BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Jul 5, 1924

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0070762.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070762.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0070762-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0070762-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070762-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0070762-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0070762-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0070762-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0070762-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0070762.ris

Full Text

Array /
Provincial  Library      Jan
nl?
_L 1
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
ut
With which is consolidated the I nailicrliind News.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 27.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Cumberland Represents British Columbia
Local Team By Virtue Of Two Splendid Wins Over North Vancouver Elks Advance
In Dominion Soccer Championship.   Meet Alberta Champions July 11-12 At Vancouver
PROTEST WAS
ENTERED BY
ELKS' TEAM
Wedding
Brown •  McLellan
Cumberland Soccer team wero
lucky lu some respects to come out
In thc long end of u 3-2 score on Saturday last against North Vancouver
Klks in the B.C. Final for the Connaught Cup. The game was played
nt Con. Jones' Park before at least
,1000 spectators. Cumberland won
the toss and elected to play with the
sun at their backs. The opening exchanges did not produce much good
football, both teams being over anxious. The Elks forced a corner on
the left, which wns easily cleared by
Stewart. Deluce and .Milligan tried
n run on the right, the outside man
crossing perfectly. Graham wns ill
n good position to receive and just ns
he wns about to connect, was charged
ln the back, the referee promptly
'.warding a penalty, which Stewart
converted. Tlle decision was loudly
protested by thc Elks, hut as far as we
could see, (nnd we were on the spot),
a penalty was the only decision a referee could give. After this reverse.
tho Elks made desperate efforts to obtain the equalizer, Cumberland's half-
buck line, playing good football, kept
the opposing forwards well ln hand.
Illnlr during the lirst half only handled the bnll nbout three times nnd had
no difficult..' In clearing lhe shots that
he did gel. The breather arrived wltll
Cumberland leading by 1-0.
The second half started with a rusli
by the Elks, lllalr being forced to
kick clear. For the next couple of
minutes play wns lu tho Elks' territory, the hall was quickly transferred
to Blair's end and then the trouble
commenced. Grant and Forgle had
bee i continuously hacking, it made
no difference wlio It wns, tbey did nol
seem to be able to resist the tempta-
llon—wheu the referee was not loosing. Illnlr had cleared tbe ball, with
Grant and Forgle practically on top
of him. and before anyone could realize It, Blulr received marching or-
ilcrs. A goalie with Blair's experience should certainly have known
better, but being aggravated by the
tactics of Orant and Forgle. the long
Scot thought lt wns time to retaliate
and got caught, lllalr was sorry ns
soon as It happened, ami apologized j
to the boys. Bannerman went In
goal and the Elks players and supporters went wild with Joy, evidently
thinking they had a cinch. A change
however, had come over tiie Cumberland team; they went Into the game
determined to keep that goal lead, a
feat they accomplished until about 10
minutes from full lime. Six minutes
from full time, the Elks were lending
two gouls to one; Bob Forgle bal
scored two goals in nbout two minutes, At this stage a great many
people left the stnnds thinking it was
about all over; lt was all over all
right, but il wns Cumberland's four
forwards who were nil over the Ellis
nud from n beautiful pass by Milligan
to Graham, the cenl re forward tricked a couple of the defense und scored
n beauty, making the score two goals
each.
A concentrated movement on the
Elks goal In the last two minutes
brought disaster, the right half handling the hall In the pennlty area.
Stewart was entrusted with the kick
he mnde no mistake, bulging the back
of the net with a great drive. The
whistle went Immediately after, Cumberland being in the long end of a
3-2 score.
For the Elks, the half-back line
wns excellent, with Forgle and Orant
the pick of the forwards. Cumberland were well served throughout, ull
tbe players giving of their best. Special mention might be made ot tho
glorious run of Graham In the second half. He tricked several opponents and came within Inches nf
scoring. He received n great ovation from the 3.000 spectators.
fiame Protested
At the conclusion of the game officials of the Elks registered a protest, claiming Referee Rodgers should
A quiet wedding took place at ti
o'clock on Monday morning lu St.
George's Presbyterian Church when
Miss Ethel McLellan, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McLellan of
this city became the bride of Mr.
Keith Melroy Brown of Courtenay.
.Mrs Biggs of Wellington, sister of the
bride was bridesmaid, and Mr. Wm.
H, McLellan, late of Boston, U.S.A.,
a cousin of the bride, acted as groomsman. The bride wns led to the altar
by her father and the Rev. James
Hood performed the ceremony.
After the wedding breakfast, which
wns served at the home of the bride's
parents, the happy couple left by
motor for a honeymon trip of the
Island and on their return will take
up their residence In lhc city of
Courtenny.
SPRINKLING NOTICE
Hours for Sprinkinling and Irrigating purposes are
Morning 7 to 8 a.m.
Night 7 to 9 p.m.
Watering Sidewalks, Streets Etc. must be discontinuurl
Effective July 6th, 1924.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
LOCAL BOY HAS RECORD OF
EIGHT YEARS OF FAULTLESS
SCHOOL  ATTENDANCE
The Garden Party which was to
have been held July 2nd ou Mayor
Parnham. lawn under the auspices
of Ihe Ladles' Aid of St. George's
Presbyterian Church, but which was
postponed until some future date, has
been cancelled. All persons buying
tickets may have their money refunded by applying to Ihe treasurer,
Mrs. Whyte.
HON. ARTHUR MEIGHEN
HAS 50th BIRTHDAY
(Continued on Page Five)
Hon. Arthur Meighen, leader of the
Conservative Party of Canada and j
Opposition leader in the Dominion |
Parliament, who recently attained his
until birthday. He was the recipient !
of scores of wires of congratulations j
from political friends and toes alike. ■
Ideal Weather
For Annual Picnic
Under the auspices of thc Methodist
Church Sunday Scbool, a most en-
joyable picnic wns held at Mallard's
Reach on Saturday, June 28th. Ideal
weather conditions prevailed, lielng
responsible in n large measure for
the success of the day.
During the afternoon everyone
gathered together for Ihe races
which were run according to ages
The main event was the older married ladles' race, which was won
after a hard fight by Mrs. Mounce,
Mrs. Richardson coming a close second.
Candy and Ice Cream were serve!
to the children during the day and
Immediately after supper, which was
served In real picnic style, the prizes
for the races were distributed,
The staff of the Sunday School
wishes to thank the management of
the Canadian Collieries for tlle use of
their truck and also the following nier
chants for donations of prizes for the
various races: Messrs G. H. Wycher-
erley, J. Sutherland, Win. Henderson,
R. C. Lang, and K. Nakanlshl.
Entrance pupils recommended to
High School without examination, in
order of merit:
Helen Parnham, Jessie Grant, Jean
MacNaughton, Beryl Hudson, Isnu
Abe, Walter Hughes. May Hughes,
Alma Conrod. Lilian Banks, Jean
Smith, Evelyn Carey, May Taylor, Leslie Dando. Norman Gomm, Thelma
Gray, Kate Robertson, Robert Yates.
Archie Dick, Yuen Low, Sam Davis,
Andrew Wnlker, Edna Smith.
George E. Apps, Principal.
During  the  year   51!   pupils   never
missed one attendance nor were late.
! thus earning an Honor Roll for Puill)-
lunlity and Regularity.
Division I
No, ou roll 30; Percentage 93.42
percent. Perfect" attendance for month'
: 15-
Honor list for June- Helen Paru-
bam, Lillian Hanks. Jean MrNnugh-
tim.
i Honor rolls for year—Proficiency—
i Helen Parnham; Deportment—Low
Yuen; Regularity and Punctuality -
Irene Bates, Mary Conn, Jean Mc-
I Nuughton. John Strachan, May Tay-
: lor, Sam Davis.
Special mention must be made of
I John Strachan wbo hns attended
| school for eight years at Cumberland
1 without being absent or late.
II. E. Murray, Teacher.
Division .
Percentage 113.1 percent. No. of
: lutes, ull. Perfect attendance 18.
Perfect  attendance  for the  yenr
Ella Conn Jessie Grant. Leslie Dandn.
Alastalr  McKlnnon.  Charles  Walkei
Honor Roll—For Proficiency—Jessie Grant; Good Conduct -Lena Gal-
lea zzl,
The following obtained Senior Wilting Certificates, having satisfactorily
completed public school course :n
Muscular Movement Writing-Isao
Abe, Evelyn Carey, l.enn Galleazzi,
May Gozzano, Jessie Orant, Ruth
Oyama. Jean Smith.
Tessle A. Oallvan, Teacher.
Division It
No. on roll 84; Percentage 98.L
percent,    No. of lates, 1.
Honor Cards for June Annie Maun
Margaret Hughes. Eleanor Bergland,
(John Auchterlonl and Kathleen Emily) Lily Leversedge.
Honor Rolls fnr yenr—Proficiency
—Annie Mann; Deportment—John
Auchterlonl; Regularity and Punctu
alily— Lena Ilogo, Edna Cawdell, Edna Conrod, Eleanor Davis, Joseph
Ducca, Margaret Hughes. Dick Marpole. Sarah Oyama, Norma Parnham.
Progress Prize-Barbara Grant.
Promoted from Grade VII to Grade
VIII--Annie  Mann,    Emma   Picketti,
I Margaret   Hughes,   Norma   Parnham,
John  Auchterlonl,    Lily    Leversldge.
• h_e_nor.  Bergland,    Knthleeu  Emily,
Isabelle Yarrow. Eleanor Davis, Low
Hou, Normal! Hill, Gordon  Horwood.
,     Trial  •     Tsuneto   Asao,    Andrew
: Brown, Agnes  Bruce,  Edna  Cawdell.
, Nokuo Hnyashl.
i Promoted from Grade VII to Grade
j VIII Jr. Annie Beveridge, Margaret
I Shearer, Edna Conrod, (Dick Marpole
'and Tusayo Sugimorl) Jack Sweeney,
i Barbara Grant, Lena Bogo, Joseph
Ducca.
Marjorie Mordy. Teacher.
Division I
No. nn roll 30; Percentage 98.3
percent. Lales I.
ilonor cards for June- Norman
Frelone, Edna Davis, Klshio Kago,
Josephine Welsh. Jack MacLean.
Mary Hunt.
Honor Rolls—Prollclency—Norman
I Frelone Deportment—Sarah Law
) rence. Regularity nnd Punctuality
i—Mary Sweeney, Lena Merlettl, Klsh-
i lo Kngn. Norman Frelone. Sakayo
I Sugimorl.
Promoted from Grade VI to Grade
VII.- Norman Frelone, Edna Davis.
Klshio Kaga. Jack MacLean, Helenc
Hamilton, Lon Leong, Allen Glen, Josephine Welsh. Jean  Johnston, Mary
Wedding
Cessford  .   Hacllunalil
Ou Saturday. June 7th, at Nanaimo
two of Comox Valley's widely known
; young people were united in marriage
1 by Ihe Rev. Mr. Ewlng. pastor of Wallace street Methodist Church.      The
bride, Miss Elvin MacDonald, daugb-
] ter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mac
Donald  of  Lethbrldgc,  is  a  popular
j member of the staff of the B.C. Tele-
! phone Co., and has been a resident of
j Comox Valley for the past ten years.
The bridegroom, Mr. William Wallace
! Cessford Is a naltve son of this dis-
: trlct, being second son of Mr. and Mrs
Robert   Cessford   of   Sandwlck,   pioneers of Comox.
The ceremony was a quiet one. being witnessed only by Mrs. Tuck and
Mrs. Ewing of Nanaimo. Mr. and
' Mrs. Cessford will be the recipients
of congratulations from a host of
friends In all parts of the valley.
DIED
.Margaret Urquhart, mother of Mrs.
James Hood of this city, died on Mou-
duy, after a lingering Illness of a few
weeks.
The funeral took place on Wednesday from the Presbyterian Manse to
the Cumberland Cemetery. Rev.
Butler and Rev. Leversedge oflicial ed.
.(Continued on  Page Fnurl
Statement Of Printing And Stationery
Expenses Of City Council
World's Largest Automobile Plant
will be seen In moving pictures at Ihe
Oalety Theatre, Courtenay, on Tuesday, July 8th. Corfield Motors Limited are sending out Invitations to a
free show.
At the last regular meeting of the
City Council Aid. Maxwell, chairman
of the Finance Committee, moved that
n statement nf the expenditure for
advertising, printing, stationery and
supply of Municipal Books for the
, half year ending June 2F>th 1921 he
published. This the Council decided
■ lo do.
Statement Follows
j Clarke  and  Stewart   Municipal Acct.
[Books   $113.69
I Kings   Printer,  Municipal  Accts  nnd
j Documents     $14.60
i The Islander, from Nov.  10. 1923 to
I Jan. 25, 1924, advertising Court of Re-
i vision, Nominations, Revenue Tax, Receipt Books. Ballots. Voter's List etc,
jetc   -  $205.09
, Jan. 2Cth to Feb. 19th, Printing Check
| Books, Advertising Poll Tax By-Law
'■ and Books, City aud School Financial
i Report     $18.15
April   1st,   Advertising   By-Law   and
1 Reports t'uM
$10,578.50 Taxes Collected
The City Clerk's olllce has been a
very busy centre during the past few
days, ratepayers all making an effort (o pay their taxes before June
30, The amount left unpaid Is a
very small sum.
Taxes collected to June 30, 1924:
Arrears    $ 405.75
Penalties and interest         9.91
City  Current       4591.82
School      5571.02
Total taxes collected
.$10,578,511
April    10th,    Advertising    Financial
Statement and Reports ....'  $288.00
j May 13th, Job Printing Envelopes and
' Stationery  |41.2» I
June Uth, Assessment   Notices   and | Balance
Forms, Tnxes due etc   $.2.iw
June 25th, Advertising    Applications
Clerk and Chief of Police     $11.70
Total        $073.'i!i
.Making a total expenditure (or advertising, printing and stationery for
The Islander from November 16th.
1923 to July 1st, 1924 of $673.69
Total including Clarke nnd Stewart nnd Kings Printer     5801.98
Estimated Expenditure Mlnn.00
.t'JS;i 1:1)
Firebosses' Picnic
To Be Annual One
The Vancouver Island Flrehoane:/
Association held a very enjoyable
picnic on Tuesday, July 1st al Qualicum Heach. Cumberland Local let!
at n o clock ii.s also did the Ladysmilli
Lantzvllle and other Locals, all meeting iit the Hunch at 10 a.m.
Sports were the order of the di;,\
consisting of racing, jumping, etc.,
and ice cream and soft drinks were
served all through the day. At ti p.m.
a concert was held, several flrebOHS-
es and their families taking part in
the songs and dances, which ended
with the singing of "Auld Lang Syne,"
So successful was the picnic that the
firebosses of the Island have made up
their minds to make it an mum I affair on a more extensive scale.
Tht> local firebosses association take
this opportunity of thanking Air. (J.
H. Wycherley for the use of his truck
on the day of the picnic.
Reception Held
After Wedding
COl'llTKNAY, June 80.—After the
wedding of Miss Grela Slllence. second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W.
Slllence of Itoyston to Mr. Kenneth
Fleming of Seattle, which took place
at Cumberland today a reception was
held at the home of the bride's parents where numerous friends and acquaintances attended to wish the
young couple all happiness for the future. The guests were Mr. Itoliert
Fleming of Seattle, Mr. and .Mrs. Leversedge of Cumberland, Mrs. F. Wllcock, .Mrs. .1. Idlens. Mrs. F. Dalby,
Mrs. D. Roy, Mrs. Ilurgood-Asli. Mi ,.
N. Uordon Thomas, Mrs. T. H. Mumford, Mrs. Finch, Mrs. Irish. Mrs. It
P. Christie, Mrs, Kelly. Mrs. McLeod,
Mrs. t'chlyanin. Mrs. E. ,1. Gregg, Miss
Gladys Roy, Miss Floreen Dalby and
Miss Owen Carey.
After the reception the happy
couple left amidst showers of good
wishes and rice per motor for Vancouver where the Irst stage of the
honeymoon will be spent.
Messrs Edwards and Orr of Courtenay, the well known Builders nnd
Contractors nr(, at present building
.freight sheds for Ihe Vancouver-
Courtenny Transportation Company
Ltd., and they hnve just received another car load of V-Joinl flooring, all
kiln dried aud a large quantity of
windows and doors. If you anticipate building you should see Edwards
und Orr.
ANOTHER WIN-
COURTENAY
DEFEATED
Displaying the same lighting spirit
that seems typical of all Cumberland's
sporting leams. Henry Plump's ball-
tossers. came from behind a 5-3 lead
in the last hnlf of the ninth Inning,
staged a real old time batting rally
and robbed Courtenny of the game
tl-5. ll was an I'pper Island League
game played on the Recreation
Grounds last Sunday and gives the
locals (1 wins and one defeat. Dave
Hunden. hurling nee of the Cumberland team and big Hill Boyd star
chucker of the farmers crew, hooked
up In the hurling duel. Thrill upon
thrill was supplied and when Cumberland did their stuff in the last half
of thc ninth the climax wns reached
and thc fans went wild with joy.
Bill Boyd hurled a wonderful gum"
fanning 15 men, but It was the ninth
that was his hoodoo, a couple of
singles and as many triples earned
three runs for Cumberland and thon
and there sewed up the game. Dave
Hunden pitched his usual game, fanned !! men and did that thing which
has won man a pitcher his hall game
scattered  Ills 8  hits.
King of Swnt 'Tucker" .liunes
Hatting honors are awarded chiefly
to Cumberland. "Tucker" James led
the parade with a single, double and
triple' in live attempts. Danny Bannerman was a close second with two
singles and a triple, which like James'
was located in that deadly ninth. Jim
McKay and "Toots" Plump made substantial contributions to their batting
averages in the race for the Royal
Candy .Medal.
Cummings nud  Beattle    were    the
i mighty swat artists of the Courtenay
nine.      Thnt only meant a couple of
hits apiece In live trips to the plate,
One Ittin Apiece in Third
Things went nlong smoothly until
I lie third Innings, when each team
tallied one.      Rob. Robertson singled
■ advancing to second base on Bentties'
■ single  and  scoring  on   Dixon's   base
I hit,     Cumberland retaliated.     Plump
singled straight over second. Andy
| Robertson let it go tearing past him
and by ihe time Robertson had recovered the bnll Pliimp had scored.
That ended the scoring.
Courtenny scored three runs iu tho
fourth canto. J. Robertson doubled,
Marocchi's error on Boyd's swat advanced J. Robertson to third und let
Boyd sate on first The latter scored
the first tally when A, Robertson wont
out. to Plump unassisted, On ibis
play Boyd advanced from second to
third base, James' error on Millard's hall allowed Boyd to score run
number two of (hat inning. Millard
scored the last tally when he started
for second ami finally scored a run
by the time the bnll was returned
from centre Held.
( unilierl I Scores in sixth
No scon- took plnce until the sixth
inning when Cumberland si ond two
runs In their hnlf as follows: Hunden
took first hnse when Downey shovel
his milt in front of his lint, Harrison
advanced hlm lo second when tie
singled. Plump scored Hunden and
Cummings' tumble of Bannerman's
chance scored Harrison.
Still the fans are raving about that
last glorious ninth when fumbei'lnnd
scored three counters: Bill Boyd
weakened for a sparse moment. It
wns enough. The gang delightedly
pounced mi his offerings fur a row
of bases. The fans, scenting nn eleventh hour victory, went wild witli
Joy. Then ii hnppened just like
this.
Plump clouted one nut to the vicinity of Beattle who wns a little late
in starting for the My -which ne
eventually reached only to drop after
a hard run. Plump scored number
one when Bannerninn snincked oul ,i
three-bagger. .Inmes not to be outdone did likewise, scoring the former
from third base. Conti came up with
the score tied nud no one out. Even
In the wild excitement lie managed to
use his think cap and attempt a
squeeze. He was nut however Boyd
to   Dixon.      Enter   the   hero   James
(Continued on Page Five) PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. JULY 5. 1(1.1.
S
*
_f«_i____M__M_|_IS/_n_^
3|SI__
MID-SUMMER  SALE
THE MERCANTILE STORE CO., CUMBERLAND
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
Our Mid-Summer Sale has been great.    It exceeded our expectations three fold.   We have heard
much about there being no "Ready Cash" in Cumberland.   We have certainly proved the statement li
, to be a myth.   You perhaps remember the saying the Rt. Hon. Jos. Chamberlain coined during the I
[■::      S. A. War:  "We don't want to fight but by jingo if we do, we've got the ships, we've got the men, 1
W\      we've got the money too."   We don't want to boast, but by jingo if you have got the money, WE 1
|      HAVE THE GOODS.   Odd lines left over from our Sale must be cleared by Saturday first. 1
| This is our last Clearance Sale this year so come and pick up your requirements while the prices j
1      are down to the low-water mark. I
i i
pTOi<IJi___i|il_MS
m
1
1 HERE ARE A FEW HOUSEHOLD REQUIREMENTS
I YOU ALL NEED
Department No. One—Groceries
HERE ARE A TEW HOUSEHOLD REQUIREMENTS
YOU ALL NEED.
Sugar—20-lb. sack of sugar-
Sale Price	
Flour—Quaker or Five Roses Flour, 49's
$2.10
$2.00
1
Tea—The Mercantile Best, strong and t'ra- fl»-|   *J(\ | Coffee—Fresh ground Coffee, a treat lor fl»-|   -| A
morning meal, iper Ib. 40c. 3 lbs. for '.. tP A. AU
$1.70
grant, per lb. 60c.     3 lbs. for
Coffee—Best Mocco Java Coffee, fresh ground PAfl
Sale Price per lb   D\)L
Medow Brook Strawberry Jam, Reg. $1.00
Today 	
80c
$2.05.     Purity, Id's
ti.'n_5u_jn5Ii5rn_Blr__n_afaj_n^__u_____r_a^
Department No. 2—Boots and Shoes
Ladies' Patent Non-rip Sandals, Sale Price only $2.75
Ladies' Patent Sandal, in a better quality, Sale $3.85
Ladies' Black, One-strap Slipper, with Rubber Heel.
Sale Price today   $1.75
Ladies' Hollywood Sandals, in Patent Leather, Grey
Suede and Log Cabin, To clear at $4.95
Ladies' Patent Leal her Shoe, Cubin Heel, with open
front, like Sandals   $4.95
Ladies' Patent Leather, One-strap Shoe, with new high
heel, for dancing, Sale r  $5.95
Ladies' Black Satin Slippers, on sale this week end at
per pair  $1.00
Ladies' Brown Calf Oxfords, new stock, per pair $5.95
Men's Brown Calf Blucher Shoe "Stinling" Brand,
worth $8.00, Sale price  $6.50
We have had wonderful success in this department and
to advertise this branch of our business, we have
chosen new lines for this closing week end of our
Mid-Summer Sale.
Men's Khaki Drill Shirts, a good roomey shirt and well
made. Sale price   $1.45
Men's Grey Mottle Shirt, "Tooks" make $1.85
Men's Black Sateen Shirt, an extra good shirt for work
Sale Price   $1.75
Men's Black Sateen Shirts, "Black Bear" brand. Regular price $3.00.     Sale Price $2.35
Men's Dress Shirt, white, with Black, Blue and Mauve
stripe, Sale Price  $1.95
Men's Silk Pongee Shirt with collar $4.95
Men's Black Denim Pant Overalls, only a few pairs left
over.     Sale Price   $1.45
Men's Khaki Denim Overall Pants, per pair $1.95 '
Men's Light Grey Summer Pants, Sale Price $3.95
Men's Fine Brown Calf Blucher cut Shoes, Sale $4.75
Men's Solid Leather Mine Shoe, nailed, with leather
Counter, Sale   $3.35
Men's Black and Brown Work Shoe, no Toe Cap and
without nails, Sale $3.75
Men's Strong Work Shoes with Toe Cap, no nails,
Solid Leather, per pair $4.95
Patent Leather Oxfords for Dancing. Sale Price $5.50
Men's Brown Canvas Shoes, with Leather Soles $3.95
Odd line of Mens Brown and White Canvas Shoes, with
Rubber Soles, To clear  $1.95
Men's Fine Dress Shoes, No. 1 stock "Leckie". Sale
price per pair  $7.95
Boys' Fine Dress Shoes, in Brown Calf, a nice summer
shoe, Today's price  $3.95
Department No. Three-
Gents' Furnishings
Men's Work Suspenders "Police and Fireman", pr. 60..
Men's Work Suspenders, extra strong, per pair $1.35
Men's Summer Underwear, special line, former price
$2.00 garment, Sale Price   $1.35
Men's Work Socks. We bought two bales of these socks
Sale Price, 4 pairs for $1.00
Men's White Straw Hats, in the most popular styles
Sale Price  $1.98
Men's Straw Hats which cannot be beat for style and
quality, Each   75c.
Boys' Strong Brown Grain Shoe, a stout shoe for the
stout boy, per pair      ...   $3.75
A few odd lines of Boy's Shoes, To clear at   $2.60
Child's Patent Leather Sandals, sizes 4 to 6  $1.65
Child's Patent Leather Sandals, sizes 7 to 10" _ .... $1.95
Child's Patent Leather Sandals, sizes 11 to 2 $2.35
Children's Brown Leather Sandals, only a few pairs
left, sizes 4 to 10 90c.
Sizes 11 to 2  $1.45
We sold all of our $1.00 line but for this week end we
have chosen 20 pairs more.
Ladies' White Canvas One-strap Shoes, a few pairs
only   $1.95
Ladies' White Canvas Shoes, Rubber Soles, pair ... 50c.
_|_EI_M_ETiSi__®M_»a_KIS_l_®H f
New line of Stetson Hats, in Black, Brown and Grey,
imported direct   $7.50
Men's Summer Caps, just in from the factor?, prices
$1.00.       $1.25,       $1.50,       $3.00
A few odd lines of Men's Summer Caps at  50c.
Men's "Tooks" K.K. Collars, 3 for $1.00
Men's Boston Garters  —  35c.
Men's Strong Rubber Belts, Sale Price 35c.
Men's Strong Leather Belts, a splendid work belt 50c.
Men's Dress Belt, with patent buckle  75c.
Men's Black Cotton Summer Socks, 6 pairs for .... $1.00
Men's Silk Ties, a large assortment, each   50c.
Mens "Lanky Bill" Ties, in latest designs, :S for $1.00
Men's Hatchway Combinations, per suit   $1.50
Men's Suits—To make room for fall stock, we will
bunch the balance of our stock, values up to $35.00, to
clear at  $23.50
a_iia_ri_i_[__ri__r_r_i_,_i^^
Department No. 4—Ladies' Wear
To clean up the balance of Ladies' Summer Coats, you
may have your pick of any coat in stock for $10.50
These are valued up to $18.00
Do you want a Knitted Silk Waist?    Then come and
see our new stock $5.50 to $15.00
Ladies' New Jackette     $6.50
Ladies' Straw Hats, good for street wear, each 85c.
Ladles' "Bias" Corsets, from  $2.75
j
].j!_aj_ii_ijitJj[j|rj[i,i__i_[.i_ai__Mi4
Afew only Ladies' Bathing Suits $1.25
Ladies' Summer Vests     35c.
Ladies' Fibre Silk Hose  45c.
Ladies Overall Aprons, Sale Price        75c.
Ladies' Hiking Breeches, good quality Khaki Drill.
$2.35.      Waist to match $2.00
Ladies' Gingham Dresses, lots to choose from .... $2.25
Ladies' Sweater Coats, combed wool, latest in sweaters
Sale Price   $6.50
Ladies' Crepe Night Dresses $1.75
A new one at  $3.50
Ladies' Sateen Bloomers, in various colors. Price $1.35
Ladies' Lisle Hose, in White, Brown, Black and Grey,
Per pair  45c.
Ladies' Best quality Silk Hose, in latest colors $1.95
Ladies' Silk Dresses—These dresses are all new and
modern. Sale Price from $12.00
A few of our Ladies' Hats up to $5.00. For Sale $2.25
Ladies' Summer Hats, for garden wear, up from 40c.
A low yards of White Vesting, per yard 20c.
Home Spun, suitable for Skirts, Dresses and Coats,
To clear, Sale Price from   $1.35
We have the balance of Ratines, To clear from, yd. 75c.
Pillow Cases, 42-inches, each   50c
Pure Irish Linen Table Cloth, by the yard, 72 inches
wide.     Sale Price $3.50
White Cotton Sheets, Sale Price each $2.00
Department No. Five-
Dry Goods
White Bed Spreads, splendid quality, each   $3.25
Wash Satin, 36 inches wide, Sale Price per yard $1.45
Very Fancy Voiles, suitable for summer dresses, Sale
Price per yard  $1.65
Good quality Voiles, in pretty patterns, per yd 50c, 85c.
White Flannelette Sheets, large size, per pair ... $2.98
Good Serviceable Pillows, Sale Price per pair $2.25
and $3.00
Window Scrim, in White, Cream Ecrue, Sale Price 19c.
Table Oils, in colors, per yard   45c.
White Table Oils, per yard   55c.
3 _Hfle!M[*M[__Ma(_l_l__ri__^
Department No. Six—Hardware and House Furnishings
Kitchen Tables, strongly made, up from   $5.50
Kitchen Chairs, each  $1.35
Cotton Rugs, "Ashibe" Rug 2x6 $2.25
All Felt Mattresses 3-6, 4, 4-6, Sale Price $10.50
Coil Springs, Sale Price   $9.50
One only Child's Crib, witn piltow and mattress $13.50
All Wool Shawl, for Baby's Buggy
Good Warm Comforter $4.95
Lino Rugs 9x12, Sale Price  $16.50
Lino Rugs, 9xl0V_, Sale Price  $14.00
Dinner Pails, Sale Price $1.45
Steamer Trunks $9.00
A large size 36-inch Trunk  $12.00
Suit Cases $2.75, $3.75 and $7.00
g-npiflfaTaMB|iWPIitHi«M
Remember Saturday is the last day of our big Mid-Summer Sale"
The Mercantile Store Company, Cumberland SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
\<i
Jam Special
Comox Strawberry
Jam
High grade Comox Valley berries phis pure sugar and made under
perfect sanitary conditions.     For sale at all local grocers at
85c per 41b. Tin
To those who have used this delicious jam this advertisement may
have no appeal, except so far as the price is concerned, but if you
are one of the unfortunates who have not as yet partaken of this
delectable local food product, you would be wise lo try a sample
tin.
Every tin carries our own guarantee as to quality.
Get the habit of using local produce on every opportunity. You
not only get the best products on the market but you help keep
your money in local circulation.
REMEMBER--
It's Guaranteed
FISHERMEN TELL YOU
feifas
to
Jasper National Park
$40.25
Edmonton and Calgary
it-ilS.OO
$13.00 extra for routing via Prince Rupert to covet' meals
mid berth mi stcitmer,
also III
Eastern Canada
CENTRAL AND EASTERN STATES
Particulars mi application
EDWARD W. BICKLE    AGENT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Canadian National Railways
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY  WORK
Write .'or 1'rlcon to
! THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
i (Mice 2d.ll llriil.. street, Victoria, II.C.
ICar   For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Fishermen will tell you that they only go to French Kiver. N'ipi.on,
or Lakc-of-the-Woods for the flailing. Not all ot them will tell
you that they go because Madame insists, these being tliree of the few
districts where one can enjoy the comforts of the average holiday resort,
the joy of camp life and the glory of the woods as well as the finest
fishing in North America. There are bungalow camps, operated by the
Canadian Pacific, in each district,      _.. !___,_____ ,_,_..__..  ^„__
E. 0.  HAUKEDAL
DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC
Now Established in
WILLARD BLOCK, CUMBERLAND
OFFICE  HOl'HS
10 • 11.30
A.M.
6 • 7.30
P.M.
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to 11 p.m.   23
From 11 p.m. to   (1 n.m.   .2
Ask for Geo. Mason.
_-,_ij_[_m^_,______Ei_Er_i_K^
"Th. Moat of the Bait (or the Leatt"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers
DR.   R..B.   DIER   AND  DR
W   .BRUCE   GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor. of Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MAKE TO ORDER.
Pressing    .    (Iriiiilng    .    Repairs
Telephone I.     •      P. O. Box  17
(TMIIKItl.AM),  II.  (!.
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
I ACCOMMODATION
i Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
i Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumhorlnnil, ll.C.
The ordinary way to m.asure distance is by miles.
Vou think any place you have in mind is so many
miles away. It seems a long way off. Look at it another
way. Measure the distance by minutes. Say to
yourself. "Such and such a place is so many minutes
away," meaning, of course, that if the telephone is
used distance does not need to be considered.
If you want to talk to a friend or discuss a business matter, no place is very far away, Not'only that,
but the means of communication is always right at
hand. Every telephone is a long distance telephone.
Besides, if you talk in the evening, you can take advantage of the special rates.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Dr. Tai Kuzuhara
DENTIST
WILLARD BLOCK CUMBERLAND, B. C.
TELEPHONE  III
PULP MILL FOR
STRAW IS PROSPECT
Arrangements have heen practically
; completed to erect this year, either
in Winnipeg or Si. Boniface, the lirst
unit of o straw-uplp mill for the man-
ufacture nf high grade paper according io information obtained from a
reliable source recently, The unit
i.< in have a capacity of 50 tons nl
straw per day, lhc process heinj:
kc-eii nn tiie Devine patent.
WOMAN PROSPECTOR
FILES HER CLAIMS
Women have made a success of
homesteading in the west, lady team-
store me nol unknown, hut .Mrs. ('.
ll. .Mills, wife or a Tor mining engineer, claims in he ilic lirst Canadian woman prospector,     Mrs  Miles
after a two  nths' prospecting trip
in ilic Sturgeon Lake district, Northern Ontario, has llled several claims.
which she says, promise to bring Iter
in a good return. She was unaccompanied nil most nl her trip', bin
makes light nf the hardships,
LIVESTOCK RECORD
Another evidence nt' what can he
done in agriculture I" Northern Alberta is llic cattle shipment recently
sent down from the farm nf .1. .].
Powers, in ihe Clear Mills district
north nt Peace Itiver. Tliis small
lot, which was ileslineil fnr eastern
markets, was fed in lhe npen all winter and arrived at tiie Edmonton Stock
Yards in good marketing condition.
WHEAT   IN   THE
NORTHLAND
Herman Trelle, who    tnnk    second
1 prize wilh his Marquis Wheat at  tho
Chicago International Exposition hist
; year, and whose farm Is at Lake Sas-
■ katoon, west ot Orande Prairie and
400 miles north-west of Edmonton, reports that on May 24 his new  wheat
■ stnnil nine inches above ground.
CHICAGO-JASPER SERVICE
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
T.WHERRY
IKMUSWANNER
sir ma, un oi
___&.«.""'
«t Pandora Ave.,
Victor-It, V C. *
sr/,
I
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 1 and (il
Cumberland, B.C.
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
The new direct Chicago-Jasper service inaugurated hy the Canadian National Railways on June 8 is expect-
;l to prove a big factor in the increased traffic anticipated through the
mountains by the northern route thin
season and Ihe large increase in reservations already made at Jasper
Park Lodge, which is now open.
FARM    YOUNG
PEOPLE'S WEEK
The sixth annual farm young people's week at Ihe University of Alberta was held June 4 to in. Lee-
lures on agricultural topics, wilh a
program of entertainment, were provided the Invitation having been extended to young people between the
Ages of lti and _!"> residing on farms.
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN  AWAY  ANI)
RUBBISH REMOVED
I'lrnsp   lunp   your   orders   ill   oilier,
Mrs. Kline'* SIiiIIoiiitj  Slurp
I'liono .111.
NKHVH'K IS OIK MOTTO
Or Phone 1,1 I nioii Hold
( I MBKBMMI   TlttNSKKII
.1. \. Bron ii
When you are in need of a
Plumbing & Heating  Engineer
see
R. Rushton
Phone 124, Courtenay, B.C.
or
Phone 157, Cumberland, B.C.
YOUR   NEEDS   WILL   RECEIVE
IMMEDIATE  ATTENTION PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
i     Sidelights on a Great Industry
Vast Purchasing
Power
SATURDAY, Jl'l.Y 6, 1H24,
FUNCTIONS OF A SCHOOL
The most important function of
the schools is not merely to teueli
facts and develop mentality, hut to
arouse and inspire the great vltul
forces of youth to thrift and industry; to lofty endeavor; and to service
ami sacrifice for Clod, country and
humanity,
DON'T TRY TO GRAB IT ALL
If yun have a nice little farm, or
business, or steady employment, and
are out of debt, do not frei and work
yourself nnd wife into the grave for
the sake of making money. You have
hut one life to live, and that is hut
brief at best. Take a little comfort
and pleasure as you go along day by
day, anil try to do a little good 'o
others. Wealth alone will not keep
your memory green after you are
gone lo the undiscovered country,
and the cemeteries are lull of people
vvlui tried to corner the Canadian
dollar.
LUMBER   INDUSTRY'S   AN
NUAL   EXPENDITURE
ESTIMATED   AT
$100,000,000
Employes Spend Many Millions
in Retail Stores
An Independent authority has placed the annual expense hill of tho
forest products Industries of llrillsh
Columbia at $100,000,000.
This may roughly be made up as
Labor  $ 50,000,0011
Freight, rail and ocean ....
Towing, stevedoring, harbour dues, insurance ...
Repairs, new equipment,
commissary and other
supplies 	
Royalties and taxation  ....
Miscellaneous 	
25.000,000
6,000,000
12.000,000
6.000,000
2,000,000
HOME
Young man, don't spend your
money foolishly, with no thought for
the future. Save your money for a
home of your own. If you have no
money except what you earn yourself, then scrupulously save and lay
aside a part of your income, until you
have enough to pay for a piece of
land. To he the owner of a homestead will have a beneficial effect upon your character. It will increase
your self-respect, your confidence iu
yourself. You will feel that you have
a substantial position and something
nl slake in the community. The ownership of a home will add greatly lo
your happiness. The feeling of possession which it engenders is a
source of constant satisfaction. There
' is one spot on earth which you improve and beautify. Witli tliat spot
your thoughts^ your ambitions and
your affection become identified. You
learn lo love if. II is like an unchanging friend. It becomes an unfailing source of enjoyment. It is
the one investment thnt pays enormous dividends in satisfaction.
$100,000,000
Tills very conservative estimate,
based us it is upon the buying cupa-
cityof over 3,000 concerns, demonstrates to what an enormous extent
the business houses of the province
are dependent upon the lumber industry for their turnover and what a
catastrophe the  withdrawal  of such
j purchasing power would mean to the
'. community.
1    A considerable percentage   of   the
I expenditures detailed above benefit
large concerns but the storekeepers
gel their turn when the employes of
tlio industry spend tlielr wages.
There are 4tt,iK>0 men wlio clothe,
feed and amuse their families and
themselves mit of the lumbermen's
payroll.
If tiie Industry's workers spent on
an average ns little as $15 a week on
rent, food, clothing and other necessaries, it is easy to sec how badly the
storekeepers would fare without their
custom.
BEWARE OF THIS MAN
All beneficiaries should beware of
the fellow who lias discovered some
way lo make forty per cent on your
money. Look out for the fellow who
is Irying to sell you what he calls
gilts-edged stock. He is playing you
for a sucker. if you must invest
your money, go to a reputable hanker and get his advice. His advice
usually is better than that even of a
friend, wlio may, after all, know ns
little about it ns you do yourself, if
your payment takes the form of nn
insurance policy, think it over for a
iong time before you deeide to part
Willi il. And especially he wary of
the fellow who claims lo know all
about doubling It for you.
How doth the gentle laundress
Search out the weakest joints.
And always tear the buttons off
At  most Htrngetie points.
Tills series of articles communicated by the Timber Industries
Council  of  British  Columbia.
SERVICE FOR SETTLERS
Better service and greater facilities
fnr handling the immigrant and tourist trade over Canadian National lines
is lhe aim of that company this year,
stated Walter Pratt, general manager
of hotels and dining-cars of the company, during a short stay in Winnipeg
last week en route to Edmonton, Jasper Park, and other points to inspect
system hotels and lodges. Mr. Pratt
mentioned a new scheme which will
lie a boon to the immigrants using
Canadian National trains, namely the
Installation of lunch counters on the
colonist cars at whicli travellers may
obtain meals at rock bottom prices.
JAM ilk. _ «fc.   1 IBf.S I0c.-tt ill tni Slim
House Dresses
A new lot in Prints and Ginghams, priced at $1.45
$1.95 and     $2.25
dills' Gingham Dresses, sizes 6 to 8  $1.95
(Jills' Gingham Dresses, sizes 10 to 14 $2.25
Gingham in fancy and plain colors, per yard 35c.
Prints, in a good assortment of colors, per yard     25c.
Crepes, all colors, per yard 35c.
Corticelli Sylverflos yarn in the newest shades, ball 35c.
Bathing suits, all sizes
Bathing Caps, at each 25c. 35c. and  50c.
.Men's  Khaki Pants, all sizes, per pair $2.00, $2.65
and       $4.00
Men's Tweed Pants, a good quality, per pair ...... $3.00
.Men's Athletic Combinations, each   $1.25
Men's Combinations, all sizes  $1.60
Mon's Yorknil Shirts and Drawers, each   95c.
Work Gloves, a good quality, per pair 50e. 75c. and $1.
Work Socks, per pair 30c, 35c, 10c and 60c.
Special Prices in Picnic Baskets
Screen Doors and Windows will keep out the flies
A. McKinnon
Sill
LOCAL   BOY   HAS   RECORD
(Continued From Page One )
Hunt, Mary Sweeney, Fred Cawdell,
Lena Merlettl, Robert Colling, Annie
Walker, Alko Yoshikum, Sakayo Sugi-
mori, Alex MacDonald, Iaduo Doi,
Louis linrmhli, Peter Mossey, Saruli
Lawrence, Bert MacLellan, James
Bell.
Promoted on Trial—Tom Comb,
Jack Watson. William Smith, Joseph
Stanaway, Charles  MacDnnalu.
H. I. Harrison, Teacher.
Division .
No. on roll 38; Percentage 97.08
percent. No. of lates, 2,
Honors for June, Grade VI Jr.—
Kathleen O'Brien. (Beatrice Cavallero and Mary Jackson) Barbara Wesl
Held, Dorothy Gordon, Junies Brown,
Harriet Horbury,
Grade V Sr.—Oswald Reid, Vincen
Auchterlonie.
Honor Rolls, Grade VI Jr.-••Proficiency—Beatrice  Cavallero;     Grade
V Sr.—Vincen Auchterlonie; Deportment—Violet Williams; Regularity and Punctuality—Willie Mcintosh, Mlnoru Tahara, Victor Tomassi,
Yoshio Kawaguchi, Tasku Oyama,
Alven Frelone, Mildred Lockner.
Annie R. Gatz, Teacher.
Division «
No. on roll 39; Lates 1; Percentage
li". per cent. No of perfect attendance
26.
Honor list for June, Grade V. Jr.—
Nina Shields. Catherine Brown, Audrey Povah. Grade V. Sr.—Willie
Shearer, Rudl Bonora, Matsuljo Abe.
Honor Rolls for year—Proficiency
-Nina Shields, Willie Shearer; Deportment—Cazuko Iwasa; Regularity
and Punctuality — Hisako Nakanc.
Harry Westfleld. Josie Burghiner,
Tommy Tobacco.
Promoted from Grade V Jr. to
Grade V. Sr.—Nina Shields, Catherine
Brown, Cazuko Iwasa. Audrey Povah,
Muriel Partridge, Cyril Davis, Allien
Cooper, Hisako Nakane, Mary Small,
Norio Herose, Irene Davis, Jack Coe,
Eunice MacKinnon.
Promoted from Grade V Sr. to
Grade VI Jr.—Willie Shearer, Annie
Young. Annie Brown, Josie Burghiner, Clarence Lewis, Kimeyo Kaga.
Ridi Bonora, Bessie Nichalos, Lena
Tomassi, Nellie Walker, Low Ping,
John Combs, Harry Westlield, Rosiua
Thompson, Matsuljo Abe, Andrew
Hates, Tom Mossey, George Strachan,
Edward Stockand, Tom Tobacco.
O.  Horbury. Teacher.
Division 7
No. on roll 38; Perfect attendance
22; Percentage 91.4 percent.
Promoted from Grade V Jr. lo
Grade V. Sr.—Alden Francescini,
Second Merlettl, Takeru Kawaguchi,
Hatsnc Matsukura, Donald Graham.
Edna Watson, Thomas Robertson,
Quon Chong, Edith Cavallero, M#y
Beveridge, Dorlno Galeaggi. Winona
Balrd, Doris Hanney, Willie Sweeney.
John Choe, Margaret Smith, Helen
Saunders, May Brown, Toklo Nakano,
Olga Bonora.
Promoted from Grade IV Sr. to
Grade V. Jr.—Jennie Laurence, Hiroshl Okuda, .Muriel Harrison, Mamoru Tahara, Mary MacMillan, Alfred
Jones. Archie Welsh. Lily Picketti.
Bennie Nicholas, Helen .Morrison, Sidney Hunt, Tommy Conrod, Mali Duck
Lung, Malia  Tomassi.  Doris  Drew.
Honor Rolls, Grade V. Jr.—Proficiency—Alden Francescini.
Honor Roils, Grnde |V Sr,—Proll-
clency—Jennie Laurence; Deportment
—Helen Saunders; Regularity and
Punctuality—Hatsue Matsukura, Takeru Kawaguchl Toklo Nakano, Hiroshl Okudn, Alfred Jones, May Beveridge, Bennie .Nicholas.
Honor List, Grnde V Jr.—(Alden
Francescini and Takeru Kuwagucsll
Second Merlettl. Thomas Robertson.
Progress—Winona Balrd.
Honor List, Grade IV Sr.—Jennie
Laurence, Hiroshi Okuda, Alfred
Jones.     Progress —Malta Tomassi.
Vivian J. Aspesy. Teacher.
Division H
No. on roll. 42; Percentage, 92.5
percent. No. of laics, 3; Perfect attendance   15.
Honor Cards, Grade IV Sr.—Audrey
Gear, Masalu Sara. Clinton Harrison.
Honor Cards, Grade III Sr.—Audry
Hamilton, Annie Cheung, Willie MacNaughton,
Promoted from Grade IV Sr. to
Grade V. Jr.—Audrey Gear, Christina
Small Clinton Harrison Masalu Sara,
Edmond Cnrrigan, Marjorie Bird, Irvln Banks, Bernice Slant, Teruka
Dol, Robert Marshall, Joe Whyley,
Alice Taylor, Arnold Derbyshire, Choo
Foo Lung, Chow Chee, Marlon Combs.
Robert Cassnr, Daniel Stant, John
Burgheimer,
Honor Rolls, Grade IV Sr.—Proficiency—Audry Gear.
Honor Rolls, Grade II Sr.—Proficiency—Willie MacNaughton; Deportment-Mary Hassell; Regularity and
Punctuality—John Burgheimer, Masalu Sara, Shlgeura Klyonn,
Promoted from Grade III Sr. to
Grade IV Jr.—William MacNaughton,
Audry Hamilton, Annie Cheung,
Christina HobertBon, Thora Keeler,
Mary Hassell, John Earl Bannerman,
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
lIMIIIIIIIII!!!!!!!
I July Sale
1 The Balance of our stock of
| LADIES' SUITS    SPRING COATS    MILLINERY
e_
| Now on Sale.   These lines are all marked at clearing
I sale values.        See windows for special sale prices.
| GENTS' DEPARTMENT
H Broadcloth Shirts
m          Men's English Broadcloth Shirts, in white, Cream and Pearl; also in Novelty stripes.
§| Extra Special Value, each  $4.50
I Silk and Silk and Wool Socks
H Men's Silk and Silk and Wool Hose; also Fine Cashmere Heather Shades.
HI Special Value per pair, $1.25 and  $1.50
B Straw Hats
!| Men's Straw Hats, in Boater shape, in plain and rough straws.
__[ Special Values $2.50 and    $2.00
^' Oxfords
§1 Men's Tan Calf Oxfords, with Crepe Rubber Soles
|H Special Values per pair   $7.50
jjfl Outing Pants
g Men's Grey and Cream Flannel Pants; also White Duck Pants at Popular prices.
__| Men's Suits
I| Special Value in Men's Tailored Suits in light and dark Tweeds, Brown and Navy,
HI Worsteds and Serges, from $22.50 to (  $35.00
|| Sport Shirts, Invisible Suspenders, Wash Ties, Lanky Bill and Silk Knitted Ties, Tennis
_s Shoes, Men's and Boys' Wool and Cotton Bathing Suits.
Grocery Department
Mrs. Porter's Salad Dressing, per hot. 25c H 60c. Christie's Muskokn  Asstorted  Biscuits, specially
Symington's Camp Coffee, per bot.  40c. boxed   <jor,
Certo-concentrnted Fruit   Pectin,   per   hot.    Illc, Shortbread Biscuits, 3 kinds, per lb   511c.
Punch Sauce, per hot _  85c. Van Camp's Pork and Beans, 2 tins for   ..'»•,
Quaker Early June Peas, 2's, 2 tills for ........ 45c, Ginger Snaps, per lb  .lie,
Quaker Tomatoes, 2's 2 tins for   Sot, Gold Medal Ketchup, per bottle   .lie.
Aylmer Chicken Soup, 2 tins for   55c, Canned Apricots, 2sr 2 tins for   55c,
Pure Olive Oil, pint tins   J,1c, Prunes, 2 lbs. for   __,.,
Pure Olive'Oil. quart tins   #1.50 Health Sails, per tin   25c,
Sugar Crisp Com Flakes, 2 for   25c, Empress Blackberry Jam, 4's, per tin 95c,
Sliced Corn Beef, Roast Mutton, Lunch Tongue and Meat Loaf
Cherries, Plums. Peaches, Bananas, Canteloupes, California Grape  Fruit,   Cauliflower,
Cabbage. Green Peas, Tomatoes, Oranges, Lemons,
Campbell's      -       -       -     Cumberland
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllililllllllllllllllllllllllll!
Jackie Wong, Wilbert Auchterlonie.
Bryson Parnham, Shlgeura Klyona.
Kiyoko Abe, Agnes MacKinnon, Gen.
Saito, Muriel Thomson, May Mali,
Chow Ting, Fung Him, Shlgeura Ya-
gauchi, William Graham, Otto Hof-
stetter, Peter Dicktnsqn.
Miss McFadyen, Teacher.
division »
No. on roll for month 38; Percentage 92 per cont; No. of lutes 3. Pupils making perfect attendance 20.
Honor Roll. Grade III Sr.—Harvey
Hurd,   David   Marshall.      Progress-
John Zonanl,
Honor lloll, Grade III Jr.—Harold
Hughes, Arthur  Povah.      Progress
Edith Taylor, Margaret Westfleld.
I Promoted from Grnde III Sr. to
Grade IV Jr.—Harvey Hurd, Albeit
Drew Jessie Robb, David Marshall,
Barbara Martin, Cheyako Sugimorl,
Clyde Lewis, Jackie Marpole, Kills
Bonora, Johnnie Robertson. John
Znnaiil, William Eccleston, Lem Hing.
Promoted from Grade III Jr. to
Grade III Sr.—Harold Hughes, Sylvia
Mutters, Alex SomervlUe, Arthur
Povah. May Graham, Preston Bruce,
Willie Logan, Don Long, Jackie Morrison, Masnkl Kaga, Willie Home
Willie Brown, Tokaski Okall, Akera
Herosl, Akea Matsunnza, Don Sing,
Heromitsu Salto. Margaret Westlield,
David Hunden.
(    Promoted  on  trial—Edith    Taylor,
' Echlro Shi, John Chapman.
Rolls of Honor, Grade III Sr.—Proficiency—Harvey Hurd.
1 Rolls of Honor, Grade III Jr.—Proficiency—Harold Hughes; Deportment
-Jnckie  Marpole;    Regularity    and
' Punctuality—Willie Slaughter.
C. Carey, Teacher.
Division 10
No. on roll 40; Percentage 97.47
percent. No. of lates. nil. Perfect attendance 35.
Promotion     List— (Madge     Bryan,
Rhoda Walton and Audrey Phillips), I
Mitsuo Abarn, Johnny Mah, Jean Dun
sire,   Jackie   Hassell.   Bessie   Brown
I Leland    Bannerman.    Gertie    Davis.
Josie   Wong,   Muriel   Shortt,   Robert
Logan, Margaret Drummonl, William
Prior.   Marguerite   Larlgan,    Toinm..
Ferryman.  Shegima   Marlya,    Arthur
Wong, George Nunns,    Mitsua    Hay-
aslii, George Foley, Wong Ylng, yaeki)
Ahara, Peter Bono, Willie Braes, Roh-
', ert Walker, Shoie Kiyonaga, Walter
Hunt, Willie Johnson, James wnijnms
Willie Cloutier, Willie Tobacco, Willie  Combs,   Richard   Marshall,   Richard Bates, Harry Waterlle|d. Charlie.
Gomm, Walter Oliver.
Honor list for June—(Madge Bryan
j Rhoda Walton and Audrey Phillips',
Mitsuo  Abara,  Johnny  Mnh, Jennnle
Dunsire.
Ilonor Rolls— Proficiency- Madge
Bryan; Deportment -William Braes;
Regularity   and    Punctuality—Rhoda
(Continued on Page Five)
J. SUTHERLAND
--Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
Victoria, b. c.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - .  B. C.
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
W.M.MEUIUnuil),   I'ropiintor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dtinsinulr Avenue. Cumberland
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and see Mr. Suther
land, our Agent iu Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to hnve done.
Our   Work   uud   Service
Will Please Vou : :     : :
PANTORIUM DVE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.(.      -      Phone lid. I
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'   and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road SATURDAY. JULY 5, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
(tf
PAGE FIVE
PREVENT  FOREST FIRES—IT  PAYS.
cgglLQCAL   BOY   HAS   RECORD
(Continued From Page Pour)
SECURITY AND
SAFETY
Secure—Because the business is carefully and economically managed. Thc average rate of interest
earned on its securities last year was 7.09 percent.
Safe—Because during the past 35 years Surplus and
Reserves have been increasing. The Company that
pays large dividends to its policyholders is:
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
"Dominion Policies for people of the Dominion"
Walton,     Sheglma    Marlya.     Gertie
Davis. Jeaiinie Dunsire.
J. B, Robertson. Teacher
Division II
Percentage 1)8,7 percent; Lates 5;
Perfect attendance 27.
Rolls of Honor— Proficiency- Margaret Marpole; Deportment- Alice
Brown; Regularity anil Punctuality
—Belly Mulpiiss. Bruno Merletil, Wardena Thompson,
Promotion List—Margaret Marpole,
Itosie Mall, Jean Quinn, Alice Brown,
Harry Mordy, Cheung Wong, Gordon
Robertson, Klso Sora. Audrey DeCouer, Dudley Kceler, Mnsahiko Ta-
. tolshl. Ada Tso, Margaret Williams,
, Gwen Abrams, Tommy Wong, Ella
i McWhlrter, Margeurlte Hofstettev,
Doreen Blckerton, Betty Malpass,
Wardena Thomspson, Jnmmey Mah,
Kiyoshl Okuda. Teniko Kiyonaga.
Alice Jackson, Gladys Miller, Alex
Mossey, Leslie Coo, Yasushi Yamas-
ahl. Billie Merriefleld, Hilda Chapman. Tsuyuko Yaguiehi. Shizeo Matsunaga. Bruno Merlettl.
P. Hunden, Teacher.
Division 12
No.   on   roll   115;   Percentage   il5.fi 1
percent; I.ales 1; No. in Grade 37.
No.  making perfect  attendance 22.
Honor    Cards—Stanley    Laurence.
Lumber
-
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED EI.OOR1NGS.
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHOUT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited,
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHHNIca ' Nlght CallS: 134X Cou,l6m,>'
i nupias | oiHt-e: IS!) Cumberland
Mary Baird, Sammy Armstrong, Dorothy Hnyworth. Gee Doon, Haron
Nakano,
I .ouur Rolls- Proficiency -Stanl" >
Laurence; A (ten dance—Jackie Graham; Deportment Dorothy Hay worth,
Promoted to Div. 11— Stanley Lawrence. Mary Baird, Sammy Armstrong
Dorothy Hayworth, Gee Doon, Haron
Nakanu. Wong Jack. Ina Robertson,
Tommy McMillan, Thelma Mennic.
itlartys Cooper, David Davis, Irene
Gomme, Annie Hof a tetter. Low Poo,
Lem Ho. Kejhl Kiyonaga. Harry (.'hoc,
AloysliI Kimoto. Cheung Ming, lsiigi'i
Iwasa, UrI Saito. Jimmy Choe, Arnold
Bonora, Mltsuro Hiroai, Daryl Thomp
eon, .Mary MacMillan. Willie Conn,
Tsuglmatau Matsunaga.
On trial—Miehlho Iwasa. Hiroshi
Kawagauchl.
C. Richardson, Teacher.
Promoted from Jr. 1st Reader to Sr.
1st Reader—Irene Bonora, Douglas
Chandler, Cleo Gibson, Deslay Harrison Tosiki Kaga, Dorothy Sweeney,
Margaret Beveridge, Margaret Braes,
Gladys Collings, Thelma Frelonl, Sa-
kae Fnjimote, Margaret Horne, Edith
Hughes Masako Iwasa, Kujoka Kiy-
one, Rose Marocchi. Hugh Miller,
Hugh McWhirter, Hiroshi Ogaki.
Wong On, Sam Robb, Aikira Saito,
Rody Selfe, Lily Tobacco. Muriel Taylor Tom Tso, Hldeko Tsuroka. Margaret Waugh, Billy Westfleld. Honest
Wong, David Bell.
Rolls of Honor—Regularity and
Punctuality— Dorothy Sweeney; Deportment—Margaret Beveridge; Proficiency—Edith Hughes.
PROTEST WAS
ENTERED BY
ELKS' TEAM
(Continued From Page One)
have  awarded  a   penalty  when   Blair
I was sent off the fleld.
An emergency meeting of the B.C.
i F.A. was held on Sunday io consider
'the protest and on the casting vote
of President A. D. Robertson of Victoria the derision of Referee Rodgern
was upheld.
The management ol the Klks Immediately took their case to the Dominion Football Association. The
I).F.A. sustained the appeal of thi'
Klks and the game was ordered replayed at Nanaimo on Wednesday last,
with the result that tbe locals gave
the Elks an awful trouncing, running
out winners by a score of four goals
I to one. The following account is
taken from the Nanaimo Herald:—
Four goals to one was the score by
which the Cumberland football team
defeated the Vancouver Klks yesterday on tbe Central Sports Grounds in
' the protested re-play for the final of
the Provincial championship in the
Connaught  Cup games.      By  yester-
I day's   decisive   victory,   Cumberland
i are  now  iu   line  to  meet the chain-
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
freshes Tired Eyes
WriwMuriiwCci„Ckk»io.foiEv«C*MBook |
The owner of a big plant, addressing a new employee:
"Did my foreman tell you what you
will bave to do?"
'     "Yes, sir, he told me to wake him
up when I see you coming."—Forbes.
191
i
Ford Economy     Economy Ford
ECONOMY
Economy and
Prosperity vgo
hand in hand
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORD DEALER
Telephone Ifi Courtenay, B.C.
The   Famous   McClary
Electric Range
Protected Elements     —     Indicating Lamps
—Reciprocating Switches—
Seamless, easily cleaned ovens
To cook electrically with one of these ranges
IS CHEAPER
than using coal.
No soot, no ashes, no hot kitchens.
25 per cent, saved on your meat bill owing to
non-shrinkage.
Everything in favor of the busy housewife.
Let us show you.
Fans        —        Washing Machines        —        Irons
Vacuum Cleaners —       Toasters
Gri'ls        — Etc.
Everyappliance sold by us of the best make only and
we   are   HERE   TO   .MAKE   IT   RIGHT   should
you be in any way, shape or form disappointed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
	
1 Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting 1th Boat at Union Ba,\
every SumUy Morning. Leave Cum-
t irlnnd Hotel, 8 o'clock.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.    _.
ARCHITECT
M» H.C. Permanent Loin llldg
i'jiONi: 2.1.1    victoria, b.c. [i
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
■2
Fresh and Cured Fiih
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY ANI) SERVICE"
W. P. Symoni   •  •    Proprietor
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNEH
| pious of Alberta, and  take a chance
>iu  going  Cast  for    the    Connaught
Cup. the silverware emblematic of th"
championship of Canada.
Yesterday's   game   was   just     what
; Island   fans  had   predicted   it   would
j be, an easy win for the  Island team.
! This   is   not   sarcasm   imr  a   case  ol
r boasting, bin on the play of the season, h was though! thai Cumberland
slmuM  win.      Yesterday    they    did.
scoring two goals to one in the lirsi
half,   and   adding   two   more   in   Uie
second.        Deluce.     playing     outside
right tor Cumberland    was    a    little
host iu himself, aud was a wonder,
After a short account of the flrsl
half which ended _:-l in Cumberland's
favor. Turner and Deluce both scoring, The Herald goes on to say:
On resumption of play, Cumberland
tool, the aggressive and forced another corner. Deluce. however, wns
too aitxiotu, and fouled while trying
to score. The ball was cleared, but
within another minute Cumberland
took charge and forced another coiner, the fifth of the game. Dfeluce
took the kick and the hall, travelling
out to Brake, was kicked by the latter way over the liar. Eighteen
minutes went lty in the second half,
when Deluce, wlio was playing a
wonderful game for Cumberland, took
a solo run with the hall, leaving his
sidelines, going into the penalty
area, and all hut scoring, .McDowell,
however, elbowed the little Cumberland player to sucb effect that he was
thrown to the ground, his play lost
and he was left face downward on the
ground. Craig, tbe referee blew the
whistle, went over and helped Deluce
to bis feet. This foul was clearly
well within the penalty area, the referee noted it. stopped the game, gave
personal assistance to Deluce and stilt
did not award a penalty. He did exactly as Referee Rogers did last week
allowed the play to go on by throwing up the hall from where he .had
stopped piny when be noticed De-
luce's predicament. The latter was
escorted to the sidelines, walked up
and down and given first aid treatment. Game to the core, he went
hack on to the field amidst a burst of
applause from (lie grandstand, aud
iwenty-four minutes after resumption
of fjie second half, took the sixth
corner for Cumberland which Bannerman beaded in. making the score
three to one.
With four minutes to go Deluce heat
two backs aud took a shot which
nearly registered. He was hack in
time to take the clearance, however,
and crossed over to Turner, who
scored the fourth and final goal for
Cumberland.
ANOTHER WIN—
COURTENAY DEFEATED
(Continued From Page One)
.McKay! He poled oul a clout thai
was good in reality for three base*
but the game was over when James
scored with only one man out.
Box Score
NOTICE
Fifty dollars reward will be paid tor information
leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or
persons who turned on the water valve at Hamilton
Lake on or about May 17th. 1924, causing loss of water
and damage to property.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
(factory tixperieuce
Leave Orders nt Mhi-bIiuII Music Co
Courleitay
Cummings, ss ,.
R. Robertson. 3b
Beottle, If
1)1X011.   Ill
.1. Robertson
Boyd, p .  .
A. Robertson, ct
Millard, rf
I 111 VVIM'V   c
Totals
Cumber In nil
Plump,  lb
Bannerman, ss
James, 2b
Farmer, ct
McKay, if
Marocchi, 3b
Richards, i
Hunden, i>
Harrison, if
•Conti, rl
Totals
All R II I'O A  K
S 0 2 3   2   1
5 1110   1
I ii 2     1
i ii i >; i l
til"   ii   ii
i i ii ii   :i   ii
i ii n ii   n   i
I 2    1    	
1 n   ii 16    1    0
::s :,   s i;.",   6   •'■
All It 11 I'll a v.
.', 2    2  I I
:, i :i r,   i   o
:, i :i i   i   i
2 ii ii 2 " 11
.", ii 2 il o n
I      2    2
I ii ii    !	
II I ii il 6 l
I I ii n    I     ii
lid    ll  in
10
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite   ■■••-Ilo   Theulre
CUMBERLAND, H.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical   Barber,   and   Hairdresser,  Shampooing.  Singeing.
Massaging.   Scalp   Treatment,
•Conti   relieved   Farmer  in   einlitii
; inning.
Siinunurj
ICarncil runs: Cumberland 3; Court-
eny 1; Throe base bits: Beattle, Bannerman, James; Two base liiis:
.lames. McKay. Millard, Cummings, .1.
Robertson; Stolon liases: Richards;
Left on bases: Cumberland s. Courtenay T; Sirin-k out by Boyd: 15, by
Hunden 9; liases on balls: off Boyd
11  Hit by pitcher:  Beattle by Hun-
' den;  Passed balls:   Downey,  Umpire
j T. Bonn.
Score li)  Innings
12 3 4 6 6 7 8 0
| Courtenay n ii 1 3 0 0 " 0 1—0
1 Cumberland       o o i o o 2 n n 3—6 PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. JULY 5. 1924.
FREE""*0 quicker, better shaves.  Send coupon
We Give You
10 comfortable face days
For ten mornings wc offer you all-day comfort that
crmu-s from having shaved cleanly, easily, quickly,
with oul irritating sensitive skin.
It is a test millions of men have made.
Making it they discovered for themselves the 5 distinct advantages ,ve produced in PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM.
Fnr IR months we worked -carried out 130 laboratory experiments—perfecting for you:
Cream tliat multiplies itself 250 times in
richest lather.
Thai softens thc wickedest hoard iu one
minute—without "rubbing in,"
Lather that lasts, if necessary, 10 full
minutes on your face—moist, luxurious,
Strong bubbles thai hold each hair erect—
for cleaner, easier cutting.
Finally, a cool, soothed, after-feel — thanks
to our careful blend of palm ami olive uils.
Shave this way for 10 days—note thc difference in
all-day comfort, After that you'll ne\ *r go hack to
the old methods.
Post the coupon today. Ot your 10-shave lube,
free.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
Toronto
PALMOLIVE
SHAVING CREAM
10   SHAVES   FREE
.luf>t ntl In mid mull Id Tiie Palmolive
Company of Canada, LIU., DoptD-.iO
Toronto,  Out.
SYNOPSIS OF
iUiACTliENDi.Eim
For Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,    , OVERHAULING,      ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
I'hone 13-lM Courtenay Exchange
■■iiiiiii
1       PETER McNIVEN
M ...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
_H     Coal. Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
_= At Reasonable Prices.
1     PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONK 150
illllllllllll
"Two of
the best"
AND
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
: Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
1 and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information  concerning regu-
; lations    regarding    Pre-emptions    Is
■ given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
j by   addressing   the   Department   of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 5,00b board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Laud Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
Ib situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvement, made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing aud cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Orant can be
received.
For more detailed Information in
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberlaod,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land Ib $5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Further infor-
matiou regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding SO
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the firBt year, title being
obtainable after residence nnd im-
i provement conditions are fulfilled
I and land has been surveyed.
I LEASES '
For   grazing   and   industrial   pur-
| poses areas not exceeding 640 acrcB
may be leased  by  one person or n
company.
GRAZING
Under the Ornzing Act the Prov.
| luce ls divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Orazlng Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
Ue Be Ce BEER
Purity — strength — wholesome-
ness — guaranteed by British
Columbia's most efficient brewery.
Muke u»e of our fret homr delivery
servine     H'% mil order a cane?
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed hy tho Liquoi
Control Board or by the Qovurnmonl of Hriiisli Columbia,
PLUMP LEADS FOR
ROYAL CANDY MEDAL
OMITTED FROM LIST
Henry "Toots" Plump, manager ot
the nifty local crew ot ball tOBsers,
leads the way in the race for the
beautiful gold medal donated by Wm.
Wain, of the Royal Candy Co. It is
for the best hitter in the team during
the Upper Island Baseball League
schedule. The averages are as follows:
j When publishing the list of donu-
i tions for Mrs. N. Huby, the following
j were omitted:
j Mrs. Jas. Watson   $1.00
Mrs. James Stockand   1.00
i Robert Goodhall   1.00
I Alex McKinnon, Goods   5.00
Mrs. Franceslni, Goods   5.00
Making a total of $513.00.
SHIPMENTS OF
GRAIN FROM NORTH
Nome G AB H
H. Plump   6 27 13
T. James   0 25 11
D. Bannerman   6 24 10
D.  Hunden     5 1C 0
J. McKay   4 18 5
J. Marocchi   0 22 6
T. Conti   II 25 (I
D.  Richards     II 23 5
O.  Harrison     6 22 4
F.  Mclntyre    4 9 1
Club     6 211 117
PO
.482
.440
.417
.375
.277
.273
.24.1
.217
.182
111
,818
W.B.A. DEPUTATION
INTERVIEWED COUNCIL
A deputation from the Women's
Benefit Association Interviewed the
Council on Monday evennlg, paid Mrs.
William Potter's taxes and then nsk-
ed I'or a donation equal to the amounl
of tnxes paid, which wns granted lu
Ilic amount of $110.89.
The ladies extend  their thanks to I
the Council and all those who gave
liberal donations for Mrs. Potter who
Is  reported  to be  In  very  poor clr-
, eumstanees.
Thc  report  with  reference  to  Mr.
Geo.  Clinton  ordering  thc  light anil
' water shut off Is    absolutely    false.
Mrs. Potter's light and water account
was paid regularly every month.
Total donations  received $197.60.
Signed on behalf of the Women's
Benefit Association.
Hannah   Watson.
Clara   Taylor.
Over 600,000 bushels of grain have
been shipped from points on the Alberta and Great Waterways Railways the past season, of which more
than 350,000 bushels were wheat and
more than 193,000 bushels were oats.
One point, Bon Acord, holds the record of a total shipment ot 398,000
bushels. On the other government
owned line In Alberta, which runs
north-west from Lucombe lo Hoadley
thc total shipments were nearly one
million bushels of grain, the wheat
shipments totalling 675,000    bushels.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.    Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
GRAIN  FIGURES CLIMBING
With grain loadings at points along
Canadian National lines for the .week
ending June 5 at 3,620 cars, an  iu-
, crease of 2,216 cars over the same
week a year ago, the season's loadings
1 fnr thnt system now total 150,017
cars containing 201,088,000 bushels ol
grain, as against 118,965 cars with
157.268.000 bushels during the same
period  of the  previous  crop  season.
1 The substantial increase of 31.052
cars with 43,820,000 bushels shown
by this season's statistics are an Indication of the rapidity with which
the 1023 crop is being moved to innrl;-
t et.     Grain in store In country elevu-
1 tors along Canadian National linos
iu  Saskatchewan  now    amounts    lo
' only 7,550,000 bushels nnd In Alberta
' 4,923,000 bushels.
NEW MAGISTRATE
Recent appointments by the Alberta
government Include thnt of A. B,
Campbell, prominent Edmonlonlan, as
magistrate al Jasper National Park,
on the main line of the Canadian National ftallwys.
POULARITY OF
WESTERN ROUTE
The growing popularity of the western route for grain export is indicated in the recent statistics announced
by the Canadian National Railways,
which show that since Sept. 1 and up
to June 5 the number of cars of grain
arriving at Vancouver over tjicir
lines was 16.211, as against 4,545 cars
for the entire 1922-23 grain season.
CROFTERS  FOR  CANADA
Rev. Father R. A. MacDonald, managing director of the Scottish Immigrant Aid Society, lias sailed for tha
Old Land and expects to return on
August 2 with another party of between 500 and 600 Scottish Crofters
for Western Canada.
LARGE SHIPMENTS OF
WINTER-FED CATTLE
Illllllllllll
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUGHNUTS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices — Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
_=
i
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18
Cumberland.   ___=
Large shipments of winter-fed cattle are now being forwarded from Alberta over Canadian National lines
for eastern and British markets, including one lot of 400 head sent hy
tbe Edmonton Feeding company to
(ilasgow, where tbe consigners were
confident of a good market for same.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
UNION   HOTEL
CV.VHEKLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike  service.
20   rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
R. YATES, Manager.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL   DELIVERY
D.llierid to All Parti of Dlitrkt
Owl, Wood and Goods of Ani Klal
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE!  CHAKOEB
TELEPHONE
53
TBLBPHONB
A Dunlop Tire to
Suit You and Your
Pocket Book
The Dunlop Rubber Company makes a
wide variety of Automobile Tires.
No matter what type of car you drive—
or what your tire allotment is—the Dunlop
dealer can attend to your needs.
Dunlop Tires are standard. Every one of
them is backed up by the Dunlop reputation
of thirty years' standing.
DUNLOP TIRE & RUBBER
GOODS CO., LIMITED
Heed Office and Factories i   TORONTO.
Branch** fas lhe Lt*d__g Cities. a,VTinf>AV,'J.LY 5.. lft_4.
■e
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVE>
:((1
SSBIHana|_ISI__[i_SI__l^^
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
FOURTH STRAIGHT I shoes. ".Micky"   DeCouer   rustled   tor
WIN FROM FARMERS   the game, maybe It was just that tho
god ot late was smiling sweetly uno'i
. us, but tor the fourth time this season. Cumberland ball    tossers    have
taken into camp our ancient bnsehal!
I rivals -Courtenay.     The    game was
Possibly ll was the luck enchanted   played   at  tlle   Courtonay   ball   park
in  those couple of rusty old  horse-   July   1   Just   previous   to   the  Cllffo-
I,Deals  Win  Exhibition (•nnip S
Jiil.v 1 With Weakened
Team
illllllllllllllllillHH
llllllillllltllllllllllllll!
| McBRYDE'S  BAKERY I
H The White Store                            The White Bakery |§
§| How to live a hundred years—Bury the Pepper dish =
s and the Vinegar bottle and eat McBryde's 100 per cent m
B Whole Wheat Bread ||
g| Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from, which s
as you know. H§
g Not How Cheap—But How Good g
j| First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking ||
11 guarantees the quality §||
§§ The Holding-on-to Quality Store =
II THE jCOURTENAY TEA ROOM B
H =
llll
Woodley scrap.     The llnal score was
8-5 in favor of the visitors.
I iiinberlimd was Weak
Courtenay   fielding   her   strongest
team of the year    were    thoroughly
couiidenS of victory-Cumberland   Ml
the other hand with Hunden and Bannerman out of the regular places hi
the  line-up  hud  many  doubts  as  to
their  prospects  of a   win!     Smiling
Lefty llarkhnuse was the selection of
Johnny McKenzie for the game, started  and  after  being touched   up  too
freely in the Ilrst canto was promptly
. yanked.      Ile might have been given
a little longer to assert himself either
| one   way  or the  other.      Then   Bill
Boyd was shot In to fill the breach
j and after his Sunday game, was hard-
' ly   in  a   position   lo  go  In   the   box.
I Young   "Hed"   Mclntyre   pitched   the
: entire  route    for    Cumberland    and
proved with fair support he Is a factor  to contend  with   In  ball  games
here.
Die  A   Bum   Then  Here)
Dave  Richards, the local youthful
I protege celebrated July  1    In    real
j style, out of the nine lilts garnered by
Cumberland he collected   just   four.
Ills catching, too, was a decided con-
• trust to that of Downey's.      Millard
I pulled    his    usual    shoestring    and
Tucker James gave the crowd a bold
dollar thrill himself when he pulled
i the niftiest catch of the game, when
; he  grabbed  Cummin's' clout  in   the
! sixth stanza.     The thrill proper came
j however when Ole    Harrison,    after
! dropping Harris' high pop fly and let-
i ting two  runs  In,  redeemed himself
| in the ninth Inning when he bust up
j the  old   ball  game.      Boyd  drove  a
I liner Ole had to run  for, and after
I base*: Richards, Mclntyre, Downey
and Cummins; Double plays: Harrison to Fanner; Passed balls: Downey 4; Left on bases Cumberland  1,
j Courtenay 10; Sacrifice hiis: Plui-i
James and R. Robertson; S mi oil
by .Mclntyre tl, t>, Boyd 6; Hit ly
pitcher, Conti. by Barkhouse, McKay,
and Mclntyre; by Boyd, Harris i 11
J. Robertson by Mclntyre; 2 hits 0
runs off Barkhouse 1-3 inning; 7 hits
8 runs off Boyd 8 2-3 Innings. Umpire
Hope Herd.
taiuly has improved a whole lot sine.' I FLOWER SHOW WAS
«
Manufactured
on the premises
CHESTERFIELDS AND CHAIRS
OF ALL DESCRIPTION
MADE TO ORDER.
ESTIMATES FREE
PICTURE FRAMING RE-UPHOLSTERING
AND FURNITURE REPAIRS
W. EMERIC
MASONIC BLOCK, COURTENAY
picking It off his shoestrings, fell for-
| ward on his head, recovered himself
j in time to whip the ball to Ilrst and
I pick Hob Robertson off that bag for
; the last out.
Box Score
I
! (iimberliind
| Plump, 3b ....
j Richards, c
Conti,   ct   ....
AH R H PO A E
4
James. 2b     4   0
: .McKay, If 	
; R. Robertson,
i Mclntyre, p .
I Harrison, ss
! Parmer,  lb  .
Totals     35 8
(ollilcnil)              ...AB R
Millard.  If    3 1
Harris. 3b   4 1
Cummins, ss   '< 0
Dixon, lb   5 0
R. Robertson, 3b .... 3 0
Barkhouse, p   0 0
J. Robertson, 2b
Downey, c 	
A. Robertson, cf
•Boyd,   p   	
II 27
H PO
1 2
2 2
1 3
2 12
1 0
II ll
0 I)
2 6
0 1
1 1
11     I
A E
DOMINION DAY
SPORTS PROVE
BIG SUCCESS
ii   11
3   2
0   1 ,
o   n|
o  o|
0 u;
3    0j
1 ii j
0 ll |
6    1 i
Rt=_
I
Comox Tailors
LADIKS' AM) GKNTLEIHAN'S
TAILORING
(1KT .O.B SPHIMJ SUIT
All our work NOW Courtenay, B.C.
Guaranteed 'Phone 14
THE
Piket Electric
RANGES       —       WASHERS       —       PLATES
TABLE STOVES      —      CURLING IRONS
WIRING       —       TOASTERS       —       HEATERS
LAMPS     —     FANS     —     IRONS
— PERCOLATORS —
TENTS     —     AWNINGS     —     FLIES
FISHING TACKLE — SPORTING GOODS
— GUNS AND AMMUNITION —
Telephone 164 Courtenay
Totals     36   5   II 27 13   51
•Boyd   relieved   Barkhouse   In   lasl
part of 1st inning.
Summary
Earned runs: Cumberland 2, Courtenay 1; Two base hits: Farmer, Hsr-i
ris; Three base hits: Millard; Stole:, I
Dominion Duy was celebrated by
the people of Comox Valley last
Tuesday when they were entertained
In the Valley Hub by a programme
that had been arranged under the
auspices of Courlenay Assembly No.
3 Native Sons of Canada, The weather was ideal and the scene of tho
day's activities on the bank of the
Courtenay River but an attractiveness,
that would be hard to surpass anywhere.
In the morning the children's sports
were held and continued in the early
afternoon. At two-thlry Cumberland
and Courtenay baseball teams clashed
at the ball park before 500 fans, tho
coal city winning by a score of eight
to foar. Immediately after this
event the boxing tournament began.
The first scrap was between Leslie
Taylor and Freddy Stephens of Courtenay at 85 pounds . Taylor showed
more experience than his young rival
and was awarded a decision. Wali-
on of lievan and Bobbins of Cumberland put on an enjoyable exhibition
without a decision. A great deal of
interest centered in the Jones-Brook-
bank mix-up. The boy from Duncan is a tall rangy fellow who knows
the boxing game. Jones has fought
more aggressively on other occasions,
seeming ou Tuesday to rely on :i
cautious attack. After three rounds
of clean, clever boxing the Cumberland lad was awarded a popular decision. Brookbank has certainly nu-
thing to be ashamed of in the scrap
he put up nnd he was not without a
lot of friends in the crowd. Then tho
"bantams" from Cowichan and Duncan, Bobby Holmaii of the former
place getting a decision over Teddy
Stock of Duncan. Adam Monk and
Jack Foster put up their usual hard
scrap the decision going to Moult.
Foster put up a great scrap and many
thought he should have been awarded
a draw.
Then the big event of the day was
announced. Roy Cliffe, of Courtenav
and Ernie Woodley of Victoria were
scheduled to go eight rounds, but-
after half a minute of scrapping Ro.\'s
glove found his antagonist's solar
plexus the blow flooring Woodley. Ho
was down for thc count of S. When
he came up he was promptly hud
down again by a love tap on the chili.
Count nine again. On coming up tor
more Roy's long piston-like arm shot
out and down went the Vlctorin liov
again for the full count.      Roy cor-
his last scrap here and Woodley lis,I j
no chance at all agalus thitn.     Cecil
Bradshaw, of Duncan    was    present j
and introduced as a challenger nf the
winner.
The judges for this tight were Tom
Moore, of Nanaimo and Jeff Hannah,
of Courtenny, with T. Waltas reteree,
Mr. Harry Jackson, of Cumberland,
announced all the bouts and fighters
in lhe order they appeared.
In the eveinng au open air dance
was held nt the Courtonay board tenuis courts and attracted four hundred people, the music being provided
by Plump's Orchestra of Cumberland.
The first Dominion Day celebration In
Comox Valley was certainly a huge
success and will be held annually.
POORLY PATRONIZED
COl'RTENAY, June 27.-The old
Agricultural Hall was a blaze nf color
and a profusion of beamy this afternoon when the Flower Show held
under the auspices of the Coniox Agricultural and Industrial Association
was staged in Courtenay.
From the start of the day exhibitors
commenced to arrive loaded with i!i"
most   fragrant   blooms   or    carefully
carrying  exquisite  specimens  of the
most  delicate  (lowers.     The entries
in many of ihe clases were very numerous aud keen competition was no-
tlcable in most Instances.     The decorated table competition made a vol.
line display  In   itself.     These tables
were  placed   right   down   lhe  centre
of the hall with the other exhibits arranged round the sides of Hie hall in
a very able manner, each exhibit l>_-
,    COL'RTENAY. June  28.—Yesterday  Ing wolf placed.     The Mower show,
afternoon the annual Royston school, In spite of being ihe best by fnr that
sports were held in a Held adjoining : the district has ever put on, was but
j the beach.       The    various    athletic   poorly  patronized  by  the public, al-
I events   were   pulled   oil'   under   Ideal   though   the   lovers   of   flowers   were
1 weather conditions.      After  lhe first. there.      During  the    afternoon    tho
j half of the sports program an inter- { Ladies'  Auxiliary  served  dainty  teas
! val took place for refreshments, when j amongst  Ihe  beautiful  exhibits,  the
j the competitors partook of as much : small lea tables harmonizing dellght-
Ice cream, candles and cake as they, fully  with  the    floral    surrounding.,
I could manage.     Before lhe afternoon ! These  teas   ware  In  charge  of  Mes-
ROYSTON SCHOOL
HELD ANNUAL SPORTS
was over the most unusual sight  ol
small boys and girls refusing further
j ice cream cones was witnessed.     Mr.
j N. G. Thomas had charge of the sports
and was ably assisted by Miss Me.Mtu-
! ray and Mr. F. Wllcock.     The prize
! winners are as follows:
'    220 yards flat—Duncan Thomson \;
Bert Carey 2.
240 yards flat, girls under 14—Violet Feeley 1; Gladys Idiens 2.
i    100 yards flat, boys under 10—Ray
' .McLeod 1;  Hibbert McLeod 2.
j    100 yards flat, girls under 1"  -Violet Feeley; Gladys Feeley 2.
dames Waller McPhee, A. E. Eniblo-
ton and W. Brown. Eight girls of tlio
Courtonay public scbool entertained
the visitors with a series of flower
dances which wore much appreciated,
Those very graceful dancers were
Ilonor Fechnor, Mary Morrison, May
Moncrieff, Nona McNeil, Burnadlna
Shannon, Kathleen Moore, Dorothy
Haines and Gladys Perez. Under
the direction of Mr. G. W. Stubbs the
children of the Courtonay School gavo
a special entertainment "Thc Plod
Piper of llanielln." This was staged
in   the grounds of    the    Association
; amidst the    beautiful    natural    sur-
Hlgh Jump, boys under U-Duncan .,.0,lmllll(,s and was greatly enjoyed by
Thomson L| Clifford Laver 2. al| ,„,„ wc,.e f01.lunaU, c,,oug„ l0 8ea
High  jump, girls  under  14- -Annie ; it       A,   illte,.v„ls   .Hiring   the  after-
Watts 1; R. Uchiyamo 2. | noon Mrs   w   w   Moore „-(„-,„,„,,,,
High jump, bays under 10-Hlb.ert  the company with beautifully render-
McLeod 1; Geo. Watts 2. | ed   „1Ilnrorte  selections   which  adde!
High jump, girls  under  10-Violet I ,„„,.„,„ ,nc enjoyment of all.
Feeley 1;  Megan Navey 2. 	
Needle Race- Dareen Ogilvio and 11.
Carey  1;   Margaret  Dunn  and  Dun-:
can   Thomson   2;   Violet   Feeley  audi
David   Idiens  3.
Three-legged   Race   for   boys—Tom j
Feeley and Edgar Kelley.
Three-legged Race for girls- Viol,
Feeley and Megan Navey 1; Gladt
Idiens and R. I'chiyama 2
DIRECTORS HELD
BUSY SESSION
COURTENAY. July 3.—At a  meeting  of  the  directors  of  the   Comox
Agricultural  and  Industrial Association held Wednesday night, a lengthy
Consolation    Race,    boys—Hlbberl I <'is''1>»sl011 t0°l< Place concerning the
McLeod 1: Bert Carev 2. , "ellon  o( ,he 8»e,olal committee ap-
Consolation Race, girls- Gladys Itl-   Pt>l»ted  III connection with the eroe-
iens 1; Jean Ogllvie 2. | "on  of  tl,e  "e,v    s|adium    on    the
--'Little  Tots-JImmie   Henderson   i;   grounds   of   the   Association   by   the
lack Hilton 2 ' '0(<a'  assembly  Native  Sons of Can-
'  Wheelbarrow Race- Duncan Thorn-  ad" and Mr' F' Lalonde.
son and  Hibbert McLeod  1;  Clifford I     Thl!  i>B«'em™l  '«  Ms  connection
Laver and Bert Carey 2.
Mrs. and   Miss Carrol  leave  today
for a holiday trip to Alaska.
Mr. H. Cook  left on Thursday for
Chicago.
GOOD BUILDINGS
are a combination of good building material, and good workmanship.
WE CAN SUPPLY  BOTH.
It costs you nothing to get a figure.
We sell all building material required for any building, large or small.
PHONE AT OUR EXPENSE
Edwards and Orr
PRACTICAL BUILDERS, SELLING BUILDING MATERIAL
Union Bay Road Courtenay
Phone 17 OPPOSITE  CORFIELD  MOTORS P. O. Box 62
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
MEATS       ■     POULTRY FISH
—   AND VEGETABLES
Telephone 143 P.O.Box lfi2
COURTENAY, B.C.
HELD AFTERNOON TEA
COURTENAY, June 2H.   On Friday
] afternon  Mrs. R.  P. Christie made, n
delightful  hoBtess  at  her    home     it
Royston   when?   afternoon     tea     wan
| served in honor nf Miss Silleuee who
Ih to he married to Mr. Kenneth Fleming of,Seattle on Monday next. Amour,
| those present  to extend    their    Bond
wishes to the hrlde elect  were:  Mrs.
Geo. Clinton nnd Mra. & R. Hicks of
Cumberland and Mrs. C. W. Slllence,
was read and very freely discussed.
Opinions were expressed that the new
building is a very decided asset to tho
association and to the whole district.
Finally on motion of Mr. Wm, Duncan
lhe action of the committee was unant
mously endorsed.
The printing commltte having failed to come to a decision in the matter
of the printing of the 1924 Fall Fair
prize list, the secretary  pointed out
Hie necessity of coming to a decision
without    further    delay.       Another
lengthy discussion ensued which culminated in th0 matter being left iu the
hands of the president and the secretary with power to act,
The Flower Show  held  last  Friday
' having been poorly patronized hy the
public,   although   the     entries     woro
enough tn make a  beautiful florieul-
! tural display, consequently showed a
1 deficit   and   it   was   decided   that   th"
president aud secretary be ernpower-
'■ ed to borrow the necessary money to
; jmy the prize liability etc. in connection with the flower show.
Some discussion took place wilh regard to the conditions of the main
Agricultural hall and it was decided
to ask Mr. L. It. Cliffe, a former di-
; rector of the association, to make a
, report as to tiu* state of the building and to submit an estimate of co^t
for any repairs that may be found
necessary. Other matters of genetv.l
interest to the association wore discussed  before  the  meeting adjourned.
'The Sultan got sore on his harem
And invented a scheme for tn scare
'em;
He caught him a mouse which he
loosed in the house
(The confusion is called harem-
sen rem. I
Mrs. N. (1. Thomas, Mrs. Ash. Mrs. I.
Idiens. Mrs. E, .). Idlens, Mrs. __,. ,1.
Greig, Mrs. R. Laver, Mrs. Fraiut
Dalby and Miss Glover. ice creams
were daintily served and proved very
I refreshing. PAGE I-ICJii
THE U M_.2IK.ANn ISLANDER
£3=
GAT,URty!,Y, June y, isy,
BIRTH
FOR SALE
SHORTT   ai   the  Cumberland   den-   POU SALE—FATALISM AND INDI8-
eral Hospital, Thursday, July 3rd,
lliil. lo  Mr. iind  Mrs. J. Shortt, a
Son.
I AIM) OK THANKS
Mr. and  Mrs.   Clifford    Davis   ot
Union  Bay. wish to thank Dr. Writs
nd Nurses of ilu- Cumberland Gen-
putuble proof of a living Ood. Read
this book; a divine solution of this
life's mysteries. Sent postpaid for
75c. Address, Matthews, 571. San
Juan Ave, Victoria, B.C. i7
WANTED-RASPBERRY PICKERS.
Women and girls. Send for prospectus. Ferhcllffe Fruit Farm.
llntzlc, B.C. 27p.
oral Hospital tor their kind attention j LOST—GOLD SIGNET RING,   F1.N1>-
and t'ooil care lo Mr.  Davis  while a      er please phone 171F Cumberland,
patient III Ihe hospital. -7.      and receive reward. -7
Attention Ladies!
;;aftjja|i3ji?fiajp[iWj'i»
FANCY DRY GOODS
Hemstitching A Specialty
Mail Orders Will bo Given Prompt Attention
Large Reduction   in   Children'*
Hats, on sale at $1.50
_'_t___rSME«!!_EI_W_^
Mrs. L. Francescini
20
per cent off
Bathing Caps
PRICES NOW ARE AS FOLLOWS
Regular $1.25, Special  $1.00
Regular    1.00, Special       .80
Regular     .85, Special       .68
Regular     .75, Special  02
Regular     .50, Special  40
Regular     .35, Special       .28
Regular     .25, Special  20
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It I'AYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Local Briefs
The Finest
English Broadcloth
Shirts
Broadcloth woven from Egyptian yarn-
on England's finest looms, finished like
silk and wears better than silk, in beautiful
shades of tan, grey, blue, peach, and helio,
also white and colored satin stripes. Fully
covered by the Forsyth Insurance Policy.
With collar to match.
J. Sutherland
Cumberland
Mr. A. MacKinnon spent the holiday
ou the mainland and was a visitor to
the horse races nt Brighouxe Park
on July 1st.
* *   «
L. It. Stevens, local watchmaker,
is visiting in Vancouver.
* *   *
We must save Uie water, ll is said
Ihat our supply ls only that ol the
lirst day of August last year. Stop
all leaky taps.
* *   *
Percy Hickman, a colored gentleman was found guilty on Wednesday
of selling whiskey and was sent tn
Okalla for six months.
BICYCLE TOUR
OF VANCOUVER ISLAND
BY BOY SCOUTS
The  Victoria   Uoy  Scouts   Associa- j
lion   intends selecting  a    Patrol    of
eight 18) Scouts who will make a bicycle    tour    of    Vancouver     Island'
from Wednesday, July Uth to Wednesday, July 23rd, visiting all Seoul and
Cub centres en route.      This Patrol |
will be In charge of Mr. H. T. Haven-1
hill, chairman of thc Victoria Executive Committee.
I attach hereto, for your information and guidance, a copy of the proposed itinerary, giving dates and
times of arrival at, and departure
from, all centres.
Tour Is being held with a double
motive, that of "Give and Get"; it Is
hoped that Mr. Ravenhill and the
scouts of this patrol will be able to
encourage and assist the various
Troops and Packs, and the movement
generally, that they will be able to
become acquainted with their brother
Scouts on the Island, and that they
wlll gain from this experience, a better knowledge of the Island, and
some useful hints on Scouting.
We trust that this proposal will
meet with your cordial approval, and
that we may receive the most Scouty
co-operation from you. As we consider Ihat, to an extent, this tour Is
a provincial matter, all arrangements
for the Itinerary arc being made
through this headquarters.
It Is hoped that every troop and
puck will "he prepared" to assist this
patrol in the staging of any displays
which it may be possible to hoiii, and
it is expected that every troop and
pack wlll he ready to put on some
"turns" of a Scouty nature whicli will
he of Interest and amusement.
Hospitality of Scout and Cub families is requested for Uie nights during which Mr. Kavenhil! and Ihls patrol will be resident in the various
cities and towns.
Trusting to hear from you during
the next few days, assuring you of our
desire lo give you any further Information that you may require and
hoping that you will send us any suggestions,
I am,
Yours faithfully
J. C. Anthony,
Provincial Sccty.
The Scouts will arrive in Cumberland Sunday, July 13th. and Church
Service will be held by Scouter Hev.
W. Leversedge either in the afternoon
or evening. In all probability the
service will he held at Royston 111
the afternoon and a meeting with thc
citizens in the evening, and will
loave Cumberland on Monday morning, July 14th at 9.30.
The following will be amongst the
number: Asst, District Commissioner
H. J. Ravenhill, Asst. Cub Master L. J.
Dodds, 17 -piling Forest Troop and
Pack, England, and Patrol Leaders A.
Stark; H. Crawford, J. Miller, S. Arch
bold, W. Deans, Hob White, Waller
Walsh, Brian Tobin. Donald McDonald und Scout Oordetl Douglas.
The local scoutmaster, Rev. W. Leversedge will be pleased to get 111
touch wlUi anyone who can accommodate any of the srouls during their
short stny In Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Cope have arrived at Royston to spend a month's
vacation.
Mrs. Watkins, mother of Mayor
Parnham, arrived on Saturday on a
visit.
The Eagles had a great time .it
Itoytson on Tuesday. It was their
annual picinc. The Eagles are opening their charter and expect to increase their membership to. 170.
Capt. and Mrs. W. O. Russell (nee
Ruth Clinton) arrived during the
week. They have motored 40'io
miles from Waco, Texas, and are here
on a visit to Mr. and Mrs. George W.
Clinton, or lhe United State Consulate.
Miss Charlotte Carey Is holidayliu;
in Vancouver,
William Hassartl of the British Columbia Telephone is spending his holidays in Vancouver and Sound Cities.
Mr. Bradbury of Parksville Is here
relieving J. 11. Robertson of the Uii-
niinlon Telegraph service, who Is on a
three weeks' vacation.
Mrs. Wm. Henderson and child arrived home during the week after
spending the last two months visiting In Alberta.
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton, assisted
by Dr. H. E. MucKechnie. of Vancouver, performed a successful oper-
ulion upon Mrs. E. W. Bickle and Mrs.
Charles Parnham at the Cumberland
General Hospital on Sunday. Both
patients are doing well.
Miss Marjorie Mordy left for Vancouver on Friday last to attend the
Summer School of the British Columbia University.
.Miss Gladys Dando returned home
on Saturday from a two weeks' vacation visiting friends In Alberta.
Mr. Cope will commence his duties
as City Clerk and Chief of Police of
the City of Cumberland on the first
dny of August.
.Mrs. J. W. Tremlett and son are
here on a visit.
Miss Carrie Richardson will leave
today (Saturday) for Victoria, where
she will attend Summer School tor
teachers.
Miss Edith Horbury left for Edmonton, Alberta, on Saturday on a visit
to Miss Annie Pryde formerly of Cumberland and will attend Summer
School iu that City.
Miss Alice Coleman arrived on
Thursday and will spend the summer vacation with her parents.
An auto party consisting of Miss
Florence Sehl, Mrs. Frank Dallos, Mr.
and .Mrs. Gordon and Miss Dallos, left
for Victoria and Seattle on Tuesday.
Miss Grace Oliver of the Cumbei-
land General Hospital staff relumed
on Monday from a six weeks' vacation. While away Miss Oliver visited Victoria, Vancouver and the principal cities of the State of Washing
ton nnd Oregon.
The fire brigade answered the call
to the building owned by Geo. Pryde
on Derwent Avenue on Sunday. The
loss would be about twenty dollars.
Some old papers had caught fire upon
a shelf in the kitchen.
Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Gillespie of Vancouver arrived on Thursday.
NEWS OF DENMAN ISLAND
Miss   Mabel     McMillan,    youngest
daughter of Mrs. McMillan was re
cently united lu marriage to Alfred
Randal of this Island. The wedding
ceremony wns performed by Hev. A,
Wulker of Union Bay. Only the Immediate relatives were present. Mr,
and Mrs. Randall will mako their
home on  Mrs. McMillan's farm
A grand charivari took place at
the McMillan Ranch on Tuesday nighl
Several sticks of dynamite were exploded, cow-hells rang In every key
IT PAID HIM TO ADVERTISE
One of the most persistent advertisers in the history of success was Robinson Crusoe. He knew what
he wanted—and he put up an ad. for one. He flung a
shirt on a pole, at the top of his island, that, in the
language of the sea, was plain to every sea-faring man.
The circulation was small—there was no other
medium but Crusoe kept at it, despite the fact that he
got no inquiries for a long time. He changed his
copy—as one garment after another was frayed out—
and in the end got what he wanted.
Suppose Crusoe had taken down that signal after
a time and declared—"Advertising doesn't pay."
Where would he and his story be rfow?-
Put up your signal and keep it there. Crusoe advertised under very discouraging circumstances. You
have got a sure thing—it is only necessary to have the
patience, persistence, and pluck of Robinson Crusoe—
and the good ship "Better Business" will soon tie up
'longside-your pier. "     ■ - -
f_BI_f_l_l__l_l___Vi__li__J
Leave your order for
Preserving   Strawberries (j
ALL CLEANED AND HULLED IN 15 & 30Lb. PAIL.
12c
PER LB.
PER LB.
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
PLUMS, ('ANTELOPES.  BANANAS,  HING  CHERRIES,   LAKH
BERRIES, GRAPE FRI'lT. ORANGES AND LEMONS.
NEW   SPUDS,  NEW   CARROTS,   BEETS,    TURNIPS.     HEM)
LETTUCE, GREEN  CABBAGE. CUCUMBERS,  GREEN   PEAS.
Full Stock of Refreshing Drinks
Loganberry Juice,  Raspberry Vinegar,  Lime Juice,
Lime Juice Cordial, Grape Juice, Ginger Ale, Hop
Ale, Shandy, Lemonade Powder and Sherbit.
All Sizes.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
Beer by the Glass
You may or may not be able to get, but we can
give you better values than you can get elsewhere for
the money. Our low overhead and our Method of
Buying, and Selling for Cash, or Short Terms of Credit
enables us to do it.
Here are a few of our prices which should convince you as to the accuracy of this statement.
Boys' Sport Shirts and Blouses, in light shades and
Khaki, Price  $1.00
Boys' Khaki Pants (longs)   $1.50
Boys' Bathing Suits, each from 75c.
Boys' Overalls, with bib, in Black,  Blue and White
Stripe, and Khaki, from   $1.25
Boys' Heavy Ribbed Black Hose, all sizes, from 35c.
Boys' Running Shoes, rubber soles, form per pr. $1.25
Men's Khaki Shirts, Traveller's Samples, Reg. value
$2.50. Now on Sale at   $1.75
Men's Cotton Bathing Suits $1.25
Men's All Wool Bathing Suits, heavy weight, Sale $3.i)5
Ladies' and Misses' All Wool Battling Suits, in the latest styles and colorings, Sale Price   $3.95
Men's B.D.V. Underwear, all sizes, per garment $1.25
Men's Sox, per pair from   25c.
Men's Overalls, per pair from   $1.50
Yours For Lowest i-rices
Frank Partridge
Cash Clothing and Shoe Store
Agents  for Tip-Top Men's Made to Measure Suits.
All Wool Material   $27.00
With Extra Pants $35.00
whistles were blown, gunR were Bred,
tin enns of nil shapes and sizes were
brought Into use and tor a short while
Dante's "Inferno" reigned supreme.
The bride anil groom soon came on the
srenc and candles and cigars were
handed around. Felicitations were
given anil the crowd dispersed after
wishing the bridal pnir the best of
luck.
Last Monday evening the Women's
Institute gave a court Whlst Drive
and Strawberry Social in the Den-
mnn Island Club Hall. Union Bny's
four-piece orchestra supplied thc
musk- and a fair crowd attended.
Dancing continued until nearly 3
o'clock In tlle morning. In the whlst
Mrs. Fraser and Mrs. A. H. Swan took
t_u> ladle.' and gent's prizes respectively while Mrs. Mosely and Mr. Mc-
Ki/ took the booby prizes. Pro-
ceds were devoted to the Crippled
'Jhlhlren's  Institute In  Victoria.
The "Hex" returned on Wednesday
from her northern trip as did also
Messrs Pickles, Meadows and Street.
Mrs. Pickles nnd Miss Pickles paid
a short visit to Courtenny.
Two flags at half-mast were discovered In front of two very strong
Provincial Party houses after the result of the recent election was known.
Several farmers have begun hny-
ninklng here although the weather
looks very unsettled at present. The
Islnnd is again settling down to its
usual puce after the hubbub and excitement of the election.
Apples and pears will only be a
very fair crop this season and tho
hay crop promises to he very light.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0070762/manifest

Comment

Related Items