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The Cumberland Islander Jul 9, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
. 2)
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
■f
Vith which I* consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAH—No. 28
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
City Council
Proceedings
Tag Day for Children's Aid-
Special Meeting Re Water
works on Wednesday.
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held on Monday evening.
His Worship Mayor MacDonald in the
chair and all the aldermen being
present.
Tag Dajjpr Children's Aid Society.
A reply was received from Superln
tendent South of the Children's Aid
Society of Vancouver, giving the in
formation asked for by the City Clerk
as to the names of the four children
the society claimed to have had in Its
home in years gone by. These children were from the district outside the
municipality.
The Council, admitting tbe worth!
ness of the society, decided to grant
tbe request tor a tag day to be held.
The City Clerk, on motion of Aid. J
C. Brown, was directed to communicate with the Women's Auxiliary of
the G. W. V. A., asking that organization to take up the matter of holding
a tag day for this cause.
Health Officer's Report
Tbe half-yearly report ot Medical
Health Officer Dr. C. R. Hicks showed
the district to be In a very healthy
Btate, with very little sickness during
tbe period just closed.
Bills and Accounts.
Bills and accounts were read and
referred to the Finance Commute for
approval before being paid. These
were as follows:
Burns & Brown  $   2.30
Cumberland Electric Light Co.
Light and water     34.67
Repairs       6.25
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., Memorial Arch   377.85
Evans, Coleman & Evans, vitrified pipe and cement   992.05
A. R. Kierstead, shoes, etc    12.35
Compensation    Board    assessment       14.22
Medical aid assessment    12.15
Legal fees     12.40
Goods Most Not Be Supplied Without
* Requisition.
Arising out ot discussion at the bills
and accounts, the Council unanimously
passed a resolution tbat a requisition
must be secured from the City Clerk
tor all and any goods supplied the
municipality. The Council may
fuse to pay for goods supplied when
not authorized.
Special Meeting on Wednesday Re
Waterworks Proposition.
Wednesday night next was agreed
upon as tbe time when the question of
the assessment of some $500 of the
city by the Waterworks Company for
hydrant use, wlll be taken up.
Tax Produced About *4(00.
The City Clerk announced that the
$5 tax had produced about $4700. This
money is to be used solely for school
and hospital purposes.
The sum of $1000 was voted to the
School Board for painting the school,
repairing roof and other improvements.
On the request of the Board of
Works the Council authorized the
purchase of 80 feet of 12-Inch pipe for
the main sewer on Dunsmuir Avenue
below Fourth Street.
The question of getting new brackets for the street light and also improving some of the lights at present
In use, was left in the hands of the
Light Committee.
Donation to G. W. T. A.
At the request of Aid. Brown and
in consideration of the fact that the
taxes on the Memorial Hall, amounting to $62.40, had been paid, on motion
of Alderman Parnham the Council
donated the sum of $62 to the Great
War Veterans Association.
Late Mr. Reid
Buried Sunday
Had Been Connected With Cumberland Mines for 20 Years—
Was Highly Respected.
Another old and highly respected
resident of Cumberland has passed
from mortal sight. Mr. John George
Reid. who had been connected with
the local mines for the past twenty
years, met with an accident on Wednesday of last week, when a small
piece of rock fell and struck him.
causing him to fall, whereby he sustained internal injuries which eventually cause dills death, which occurred on Friday.
The deceased was a native of Wast-
vllle, Nova Scotia, but came to this
coast many years ago.
The funeral took place Sunday afternoon, when the mortal remains
were taken to the Cumberland cemetery for interment, i a large number of
friends attending the funeral to pay
their last respects. Rev. James Hood
conducted the burial service.
Mr. Harry Reid, a brother living in
Nanaimo, and Mrs. D. R. Pottinger. a
sister residing in Victoria, came up
to attend the funeral.
It is understood that Mrs. Reid,
mother of the deceased, is at present
In the East on her way to visit the
Coast.
Colliery Employees* Picnic
Royston*. Saturday. July 23
Last Year's Executive Re-Elected— Arrangements Under
Way for Banner Event.
Moose Lodge
Being Formed
Prominent Citizens Signing on
List of Charter Members—A
Worthy Organization.
BIG ATTENDANCE AT
BASEBALL DANCE
The Intermediate Baseball Club
lived up to their reputation for giving
a very enjoyable dance when on
Wednesday night the Ilo-llo Dance
Hall was well filled with a jolly crowd
of dancers. Splendid music was supplied by Mrs. R. E. Frost, Mr. C.
Graham and Mr. Wlnningham. Mr. C.
R. Mulholland was floor manager.
COMPLETE CEXSUS WORK.
"Messrs. Walton and Merrifield, who
Hays been away for over a month taking tbe census on points ln the gulf,
returned Wednesday, having completed their labors. The party had a
very interesting and varied tour, undergoing many new experiences. Mr.
M. DeCoeur accompanied the party as
guide. Mr. Walton had Lasquetti Island and Texada Island to cover, while
Mr. Merlrfleld's district took in Powell
Don't hesitate to put your name on
the Charter List asking for a charter
of the Loyal Order of Moose to be
established here. Get in the first fifty
and your name will be on the charter
of the lodge. Without thinking, one
does not realize what a great benefit
it would be to have a lodge of an order
hacked hy a million members in our
midst. It Is the cheapest insurance
you can get, states Organizer Thompson, and because of its small cost does
not prevent people taking all the other
Insurance they feel disposed to. It
you do not require the benefits personally you are asked to endorse this
great plan for the benefits of others.
Children are at Mooseheart today
whose fathers have paid as little as
$2; the average cost to the fathers of
children that are now enjoying the
privileges of Mooseheart is hut six
dollars per annum.
See Organizer Thompson at the
Eagle Hotel for particulars concerning this great institution aud its noble
work.
The Fourth Annual Picnic of the
employees of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited will be held at
Royston on Saturday. July 23. This
is somewhat earlier than last year,
but this course was thought advisable
iu order to give Ladysmith employees
the advantage of the August weather
for their picnic.
As the time is short the various officials and committees are pushing arrangements, which are now well under way.
As in past years an extensive programme is being arranged, with tbe
children's events a leading feature.
A general meeting of tbe employees
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited was called to order at 7.30 in
the Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association's Lecture Hall on Sunday
night last. Mr. Charles Graham addressed the meeting and intimated to
the employees present the purpose of
the meeting, i.e., to organize a committee to take charge of affairs pertaining to the Fourth Annual Picnic.
He strongly advised the meeting to
re-elect last year's executive and
chairmen of committees.
Mr. Graham explained that in view
of the fact that it was decided to hold
the picnic earlier this year so as to
give the Ladysmith employees the advantage of the fine August weather
that this re-election would be the best
course to take. A motion adopting
this suggestion was carried unanim
ously.
Mr. Graham then declared the old
executive re-elected, and requested
Mr. R. C. Walker to take the chair as
president of the Fourth Annual Picnic.
Mr. Chas. O'Brien is secretary, Mr.
Jno. D. Davis is treasurer, and Mr.
Chas. Graham director of ceremonies.
In connection with the sub-committees it  was unanimously decided
B. C. HOSPITAL ASSN.
CONVENTION THIS WEEK
The Britisli Columbia Hospital Association is meeting in Kamloops ibis
week, having a three-day session, on
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
The Cumberland delegates attending are:
Miss M. Browne, matron oi the Cumberland General Hospital.
Mrs. A. MacKinnon, representing tin*
Women's Auxiliary.
Mr. J. C. Brown, representing the
Hospital Board.
Many important matters of particular interest to hopiials generally are
being dealt witli. aiming llieni being
"Hospital Service in the Industrial
Community"' and the report ni the
committee on Hospital Standardization.
A motor trip to the Trnmiullk- Sana
toriuni was scheduled for Thursday
A lengthy programme has been ar
ranged, which will keep the delegate!
fully occupied.
The band contest held at Ladysmitl
on Saturday last, the first ever held
that each chairman should select t£$ou Vancouver Island, proved a Ereai
GRAND MASTER TO
VISIT CUMBERLAND
Thursday, July 28, will be a red
letter day for Cumberland Odd Fellows. His Honor Judge Swanson, ot
Kamloops, Grand Master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for
British Columbia, has notified Union
No. 11 that he will visit the local
body at the end of the month.
BUYS BARBER BUSINESS
Mr. G. Llddell. of Vancouver, has
purchased the Barber Shop which has
been conducted 'by Mr. Macdonald.
The new proprietor is engaged in
thoroughly renovating the premises
and making some changes in the interior arrangements which will make
it much more comfortable for patrons.
Mr. Liddell is an accomplished
violinist and has played iu the largest
orchestras of Vancouver. He will be
a decided acquisition to local musical
ircles.
MULHOLLAND BUYS
NANAIMO BUSINESS
River,   Olsen   Lake,   Sliamon,   Still ^^^
water, Wulfnson Bay and Myrtle Point, every success in his new venture.
Mr. C. R. Mulholland, who has been
connected with the Cumberland Garage for some time, has purchased the
Central Garage on Haliburton Street,
N'anaimo, and left Cumberland Friday
morning to take charge. The new
proprietor hopes to welcome his many
friends and acquaintances at his new
location when they are ln the hub
city.
Farewell Party.
On Thursday night a farewell party
was tendered to. Mr. Mulholland by a
number of his friends. This was held
In the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomson, a very jolly time being spent in
vocal and Instrumental selections, etc.
Those contributing to the entertainment were Messrs. C. Graham, A. W.
Wlnningham, D. Denholm, A. Macabe,
C. Hitchens. A. Pilling, S. Gough, Rob
Robertson, H. Roy. A. Scott, B, Thomson, D. Richards, Con. Walker, Con.
Hicks, F. Wallace, R. Robertson, Andy
and Bobby Thomson.
During the procedings refreshments
were served, tlie happy gathering lasting until the small hours of the morning.
Mr. Mulholland will be missed in
sporting and musical circles, in which
he was very popular. He was manager
of the Cumberland Intermediate Baseball team, and nlso took a prominent
part in the Courtenay orchestra.
His  many  friends   will   wish   him
own committeemen. Mr. Jas. A. Quinn
was unanimously elected chairman of
the Sports Committee.
The secretary was instructed to advise the chairmen of committees of
their appointments and to furnish
each with a list of the members who
served last year, together with a list
of others who were present and Interested.
At the suggestion ot Mr. Robert
Walker the meeting then discussed
the question of raising funds for the
prize list for the sports, and a motion
was promptly made that the sum of
$1 be deducted from each employee's
statement on the pay-day falling on
July 16. This motion carried unanimously.
It was decided to ask the Great War
Veterans' Association to take charge
of the refreshment booth.
The practice of giving dimes to
children who are unsuccessful competitors in the races will be continued
(Continued on Page Two)
NEW MANAGER AT
EMDE'S FORD GARAGE
Mr. E. C. Emde, of the Ford Garage.
Courtenay, has secured as manager
.Mr. W. M. Ritchie, of Victoria, who
for the last 20 years has been In association with Mr. Thomas Plimley in
the automobile, motorcycle and bicycle
business.
The Ford Oarage is now installing
a Louden overhead carried system for
the more rapid and convenient handling of heavy Ford repair jobs. This,
together with the many latest Ford
repairing devices employed, makes
the Emde plant the most modern and
efficient north ot Victoria.
CHILDREN HAD VERY
HAPPY TIME AT PICNIC
The annual picnic of Holy Trinity
Sunday School was held at Royston
on Wednesday afternoon and was very
successful. Some sixty children attended, as well as many parents anil
friends. Perfect weather favored ihe
party, and tlie arrangements worked
out without a single hitch. Good
things to eat. as well as ice cream ami
milk, were in abundance. Altogether
the kiddies hail a very happy day of It.
The committe iu charge wish to
thank all who by contribution or
assistance helped to make the picnic
such a success.
CUMBERLAND BAND
SECOND IN CONTESTS
INTERMEDIATE BASEBALL
BEVAN PLAYS HERE SATURDAY
Cumberland Intermediates will play
the newly formed Bevan Baseball team
on Saturday evening. The game will
commence at 5.30. The Cumberland
line-up will be: Catcher, D. Richards;
pitcher, J. Bennle; 1st base, A. Farmer; 2nd, R. Robertson; 3rd, A. Sommerville; s.s., P. Courtenay; right
field, V. Dalby; centre field, A. Wlnningham; left field, M. Stewart.
JOl'RSEY TO ALBERNI SUNDAY
The Cumberland Intermediates go
to Alberni on Sunday for a game with
tlie Port Alberni senior team. The
following players are asked to meet
at the Post Office at 7.30 Sundav morning: D. Richards, J. Bennle, P. Courtenay, A. Farmer. R. Robertson, M.
Stewart, A. Wlnningham. A. Sommerville, V. Dalby and C. Graham.
success. Four bands entered in the
various contests, namely, Nanaimo,
Cumberland, Ladysmith anil South
Wellington.
Mr. H. Ward, of North Vancouver.
acted as adjudicator In all the test
pieces.
The first test piece, open to all
bands on the Island, bands having
own choice of selection to be played,
was  staged  in  the  following- order:
No. 1, Ladysmith Band, their selection being "Memories of Wales."
No. 2. Nanaimo Silver Cornet Hand.
"Maritana."
No. 3, Cumberland Band. "Wagner-
Ian."
No. 3. South Wellington Band. "lie-
collections of Scotland."
All the selections were well rendered and each band was greatly applauded after its performance. The
adjudication for this selection was as
follows:
Nanaimo lirst. with SO points, winning $100.
Cumberland second with 7" points,
winning $50.
Ladysmith third, with 55 points.
South Wellington fourth, with ."■"
points.
The medal for the best cornet solo
went to the Nanaimo Band. This
band also won the euphonium aolo.
No. 2 Contest, Overture, *
Nanaimo'. lirst. with 100
Cumberland second. 75
South Wellington third,
"l.lllspiel."
polnta, $50.
points. $^j.
50 poiuts.
Ladysmith fourth. 45 points.
Third ('oiliest, Overture, "La Dluiloni."
Colliery band contest. Tbe prize foi
this contest was a cup presented by
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited.   The results were:
Nanaimo first, 75 points, nip.
Ladysmith. second. 60 polnl .
Cumberland  nnd  South  Wellington
equal.
Fourth Contest, March. Own Choice.
Nanaimo lirst. 00 points. $50.
Ladysmith second, 05 points. J25.
Cumberland third, 55 points.
South Wellington fourth. 60 point-
The conductors of the different
bands were: Cumberland, Mr. C. C.
Halverston; Nanaimo, Mr. J. Lewis;
Ladysmith. Mr. Merry; South Wellington, Mr. Mead.
BAZAAR AT BEVAN
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2C
The Bevan Bums' Club announce
that they are holding a bazaar in tht
new Athletic Hall ai Bevan on Wed.
nesday, July 20. from 11 a.in. in .v:ii
at night.
First Case Under
Moderation Act
Man  lined  $50 and  Costs  for
Being Intoxicated—Penalties
Severe for Infractions.
TUe lirst cose in this district under
tin- new Moderation Act came up he-
fore Magi itrate Batrd tlie other day. A
man named James Donnelly was ar-
ted at Union Bay on Saturday hist
a charge nt' being Intoxicated lu a
public place. He was taken he tore
Magistrate baird. and pleaded guilty,
when he was fined tlie minimum penalty ol $•">■*, together with $7 costs.
Tin- max[uim penalty under the act
Cor tliis offence is (100 or three months
Imprisonment tor a first offence.
Under the provisions of this act the
lefendaut was a compellable witness,
ind in his evidence said he bought the
liquor from Hen Miller of Union Bay.
A warrant was issued for Miller's
irrest, hut upon enquiries at Union
Hay it was found that Miller had left
in Sunday morning.
The Provincial Police are making
very effort to locate Miller, who if
ouvicted is liable, to six months' hard
labor without ibe option of a fine.
Tin* penalties under the act are extremely severe. Should a compellable
witness refuse to disclose as to where
he procured liquor he is liable to a
sentence of three months in jail. The
minimum tine of S50 for a first offence
is out of all proportion to the offence.
G.W.V.A. Concert
Was Big Succes
Audience Delighted With High-
Class Instrumental and
Vocal Numbers.
Ladysmith Team
Beat Champions
Winners Were in Splendid Form
And Easily Outclassed Cumberland United.
Cumberland t'nited. champions of
British Columbia, went down to defeat on Saturday last, when the Ladysmith team whitewashed them on their
home grounds with a 2-0 score.
The Ladysmith team deserves credit
for their win, as.they played a fast
game and were in good condition,
whereas the Cumberland team was decidedly off color.
By winning Ibis match the Ladysmith team have won the honor of being the British Columbia representative team to compete in the finals of
tho Connaught Cup proper.
Alberta Team May Play at Nanulmo,
It is understood that Ladysmith and
the Alberta representative team will
play a two-game series on the coast,
one game to be played at Vancouver
and the other game at Nanaimo. In
the event of a win for each team, then
tlie goal average will be taken into
oiuiideration to determine which
earn will be eligible to travel back
East to compete further in the Connaught Cup finals.
Notes Ou the i.nnic.
The Cumberland team were completely off form, and none of the play-
)rs showed their usual dash and vim.
The defence was.very weak and the
forwards did not seem able to do any-
liing right.
Ladysiuitli Team Full nf Wash.
Tbe Ladysmith  team are   a   young
iggregation, full of dash and running
abilities, and bore down on the champions throughout the game.
The Ladysmith captain won the toss
nd Wilkinson kicked off for Cumber-
land   against   a   strong   sun.   which
eemed to trouble all the boys during
ihe first half of the game.   Ladysmith
pressed for the first ten minutes and
tbey let a few opportunities go a-begging by kicking past  the side of the
goal and oyer the bar.    Both Stobhart
and Gibbons mlsed open goals, both
king   past    when    they   had   only
Walker   lo   beat.    The  Cumberland
hoys then took the game in hand for
few minutes and Shepherd had a few
hois hut none ot th*' difficult type, a
rew corners came lo Cumberland hut
II proved truitjess.
i limber I und Scored for Ladysmith.
After 30 minutes* play Stobbart sent
in a shol to Walker, which he caught.
(Continued on Page Two)
G. W. V. A. NOTES
A lull attendance of members is re-
luested for next Tuesday's meeting,
lie special business being to arrange
*ur refreshments, etc.. for the forth-
•urnlng Colliery picnic on the "Urd.
At a recenl meeting of the local It
as decided to form a Returned Sol-
tilers' Football Club. All those Interred are asked to attend the G.W.V.A.
neetiug on July 12 at 7 p.m., or give
heir names to Comrades A. Wllkln-
-iiii or I-'. Slaughter, who are the or-
•auizera.
OPEN-AIR CONCERT
SATURDAY NIGHT
r
Cumberland City Band will
give another open-air concert from
ihe city Hand Stand on Saturday
night, commencing at s o'clock.
The grand concert held on Wednesday night in the Ilo-llo Theatre by
the Great War Veterans' Association
was very enjoyable and successful.
There was a good sized audience, but
tlie high-class talent of the artists deserved a full bouse. The object of the
concert was to raise money towards
Ihe fund for completing the upper
portion of the Memorial Hall.
The committee in charge of (he
i onc-ert worked bard to ensure Its
success and bad arranged a splendid
programme. Much credit is due to
Mr. T. Vi. Scott for his efforts ln this
direction. Mayor D. A. MacDonald
was chairman for the occasion.
The Cumberland City Band, under
the leadership of Bandmaster Halver-
ton, opened the entertainment with
a Wagnerian selection and showed the
result of careful practice and good
leadership, this number being particularly well rendered.
This was followed by Mr. Vi. Carr of
Union Bay. who Is always a favorite
with Cumberland audiences. He sang
'Til Sing Thee Songs of Araby" and
was heartily encored, when he responded with "The Company's Sergeant Major." which was especially
pleasing. .Mr. Owen accompanied on
the piano.
Mr. J. H. McMillan played Drdla'e
"Souvenir" with excellent expression
and had to respond to two encores.
His encores were old favorites and his
splendid playing of them made a decided hit with the audience, they being "Anie Laurie" and "The Bonnie
Banks ot Loch Lomond." Mr. McMillan also gave a splendid imitation
of the bagpipes. Mrs. McMillan accompanied him on tbe piano.
The beautiful violin used by Mr.
McMillan is said to be one of the best
in British Columbia, and Is valued at
upwards ot a thousand dollars.
Mrs. E. McAdam, a newcomer to tha
district. who has a clear soprano
voice, sang "Love's Old Sweet Song"
most artistically, and in response to a
well-merited encore sang "The Garden of Roses." Her enunciation is very
clear and her singing charming. We
hope to hear more of her In the future.
Mrs. R. E. Frost accompanied.
Juvenile Dancers Captivate Audience.
Miss Jean MacNaughton and Miss
Helen Parnham. in full Highland costume, took the audience by storm with
their graceful dancing of the Highland
Fling. Their graceful exposition of
this old Scotch favorite was very
pleasing. These young misses, who
are not yet In their teens, are promising students of tbe terpsichorean art
Mr. C. J. Parnham accompanied them
on the piano.
Miss M. McKee. of Victoria, a
visitor in town, and who has a full
and resonant soprano voice, Bang
"Come Sing to Me." and In response to
repeated encores responded with a
pleasing ballad. "Don't You Want to
Come Back to Home Sweet Home,"
She was accompanied by Mrs. Frost.
An Instrumental Treat.
The well-known and very popular
musicians, Mrs. R. E. Frost, Mr. W. A.
Owen and Mr. Colvllle Graham, delighted the audience when they played
"A Grlekdanse" in their usual artistic
manner, but perhaps the star piece of
tlie evening was the encore item, the
"Berceuse" from Goudard's "Jocelyn."
The full mellow tones of the magnificent viollncello which Mr. Owen has
lately acquired were shown to advantage in this well-known and exceedingly well rendered composition.
Mr. Owen was undoubtedly al his best
on this occasion. Mrs. Frost and Mr.
Graham accompanied Mr. Owen with
sympathetic understanding.
At the opening of the second part
of tlie programme the City Band
played a lively overture. "Spink and
•Span." the performance of which was
highly ci editable to this organization.
A young singer. Miss Crawford of
Onion Bay. sang "Tbe Scottish Bluebell." which was enthusiastically received The delightful singing of this
young performer quite took the audience by surprise. Her singing shows
great promise and with competent
training sin* win make a name for
herself. She was accompanied by
Mrs. Finch, of Onion Bay.
Mr. Harold McAuley. whose splendid tenor voice is well known to Cumberland audiences, was heard to good
ellect in bis able rendering of "Rose
of My Heart." for which he was
heartily encored. He was accomponied
heartily encored. Mr. Owen accompanied him.
Tbe War Veterans wish to thank the
artists for their contributions to the
success of tlie concert.
BKEAD TEN CENTS A LOAF
Notice is given in our advertising
columns by local takers that on and
after Monday next bread will he sold
by them at 10 loaves tor $1. or ten
.eats per loaf. This is the same price
as charged by leading bakers In Vancouver and Victoria for an 18-ounce
loaf, the standard sized loaf for D. C.
The name of Hector Stewart was
inadvertently omitted last week from
the list of names of scholars promoted to matriculation grade in the High
School. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 3,1921.
Sale of Bicycles
Out for a Spin
 --,—__- --— v I r.
Ride a (AC M Bicycle
For One Week Only
The famous C. C. M, Bicycle, the highest grade
machine on the market. Fitted with the new guaranteed Hercules Coaster Brake and Dunlop Studded Tires.
A SPECIAL BARGAIN  FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
$55.00
SOLD EVERYWHERE AT $65.00
This is your chance to get a high-grade Bicycle at a
low price.   Call in and inspect them.
THE BATE HARDWARE CO.
Phone 31
P. 0. Box 279
PRESERVING
KETTLES
ALUMINUM KETTLES, in "Wearever" and "Louis
McLain" lines.   A good range of sizes.
STRAIGHT SIDE SAUCEPANS,  in  aluminum;   all
sizes.
ALUMINUM DOUBLE BOILERS, STRAINERS AND
SAUCEPANS, ETC.
SAUCEPANS, etc., all in "Wearever" or "Louis
McLean" lines.
WE WILL CONTINUE OUR
SPECIAL PRICES ON FURNITURE
FOR ANOTHER TWO WEEKS
This gives you a genuine chance to secure Furniture at a low price.
LINOLEUM—Another consignment of      AM   QC
Linoleum just opened up; square yard  *pA<»Otl
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
'1 COLLIERY  EMPLOYEES'
PICNIC AT ROYSTON
SATURDAY, JULY 23
(Continued from Page One)
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on  Ro?ston-
Cumberland   Road
Price $30.00 J&
this year. A discussion arose over
the indefiniteness of the ages of
competitors in the children's races.
The starters are vested with power to
decide as to which children should
compete In the other races, that is to
say, that they should decide whether
a child of 8 years of age should compete In a race for children of 10 of 11
years and under, ln connection with
the foregoing it was decided to invite
the teaching staffs of the various
schools in the district to the picnic
with a view to securing their co-operation with the starters In ascertaining
the ages of the children.
In view of the fact that the general
committee ls conversant with its
duties It was thought unnecessary to
meet again as a whole until the 17th
ot July.
The secretary was Instructed to
write the Cumberland City Band with
a view to securing their services for
the picnic.
Executive Oflicers.
.Mr. Jas. M, Savage, hon. president.
Mr. Thos. Graham, hon. vice-president.
Mr. R. C. Walker, president.
Mr. Chas. O'Brien, secretary.
Mr. Jno. D. Davis, treasurer.
Chairmen of Committees:
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, refreshment com
mittee.
Mayor D. R. MacDonald, reception
committee.
Mr. H. L. Bates, transportation committee.
Mr. Jas. A. Quinn, sports committee.
Mr. H. G. McKinnon, programme
committee.
Mr. Andrew Pollock, grounds committee.
Starters.
Mr. Tos.  Graham, Dr. O.  K.  Mac
Naughton, Mr. J. G. Quinn.
Judges.
Messrs. A. Auchlnvole, Sandy Walker
and John Sutherland.
First Aid—Dr. G. K. MacNaughton,
Dr. E. R. Hicks and Dr. Millard.
Judge of Quoitlng—Mr. D. Wilson.
The different committees have been
appointed as follows:
Director of Ceremonies.
Chas. Graham.
^Transportation Committee.
H. L. Bates. Harry Buchanan, G.
Simister. A. R. Westley, A. Matheson,
L. Francesclnl, H. Hughes, A. Derbyshire.
Grounds Committee.
Andrew Pollock. A. C. Lymn. Ed.
Nancy, S. Fraser. Jno. Smith. M. Williamson. A. Lockhart. R. Turnbull. P.
Harris, W. Wilson, Vi. Mossey, Arch.
Boyd, T. Robertson.
Reception Committee.
D. R. MacDonald, Thomas Graham.
Chas. Graham.
Programme Committee.
H. G. McKinnon, Robert Brown. Jas.
L. Brown, Pete Reed, Jas. A. Quinn.
Snorts Committee.
J. A. Quinn, Bobbie Brown, Preston
Bruce. A. H. Kay. Dan Stewart, Jonathan Taylor, Vi. C. Colling.
Refreshment Committee.
Geo. O'Brien. R. Robertson. T. W.
Scott. Robt. Smith, Win. Devoy, W.
Wier. S. Cameron. Thos. O'Neil. Thos.
Eccleston. H. Buchanan. A. Brown, S.
Robertson. Jim Boyd, Jno. Horbury,
Chas. Walker. J. Taylor, Dave Ford,
W. Beveridge. Thos. Watson, Jack
Williams, Sam Jones, William Gillies.
E. Mugford, A. C. Dunn, A. J. Four-
acre, Jno. Potter, Andrew Thomson.
Robert Strachan.
LADYSMITH TEAM
BEAT CHAMPIONS
(Continued from Page One)
APPLY—
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
illl
but somehow he let the ball drop and
while clearing his line by kicking tin
ball out, Campbell seemed to be in the
way and the ball rebounded hack Into
the net, Cumberland thereby scoring
tlle lirst goal for Ladyjraiith. Halt-
time was called with no further scoring.
The Second Half.
Cumberland boys -pressed the Lady-
sniitli defence tor the first 20 minutes
of the second half, bat could no! locate the net. Conti. playing centre,
beat both backs on an individual run.
but kicked high over the bar. Banner-
man tried Shepherd with a shot rigln
at the corner ot the upright, but Shepherd saved at the expense of a corner;
nothing resulted, Roberts heading
past. (
It was to be seen that the game was
lost for the Cumberland team, as the
Ladysmith boys put some fresh life
Into the game tmd Walker was again
kept a little busy. With five minutes
to go, Gibbons, the outside left, sent
a cross over and Strang, the new inside right for Ladysmith. scored a
good goal with his head. Walker having no chance to save. Tiie game
ended wilh the score Ladysmith 2.
Ladyhsmith 0.
On the day's play there ia no doubt
but that the best team won, although
brilliant football was lacking on both
sides. The Cumberland boys *WOTe off
I form and the Ladysmith team went
into the game with determination to
J win and caught the champions nap,-
™ ping, hence the result.
i C    *
SPECIAL SALE AT BEVAN
George Beattie of Victoria announces to the residents of Bevan, Cumberland and
Courtenay districts that he has purchased the business at Bevan of the ISLAND
SUPPLY COMPANY from Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., and will offer for sale at
SWEEPING REDUCTIONS
ALL THE STOCK OF DRY  GOODS, BOOTS,
SHOES AND HARDWARE.
I will also add. to make the sale one of genuine bargains, $8,000 of DRY GOODS
recently bought at the very lowest prices from manufacturers in Canada and England.
BROKEN LINES GO REGARDLESS OF COST
Having found many broken lines in the store after inventory, I will put these goods
up for sale regardless of cost.
SPECIAL PRICES ON GROCERIES
During the sale special prices will be given on all Groceries, and customers living at
a distance will find it to their interest to attend this sale.
SALE NOW IN FULL SWING
NOTE  THE   FOLLOWING  PRICES
Indigo Print 5 yards S1.00
Canton Flannel 4 yards $1.00
English Prints 3 yards $1.00
Children's Stockings   4 pairs $1.00
Best Quality Flannelette Blankets—
At $2.75, $3.50 and $3.75
A special line of English Cotton Sheeting.
pre-war quality; large size, pair $4.25
Unbleached Calico, the old-time quality
again; per yard 40c
White Longcloth, per yard .... 25c and SOc
Beautiful Check Ginghams, just arrived,
at assorted prices.
White Flannelette, per yard 25c
Men's Sox   4 pairs for $1.00
Over 1000 pairs of Ladies Silk Lisle Hose,
in all colors, at popular prices.
AS A CRITERION OF VALUES
Italian Silk Hose, per pair  75c
Beautiful Navahoe Blankets, each... $8.50
Bath Towels, per pair  85c up
1500 yards of Nottingham Lace, regular
value to 50c per yard.   Sale price, 5c,
10, 15c and   20c
Men's Overalls, all sizes, pair $2 and $2.25
Camp Blankets, 7-lb. weight, pair.... $0.00
Sweater Coats, from $2.50 up
Men's Heavy Rib Underwear, per garment  • $1.50
A great quantity of Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Rubbers, Hardware, etc., will be
laid out and marked at prices^ that
should effect a speedy clearance.
50 Bread Pans, each   15c
20 Gallon Oil Cans, each  15c
A GREAT ASSORTMENT OF SMALL WARES TO GO AT NOMINAL PRICES
ALSO A  QUANTITY  OF  FOOTWEAR.  SLIGHTLY  SOILED,  AT ANY REASONABLE OFFER.   COME EARLY!
GEORGE BEATTIE
BAND  DANCE WAS m
HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL m
The Cumberland City Band dance
which was held In the llo-Ilo dance
hall Thursday. June 30, was a big success, financially and otherwise. About
100 dancers attended. The music by
the band orchestra was splendid and
was greatly enjoyed by the dancers,
tlie consensus of opinion being tliat
the time and music was very good.
.Many are already looking forward to
the next band dance, as they are getting very popular.
Results of Prize Drawing.
While the orchestra were having
supper at 12 o'clock, the drawing for
the gold watch and other articles In
tlie prize drawing, the following being
the successful winners. Those who
have not already secured their prizes
can do so on applying to Mr. Jackson,
eretary of the band.
1. Gent's gold watch, won by S.
Williams, Royston, ticket No. 3SG.
2. Goods to the value of $10, donated by Campbell Bros., won by L. Fran-
ioli, ticket No. 35S.
3. Pair men's white shoes, donated
by W. Gordon, won by J. Green, ticket
No. SS".
4. Pair lady's white shoes, vulue
$4.50, donated by F. Partridge, won
by A. Baird. llckei No. 141.
5. Three gent's pocket books, value
S7.50, donated hy Mr. Laver, won by
J. A. Cameron, ticket No. 353.
6. China tea set, value $4, donated
by A. MacKinnon, won by C. Quinn,
lievan. ticket No. 1459.
7. Briar pipe, value $5. donated by
.1. English, won by ticket No. 1186.
8. Box chocolates, value $4, donated
by Royal Candy Co., won by W. Collins, ticket No. 1176.
!). Box of cigars, value $6, donated
by Burns & Brown, won by S. Young
ticket No. 204.
10. Pair lady's slippers, value $4,
donated by Cavin's Shoe Store, won
by ticket No. 1400.
11. Fishing rod. value $4.75, donated
by C. H. Tarbell & Son, won by J.
Thompson, ticket No. 65.
12. Pali* lady's silk hose, value
$2.50, donated by J. Sutherland, won
by A. Ellis, ticket No. 14S7.
13. Silk necktie, value $2, donated
by T. Rickson, won by M. "Mitchell,
ticket No. 444.
14. Flashlight, value $2.50. donated
by Bate Hardware Co., won by M.
Williamson, ticket No. 34.
15. Goods value $2. donated hy T.
Nakanishi, won by A. Pollock, ticket
No. 1494.
The members of the Cumberland
City Band wish to expres their thanks
and appreciation to those who donated
prizes towards tlie drawing, also to
those who purchased tickets for name
alld assisted In making the drawing
such a success.
On behalf of tbe Cumberland City
Band.
NAT BEVIS. President.     '
--■■»-..       TEDDY JACKSON, Sec.
NOTICE
May 2a, 1921.
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons havo
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
■M (<"
July 9, ld21.
THB   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
TbrM
McLaughlin
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK, WILLEMAR &  WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. 0. Box 153
illllllllllllllllllli
( New Cars for Old |
H     Make that Car look like a new one      j§
| Phone 135 Courtenay |
H AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE H
K. P. Auto Painting Co. i
ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Illllllllllllllllllli
II
SAVE BEFORE Ygjj SPEND
Let your Bank Account be your
first concern.
It will more than repay you In
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a large
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
Send us your specifications
and we will give you a close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
PRESIDENTS  AND T,
PEANUT STANDS
BREAD!
Do you just fall back on bread
when you have nothing else or
do you eat it all the time?
Do you know how good it
tastes with milk?
Fnd out! Eat a big bowl of
Bread with milk for supper tonight.
Bread is your Best Food—
Eat more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue     •     Cumberland
BEFORE YOU HAVE
YOUR FORD
OVERHAULED
get our book containing prices
on every kind ot a Job, from a
motor overhaul to tighteuing a
mudguard.
These prices are set by the
guidance of Ford dealers and
Ford Motor Company for the
Ford users.
We iiave the best equipped
shop north of Vicotria for the
repairing of Ford cars aud
trucks. * Thousands of dollars
worth of modern labor-saving
machinery has been installed,
enabling us to do -the work better, more rapidly and cheaper.
Let the Ford Garage attend to
your Ford cars.
THE FORD GARAGE
E. 0. EMDE
COURTENAY, B. C.
By WALT MASON.
HOW FLIES INCREASE
A sTtigle fly lays four times each
summer, an average of eighty eggs
during the season. One-half of the
eggs produce females, so that the flrst
forty females, which would also lay
four times during the season, would
produce 12,800 flies. The first eight of
these, or 1,600 females, would produce
381.000 offspring; the second eighlli
2Stl.O0O between them. Thus there
would be 909,120 flies as the result of
the lirst of four batches of eggs laid
by a single fly in one season. The
second batch of eggs laid by the original fly would produce 777,600 during
the remainder of one season; the third
202,400, and the fourth 131,120. Therefore the total number of descendants
of a single female fly during one summer ls 2,080,000. A consideration of
this ligure shows why "Swat the fly!"
is a most excellent slogan.
FORDS ARE NECESSITIES
LIKE JACK-KNIVES
Two gluut American manufacturing
organization are now working full
time, enjoying a boom. They are:
1. The American Woolen Company,
which is operating Its entire system of
mills 98 per cent, capacity.
2. Henry Ford, who will make more
cars ln July than in any month in his
history.
Other auto plants have slowed
down. But auto makers now say
that, iu considering the condition of
their Industry, Ford cars must be ex-
■luded. since Fords have become ne-
lessities like jack-knives.
It Is a flue thing lu begin life with
a high determination to be President
of the United States; but if you reach
mature years, and lind the chances a
million to one against your being
President of the United States, it is a
good plan to forget the high ambitions
and do your best to make your peanut stand a success.
When I was very young I was impatient of the half-gods, nnd I know
that ultimately I'd write a belter play
^luui "Hamlet" or "Uncle Tom'a
Cabin," a better sonnet than Milton's
best; but years and QXpertenoe taugbl
tue that my highest night would be a
good limerick, and I quit looking aloft
to tbe swing ol the Plelodeif, to Un
bluing peaks of song, and not D jol
writing rhymes tor BungBteller's Al
mauuc; and having found my pooroi
level I became reconciled to il at once
and bade a long farewell to the am
bitions which hud disturbed my youth
Happy and fortunate arc tbo men
who find out where they belong, and
strive to make themselves useful ii
their proper station. There's mon
than enough room at.the top, when
the gods breathe the rarefied air; hu
ou ihe lower levels, where the niulti
tildes throng, it's the half-gods who
make the wheels go round.
In Your lliiiib) More Interesting Than
Vour Job 1
It Is a common weakness nf the
half-god to underestimate his real
talent, and pretend to n gift ho docs
not possess. Our village band is made
up of clerks and young business men.
with a sprinkling of lawyers and dentists. They are good nun in their
respective lines, hut they think they
do their real shining when they put
on their band uniforms, and are engaged in playing some littlo skit by
Mozart or Beethoven; and tlie truth is
that their music is execrable.
Jed Halter Is so good a tailor that
people come from towns fifty miles
away to be measured for clothes. I
am too fat for a perfect beauty, and
unless my tailor is an artist I resemble a load of hay when I am attired
ln a new suit of clothes. But when
draped in a set of Jed's masterpieces
my friends assure me I have a real
human appearance, Bill Higgins, tlie
lawyer, is about seven feet high, and
mostly- boues, and he says he always
looked like a sycamore that had been
struck by lightning, until be patronized Jed.
Yet Jed Isn't proud of these triumphs. When I call at his shop to
tell him that his tailoring makes the
world a brighter and belter place, he
seems bored; but if I bint that he
plays the alto horn better than anybody since Paganini. his emotion is
painful to witness, and he wants to
embrace me and weep happy tears ou
my shoulder.
Walt Mnsmi a Contented Half-God.
It Is better to be a half-god and
have a balance in the bank than be a
god two jumps ahead of the sherill".
People are forever asking me why 1
don't do something other than the
work I do. Why don't I write B novel *.'
Why don't I write serious poetry?
Why don't I break Into the movies?
Why don't I tackle the Chautauqua
circuit and electrify tlie masses with
my burning words?
It is because I am satisfied to ho a
half-god, knowing I haven't the mn
terlal in me to be a god. I have sized
myself up from every angle, have
measured my limitations and possibilities, and determined lo stick to the
work I know I can do. And I rcspei I -
fully submit that the number of ilo
year's failures would be cut down one-
halt If this altitude of mind wore gen
erally adopted.
By switching the truth ;*.  .''"In of
lies 'is soon made up.
MOTORING WITH A MUSIC
BOX ARRANGEMENT
The newest thing iii simplifying Ihe
task of the automobile driver is the
application of tiie piano-player prln
clple to the gear shifts of the auto
mobile.
In exterior appearance the mcchau
Ism reminds one rather more torclbl)
of a cash register. But when ii is dissected it proves to consist essentially
of a roller having a bole in Its face
into which, hy proper manipulation,
any one of five steel rods may be adjusted. Each of these rods is connected with one of the speed gears. Tho
adjustment of one rod or another Into the cylinder Is effected by move-
ment of the little thumb-lover in eon
nectlon with the cash-register numbers. Instead of fumbling with bund
levers and twisting them this way and
that, In the manner familiar in ever)
motorist, all that is necessary i.. to
shift one hand a few Inches from the
steering wheel and slide tho thumh
lever to one figure or another, ad
vancing from neutral lo suree.-siv.-h
higher speed, or reversing the proce ■
by merely moving the lever along an
arc a few Inches in length.
Now On Sale
— AT
The   Local   Government
Vendor's Office
CASCADE BEER
— AND
U. B. C.
This is the original U. B. C. Beer, the same as was
made in pre-war days and is the finest beer on the
market today.
INSIST ON  HAVING
U. B. C.
Order at once from the Government Vendor's Office
and get prompt delivery.
We Guarantee this is the Real Original U. B. C. Beer
The Beer Without A Peer
99
Druggist's Assistant: "flood gracious! I have kept that woman waiting
half an hour. I forgot all ahout her
proscription."
Druggist: "Vou will have to charge
!ni" a good tall price in order to make
her think you had a lot of trouble in
mixing it up."
Knicker: "My wife got stung on a
leal several days ago."
Docker:  "How so?"
Knicker: "She wrote for a hook
Mow lu Got in the Movies.' and the
uiswer was, 'Pay a quarter and tlie
.var lax.'"
"We've had a mighty dry summer,"
said the man from Lethbridge, who
was exhibiting at tbe fair.
"Dry summer?" asked the man from
Montana. "Man. you ought to come
down to my country. Why, we have
hull-frogs down there eight years old
that haven't learned to swim yet."
'This talk about it being more expensive to live when married than
when single is all rot," said Groom-
ley. "Why, I've been married a year
aud I save as much as I used to."
"And how much is that?"
"Nothing."
IDLE  MONEY
To leave money idle at the present time is harmful, not only to your own prosperity, but to that of
your country for the financial requirements of industry
ami trade are very great.
Build up your Savings Account until you accumulate enough to make a sound investment.
We welcome small deposits.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
■
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. UltAINOEIl, Manager.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LlFE^nd MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by tho Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
slock, amount to over
$30,000,000
K. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
11. (J. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland. Pour
TBS  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 9,1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
s EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1921.
Even if tiie weather is cool, tho Sun is making it pretty
hot for Honest John.
While the coat of living is steadily declining, the coat of
staging u championship prize fight has got the rankest
profiteer left hopelessly in the rear.
The people in Toronto are bathing ut 2 and 3 o'clock
in the morning in an endeavor to get cool; hundreds are
sleeping in the parks. In another COlUtnu It ia stated that
the Lord's Day Alliance seeks to prohibit bathing .on
Sunday. No wonder Christianity makes such slow headway with men of this calibre seeking to dictate people's
actions.
A New Jersey medico says "tobacco forma a sliagoague
around the teeth, thus preventing bacteria from getting a
foothold." If the average tobacco chewer finds out that
the habit may help him in some way he may quit.
The janitor of the Ventnor, New Jersey, city hall has
been shocked Beveral times after a meeting of a women's
club in thf city hall because he always found cigarette
butts scattered over the floor and the desks and tables
littered with empty boxes and ashes. When this happened time after time he notified Mayor Brennan and the
mayor told the city council. The council, after it had recovered somewhat from its horror, adopted a resolution
barring the women from meeting in the city hall. The club
hasn't heard of it yet, bin a row is expected when it does,
says the New York Herald.
The "Microbe Review." as the Paris Pasteur Institute
periodical is vulgarly called, states that tobacco smoke is
antiseptic and kills in a few minutes the primary bacteria
of cholera, diptheria and cerebro spinal meningitis.
By permission of the Board of Liquor Control the civic
employees of Vancouver had beer at their annual picnic
recently. This was tbe first case of the board exercising
its right to issue a special permit for this purpose.
Premier Oliver says it is the intention of the government to strictly enforce the liquor law. Good intentions,
we suppose, but we must take the liberty of reminding the
Premier that his party has already overstocked the province with this same brand of paving material—Alberni
News.
As life becomes more and more of a tension; as civilization reaches so high a place that it becomes madness, then
it will topple, and the world degenerate to savagery—from
■which another evolution will start. In centuries to come
learned men will paw and dig up our ruins; they will
work to translate our hieroglyphics, and they will wonder
what race this was that rose to such heights and then disappeared—even as we wonder now about the Aztecs,—
Oregon City Banner-Courier.
WHY ROME DECAYED
In tbe early period ol the Roman republic woman was
highly respected as a matron. For 250 years, the historian
Dlonyius declares, there was no divorce in Rome. The
republic reached the pinnacle of prosperity and stability.
But as one result ot wars ot conquest and consequent multiplication of slaves, three forms of marriage came to be
adopted: First, a form of patricians which could not be
dissolved; second, a purely civil contract; third, a marriage that could be formed or ended at the will of either
party. The last named at length drove out the others, so
that tn Rome, where tor half a millennium, divorce had
scarcely ever occurred, marriage ln turn became practically unknown.
Cicero put away Terentia to obtain a new dowry. Pom-
pey divorced Mucla. Caesar divorced Pompela. Cato
loaned his wife to Hortenstus, and then took her back a
wealthy widow when the old man died. .Mercenas changed
his wife frequently. Women likewise divorced their husbands. With such conditions among the cultured classes
we leave to the Imagination the rottenness that pervaded
the populace. At last the nation found Itself crushed by
the penalties ot violated laws of nature and ot Qod.
Weakened by lust, wealth, the pursuit of pleasure, Inflamed
against one another by animal passions, the 120,000,000
of Romans fell upon one another In constant rage of civil
wars that ceased not until the republic was destroyed —
wurs that ceased not until the republic was destroyed.
Kitsilano Times.
OUR  MITES
A little over $200,000,000 was contributed to Protestant
churches by American and Canadian members la3t year.
That's about a tenth as much as we spent on tobacco in
the same period. Churches christen us, marry us, bury us,
give us our line ideals and try to save us from hell. What
we give them in return should make us ashamed—Sun.
THE TIDE HAS STEMMED
In Italy the tide of anarchism and Bolshevism, which
has for the past year been steadily ebbing throughout
Europe, is now completely spent. Italy has recovered as
marvellously and as gloriously from this subterranean
attack as she recovered from the Hun onset at Caporetto.
Her friends may well congratulate her not only on the
victory of the forces of order within her territory, but also
on the example which her people have given to the world
Civilization when It is courageously defended is Inllnately
strong—much strongly than Its dishevelled assailants
dream.—London Dally Mall.
SACRED TO THE EMPIRE
It required the voice of General Smuts, Premier of South
Africa, to bring afresh to the minds of the statesmen of
the world knowledge of what the Great War was fought for
by Britain and her allies.
"There Is one chapter in the peace," said he, "which to
my mind should be specially sacred to the Empire. That
Is the first chapter on the League of Nations. The coven
ant may be faulty. It may need amendment In order to
make it more workable and more generally acceptable. But
let us never forget that the covenant embodies the most
deeply felt longings of the human race for a better life.
There more than anywhere else, do we And a serious effort
made to translate Into practical reality the great ideals
that actuated us during the war, ideals for which millions
of our best gave their lives, a method of understanding
instead of the violence of force."
Big Discount On
Hobberlin Suits
MADE TO YOUR MEASURE—FIT GUARANTEED
MEN'S SUITS
at thc Following Reductions—Good for JULY Only:
REGULAR PRICE S 12.50. d»0 O QQ
JULY SALE PRICE   «P£0.00
REGULAR PRICE $47.50. d»Q1   C7
JULY SALE PRICE   «PO±.U I
REGULAR PRICE $52.50. COF-I (\(\
JULY SALE PRICE   «POt).**JU
Hundreds of samples to select from. This Special
Sale gives you the opportunity to buy at LESS THAN
PRE-WAR PRICES.
Boys' Khaki and Summer
Clothing   at   Low   Prices
BOYS' KHAKI BLOOMER PANTS, sizes rt»-|   PA
22 to 84,   Price, pair   «pl«UU
BOYS' BALBRIGGAN UNDERWEAR—   (jl   nt
Shirts and Drawers.   Per suit   «pX»*£t)
BOYS' KHAKI OVERALLS— d»-|   AA
WHITE FOOTWEAR
Another shipment of White Fotwear, in Rubber and
Leather Soles, at Lowest Prices.
THE BATHING SEASON IS NOW IN FULL SWING
Get our prices on all lines for Men, Ladies and
Children in Wool and Cotton textures. We can save
you money.
Model Clothing
and Shoe Store
OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE, CUMBERLAND
Box 313.    Phone 152.
Boy: "Pa, what are the silent
watches of the night?"
Pa; "Those which their careless
owners forget to wind, my son."
"I do not believe that I have a
true friend in the world."
"So you have been trying to borrow
money, too, have you?"
Among the begging letters received
at the office ot a benevolent society
was one running thus:
"This unfortunate young man Is the
only son of a widow, who died child
less, and his earnings maintain his
aged father and infant brothers, whose
sole support he Is."
A gentleman was relating one day
to the minister of the kirk a tnle of
deep distress, and concluded hy saying: "I could not but feel for them."
"Verily, friend," replied the minister, "thou didst right in that thou
didst feel for thy neighbor, but didst
thou feel ln the right place? Didst
thou feel In thy pocket?"
Husband: "I wish I had some of
those good old-fashioned puddings
like mother used to make for me."
Wife: "I wish I had some of those
nice new-fashioned clothes like father
used to buy for me."
A Chicago Judge says that three out
of four domestic troubles brought before him have been the result of the
neglect of husband and wife to attend
any church service.
"That waiter is either a fool or a
humorist!"
"What's the matter?"
"1 ordered extract of beef, and he
brought me milk."
"Today I bought an alarm clock. 1
call It the National Anthem, because
every time 1 hear It I have to get up
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK IN
Cretonnes, Art Sateen and Curtain Muslins
Special values from SOc to S1.25 per yard.
NEWEST PATTERNS IN CRETONNES—Suitable for the new Housedresses and
Underskirts.
BATHING SUITS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN—Special values; Cotton
and All-wool garments, from $1.50 to $7.50 each.
PLAIN AND NOVELTY DESIGNS IN BATHING CAPS from 50c to $1.50 each.
ALSO LADIES' AND MISSES' BATHING SHOES.	
CHILDREN'S SHOES
Special showing this week of Misses' and Children's famous "Nursery" brand Shoes, at
popular prices. Shown in Black and Chocolate Kid, Patent with White Kid Tops,
Patent with Chocolate Kid Tops, also Patent with Black Kid Tops.
Special value in all style of Women's White Canvas Oxfords, Pumps and Theo Shoes.
Hiss Burden: "I overheard that
dear young man telling you I danced
like a zephyr."
Miss Bright: "Zephyr? He said
'heifer!'
Drafts chill a man
To the marrowbones; still
Not a whit more
Than an overdraft will!
"Did you hurt yourself much when
the branch broke?"
"Not until I reached the ground."
"You're kinder to dumb animals
than you are to me, your wife!"
"Well, you try being dumb and sec
how kind I'll be."
"You can't go home when It's raining like thia; you'd better stay and
have dinner with us!"
"Oh! it's not quite so bad aa that!"
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
EXTRA SPECIAL VALUE IN MEN'S BLUE SERGE SUITS,, values
to $45.00.   Special Sale Price	
SPORT SWEATERS—Special Sale of Men's Sport Sweaters, values to
$6.50.   Special Sale Price 	
SPECIAL VALUE IN MEN'S ONE-PIECE BATHING SUITS, with Skirts,
in Navy and White, Brown and Orange.   Each	
$32.50
$4.50
$2.00
A COMPLETE RANGE OF MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' TENNIS SHOES
ALSO WHITE AND BROWN CANVAS.LEATHER-SOLED SHOES. "
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
ROYAL STANDARD FLOUR. 40-lb. sacks... $11.1(1
PURITY FLOUR, 49-lb. sacks  $2.90
PASTRY FLOUR, 10-lb. sacks   85c
CORN FLAKES  S pkts. 25c
SHREDDED WHEAT BISCUITS   2 pkts. 85c
PUFFED WHEAT  A 2 pkts. 35c
SALT WAFERS, per pkt 20c
MRS. PORTER'S SALAD DRESSING, ln bottles.
each   25c and SOc
CR1SCO, 1-lb. tins, ,10c  3-lb. tins »0c
DESICCATED COCOANUT, pur lb.     .. SoC
ALSO FULL LINE
SQUIRREL BRAND PEANUT BUTTER, tin 25c
LOCAL DAIRY BUTTER, lb  40c
ST. JAMES COFFEE, per tin  65c
TILLSON'S ROLLED OATS, tubes .'15c, il for $1.00
FINEST NORWEGIAN SARDINES.... 5 tins $1.00
HERRINS IN TOMATO SAUCE, per tin   25c
SHELLED WALNUTS, per lb  45c
DEVILLED MEATS  3 tins 25c
DEVILLED HAM   2 tins 25c
B. C. STERILIZED MILK, large tins .... 7 fur 95c
LUNCH TONGUE, %'s, 35c   l's, «5c
JELLY POWDERS   2 for 25c
OF SUMMER DRINKS
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
■lllllli
|   The Studebaker   1
I        Light-Six        |
n S
jj   The World's  Greatest   Light-Weight   Automobile   I
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was de-
signed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks   Motors
H     WALLACE STREET
LIMITED
NANAIMO, B. C.     B
mi «f
July 9, 1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
five
"WHAT WOMEN WILL DO"
A Thrilling Drama That Reaches
Sensational Climaxes — Su
preme in Heart Pull and Suspense—A First-Run Picture.
At big expense the management of
the Ilo-llo Theatre have secured for
showing Saturday night a special production, starring Anna Q. Nilpson
"What Women Will Do" Is the title of
the Edward Jose Production and It's
a melodrama of modern New York
life. It deals with a young woman
who becomes Involved in a malicious
scheme designed to mulct a wealthy
old lady, whose grief oyer the suicide
of her son while he was under the
stigma of a charge of murder, has
made her easy prey.
In working to thc climax, In which
the girl and her companion are elevated through the regenerating influence of the grieving mother, the story
introduces elements of great contemporary i Interest, among them spiritualism.
A horse race of a very exciting nature was especially staged on the
course at Jamaica, Long^Island, for
one of the many thrilling moments.
"Speed Star," the horse ou which is
centred Ihe particular attention of
several leading characters in the
story, had ben picked as the winner
of the Derby, and the bets on him
were very heavy. But two plotters
doped a lump of sugar for the horse
and then bet their all on him to lose.
The signal was given! They were
off! The camera, after the manner of
the new invention of photographing
races, followed the speeding horses
around and around the track, giving
to the audiences of the motion picture
a much better view than those seated
ln the grandstand!
Speed Star got off to a good start,
then fell behind—the poison was taking Its deadly effect! Then he spurted
ahead! Past one horse, then another,
then—
But,"* whether Speed Star won or
lost, and what the race meant to
those Interested, we will leave for you
to see in "What Women Will Do."
What will a woman do for beautiful
clothes, limousines, butlers, and breakfasts in bed? Lily Gibbs, fair, clever
and shrewd daughter of the underworld, lied and cheated for the sake
of such luxuries, but the fruits of her
deceit turned bitter when conscience,
which makes cowards of us all, was
aroused for the lirst time.
A very charming romance enters into the story, and her greatest test was
telling the man she loved of her past.
But he had ihe power to forget what
she had the courage to confess, and
she found happiness aud peace at last
"THAT GIRL MONTANA"
A Stirring Drama With the Virile Punch, the Majestic Beauty
and the Colorful Romance of
the West That Has Passed.
CHILDREN MAKE A
MUSICAL  NATION
The future of music on this continent was discussed recently by Thomas
A. Edison, the inventor, nml he has a
definite formula for its cultivation.
"To make Canada and the United
States have true musical instinct, we
must begin." he says, "with our young
children." And In this connection he
instances Germany: "Thut nation is
not a musical one—certainly uot as
musical as America." Mr. Edison continues;
"Brahms, of ull their great composers, is really the only one we may
count as a German; Beethoven, a
Dutchman; Wagner, Mendelssohn,
"Meyerbeer—all Jews. Yet Germany
has developed a vast love of music
among the people for the simple reason that almost every child ls taught
ome instrument. In a family, every
youngster is given some instrument
to learn, and in the home there is cultivated a love of art which proves
more alluring than our moving pictures, and much more Inspiring.
That Is what we must do here In
this new world. It Is not the schools
or the teachers that have in their
power the making of a musical nation, but the mothers. Newspapers
and Individuals should preach the
gospel of teaching music to our youth
in their homes, a different instrument
to each child, then all our musical
difficulties would solve themselves.
Do this ami a noble musical futureis
assured our coming generations."
CUMBERLAND
LOYAL ORDER OF IPSE
A Lodge will be instituted here.
The International social benefits in this order are
worth more than you pay in dues, and, in addition to
the benefits in your local lodge, you have the benefits
of Mooseheart. Children without a father, children
without a mother (more than 1,100 children) and 98
widows and 22 aged men, are now at Mooseheart, 111.;
every child is entitled to a high school education and
a trade; 1,000,000 men have said that they will give
four cents per week (two dollars per year) to make a
home and build a school to care for the children, and
that school has been built and is in operation. Have
you stopped to consider if you should die tonight what
would become of your wife and children?
Brother Quintens', of Ladysmith, received a letter
from his lodge at O'Fallon, Illinois, stating that a member of the lodge had become demented and his wife and
seven children were in the Moose home at Mooseheart.
Is there any Insurance like it ? Can any man resist the
call of the children ? Does not the heart of every man
respond to the great heartbeat of the Moose, for the
heart of the Moose is but the sum of all that is in the
hearts of men. The benefits dispensed in this local
lodge will be $10 per week for thirteen weeks for
sickness and accident, and a funeral benefit allowance
of $100. A Moose card will be an introduction to
hundreds of men in any city that has a Moose Lodge.
The man who knoVs and understands the objects
and purposes for which the Loyal Order of Moose contends, and does not believe in them, is not a good
citizen.
The man who knows and understands the magnitude
and benefits of the work in which the Loyal Order of
Moose is engaged and then opposes, or condemns, is an
enemy to this Nation and to Mankind.
Residents of the surrounding district and towns are
invited to join the Cumberland Lodge.
Seattle has 3,000 members; Vancouver 2,000, Port
Angeles 600, Victoria 250, Ladysmith over 200? Why
should Cumberland not have 400?
WHY YOU SHOULD BECOME A MEMBER
BECAUSE—
1,000,000 men have banded together for its support.
1,100 Children are being given a home and education.
98 Widows and 22 Aged Men are being maintained at Mooseheart.
It is acknowledged to bo the greatest Philanthropy of Ihe
day
It is based on the greatest and most sincere standards.
You should be recognized as One of its many supporters.
Eminent Philanthropists have appreciated the noble work
that Mooseheart is doing and have dunated large sums of
money to Its support.
See Organizer Thompson at the Eagle Hotel, Evenings
Montana — a name reminiscent of
the old frontier—of cattle wars, of
gold stampedes, of outlaws and grim
vigilantes, ls thc locale for "That Girl
Montana," the Jesse D. Hampton-
Pailie feature in which Blanche Sweet
is starred, and which shows at the
Ilo-llo on Thursday night next.
"That Girl Montana," adapted from
the novel by Marah Ellis Ryan, tells
the romantic story of a girl who had
been forced by a cruel father to wear
boy's clothes and be his companion ln
robberies and at card cheating.
When she finally escapes his evil
influence, she struggles to live down
a past for which she was not respon
slble, and prove her right to the
friendship of decent people. Inter
woven with the adventure and daring
Is a charming romance between thc
girl who did not trust men and the
man who had lost his faith In women
Blindly, desperately she had tried to
answer lu ber own mind the reason
for her suffering for the sins of another. At last she went to Jim Harris
and determined to know why he hated
her—why. when she had won a place
among decent people, he should send
her dream toppling about her feet, by
accusing her of being the companion
in crime of a thief aiid a gambler.
The picture offers Blanche Sweet
a role widely differing from some of
her recent characterizations. She Is
seen us a daring, stout-hearted and
high-spirited ' out-door girl. In the
opening scenes she wears boys'
clothes. When she lives ln an Indian
camp she dresses in buckskin, and
later wears a variety of costumes, tbe
Impliclty ot which bring out the star's
blonde, translucent beauty.
IL0IL0 THEATRE
Hugo Ballln has chosen another old
favorite for his next production for
Hodgkinson. Because of the success
of "East Lyune," he has decided that
old friends are the best, and so be will
make a picture that has "Home, Sweet
Home," the well-loved song by John
Howard Payne, as Its leading motive.
The funny little straw hat worn by
Charles Ray in "The Old Swimmin'
'Ole" was sold at auction to raise
funds for the American Relief. It
brought $200 to the cause.
The Bohemians (Czecho-Slovaks)
are among the most musical people
in the world. There Is a fable that
every male Bohemian baby ls born
with the mark of a violin on his right
arm.
Mr. Thomas A. Edison said recently:
"I have been quoted as desiring to
see a phonograph in every home.
What I want to see ln every home is
music."
A school pupils' orchestra Is proposed for the Toronto public schools
to serve as a background for the present children's chorus of 2000 members.
Vienna was the hallowed home of
Gluck, Harden, Bozart, Beethoven,
Schubert, Brahms, Bruckner, Johann
Strauss, Lanner, Mahler and other
more recent musicians.
"Ben Hur" is being Aimed ln Italy
on an elaborate scale, according to a
Rome dispatch. The Coliseum, It Is
said, will be used for,the chariot race
scene by special permission of tbe
Italian government. The Ultra Company, a new organization with a backing of 5,000,000 lire, is named as the
producer of the picture. It Is not
known what effect this will have upon
the picturization of Lew Wallace's
novel by producers on this side ot the
Atlantic, who are said to have paid the
author's heirs $1,000,000 for screen
rights to the book.
"Mary" and "Bong" Legally Married.
—t—
The divorce of Mary Pickford and
Owen Moore has been sustained. This
means that the marriage of Miss Pickford and Douglah Fairbanks is a
legal one.
Saturday, July 9th
Don't See It—If you think you know
What Women
Will Do
BUT~If they are still a delightful puzzle to
you, you'll enjoy  this  drama of  woman's
mysterious nature.
This is a first run Picture, never having
been shown in the Province
Thursday, July 14th
Blanche Sweet
— IN —
THAT GIRL
MONTANA
A Western Master Drama
In Australia maving picture exhibitors in their programmes mark forthcoming Alius with either an "A" or
a "U," the "A" Indicating Alms Intended for adults only, and the "U" I'm*
Alms which will he sown t" both
adults and children. In Australia
children are not permitted to sue Alms
Intended ftjr adults.
Doraldina, famed as u danci i* nnd
scrcou star, who recently, finished
"Passion Fruit," and is now lauucblng
her own company, has had her legs
insured for $125,000, according t" an
announcement made by her manager,
Frank Saunders.
CAHFAHK AMI INTEREST
The story goes that Johns HopkiiiB,
the founder of the University thai
hears his name, was accustomed even
when of venerable years nml mini' or
less Infirm of body, to walk to hla
office. Questioned by a friend .1 i"
why ho did this, be replied: **l never
forget thin a oai'tare represent! nn
entire year's Interest on a dollar. The
Interest on 11 dollar Is worth Bavins."
BEWARE OK UNUSUAL
CONDITIONS IN CANS
In February of this year a woman
in Seattle died from outing three small
biles ot* canned beans. She knew Unit
(lie tii'nns showed signs o£ spoilage,
but she "tasted them," with fatal results. Referring to this case, the
United Stales Public Health Service
ays thai it is dangerous to cat any
canned food Hint shows "the slightest
unnatural olor, unnatural color,
swelling nl* the container, signs of
gas, or uiiy evidence of decomposition
whatever." Such food may contain
the bacilli nf "botulism," which en-
gender one ol* the most dangerous'of
known organic poisons.
Bligglns for some years had gone
Ihe pace that kills, only It didn't kill
liim but merely reformed him. Then
he joined a church and rose so high
in its councils that he was sent to ono
of the big cities as delegate to a convention.
"How was it?" asked a friend when
he returned.
"The convention? Oh, all right,"
answered Bligglns. "But that town!
Some town! If I'd only been a dele-
Bute to something there before 1 got
reformed!"
"Have you heard of a machine that
discovers when a niun is lying?"
"Yes. certainly!" replied the Individual addressed.
"Perhaps you have seen one?"
"Seen one! Why, man, I married
one!"
"Would you like lo get rid ol
old typewriter, sir?"
Boss: "Not just yot. I only
ried her last week."
Mrs. Wlbbles:  "I shall never I'm
get, dear, how Idiotic you looked when
you proposed to me."
Mr. Wlbbles: "I was idiotic."
F-R-E-E
T-ES-
1000 watches absolutely free. Owing to the enormo
cess of our previous puz/.lo advertisement, which
for us hundreds of new clients, who, being so'picas*
their free watch, that they are now our pernio nan I
mere, we have decided to furlher advertise nnd *y:ii
gnition in 1000 new homes, by giving awaj anuthi
valuable watches, to those who aroclevei cnougl
in the missing letters in the following phrase.
W--CH-S      A-K      F-L-Y      O — H-NT-I
gained
id wild
r 1001
tu    I!
By correctly filling in the missing tetters, you can obtain absolutely free a
that will equal for time any solid gold watch made, which is Bullicienlly pn
the large number of testimonials that we have received. Solve lhiJ puzzh
tly and comply with our simple condition of which we will wrlto when wo
you if your reply is correct, write clearly, your name und complete address, bo
that we may without delay inform you of your sucres«.
REX MANUFACTURING CO. DEPT  33 11/ CwWittCMf St Kntnai
Willi!*.
ivenb)
inform
Plant Home
Grown Fruit Trees
Shrubs, Roses
ami place your order with the
British  Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
wIki have a large lot of splendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coining on for Fall delivery.
OUR HOSES are specially {rood this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
V\ KITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the .finest in the
land, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WRITE US TODAY.
ADDRESS—
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
SARDIS, B. C.
Depnrliuonl C. .Mention tills paper when writing. Six
Hie   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
July 9,1921.
' •> —■•■■»——-fr;
SILVER SPRING
BEER
ON SALE
AT —
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
in the Provincial Government Building
WHEN YOU CALL AT THE VENDOR'S OFFICE
ASK FOR SILVER SPRING
The same beer as was made before the war and has
no equal on the market today.
BREWED OX VANCOUVER ISLAND
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Courtenay. B. C. -       -        Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
1
EVENTUALLY:
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why not get the best now?  It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Eesides, the price is little more, and we can
arrange terms to suit any customer.   Write us.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON* I11CKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
EASTERN CANADA TOURS
Low Excursion Fares
EDMONTON AND CALGARY
Direct Rail Line $50.00
One Way via Steamship and Prince Hupert 1(10.(10
Both Ways via Steamship ami rrince Ilupert  WM
Meals anil Berth Included on Steamer
tVlNNlPKGI
MINNEAPOI,
487.60
ST. PAUL
KILITH
CHICAGO  »100.S0    TORONTO, LONDON ...^I!I5.66
MOSTllEAI  $168.41     QUEBBC    4188.68
ST. JOICf . siilss.111     HALIFAX  _ »1»8.76
NEW l'OHK .$172.14
War Tax Extra
E. W. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland, B. C.
C^atilah National Railwaif
The wit of a sharp retort makes the
hearer forget iis impertinence. Such
a rebuke was that which the late Sir
W. S. Gilbert administered to an overbearing man at a dinner party. After
the dinner, Gilbert wns standing in
the hall waiting for a friend to join
him, when a pompous and somewhat
near-sighted gentleman, mistaking
him for one of the servants, exclaimed;
"Call me a cab!"
Gilbert looked the stranger up and
down;  then he observed quietly:
"Vou're  a  four-wheeler."
"What do you mean, sir?" spluttered
the pompous one:  "How dare you?"
"Well," Gilbert retorted, "you asked
me to call you a cab, and I can't call
you 'handsome,'"
, A man, rushing from his dining-room
into the hall, and sniffing disgustedly,
demanded of James, the footman,
whence arose the odor that was pervading the whole house. To which
James replied, "You see, sir, today's
a saint's day, and the butler he's 'igh
Church and is burning hinsense; and
the cook, she's Low Church and Is
burning brown paper to hobvl.Me the
hinsense."
"Prisoner at the bar, you are charged
with  vagrancy,   having     no*   visible
m?"8 .?f .""PP'"-'-  Are yon guilty or
not guilty?"
"N'ot guilty, your honor. Nora,
shake hands wld de judge; indg«, meet
me wife." .«-•■■»
st-n .:\       .»    h_.
YOUR TEETH
THE HUMAN JAWS
By REA PROCTOR McGEE, Editor of
"Oral Hygiene."
Every hone In the body ls fashioned
to stand the particular strain that
comes to Its own zone. The shape and
strength and blood supply of each
bone is Just right for that bone, just
as a well-balanced piece ot machinery
must have every part fitted to do Its
work and must have every part strong
enough to last without too much bulk
or weight.
The bones In the Jaw have as a pro
tectlon from the pressure ot chewing
only a very thin membrane composed
of periosteum and mucosa which we
call the muco-perlosteum.
The teeth are set In sockets, properly
called alveoli, which are simply holes
In thc bone that Ht the roots of the
teeth.
There Is a membrane that lines the
socket and at the same time covers
the root. This is a double faced mem
brane which protects and nourishes
both the bony surface and the surface
of the tooth root. The Jaws have
transmitted to them the pressure that
is made upon the teeth in chewing
and the only thing that acts as a shock
absorber is this one little thin membrane that lines the socket. As much
as two hundred and fifty pounds pres
sure to the square inch is frequently
exerted upon the teeth. Whenever a
tooth ls lost the work that the other
teeth do ls increased so that the pressure of chewing is no longer distributed over the whole Jaw, but is confined
to those spots where the teeth remain
Is it any wonder that the bones of
the Jaw sometimes become so irritat
ed from overwork and so inflamed
from abscessed teeth that considerable portions of the bone Itself may be
lost?
If the teeth are kept In a state of
health the bones of the Jaw will usu
ally remain strong and vigorous as
nature intended them to be.
TO RESTRAIN TEACHERS
FROM JUMPING JOBS
At the convention of school trustees
from various parts of Vancouver Island, held in Duncan recently, It was
proposed to take up with the British
Columbia School Trustees Association
a proposal to amend the bylaws in
order to create divisional areas for
the province and looking forward to
the establishment of a Vancouver Island division.
The convention adopted a resolution recommending that in future no
teachers should be engaged unless a
satisfactory release was presented
from the last employer. In other
words, boards will be encouraged to
prevent teachers Jumping, their employment to go to other boards, thereby leaving the trustees with vacancies
in the teaching staffs.
EDUCATION
You are the answer to the times,
The challenge of this crimson age;
You are the silencer of rage,
The end of earth's colossal crimes.
Across the caverns ot mischance
Where groping human minds would
reach,
O'er fearful gulfs of ignorance
You are the sliver bridge of speech.
You span the silence and the dark
Of centuries replete with lore,
Where minds of men may softly hark
To words of sages gone before.
You are the swinging crystal gate
Where Sophocles and Sappho waif,
Where Pericles and Plato bring
Their answer's to earth's questioning.
And Dante with his flaming pen
Bequeathes the sword of Truth to men.
You are the heaven-climbing stair
Bullded above the world's despair
Where souls of men go singing up
To drink the sacramental cup.
You are the good men grapple for,
You shield the song and lift the grail;
Because of you men shall not fall,
For you are Conqueror of War!
—Angela Morgan.
Wffl-M.
The
Willard
Sign
The red Willard
sign marks the place
where you can get
authorizedWillardSer-
vice—and buy the
Willard Threaded
Rubber Battery.
We're here on the
job to see that you get
the full satisfaction and
service you are-entitled
to as the user of a
Willard Battery.
We're authorized
Willard Dealers completely equipped for
battery recharging, repairing and full Willard Service.
Come in and we'll
tell you how Threaded
Rubber Insulation
saVes you money and
worry.
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
NANAIMO  and  DUNCAN
Willaid
Batteries
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIA!
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
NOT THE KIND OF BLIND PIG THE
PARTY EXPECTED
Fred Barnes of Victoria never knew
It was possible to have so many
thirsty friends until last week, when
word was spread around quietly but
rapidly that he had a blind pig out nt
his secluded home in the Lake Hill
district. A group ot these gentlemen
got together and planned a parched
pals' party as a surprise, which they
thought would please Fred. When the
surprise party arrived at the Barnes
home they found Fred putting down
the straw for a sow and ten little
porkers. In a nearby pen were ten
more, which had arrived the week before. One required special attention
as It had been born without eyes. The
parched pals turned and started at
once to get their money together for a
government liquor permit.
"My wife ls prolonging her visit. I
need her at home, but It seems useless
to write suggesting that she return."
"Get one of the neighbors to suggest it, old boy."
PREPARE FOR MORE
UNEMPLOYMENT
VANCOUVER.—Conferring on plans
to cope with threatened unemployment in the province during next winter, Lieut.-Col. F. A. Robertson. D. S.
0., chairman ot the B. C. Returned
Soldiers' Commission, was In Vancouver Thursday. He spent his morning
with T. M. Harnett, president of the
Provincial Great War Veterans' Association, iu discussing projects for
the coming winter.
Last winter, says Col. Robertson,
applications for aid to his department
did not come In any large number till
alter January, indicating that most ol*
the men had made their stake for the
winter and had got very well through
the early part of the winter unaided.
The provincial government, through
the commission over which Col. Robertson presides, realizes that many
men may not be able to make their
winter stake this summer owing to
delayed employment conditions, and
that ways and means for employment
for the coming winter must be discussed and prepared for during the
present summer.
PRECAUTIONS AGAINST
'   BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS
A few years ago the United States
breeders of pure-bred cattle, recognizing the necessity of more effective
measures for the control of tuberculosis, arranged a conference with ofllelals of the Bureau of Animal Husbandry at Washington, thc result of
which was the adoption of what is
known as the Accredited Herd Plan
meaning that tho herd had been thoroughly tested and found entirely free
from any symptoms of tuberculosis
The plan proved so successful—over
a thousand herds being accredited in
a brief period—that a decision was
arrived at to adopt the system In Canada. Regulations were promulgated
which came into force in September
1910, and have proved gratifylngly
successful, a number of herds having
been accredited, while many others
are under test. There 1 s now an
agreement between this country and
the United States that cattle from
accredited herds may enter either
way, without detention or test. Under
the Municipal Tuberculosis Order,
passed at Ottawa some years ago, and
the more recently adopted Accredited
Herd Plan, compensation is paid for
animals officially slaughtered and the
owners are permitted under regulation to realize whatever they can from
the sale of the carcass.
VARIOUS COMETS
Dunsmuir
S   DAVIS  DAun,mm
•J.     MJt\. V \\%jy    Avenue
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Fortunate is the man who is a hero
to his wife,
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2820 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
The great Kepler said that there
were probably more comets in the
heavens than fishes in the sea, and
that, If we lived on one of the outer
planets—say Uranus or Neptune—we
might see them by thousands. But we
are so close to the sun that only now
and then does one of them come within range of our vision.
Relatively to their vast hulk, comets
are exceedingly light, and therefore
respond readily to the attraction of
heavenly bodies. Apparently the giant
planet Jupiter catches many of them
from outer space, drawing them Into
our system, and for a while they swing
around the sun in elliptical orbits, but
sooner or later break up or take flight
into other celestial regions.
Or It may happend that one of these
strange wanderers of the skies, entering our system, passes around the
sun at a terrific rate of speed and
then depnrts forever, disappearing
again into the void of space.
Pons-Wlnnecke takes five and three-
quarter years to complete its orbit,
but the great comet of 1811 pursues
an elliptical path around the sun, the
farthest point of which is forty thousand million miles away, and requires
over thirty centuries to accomplish
one round trip, Our descendants will
see it again ln 4S76.
In 1770 Lexell's comet passed so
near to the earth that, had It weighed
only one live-thousandth as much as
our planet, it would have drawn the
latter from Its course sufficiently to
lengthen the year by three hours!
Donati's comet, when last seen In
1858, had a tall that stretched clear
across the sky. The comet of 1744
was visible for seventeen months, and
had six tails, spread over the heavens
like a wonderful luminous fan.
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Duy nml Night.
Wood for Sale
$1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 pet* Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Acreage for Sale
6' •> acres of Land for sale,
2'/i, ficres .cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST   .
Oilice:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone lit! Cumberland, B. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and "Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■  B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
Manufacturers in the province expect to record a big Increase in the
sale of provincial goods from June
20th to 25th. the period set aside for
"Made in B. C. Week." Extensive
plans have ben made to make the
week a success in every way, and
valuable co-operation is being received from farmers and others
throughout the province.
'And when does the wedding take
place, Miss Brown?" asked the genial
proprietor of the stationery shop.
The wedding!" exclaimed the young
woman, blushing. "Why, you don't
think "
"Ah, Miss Brown!" rejoined thc
wise old cbap, "when a young iady
buys a hundred sheets of paper and
only twenty-live envelopes, I know
there's something in the wind!"
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 00
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Fork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have yon tried our Pickled Pork
nnd Corned Beef I It Is delicious.
JJ
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKRWFIEM),   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.       Cumberland. B.C. \iP.
July d, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
Something New
Astley's  Self-Raising
Aerated Pastry Flour
EXTENSIVELY USED IN ENGLAND
MAKES  DELICIOUS  PASTRY,  SCONES,  CAKES.
COOKIES AND  PUDDINGS
FINEST  QUALITY — HIGHLY  RECOMMENDED.
25c. and 50c. Packets
Yeast and Baking Powder not required with this Flour.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
NEWS IN BRIEF
A meeting of the Game Conservation Board will be held in the Court
House. Vancouver, on July 14, commencing at 10.30 a.m., when open seasons for game birds and fur bearing
animals will be discussed. The meeting will be open to delegates from the
Game Associations and to all sportsmen who wish to attend.
What's a
Guarantee ?
Our idea of a guarantee is that the
manufacturer who gives one-which hasn't
any tags and loopholes—believes in his
product.
So much so that he stands ready to make
good any loss suffered by the purchaser
through defective material or workmanship.
It's mainly because of the guarantee that
gees with them that wc are selling and
recommending Ames Holden "Auto-
Of course, we know they give the cheapest mileage too—that they are dependable tires for any
make of car, anywhere. But it's tlie guarantee
that we talk about most. It's the straight and
clean-cut, without time or mileage limits. It
shifts our responsibility on to the manufacturer
and he lives up to every let t er of it. Come in and
let us tell you about the guarantee that goes with
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Size
Cumberland
Motor Works
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a SnecUBj.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland. Jl. C
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER;
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
While engineers in charge of the
work of construction of the proposed
new ferries for North Vnncouver art
understood to have favored American-
made boilers, the Committee of Em
ployment of the G. Vi. V. A. of Vancouver has requested thc council to
consider the use ol* British Columbia
hollers. The committee points out
that the product or this province is
Just as good, and that the sentiment ol
the people at this time is strongly In
I'avoivif made-lu-U. C. goods.
FAREWELL PARTY TO
PUNTLEDGE TEACHER
A delightful surprise party was
given on Thursday last by the residents of Puntledge In honor of thc
| teacher, .Miss at P. Marshall, who
leaves to lake up advanced studies in
Victoria. Tlie evening was spent in
a most entertaining manner, during
which a presentation was made to
Miss Marshall of a grey sueile pocket-
book, by the mothers and children of
Puntledge.
Among the perfortnerB were Mrs.
Watson, Mrs. Thomas, Miss Cornwell,
Miss Blalock, Mr. Hamlin and Mr
Henderson, all of whom caused much
merriment in rhyme and. song. .Mr.
Pettys was master ot* ceremonies and
Miss V. .Marshall -pianist lor the occasion.
A delightful supper was served and
ifterward dancing prevailed until mid-
bight, whon the National Anthem was
sung as a closing.
A doctor and a parson of the same
name lived on the same street. The
parson died, and about The same time
the doctor went to San Francisco to
a post there. On his arrival he telegraphed home to his wile, but the wire
went to the parson's widow by mistake, it read in-the following terms:
"Arrived safely.    Heat intense."
Work on tho reconstruction of the
concentrator and mill at Britannia
Beach will commence at an early date.
It is understood. It is anticipated that
it will take about twelve months for
the Installation of the necessary machinery, and that an expenditure of
11,000,00(1 will be Involved.
One of the principal objects of the
recently formed Economic Council foi
dealing with the problem of unemployment in the province, will be to
induce the people to purchase Made-
in-B. C. goods.
Many large orders for British Columbia lumber are being received
from the United States at present.
Whether this is owing to the recent
strike it is difficult to say.
The Sarnia Hatchery this season
sent 12,825,000 whiteiish eggs for distribution ln British Columbia waters,
according to a report from the Dominion Fisheries branch.
According to Mr. A. B. Buckworth,
crops along the Pacilic Great Eastern
Hallway never looked better. There
were 24,000 assessed acres of line
agricultural laud in the Pemberton
District alone, and at Pemberton he
states he saw timothy waist high.
It's the little things that separate
us from success, uot the big otaes. Insisting on every article, no matter how-
small, bearing the Made-in-B.C. brand,
means the success of the Made-in-B.C.
movement.
Starting out to work a farm with
a mortgage tacked on it for more than
the farm was worth was the prospect
of Sam Chute, of Berwick, Nova
Scotia, 25 years ago. Last year he
sold 20,000 barrels of his own apples
and about 60,000 quarts of strawberries. The old mortgage is gone and
forgotten, except as .a memento.
Gold prospects in Northern Ontario
surpass those of every known field ou
the North American continent, according to W. T. Gibson, Deputy Minister
of Mines for Ontario, addressing tlie
23rd annual meeting of the Canadian
institute of Mining and Metallurgy.
Joseph Beaudoiu, one of the earliest
settlers in tbe Nachako Valley, has
commenced cutting a large acreage ol
fall rye already, and expects to average at least three aud a half tons to
the acre.
The apple crop lu the Okanagan
Valley this year will equal that of the
record year. 1019, according to Mr. J.
E. Reekie, leading fruitgrower of
Kelowna.
Made-in-B.C. goods will be a feature of the Vancouver Exhibition tills
year, according to Manager Rolston.
who states that nearly all available
space in the manufacturers' building
has already been spoken for. "There
wlll no doubt be a record showing ol
provincial goods," he said, "and much
attention will be paid to the quality
of goods displayed."
Mining operations in Northern British Columbia are un the Increase, nen
properties are being worked and old
ones re-opened.
Success brings success. If the industries already located lu B. C. prosper, others will come and more employment will be available for the
workers of British Columbia. The
Made In B. C. campaign ajms to Increase the output of local Industries,
to bring new ones to the province
alld to Increase prosperity generally
among  the  people  of  this  province
The plans for an advertising campaign to help sell this year's crop ol
fruit—said to be the biggest trull
advertising campaign ever conducted
lu Canada—will be started early this
month and It Is predicted that B. C
fruit wlll become better known than
ever as a result of the advertising.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
The new Hudson's Bay Company
building at Victoria represents an Investment of $2,000,000, and the fixtures, which are mahogany, another
If.nO.OOO. There will bo forty departments employing between 250 anil 300
people. Goods valued at $1,000,000
have been purchased in England and
wlll be In the store when opened for
business next month.
The dearth of domestic servants in
the eastern provinces is so great that
it ls no unusual-thing when a party
of these greatly desired household
helpers are expected from England
for tbe prospective employers to proceed to the emigration sheds on the
arrival of a steamer and attempt to
have ttteni there.
WATER NOTICE
USE AND STORAGE.
TAKE NOTICE that lbc Canadian
Collieries (J)unsniuir) Limited, whose
address is Belmont House, Victoria.
B.C., will apply for a licence to take
and use 20 cubic feet of water per
second out of Tsa-Abl River, also
known as Baynes Sound River, which
flows In an easterly direction aud
drains into Baynes Sound, about 5
miles south of Union Bay. Tlie storage dam will bo located at Langley
Lake, water being diverted thereto
from Tsa-Abl River. The capacity of
the present reservoir, Langley Lake.
is about 5110 acre feet, and will be Increased to about 000 acre feel, aud II
will Mood about. 10 additional acres of
land. Thc water will be diverted from
the stream at a point 1% miles more
or less, approximate bearing S. dti degrees, IS minutes Vi. (ast) from N.W.
corner of Lot 2A, Nelson District, and
will be used^for Mining, Coal Washery
and Steam purposes upon the Mine and
Washery described as located in Block
33 or Block 34 or Lot 2A or E. & N.
Ry. Land, adjacent to Block 3.1, Nelson
District, and Lot 28. Nelson District.
Union Bay. This notice was posted on
the ground on tho 2nd day of June,
1921. A copy ot tliis and an application pursuant thereto and to the
"Water Act, 1914," will be tiled in the
ofiice of the Water Recorder at Nanaimo. Objections to the application
may be Bled with the said Water Recorder or with tho Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings.
Victoria, B.C., within 30 days after the
Hist appearance of this notice hi a
local newspaper. Thc dale of the Urst
publication of this notice is June 4th,
1921.
CANADIAN  COLLIERIES   iDUNS-
MU1R)  LIMITED, Applicant.
CHARLES GRAHAM, Agent.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
The steamship Blast Side, held up
ior several days at Newport News he-
use of 50(1 machine guns having
oeeu found in her coal bunkers while
lying at Hoboken, left on Monday
night for Dublin, the Department of
Justice having completed its examination of Captain Johnson and bis
row. The master of the vessel convinced the department that he bad no
knowledge of the guns being placed
on tbe vessel.
"Everybody does it in Prince Albert." was the explanation of a
visitor from that city who attempted
to disrobe and prepare himself for
lathing at English Bay on Sunday afternoon. Spectators sent in a police
:all and before tlie stranger had completely disrobed he was loaded Into
die patrol wagon, where his explanation was accepted and after being
warned lie was allowed to go. "1 don't
;ee where 1 done wrong. Everybody
Iocs il In Prince Allien men nnd
voinen." he repeated.
Here is a hint that might be adopted
locallv. It is un advertlsomenl from
ihe Idaho Falls Register: "A lady's
leather handling led in my mi- while
parked on Park Avenue two weeks
ugo. owner can have same by calling
nt my olllce, proving lllc properly and
paying for this ml. ir nhu will explain
to my wile thai I had nothing to do
with Its being there, I will pay for
(Ills ad."
A sensational report" saying that
plague Is spreading rapidly through
Southwestern Russia from Persia to
.Siberia w-as presented at the Pan-
Husslnn Health Congress lu Moscow,
says a Central News dispatch from
Helslngl'ors. Cholera Is snld lo be
i-aging In the southern nnd middle
provinces of Russia, and II was said
there was hardly a part of Russia free
from malaria. Tlie epidemic was attributed to tlie enormous swarm* of
tiles and gnats which arc carrying
the disease.
The Interviewer: "And whal with
icebergs, and shipwrecks, and sea serpents, and being cast away on a desert
island, what do you reckon (be narrowest scape you've ever had?"
Old Salt: "A widder al Plymouth
with eight kids."
Gussle: "Good day, where nre you
going?"
Miss: "Though It's no business of
yours. I'm following my nose!' '
Gussle: "Oh, I see! Vou are going
up lu the elevator!"
Thqy w>rk
naturally
and form
no ha£>it>
they work
naturally
and,fbrm
nolhabit-i
They-vvoA.
naturally'
and.fbrm
nojiabit-
4£2T
1
li for if*.
l».fJi|l.O0
NEW  BOOKS ARRIVED
CHAMBERS
HEX BEACH
HENDRYX
FARNOL
CONNOR
JOHNSTON
BOWER
OPPENHEIM
ZANE  GRAY
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
F. AIKAWA
Boat Builder and General
Carpenter
Boats built to order.    All sizes
of Boats for Sale
■  F. AIKAWA
Royston Rd.
Value of Telephone
Service
From near neighbor tn distant cities and villages,
thousands of slender highways made alive by speech
converse within the small compass of your telephone.
The ears of people are within your call; their voices
are within your hearing.
Telephone service cannot be estimated by usual
values. Imagine how complete a revision of methods
of living and working would have to be made if the
telephone ceased to operate! The miracle of the telephone is realized at all times, and its ceaseless service
puts its value almost beyond price.
British Columbia Telephone Co. Eight
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
July 4,1921.
EXTRA SPECIAL VALUES
Ladies' Night Dresses, made of good
quality cambric, trimmed with lace; a
really good gown. (PI   '7P*
Special Price     «P±*»I«J
Ladies' Night Gowns, made of Pink Mull;
with V neck, trimmed blue d»*i ryC
embroidery.  Special Price   (px-tlt)
Ladies' White Underskirts, good heavy
quality Cotton. fl»1   H\\
Special Price     «P1« I tl
Ladies' Bloomers, made very full, in Pink
Cambric, also in White. OF*/*
Special Price, pair uwL
Silk Camisoles in Pink and White, trimmed
with 2V-*-inch lace. A really QFCp
smart garment.   Special Price.. J/tlV
Wash Satin Camisole, in Pink only; a
beautiful garment and offered at a very
attractive price. (j*~t   QP
Each .'  «Pl.«7tl
Ladies' .Middy Waists, made of a heavy
Drill, in White only; with detachable
collar; made of Navy Flan-  d»Q H&
nel.   Price
Kiddies' White Pique Rompers, in sizes 2
and 3 only. d»1   IA
Price     tPl.lU
Kiddies' Rompers, made of nice pattern
Prints; sizes 2 and 3 years. QK/»
Price  Oul
Children's Rib Cotton Hose, in most sizes;
a really good quality. Regular price 50c
per pair. Q prs* ffl   Aft
Now  O  for  tple-UU
Ladies' Silk Hose, in Brown, d»-| JfA
Navy and Black.   Pair....     vliUU
White Flannelette, a good width nr.
and nice quality. Price, yard uOK,
Bed Spreads—Special quality and extra
large size; suitable for the (PO QC
largest bed.   Price  ' tyOwtjO
Ladies' Bungalow Aprons, made of extra
good quality Print; well (Jp-J QP
made. Our leader, each   (PX«t/tl
Bungalow Aprons, light and (P"| OP
dark Prints. Each $1.50 and«DJ.W&tl
Ladies' Hats, to be cleared at greatly
reduced prices.
Phone 134
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
Who was the .Mason who learned to
play golf while In Victoria? And beat
his Instructors.
Who said tliat a while stiff collar
was the latest style while on a Ashing trip?
Which lady started a beauty parlor
while in Victoria recently?
Which Cumberland visitor to Victoria took the wrong road on his way
back? Had be been patronizing thc
government vendor's liquor store?
Who was the red-headed Irishman
who got so excited when "Annie
Laurie" was being played at the concert?
What is the joke about the Hay-
Wire?   Come on, Bert, be a sport!
If the present is not an opportune
time to form a symphony orchestra
with so many talented musicians In
our midst?
If J. S. hns got a bite yet? Sems to
be nn off-year with fish, by heck!
Who is tlie son ot a prophet now?
What was the matter with British Columbia's champion footballers
on Saturday?
What certain truckls) stop outside
the Bevan store, and why?
Which two Bevan boys think they
know how to drive a Ford?
Who is the love-sick maiden at
Bevan? Cheer up, dear, be can't play
good fotball and make love at the
same time.
Who took a full shaving outfit on
that fishing trip? However, the boy
would not let her friend shave—he
can rub his whiskers oft with a towel.
Who was sick In the car going to
Royston Friday morning?
Who missed roll-call Friday morning, following a glorious night before?
Wiio ate the most eggs?
Who Is the new Director of Kail-
roads for the Province?  Ask Hughle.
Who was the gentleman who was
put to bed Thursday night—and then
complained that he was not equipped
with pyjamas?
Messrs. .Marshall and Fletcher of
the Fletcher Music Home attended
the Edison Carlvan convention in
Vancouver recently. They were away
a week at this continent-wide convention, coming bach last Sunday.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
SJune 30—Dauntless, coastwise; Melanope, Vancouver; Dola, Vancouver;
Storm King, coastwise.
July 1—Gleeful, coastwise.
July 2—Charmer, Vancouver; Wal-
runa. San Francisco;  Joyful, Comox.
July 3—Transvaal, Portland.
July 4—Princess Ena, Vancouver;
Stetson, coastwise; Oregon and Scow,
Seattle.
July 5—Alcedo, coastwise; Glen-
boro. coastwise; P. W., coastwise.
July (!—Fushlml Maru, Seattle;
Charmer, Vancouver; Wireless and
Progressive, coastwise.
FIR TREES STRIPPED
BY CATERPILLARS
Pests Are Entering Houses in
Vernon and Causing Injuries
To the Occupants.
The caterpillar pest that is spreading over the province Is doing much
damage in Vernon. The City Council
is taking action to cope with the invasion. The provincial Department of
Agriculture has loaned the city a spray
machine and the civic employees are
spraying the infested trees.
Many fir trees and fruit trees have
been stripped of their foliage and It
is feared that next year the pest wlll
spread at an even greater rate than
this season. One speaker said it would
be an eyesore to the town If allowed
to spread. He explained that the
caterpillars were getting Into the
houses and that the doctors had treated patients suffering from rashes
caused by the pests.
It was suggested that the matter be
taken in hand this year by the council, and that noxt season the citizens
would be obliged to deal with the Infestation.
ROYSTON NOTES
Mr. Watklns and family of Vancouver arrived this week and are camping at Gartley Point, having bought
the camp belonging to the Dunsmuir
estate.
Mr. Ken B. Dalby, druggist of Van
couver, and Mr. Emerson Blake, also
of Vancouver, were guests of Mr. and
Mrs. F. J. Dalby at Royston over the
week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Cameron took up
their residence at Gartley Point this
week.
Other campers at this beach are
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McMillan, Mr. and
Mrs. T. E. Bate, Dr. and Mrs. Hicks,
Rev. Jas. Hood and family.
Mr. Merrifield, druggist of Victoria,
accompanied by his family and friends,
and who is making a tour of the Is
land, camped at Royston Sunday
night.
The amateur boatmen living al
Royston got a surprise Sunday morning on discovering that three row
boats had drifted away on the night
tide. Those belonging to Mr. Bate and
Mr. MacKinnon were later discovered
stranded down the coast, but Mr. C.
Campbell's boat Is still posted as
among the list of missing vessels.
Dr. Dalby and wife and family of
Victoria spent the week-end at Royston as guests of Mr. and Mrs. 1*. J
Dalby.
BEVAN NOTES
Mrs. Beattie, wife of Mr. George
Beattie who recently purchased the
Island Supply Co., arrived on Tuesday
to take up her residence here.
WHY PAY MOKE WHEN I CAN FURNISH YOU
WITH
PURE PAINTS
MADE IN 15. C, AT THE FOLLOWING PRICES:
TERRA COTTA, per gallon   W&h
GREY, SLATE and ANTIQUE BROWN, per gallon  $4.85
OUTSIDE GLOSS WHITE, per gallon   $5.00
INSIDE GLOSS AND FLAT WHITE, per gallon  **U0
ALL OTHER COLORS, per gallon   $4.70
W. M. BRANDS—Guaranteed Three Years
OUTSIDE WHITE, per gallon   $4.10
INSIDE WHITE and ALL OTHER COLORS, per gallon $3.90
SHINGLE STAIN. BROWN, $1.76 gallon  GREEN, $8.00
BOILED OIL. $1.05 per gallon   TURPENTINE, $2.55
Less 111 I'cr lent. If Ordered In Four-Gallon Tins.	
SHINGLES
No. 2, $2.00 per 1000 at mill. No. 1, $4.00 per 100 at mill.
DOORS AND WINDOWS, SASH AND MOULDINGS
AT RIGHT PRICES.
MAIL ORDERS TO
Comox Supply Co.
PHONE 32
COURTENAY, B. C.
Mrs. John Waugh of Nanaimo returned to her home on Monday, having been the guest of Mrs. Jas. L.
Brown for a few days.
Miss Phemia Brown of Bevan left
Monday for Nanaimo and Vancouver
on a two weeks' vacation.
The Bevan Burns' Club are holding
a bazaar on Thursday next, July 14
BEVAN SCHOOL RESULTS
The following results at the Bevan
School were unavoidably omitted from
last week's issue:
It-ill of Honor   Senior "fourth.
Proficiency—Sadie Brown.
Punctuality   and   Regularity—Preston Parks.
Third Header.
Deportment.—Andrew Walker.
Promotions,
Nellie Cameron, low fourth; David
Robertson, high third; Hattie Robertson, high third; Andrew Walker and
Harry Quinn,
Miss Harris' Ileum.
Proficiency.—Marjorie Brown.
Punctuality   aud   Regularity.— Is
bella Herd.
Deportment.—Clarence Quinn.
G. W. V. A. WILL HANDLE
REFRESHMENT STALL
The Great War Veterans' Association have accepted the offer of tht
Canadian Collieries Picnic Committee
to take charge of the refreshment
stall at Royston on the ocaslon of the
fourth annual picnic on Saturday.
July 23. Friends are asked to leave
pies and cakes at the Memorial Hall
on the day preceding, Friday, July 23
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
BIG CATCH OF FISH.
Messrs. Allan Nunns, Bert Knappett
Bill Wood and Fraser Watson went to
Campbell River on a fishing expedi
tlon over the holiday. They had a
whale of a time, catching at least lOn
fish, so they say. Being honest, truth
ful citizens, of course no one would
dispute the veracity of their state
meats!
Personal Mention
Dr. R. P. and Mrs. Christie will be
leaving Sunday morning for Vancouver, and expect to return the following Sunday. Dr, Christie is taking a
post-graduate course at tbo meeting
of tlie Washington, Oregon and B .C.
Dental Associations, which will be
held in Vancouver from July 11 to 10.
Miss XI. Browne, matron of the Cumberland General Hospital, left Monday
to attend the B. C. Hospital Association meeting at Kamloops.
.Mr. George Michell, who for the
past year been attending the Milwaukee University, arrived on Tuesday on
a visit to his parents, Mr, and XIrs. T.
Michell.
Mr. J. C. Brown left Tuesday niorn-
ng for Kamloops, where lie Is attending ihe meeting of the B. C. Hospital
Association as representative of the
Cumberland Hospital Board.
.Miss C. .MacDonald. accompanied by
the .Misses Jessie and Isabel Brown,
went to Vicloria Tuesday for a week's
holiday.
.Mrs. D. R, Pottinger of Victoria is
a guest of XIr. and -Mrs. D. R. Xlac-
Donald for a few days.
Mrs. A. MacKinnon, representing the
Women's Auxiliary of the General
Hospital, left Tuesday to attend the
meeting In Kamloops of ihe B. C. Hospital Association.
Xliss Dorothy Hillhouse of Vancouver is thc. guest for a couple of weeks
if .Mr. and Mrs. T. Mordy at their sum-
ner camp at Royston.
.Miss E. Pollock of Vancouver arrived Saturday on a visit to XIIss
Michell.
XIIss Nora Rodden returned to Vancouver Xlonday morning after spend-
ng the week in town with friends.
.Mr. J. MacDonald left for Victoria
on Tuesday morning.
XIr. Cecil Mulholland left for Nanal-
nio Friday morning, where he will re-
ilde in future.
Mr. W. A. Owen returned from Na-
.iaimo .Monday evening.
.Miss XI. McKee of Vancouver ls
{pending a vacation with Xliss Michell.
Miss Mildred Halcrow is in Vancouver spending her vacation.
Xliss Caddins returned to her home
Thursday morning after spending a
'hort time with friends In town.
.Mr. C. R. Drader spent last weekend in Victoria, returning .Monday
evening.
Mr. Alexander Campbell nnd .Mr.
William Campbell, of Campbell Bros.,
left on Wednesday for San Francisco
and Southern California on a month's
vacation.
XIr. and XIrs. C. E. Burbrldge have
gone to Kye Bay for a few weeks'
holiday. •
.Mr. Conrad Reifel, manager of the
Union Brewery Co.. Ltd., was here on
a business trip during the week.
XIr. A. S. Killam, representing
Fleck Bros., Victoria, arrived In town
Friday.
XIr. J. P. Hicks, of thc Heintzman
Piano House, Victoria, is iu town on
a business trip.
.Mr. J. T. Hamilton, of Victoria, is
visiting friends in the city.
Rev. J. Combe returned to Vancouver
Tuesday morning after spending len
days' vacation in Cumberland. During his Slav he was the guest of .Mr.
and Mrs. T. Michell.
Xliss Ruth Clinton arrived from California Tuesday on a visit to Mr. and
XIrs. G Vi. Clinton.
XIr. George O'Brien. Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., accompanied by .Mrs. O'Brien,
returned from Ladysmith Wednesday.
Mr. Chas. C. Segrave. publisher of the
Acme Sentinel, Alberta, accompanied
by .Mrs. Segrave, are visitors in town
and guests of XIrs. Segrave's parents,
.Mr. and XIrs. T. Lewis. XIr. Segrave
wil be returning home next week but
.Mrs. Segrave will remain here for
about a month. XIr. Segrave spent
several years In Cumberland, being on
the staff of the Cumberland Islander
and News, and he also ran a little
paper called the Enterprises and
Truth.
Xliss Mary Coleman left for Vancouver on Sunday, where she will take
a six weeks' course at the University
summer school. .Mr. C. B. Wood, principal of the High School, wlll also
take the above course, and left on
.Monday for that purpose.
XIrs. Waddington and family left on
Tuesday for .Michel, B. C. their old
home, where they Intend to reside In
,'uturc.
NOTICE
REDUCTION IN PRICE OF
BREAD.
On nnd after Monday, July 11, Bread
10
will be sold at
LOAVES
FOR
$1.00
MAROCCHI BROS.
J. HALLIDAY
TENDERS WANTED
Repairs to Cumberland School
Tenders wanted for the repairing
ind renewing of roof, chimneys, flushing valleys, water troughs and down
jilpes, shingled portions of walls, and
'lack entrance steps and adjoining
work.
Painting the roof with Liquid Elas-
Igum and painting outside of building.
Tenders to be In by Xlonday, July
18th; work to be commenced within
me week of letting of contract and
work to be completed by August 25th.
Lowest or any tender not necessar-
ly accepted.    For   further   information apply to the Board of Trustees.
A. MACKINNON,
Secretary Board of School Trustees,
Fruit Jars
A Full Stock Just Arrived
KERR ECONOMY—Pints, Quarts and Half-Gallons.
KERR ECONOMY CAPS AND CLAMPS.
SELF-SEALING WIDEMOUTH—Pints and Quarts.
SELF-SEALING MASON—Quarts.
DREY MASON—Pints, Quarts and Half-Gallons.
PERFECT SEAL—Pints and Quarts.
KERR JELLY GLASSES—Pints. Two patterns.
Rubber Jar Rings and Parrowax
Full Stock of Fresh
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
ARRIVING DAILY
Watch our Windows for Display of
English  Enamelware
due to arrive first of the week. There has been a big
drop in the prices of these goods and they arc now
DOWN TO PRE-WAR RATES.
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
NANAIMO PYTHIAN
SISTERS VISIT HERE
On Wednesday night last some 17
members of Silver Leaf Temple, Nanaimo, of the Order of Pythian Sisters,
paid a fraternal visit to Benevolent
Temple No. 9, Cumberland, and put on
some special work.
Following the lodge business a very
enjoyable social time was participated
in by all, the local sisters providing
an excellent supper.
The visitng ladles returned to Nanaimo the same night on tbe Nanaimo
"Whizz Bangs." They thoroughly enjoyed the visit and have extended an
invitation to the local lodge to visit
them in tho near future.
C.R.Mulholland
late   of  Cameron's   Garage.   Cumberland, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton Street,   NANAIMO
and will be pleased to have the
patronage of his old friends nnd acquaintances  when in Nanaimo.
Repairs Guaranteed.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Prices Reasonable.
PERSONAL MENTION
WE CLEAN OR DYE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housafurnlshlngs.
etc. Let us send you our price list.
Waterproofs "reproofed." Permanent Dye Works Limited, 1611 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, B. C.
Automobile
Owners
If you have a Leaky or Damaged
RADIATOR
ship it to
Hargreaves the Radiator Expert
We  repair   Radiators,   Fenders,   Car
Bodies, etc.      All work  guaranteed.
W. HARGREAVES
51 Commercial St.      Nanaimo
Phone 213
LOST
GENT'S WATCH,   ABOUT   JUNE 25.
Apply Islander.
SMALL NEW HOWIIOAT FROM ROY-
ston; painted grey and green;
drifted away on Sunday morning's tide. Rewnrd on returning or
sending particulars as to location
to Colin Campbell, Royston.      1-28
FOR SALE
1920 MITCHELL ROADSTER FOR
sale—Equipped with cord tires and
one spare tire; $1950 cash, or $2000
on terms. Car insured for $2700.
For particulars telephone 16, Courtenay.
TWO 5-AC'RE LOTS FOR SALE—
$175 for both. Lots 1 and 2, Trent
Road, on Royston Road. For further particulars apply P. O. Box 79,
Cumberland. 4-29
NINE BBLGION HARES, SIX WEEKS
old; 50 cents each; also
TWO PIGS, FIFTEEN WEEKS OLD
—$15.00 each.   Apply No. 22, Camp,
or address A. B. C, c-o Islander.
1-27
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. II. It. Pottlngor and family
of Victoria wish to convey their
sincere thanks for the kindness
and sympathy shown them, also
for tiie many floral tributes, during their recent bereavement of
a loving brother and uncle, the
late John George Reid.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock In the Memorial
Hall.
Ancient Order of Foresters
The next meeting of Court Bevan.
No. 9S30. will be on Wednesday, July
16, In the Fraternity Hall, Davis
Block, Dunsmuir Avenue. Visiting
brethren cordially invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; P.
Myers, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.

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