more minutes and time
was called with Cumberland winners
over their old-time rivals by a score
of 2-0.
For Nanaimo. Routledge, Dickinson
and Ogle played good ball; the halfback line was far too slow and could
never hold the Cumberland forwards.
The home team's front line was very
weak with the exception of Bobby
Husband, who played a magnificent
game.
For Cumberland, It would be hard to
pick out any individual player, as the
whole team played good ball. Toots
Plump was credited by the Nanaimo
fans to be the best man ou the Held.
Cumberland's defence was In great
form, Jock Campbell and Mortimer
kicking and tackling with rare judgment. Mortimer had the misfortune
to lose all the studs, except one, off
his boots before half-time, which Interfered with his kicking and tackling
the rest of the game. Try another
cobbler, Mortimer!
Boyd, the old Heart of Midlothian
player, was also in fine form, and as
one fan remarked, "They couldna' pul
one by yon mon In a week."
CLUB NOTES
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association.
Visitors—J. P. It. McOlll, Nanaimo;
A. Parfitt. Victoria: Vernon K. Hall.
Vancouver; D. .McMillan. South Wellington; Vi. W. Anderson, Hazelton;
H. I. Smith. Victoria.
The International Encyclopedia has
arrived for the Library and is on the
shelves for reference. It is one of
the best encyclopedias printed.
The Bylaws and Constitution have
been printed and bound in a convenient size; they will be distributed to
each member of the club with the current statements.
There will be a meeting of the
Junior Football Management immediately after the football game on Saturday. The meeting will be held in
the writing room of the club building.
A meeting has been called for 7
o'clock Sunday evening for the purpose of organizing a debating society
among club members. It is hoped a
sufficient number will attend so that
this branch of the literary work can
get under way.
Arrangements arc being made with
the University of B. C. to have the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association on their lecture circuit.
Illllllllllllllllllli
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on Royston-
Cumberland  Road
Price $30.00 Z
er
ere
EYE  HEADACHES
NEED NOT BE
There is no need for anyone to suffer
with headaches caused by eyestrain.
Our special lenses will cure, and cure
quickly.
All you have guessed about your
eyes may be wrong. We can locate
aiiy existing eye trouble.
Louis R. Stevens
Eyesight SiK-clullst
LADIES!
We have just received a large
shipment of
Slater's Strider
SHOES AND OXFORDS
All the latest cuts. See the
new Ball-Strap Oxfords — the
latest Fall style.
GENTLEMEN!
We have just received our
Fall shipment of
Slater's
Strider
in No. 1 Calf and No. 1 Kid
leathers—brown and black, and
latest lasts. They range in price
from $8.50 to $13.00.
lW We now have the most complete line of shoes in town—in
fact one of the best outside of
Victoria.
Cavin's Shoe Store
Everything in Shoes
BARGAINS!
With this big Fall shipment
just in we will sell our
BROKEN LINES AT COST
Our store is too small to show
much stock, but drop in and ask
us to show you some real bargains.
DON'T FORGET—"CHUMS"
for the Children will be the
cheapest in the long run.
Cavin's Shoe Store
Notice of Dissolution of Partnership.
Notice Is hereby given that the partnership heretofore subsisting between
us the undersigned as general merchants at Cumberland, Chinatown, in
the province of British Columbia, carried on under the name of Charlie
Sing Chong & Company, has this day
been dissolved hy mutual consent. All
debts owing to the said partnership
are to be paid to Mah Yick at Cumberland. Chinatown aforesaid, and all
claims against the said partnership
are to be presented to the said Mah
Yick. who will manage the said business still to be carried on under the
name of Charlie Sing Chong & Company, by whom the same will be settled for the continuing partners In
said firm. Dated at Cumberland, B.C.,
this  19th day of  September, 1921.
Charlie Sing Chong, Mah Sam, Mah
Why, Mah Chung, Mah Yick, Mah
Why, Mah Hing. Mah Toy. Union Bay,
B.C.
NEW TROPHIES
FOR FOOTBALL
Province Cup Will Replace the
McBride Shield—Challenge
Trophy for Juniors
The Cumberland United Football
Club will have another beautiful cup
lo its credit if it repeats its magnificent performance of last season, for
the McBride Shield has been supplanted by a cup donated by the Vancouver
Dally Province.
At the meeting of the British Colum-
blt Football Association held at Nanaimo on Saturday night two new
'leautiful trophies were presented Ior
competition. The first. The Vancouver
Daily Province Provincial Amateur
Challenge Cup, donated by the Province, will he the emblematic trophy of
;he provincial championship and replaces the McBride Shield, now held
by the Cumberland United Football
Club. The new cup Is u magnificent
piece of solid silver.
The second, the O. B. Allan Provincial Junior Amateur Challenge Cup.
donated by Mr. O. B. Allan of Vancouver, will be emblematic of the junior
championship of the province and will
mark a great forward step in the work
among the younger element In the
game. The trophy will be competed
for under the same conditions of play
as the seniors aud players who can be
called Juniors was defined by a ruling
that they shall not have reached the
age of 18 years at September 16.
Sunday Football.
In addition to these Important items
a fund of routine business was conducted during the evening. The committee previously appointed to secure
local autonomy from the D. F. A. in
the matter of playing Sunday football
on the upper Island were Instructed
to further prosecute the question and
further advances are now being made
to tbe Dominion body to that end.
A claim by Referee Baron, who was
assaulted ln a game at Vancouver recently, was rejected by the association, it being decided that the association accept no liability in the case.
The special committee appointed to
prepare the official list of referees was
augmented by the addition of Messrs.
Peden of Victoria and Macdonald of
Nanaimo. The various gentlemen will
examone the candidates in their own
districts.
BEVAN JUNIORS BEAT
CUMBERLAND 3 TO 1
Visitors Played Good Game —
Cumberland Teams Minus
Five Regular Players
The Cumberland and Bevan Juniors
met in an exhibition game last Saturday on the Recreation Grounds, when
the Bevan boys won out by 3 goals to
one. The weather was dull and threatening rain before the game, which no
doubt accounted for the small attend-
ince of spectators. It was a fairly
sood game for the first of the season.
The visitors were far the superior
team, and were on the attack about
three parts of the game, scoring all
the three goals in the first half. The
Cumberland team, spurred up In the
econd half and kept the Bevan defence busy at times. The Bevan team
s a good one and it will take a first-
rate team to defeat It this season. The
loys are all well trained and have a
good knowledge of the game.
The Cumberland team was not at
'ull strength, being minus five of their
regular players. However, the local
joys say that wheu the district league
starts they will be right there, and
we have no doubt they are a team to
ae reckoned with.
Four Teams In League.
It is understood the league executive will meet In the near future for
'he purpose of receiving entries for
the Graham Cup and drawing up the
league schedule for the same. It is
jxpected that four teams will be entered in this competition, namely.
Bevan, Cumberland Juniors, High
•School and Union Bay, therefore thc
ans are assured of some good games
in tbe Junior circles this season.*
APPLY-
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in tho Memorial
Hall.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
A GENEROUS SPORT!
Two local men went fishing the
other day. One of them had extraordinary good luck and soon* had a
,'ood basket, whilst his companion
only managed to catch a couple of
tmall ones. On getting ready to return home the one with thc full
basket of fish suggested putting the
two email fish In with the others. The
offer  being  accepted,  the  fishermen
proceeded.   On arrival at the B	
Hotel the fish were dumped on the
kitchen table; a big bunch ot people
had collected, viewing the wonderful
catch, when he of the full basket ex-
■lalmed. "I say, can you pick out
your own twa from this bunch?"
Some sport, we'll say he was.
The Evenings are
Cool
Our Heaters have just arrived and we have placed
them on sale.
FAWCETTS HOT-BLAST HEATERS
Brick lined; the most satisfactory Heater on the
market.   Three sizes, at $35.00, $27.50 and $25.00.
FAIRY OAK HEATERS
A   Heater of a very pleasing appearance; two
sizes, at $20.00 and $25.00.
OPEN FIRE GRATE HEATERS
Two different styles, at $32.00, $28.00 and $1S.00.
Mattresses  and  Blankets
A   good Mattress and a pair of new Blankets will
make the night just right.   We have them.
All Kinds of Furniture
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
IT 18 NOT EA8Y-
To apologize,
To begin over,
To be unselfish,
To take advice,
To admit error,
To face a sneer,
To be considerate.
To avoid mistakes,
To endure success,
To keep out of the rut,
To think and then act,
To forgive and forget.
To make the best of little,
To subdue an unruly temper,
To maintain a high standard,
To shoulder a deserved blame.
To recognize the silver liniug—
But it always pays.
/
SAP, BIT Till *F,
A preacher once said: "Editors daro
not (ell the truth. If (hey did they
could not live, and the newspapers
would be a failure." The Editor replied; "You are right, and tlie minister who will at all times tell tho
truth about his members, alive or
dead, will never occupy the same pulpit more than one Sunday, and he'll
find it necessary to leave town in a
hurry. The press and pulpit go hand
in hand with whitewash brush and
kind words, magnifying little virtues
into big ones. Tlie pulpit and the
press are a saint-making partnership."'
;*;:ip."
LADYSMITH SCORED EASY
WIN OVER GRANBY
In the Upper Island Soccer League
Same played at Ladysmith Saturday.
the Ladysmith team easily disposed
of the Granby players by tlie score of
6 goals to nil. Ladysmith had the
better of the game from the outset,
and It was Just a question of how
many goals they would score.
WHISKY MADE HIM EAT
BARK FROM A TREE
LETHBRIDGE—Barking up a tree
—and It was no member of the canine
species, but a human being who was
so discovered by the police in Gait
Gardens Sunday evening. Tlie barking he was employing In was eating
the bark off trees to satisfy the pangs
of hunger with the Instinct of the
squirrel instilled Into him by drinking
squirrel whiBky. It was ascertained
that the victim was without food for
three days while awaiting a cheque.
SCHOOL SHOES
FOR GIRLS AND
BOYS
Opened up this week
another consignment of
Shoes, the best and
most reliable footwear,
including Leckie's, Weston's, Harvard, Sculler,
etc.
THE FAMOUS LECKIE. TO SUIT ALL AGES
Boys' Strong School Shoes— d»Q Of?
Sizes 11, 12 and 13, at   tpO.^O
Youths' Strong School Shoes, tfJQ AA   rt» J   AA
sizes 1 to 5, price    «Dt).i7U*) «Pf*l.t7*-J
Misses' Strong School Shoes, d»Q  r A    fJ» A   Hr
sies 11 to 2, prices  ♦jJO.OU* «Jjfi   I O
Girls' Strong School Shoes      <j*0 QC    <I?0 \ A
"     '   ' $3^50
THE FAMOUS SCUFFER SHOES
Boys and Girls, at	
WINTER COATS FOR BOYS
in dark effects.  Maim-
$6.50
In a nice warm MACKINAW
facturers' samples,
priced upwards irom 	
Hats
and
Caps
From the factory direct, a nice range of Hats and
Caps, in the newest styles and shapes, in Felts and
Tweeds.   Prices the lowest.
THE MODEL CLOTHING
AND SHOE STORE
F. PARTRIDGE
Phone 152
P. O. Box 313
J feist
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 24, 1621.
UNEMPLOYMENT-FREIGHT RATES
AND RAILWAYS
THE INDICATOR of true prosperity is employment. The presence of unemployed men, unemployed machinery, unemployed railway equipment, and
unemployed capital in Canada is reason enough, therefore, for every large
Canadian business interest to study its relation to the general problem—to see
whether anything in its power remains to be done to advance the general prosperity of the country.
IN THIS connection the Railway Companies have been specially interested.
Freight rates touch everyone, and, because they touch everyone, are always
close to the public consciousness and more conveniently attacked than the true
causes of depression which are less easily discerned and more difficult, if not
indeed impossible, to control. Furthermore, the railways—while joining with everyone else in the general agitation for deflation of prices and wages—found themselves
recently in the seemingly anomalous position of demurring when it was proposed to
lower the railway rates.
THEY were made to appear as though they were endeavoring with one hand to
put wages down and with the other to keep rates up, thereby securing for their
own treasuries instead of passing on  to  the  Canadian  public,  any  saving
effected on wage rolls.   They were placed in the equivocal position of having
urged blanket increases of rates when wages went up—and of opposing blanket
decreases when wages were seemingly decreased.
THE  FOLLOWING  statement is offered, therefore, with a view to exhibiting
what the railways believe to be the true relation of railway freight rates to
the question of unemployment, outlining the history of Canadian rates, explaining something of the groundwork of rate-making  nnd   clearing  up   the  seeming
anomalies referred to, so that none may remain as possible causes for future weakening of confidence between the public and the carriers.
Freight Rates and Unemployment
With a large part of the world's population Idle, or only
partly efficient owing to wars or disturbed political conditions
—with Inventors In many parts of the world almost afraid to
expose their Inventions, organizers afraid to organize, capital
hesitating to invest—a corresponding proportion of world production is missing. Thc total of goods available for the world
ls less than normal. Those who do not produce—speaking
generally—can not buy. Few purchasers—few sales; few sales-
little employment. This Is the great world-wide fundamental
of the unemployment situation.
The condition Is international, not local to Canada. If
Canadian railway rates were a determining factor in making
the sale prices of our export goods, in other words, if Canadian
prices were higher in International markets than the goods of
our competitors, then railway rates would be contributing to
unemployment in Canada by depressing our sales abroad, lowering the number of our customers antl the orders coming to our
producers.
But in the first place the real effect of freight rates on price
making fs a debatable point.   This is proven:
(1) By the fact that prices fell last Fall after the rates
were Increased instead of rsiing as the retail trades had
prophesied;
(2) By the fact that a ten per cent, reduction on Western
coal rates, offered in order to stimulate coal movement In the
summer months, was followed by a drop In the coal tonnage
offering instead of an increase.
In the second place, assuming for the purposes of argument
they did have serious effect, Canadian export rates are lower and
not higher than the rates in countries witli which Canada may
be compared. .Mile for mile the haul from Western Canada
points to the head of navigation is cheaper than in the United
States. The export rate on grain is lower than it was last
August.
In other words, with international competition on her chief
items of export, Canada Is helped by her railway rates. So far
as international trade is concerned, they are alleviating unemployment rather than aggravating it.
Inside Canada the same Is true. Although It is a very difficult point to prove or disprove, the railways of Canada are
sincere in claiming that, by and large, goods are carried "more
cheaply In Canada than In the United States. Canada lind ono
blanket reduction of five per cent, last January, whereas there
Is still no decrease, nor immediate prospect of a blanket decrease
In the United States.
The Trend of Freight Rates
With the exception ot war and post-war conditions, the whole
tendency of freight rates In this country, as in any other progressive country of Its kind, is downward. As Canada's population rises, as our Industries multiply and the density of traffic
becomes more nearly like that of older countries, some of the
principal costs of railway service can be subdivided among a
great number of shipii >rs nnd travellers, levying on each, therefore, a smaller fraction of these costs than before. For twenty
years prior to the war. traffic was on the Increase. For twenty
years, therefore, the railways have been adjusting rates downward—quite apart fro.n special decreases put In effect by the
Board of Hallway Commissioners. The revisions have been
skillfully applied by experienced, practical economists—that is,
by the freight traffic experts ot the railways, whose business it
Is to know all branches of Industry intimately, so that the benefit of these voluntary rate adjustments would go to "key commodities," thus stimulating further growth of the country,
increase in traffic, and In the end, further reductions of rates.
The difference between giving a reduction to a "key industry"
rather than spreading over all kinds of goods as Illustrated In
the ease of a certain small railway which by concentrating rate
reductions on lumber, enabled the mills of that region to remain
open and the people to remain at work, whereas if the effect of
the reductions had been scattered over all the goods carried by
that road each family would have been able to save a small
handful of silver in a year (provided the decreased rates had
been passed on as decreased prices by storekeepers)—but there
would have been almost no employment.
So much for the day to day reductions arranged on thousands of articles hy the traffic department of the roads. Iu
1907 a substantial reduction in Eastern rates was made, ln 1914
a very material cut was applied in the West. So that the transcontinental lines entered tlie war period with a depressed earning power.
Now while all—even the railways—see the desirability for
low freight rates, there are certain limits beyond which no one
urges reductions. Of course there are theorists such as Mr.
Bernard Shaw, who believes that all railway service should be
free. But leaving aside views so far in advance, as yet, of public
opinion, it is assumed by most people that a railway will give
best service at least cost—because, of course, even free railways
must he paid for hy the taxpayer—when their managements are
allowed to show their mettle by meeting tlle obligations of their
properties out of their earnings. It is usually recognized that
these obligations fall into two groups:
Group 1. To pay their employees; to pay for current supplies of materials, such as coal, etc.; to pay for repairs and
replacements.
Group 2. To pay such a wage or hire for the use of the
capital which built these railways as will make Canadian railway securities always desirable and easily marketed whether as
bonds or stocks. This involves more than tlie mere payment of
the established rate of dividend in the case of privately owned
roads. It involves the earning also of some surplus—a safety
margin of income over expenditure, which will assure investors
a complete safety. This principle ot a surplus was definitely
established by the judgment of the Board of Railway Commissioners in 1914. under the chairmanship of Sir Henry Drayton—
and upheld by its judgment of 1920, when the matter was again
considered exhaustively. On this principle rests Canada's
ability to enter the money markets whenever she may need and
feel confident of bringing hack funds for extending her railways
as she may require in the future.
War conditions, following the Western and Eastern rate
adjustments, brought the railway managements sharply up
against these fundamental problems, comparing the Government's figures for 10n7 against 1919—the last year for which the
railway blue book is available—the wage bill of the railways rose
Hull per cent., coal 345 per cent., ties 320 per cent., hut neither
the volume of traffic or Ihe scale of freight rates Increased In
comparable degree during that period/ The actual revenue per
ton per mile I which Is tlie real proof or disproof of the matter)
advanced only twenty per cent, over 1907. The year 1920
enlarged tlie discrepancy, although an increase of 35 per cent,
on Western lines nnd 40 per cent. In the East was supposed to
yield enough additional revenue to meet the increased wages.
Tlie increased wages were effective from May 1—the increased
rates not until September. The effectiveness of that Increase
depended on the volume of traffic remaining at a fairly high
level.   It did so for a time, then began to drop.   Today it is
very low. Nevertheless a five per cent, decrease was applied
in January. Fur tlie lirst six months of 1921. ns compared to the
lirst six months of 11120. the volume of traffic oii the most fortunately situated Canadian roads fell 20.72 |>er cent, nnd Its
revenue on this business, In spite ni the higher rates, fell 11.14
per cent.
The net result of these changes lias been a state of emergency in the offices of even the most fortunately situated of all
Canadian roads. Wages could he paid and bills met on time.
Even tlie usual dividend was paid and n very slight surplus—
one of tlie factors In maintaining tlie reputation of Canadian
railway securities—was earned. Bul this wns only done by
deferring work thnt must iillinialely he done on current account.
Such, economies can not long be continued without eating too
far into the broad safety margin which the Canadian roads maintain. Nothing but slackened speetl of trains and reduced Canadian industrial efficiency cau result if these savings have to be
long continued. Falling traffic still further aggravates the condition. Maintenance can not continue to be sacrificed lo protect
the credit of our railway securities.   Neither can be neglected.
In May tlie managements approached the task of reducing
their wage bills. For the first time in many years it was the
managements, and not the men. who were taking the initiative.
They had been forced to adopt tlie war-time increases granted
In the United States—where 92 per cent, of tlie members of tlie
railway unions lie. Therefore, when tlie reverse movement was
undertaken ln that country, the Canadian roads at once gave due
notice and a provisional and conditional decrease of roughly 10
per cent.—corresponding to the same movement in the United
States—was put in effect, tentatively, as from July 15. This
reduction has not been accepted by the United States membership of the unions, where a vote is being taken ou tlie question—
nor by the Canadian membership, who have applied for a board
of conciliation. Every resource of the management will be used
to sustain tliis imperatively necessary and only too moderate
reduction of their wage bills—which account for 60 per cent, of"
tlie cost of operation—they are compelled to regard tlie matter
as still unsettled and therefore not to be considered as a basis
for the reduction of railway rates—a view which a majority of
tiie Board of Railway Commissioners has just expressed ln its
judgment.
In Conclusion
The railway managements welcome deflation of railway rates
and are working steadily toward that end. On two grounds, however, they asked that any general decrease be deferred.
First—Because the so-called wage decreases are not yet
assured and can not he until tlie parallel decreases in the United
States, where 92 per cent, of tho union membership lies (and
where no general freight rate reductions have been ordered)
aro settled.
Second -Because the volume of traffic In the Immediate
future is problematical and any serious decline. If coupled with
n decrease In rales, would have very grave effect on even tlle
most favorably situated managements.
The railways have spoken against blanket decreases on the
grounds that it would be in the Interests of the country as a
whole to concentrate any beneficial effect to be expected, on
"key commodities" rather than distribute them ovcr all classes
of goods, thereby benefitting only tlie distributors.
They have been actuated throughout by the desire to assist
in tlle process of deflation—objecting only when that process
might seem to threaten their solvency and injure them—and
through them—the ultimate interests of the Canadian public.
THE RAILWAY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
263   St.   James    Street,    Montreal,   Quebec September 2i, 1&21.
tSL
TBI CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
.DougiAS
FA1DBANKS
The'great hurricane of joy and excitement    in
'TheMdikofZorrd
from the JMt-StoryUfeekiy'Novel 'Tre Curse of CdpistTdto'
by Johnston MJCu!ley Directed by Fred Niblo
Brings tottie screen a wholesome.qingery mixture
of melodi'dmd and vigorous comedy, crammed
with whirl-wind action, thrills, suspense and irresistible
funny angles* with never a let-up in its headlong pace
from theyery start to the rip-roaring, rattling,
eminently-satisfactory climax.
EXTRA SPECIAL, COMING TO THE ILO-ILO ON
OCTOBER 15—WATCH FOR IT
Why Buy a Piano With
No Reputation?
There are pianos with good enough appearance, but which are
not worth house room.
Why buy them when you cau get the Best at such reasonable
price and easy terms.   You know—everyone knows—the
Heintzman & Co. Piano
IS THE STANDARD
Vie have them  in ninny designs ami can arrange terms to
suit all.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of tlie Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are.within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our oilice by interested parties. •
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 7S ^©m Ltd. P.O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tampe- with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
SCHOOL LIBRARY
HAS 600 VOLUMES
Canadian 'Collieries' Donation of
290 Books Gives Library
Splendid Selection
Some time ago Mr. Thos. Graham,
General Superintendent' of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., who
is always willing to aid any good work
for the community, offered to present
the schools with a substantial addition to tiie library. At the game time
the School Board made a grant for
the same purpose.
With the arrival of 290 books donated by the Canadian Collieries, the
library, consisting of 560 volumes, is
now complete.
The books, which were selected by
a committee composed of Mr. Colin
Campbell, acting for the Canadian Collieries, and the two school principals,
cover all departments of school activities. Tiie classes and numbers are:
Stories. 770; history and biography.
103; nature study. 28; poetry and
drama. 34; geography and travel. 47;
games and occupations. 31; fairy tales
and legends, 70; literature, 53; science,
IU; books for small children. 13; reference books, 6 (including 3 volumes
of a Musical Cyclopedia donated by-
Mrs. Oliver).
As far as possible books likely to
be new to the pupils have beeu selected. Iu some cases finely Illustrated
copies of old favorites have been secured. Well known illustrators represented are Crane, Greenaway. Rack-
ham and Rhead.
Modem authors of note are also
well to the fore, Wells, Bennett, Galsworthy, Barrle, Maeterlinck and
France all being represented. There
are a number of books by Italian
authors and bsoks about Italy. There
are also books on Japan and China.
Two of the books are by Chinese
authors.
Books about Canada and by Canadian authors number 90, including a
set of the "Chronicles of Canada." and
amongst others, books by Parker.
Ralph Connor, Montgomery and
Pauline Johnson.
It may be mentioned that there are
some 3500 books now written for or
suitable for children, so that there ls
still scope for enlargement.
The staffs of the schools will make
every effort to £ee that the best use
is made of the books by all pupils
who can benefit by them. The assistance of parents will be welcomed Iu
seeing—
1. Tbat books are read to some purpose; not idly glanced at.
2. That books are properly cared
for and returned ln a reasonable time.
G. W. V. A. NOTES      I   §
At the last regular meeting President II. Davidson gave his report as
delegate to the G.W.V.A. meeting at
Nanaimo.
Secretaries and presidents of the
Island locals were present to hear
Capt. Carmichael. President Harnett,
Secretary-Treasurer Drinnan and
other members of the Provlnclal Command who addressed the meeting on
the question of amalgamation, etc.
All members who were not present
at the meeting on Thursday are re-
iiuested to attend next meeting as
there will be a vote taken as to the
local's wish re backing the provincial
executive on the various questions
discussed at the last meeting.
Don't forget the Women's Auxiliary
whist drive and dance on Friday next.
The ladies are working hard for the
association, so it's up to the men to
rally around them.
Members are earnestly requested to
bear this date iu mind—Tuesday. Sept,
27, at 7 p.m. A special meeting will be
held In the Memorial Hall to discuss
the question of amalgamation and
other items vital to all en-service
associations.
Representatives from Courtenay,
.Merville and other returned men's organizations will be present.
It is proposed to hold a Smoker on
Saturday. October 1. Several speakers
from Victoria and Vancouver wlll be
present, including Capt. Carmichael.
A special Invitation Is given to all ex-
service men in the district to attend.
Opportunity will be given all those
who wish to express their opinions on
the question of amalgamation and
other topics. Representatives from
nther returned men's organizations
will be present.
This will be a good opportunity for
nil knockers and dissatisfied ex-service men to publicly air their opinions
of the G.W.V.A. aud kindred soldier
organizations.
There will be plenty of good smokes
und drinks, also an interesting programme.
The G. W. V. A. will hold their 3rd
Annual Masquerade Ball on November 11th.    Particulars later.
■■■il
SPEAKING PICTURES
British  Producer  Confident of
Successful Experiment.
One of the foremost British producers, Mr. Walter West, ls now busily
engaged with experimenting ln what
he is confident will be the perfect
speaking picture. At present Mr.
West cannot be persuaded to divulge
any of the secrets of the new process,
liut that the Invention will prove a big
success there is little doubt—for Walter West ls declared to be a man who
seldom experiments unless he seeB the
possibility of achievement rewarding
lis efforts. Should Mr. West's experiments prove successful, It Is within
tlie bounds of possibility that the silent
drama will undergo wonderful changes
and there ls little doubt that for instructional and topical subjects, the
new speaking film will be at once
adopted.
A young fellow took his elderly
father to a football match.
"Father." he said as they took their
seats, "you'll see more excitement for
you dollar than you ever did before.
"Oh. I dont' know," grunted the old
man, "one dollar was all I paid for
my marriage licence."
IL0IL0 THEATRE
Saturday, September 24th
JESSE L. LASKY PRESENTS WILLIAM DE MILLE'S PRODUCTION
Midsummer
Madness
Adapted from Ihe Novel, "His Friend and His Wife"
— STARRING —
Lois Wilson      Lila Lee
Jack Holt
and Conrad Nagel
Under the kiss of magic moonlight, the warm night called to love. And
here were these two, alone. She, the friend of his wife—unhappy, because
her honeymoon romance had failed. He, the friend of her husband; yet
now, in one mad moment	
A story that hurls the instincts of ages into the midst of modern conventions and cleanses them all with living lire. Acclaimed by the editor
of The Moving Picture World as "the greatest legitimate dramatic production the screen has ever seen."
^***" ***'
The World hath seldom heard
Of lovers, who so nearly erred,
And yet, who did not.
The Third Episode of the New Serial
THE SKY RANGER
will be shown on Wednesday and Thursday
Thursday, September 29th
WILLIAM FOX  PRESENTS
Shipley  Mason
Flame of
Youth
A STORY OF GILDED EVIL AND GOLDEN ROMANCE
A Sweetheart Classic of the Screen — An Entrancing Story of Life's
Springtime—A Trip Through Sweetheart Land—Youth's Sunshine and
Shadow—A Story Laden wilh the Essence of Youth—A Thrilling Romance
of Love and Ail, of Studio and Countryside.
Moments of Tense Interest
When little Bebee, at her flower stall, meets Victor Fleming for the fust
time.
When,
When
When
When
When
When
progress.
i Jeanot realies that he may lose his little sweetheart.
Bebee prays for a gift from Heaven—and gets it from Fleming.
Fleming is turned from his wicked purpose by the child's prayer.
Magda, filled with jealous rage, comes from Paris to see Bebee.
old Bac recognies Magda as his long-lost daughter.
Bebee at last reaches Fleming's studio while a wild orgy is in
NO   SHOW   ON   FRIDAYS Sight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Featuring
New Fall Skirts
LADIES'  ALL-WOOL  NAVY
Made of a good hard-wearing Surge, in the
wanted sizes.   Price 	
SERGE SKIRTS
$6.75
FINE NAVY SERGE SKIRTS
.Made of high-grade Botany yum.
Prices	
SKIRTS FOR STOUT LADIES
$9.50, $10.50
$8.50
We specialize in Skirts for those requiring waist measures
of 30, 32, 34 and Sti, and larger sizes made to order. Call
and inspect our new lines.
PLAID SKIRTS AND NEW STRIPE SKIRTS
In new cloths, good heavy material, nicely made
and smart dosigns, from 	
New Eiderdown Quilts
A shipment of McLlntock'a   world-known   Quilts   have  just
arrived from London. England, and comprise some really fine
goods—tlie coverings are guaranteed to give satisfaction and the ,
lilling is of the very best.   A most useful present for tlie good
lady.
Cotton Filled Comforters
A most comprehensive showing   of very   pretty   designs, in
pinks and blues, and the new reduced prices are very attractive,
Dress Goods
$2.95
VERY FINE ALL-WOOL NAVY SERGE
54 inches wide.   A most desirable piece of Serges for Ladies'
Suits, Skirts and   Dresses.    This   special   line   was   sold
previously at $5.50 per yard.    The new
reduced price is_ only 	
NEW LINES IN JERSEY CLOTH (Circular)
Ready for your Skirts—very little making. Qff PA
One yard makes a Skirt for most ladies.   Per yard *Dtl*»OU
New Bungalow Dresses
Another shipment to hand today; made of good quality Unbleached Cotton, trimmed with Plaid Gingham. This flM Qr
is one of our very special leaders.   Price  «DjL.t/t)
Gossard Corsets
Ladies who desire a really well made, comfort-fitting Front
Lace Corset will do well to see the "GOSSARD"—it is in a class
by itself and will meet with your approval.
OUR CORSET SPECIAL—Made by the  (J»-|   r A
Dominion Corset Co. Per pair  «pX»OU
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
.COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION RAY
Sept. 15—Melanope, Plunger and
scows, Vancouver; Achates and Red
Fir. coastwise.
Sept. 10—Princess Beatrice, Honeymoon, Rermuda, coastwise.
Sept. 17—Annacis, Karl and Active,
coastwise.
Sept. IS—Canadian Farmer, Ocean
Falls; Dauntless, coastwise.
Sept. Ill—Gunner, coastwise; Dola
and scow, Victoria; Chemainus, coastwise.
Sept. 20—Coaster, coastwise.
Sept. 21—Glenboro and Olive M.,
tea st wise.
FOR SALE
MODERN F1VK-IIOOMED HOUSE
and furniture for sale. Apply* ,1.
Ferozzinl,  Windemere Avenue,    tf.
FIVE-ROOMED PLASTERED HOUSE
and two-roomed cabSn in rear, on
Maryport Avenue. Apply J. Ramsell.
Sr- . 1-36
TWO WEE MACQREGOR SAWS, IX
good condition: cheap for cash. Can
be seen any time at Harling and
Ledingham's Garage, Fourth Street.
Cumberland. 1-39
1920 CHEVROLET. $450 CASH. IN
first-class condition; model 490. Can
be seen at the Cumberland Motor
Works. 2-40
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND EF-
fects. Apply John .MacKenzie, next
to Post Office. 1-39
FRESH VEGETABLES, DELIVERED
to your door. Green Tomatoes, Jam
Marrows, Carrots, Potatoes, Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddington, Calhoun
Ranch; Sandwick, P. O. 2-4P
PIGS AND POULTRY
IIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIGS
and Poultry. Kwong YJpJt, Chinatown, Cumberland. Telephone 5-F.
P.O. Box 2S2. 13-52
PERSONAL  MENTION
WE CLEAN OR DYE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housefurnlshlngs,
etc. Let us send you our price list.
Waterproofs "reproofed." Permanent Dye Works Limited, 1641 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, D. C.
Two young girls were looking in
tlie drugstore window, gazing at some
physical culture belts which were ou
display, when suddenly one said: "Oh.
look, Mary! These must be the new
kind of corsets tiie men are wearing!"
Personal Mention
Mr. J. P. Hicks, representing the
Heintzman Piano Company of Victoria, arrived on Wednesday on a few
.lays' business visit.
.Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Cameron motored
to Victoria on Sunday for a few days
holiday, returning on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson and daughter Lois, of Hazelton, B. C, who have
been on a visit to Mr. Thomas Hor-
bury, father of Mrs. Anderson, left
Tuesday morning on their return.
Masters Cyril Michell and Montgomery Hood left for Vancouver Mon-
iay to take supplementary examinations. If successful in these tbey have
the privilege of entering Normal or
uiking senior matriculation at the
Cumberland High Scliool.
Master Finlay MacKinnon left on
Thursday morning for Vancouver tc
enter for the winter term at the B. C
University.
Miss Phyllis Partridge, who resigned
from tho teaching stall' of tlie Cumberland scliool In order to continue her
studies at the University, left Thursday morning for Vancouver. Miss
Partridge will study for the Bachelor
of Arts degree.
Mr. J. Strang of Extension  Mines
paid Cumberland a visit tliis week.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Graham, accompanied by their daughter Janet, motored to Nanaimo on Saturday, returning
on Sunday.
Mrs. Thos. Michell left for Vancouver Friday morning.
Miss A. Seagraves has left for her
home in Acme. Alberta, after spend
ing a vacation with Mr. aud Mrs. T.
Lewis.
Mrs. Ralph E. Frost left for Vancouver on Sunday, returning on Tuesday.
.Mr. W. A. Owen returned from Nanaimo on Wednesday.
Mr. T. Macabe, teller of the Cana
diau Bank of Commerce, returned from
Seattle, and Vancouver on Monday
Mr. and Mrs.   A.  Sommerville   returned home on Saturday.
E. Tarry, of Leicester, England, is
registered at the Cumberland Hotel.
J. D. Stein, of Seattle, Is a visitor in
town.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rodie and family are registered at the Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Damonte returned
home ou Saturday.
Mr. Earl Fletcher arrived iu town
on Wednesday from Nanaimo.
Mr. Vi. Woods left for Calgary on
Thursday on a visit to his sister.
SUIT SALE
SATURDAY   AND   MONDAY   ONLY
lUpM|   HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO BUY
IVlEil^l.   a SUIT  OF THE BEST QUALITY
30 Only Traveller's Sample Ready-Made Suits
BLUES, BROWNS AND  GREYS, IN ALL SIZES
Including some very high-grade Suits of All-Wool Navy Blue Serge, pure Indigo Dyed.
These Suits to be sold at Cost
I
COME EARLY
SATURDAY "'
MORNING
LOOK
OVER
THESE
PRICES:
11 SAMPLE SUITS TO BE SOLD
AT COST 	
2 SAMPLE SUITS TO BE SOLD
AT COST 	
6 SAMPLE SUITS TO BE SOLD
AT COST 	
7 SAMPLE SUITS TO BE SOLD
AT COST 	
4 SAMPLE SUITS TO BE SOLD
AT COST 	
$29.75
$33.50
$35.00
$38.50
$41.75
COME  EARLY  SATURDAY  BEFORE  THE BEST ARE PICKED OUT.   ALTERATIONS MADE TO THESE GARMENTS, IF  NECESSARY,   FREE  OF  CHARGE.
Our Window is too small to make a display, so
come inside and look them over
DON'T FORGET WE DO CLEANING, PRESSING, DYEING
AND ALTERATION WORK AT CITY PRICES.
No Job Too Small—None Too Big.    We Aim to Give Satisfaction.
Gardner's New Clothing Store
IN   THE   ILO-ILO   BUILDING
WHIST DRIVE AND
DANCE TONIGHT
The Men's Club of Holy Trinity
will open the fall season with a whist
drive and dance in the church hall,
when it is expected there will be a big
attendance. Whist will be from 8 to
9.30, refreshments 9.30 to 10, and
dancing 10 to midnight. Admission is
fifty cents.
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Her, Vi. Leversedge.
Sun-lay, September '25th—Harvest
Thanksgiving;.
Holy Communion, S.30 a.m.
Sunday Scliool, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, with Anthem, 7 p.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Hev. Jas. Hoed.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday Scliool, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Roman Catholic Church
Iter. Father Benton.
.Nineteenth .Sunday After Pentecost
Mass at 9 a.m.
Grace Methodist Church
Her. G. 1). Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
lingular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
A wife Is like an nutoniobilc. It's
not the Initial cost so much as the
upkeep.
September 24, 1921.
Now for the Pickling -Season. We
are right here to supply
your requirements.
Pickling   Recipes
FREE
We carry a full line of
VEGETABLES
FRUITS       SPICES
VINEGARS
Try our pure White Wine or
pure Malt Vinegar
Gravenstein Apples, $3.50  Box
Cream of the
West Flour
49-pound Sacks—
Price 	
$2.80
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
v B. & B. GROCERY
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
ivill hold its first meeting after the Summer recess on
SUNDAY, OCT015ER 2nd. IN THE FIRST AID HALL
Commencing at 10.30 a.m.
A PAPER WILL BE HEAD BY MR. J. G. QUINN.
Election of Oflicers will also take place.
A. J. TAYLOR, Publicity Agent.
OBSERVATIONS
'Protect your lips from tlie son,"
says a Vancouver advertisement. Ah,
a .Miss-print.
Father bad the car overhauled ami
then gave It to Ihe garage as part
payment!
Why does a man swear to love before marriage and love to swear after
marriage?
The faster a man is the harder It is
for him to kep in Bight of his running
expenses.
I'lie Sel Iboy's Wish.
1 wish 1 was a little rock
A-settln' on a hill;
A-doln' nothing all day long
Hut just a-settin' still.
I wouldn't eat. I wouldn't drink,
1 wouldn't even wash.
I'd sot and set a thousand years
And rest myself, by gosh.
Many a bride opening the fruit sho
cauned tliis summer will get an awful
jolt.
"Whnl  will tbe Kail styles show?"
"Every thing."
—Kitsilano Times.
SPECIAL
DISCOUNT
SILKS
FOR  ONE
WEEK
PAILLETTES, all colors
CHARMEUSE SATINS
DUCHESSE SATINS
PONGEES
SILK JERSEYS
HABUTAIS
DURABILITY
WASH SATINS
EXTRA   SPECIAL
BLACK DUCHESSE SATIN—
As sold at $4.50 a yard, on sale
next week at 	
$2.75
Laver's Store - Cumberland

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