BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Islander May 29, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0070738.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070738.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0070738-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0070738-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070738-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0070738-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0070738-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0070738-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0070738-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0070738.ris

Full Text

Array Wis
> *
%lixuhtt
11
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI.. No. 10        THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, MAY 29. 1915.-    Subscription price, $1.50 per year
SURVIVED BLOW BY HUGE PIECE OF SHELL
.One"of [the Canadian artillerymen who assisted
in the saving of the guns at Langemarck, and who
was wounded in the thigh by the big Diece of shell
the nurse is holding in her hand.
VICTORIA J) AY SPORTS
. The Victoria day sports were
held on the recreation grounds on
Monday. The weather was an
improvement on the previous
year and the crowd attending
was equally as large. The amount
subscribed for the sports on
account of the depression in
trade caused by the wholesale
importation of fuel oil from
California which is allowed to
enter this country duty free was
only one fourth of the amount of
previous years. As a rule the
amount subscibed for Victoria
Day's sports in this amounts
to all the way from $1200 to
$1500. It was near the latter
amount in 1913. The amount subscibed this year was about $300.
Another effect that free fuel oil
has upon this city and the coal
industry. The sports were
equally as good as other years,
but not on such a large scale. The
crowds were just as great and
all seemed to enjoy themselves
as usual but the effect of fuel toil
imported into this country tree
and the dull times were visible
on all sides. Empty pockets are
not very encouraging when
attending Victoria Day sports.
The residents of Cumberland are
accustomed to having a few
dollars extra for such a day as
Monday.
The West Cumberland Conservative Band was engaged and
rendered beautiful selections during the day. The sports closed
with a dance in the West Cumberland Band Hall,
WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC SOCIETY
on June 5th the above society
is holding a "Linen Day" in
Cumberland, Bevan and Union
Bay. The Boy Scouts have kindly undertaken to collect., the
contributions. Any pieces of
cotton, linen or white flannelette
not less than 4 inches square will
be gratefully accepted. These
pieces should be boiled and ironed
(no starch or blue) and all seams
and hems cut off. Any other gifts
of hospital supplies such as
sheets and pillowcases (either
new or old) absorbent cotton,
bandages or material for same
will be thankfully received.
When one reads in the papers
that many of the Field Hospitals
will be forced to close unless
more supplies are available, one
feels that every effort must be
made to prevent such a calamity
Let us therefore collect and save
all we can and take the trouble to
cleanse something which otherwise we might have destroyed.
A small parcel of garments
will be s?nt to Vancouver next
week. Anyone still having work
belonging- to the Society please
send in to Mrs. Clinton as soon
as possible.
The collecting boxes for Red
Cross contributions placed by
this Society in town will be periodically emptied and the proceeds
sent to the Canadian Red Cross
Society.
WANTED TO RENT-A house
containing at least five rooms.
Apply The Islander, P. O.
drawer 430.
. LOCAL STUDENTS PASS
The following Cumberland and
District students have been
granted teachers' diplomas for
the _ Vancouver Normal School
preliminary and advanced sessions just closed:— Eva G. Bickle,
Hannah Harrison, Janet E. Robertson, Hilda Watson, of Cumberland; Marion H. Gray, of
Minto; Robert G. Duncan and
Bessie Woods, of Courtenay.
The next sessions will commence on August 16th, and intending students are requested to
make application for the prope-
form at the Provincial Normal
School either by letter or between
the hours of 10 and 12 a.m., during the month of June. These
applications should be returned
ten days before com'mencement
of session.
Ottawa, May 26.—Sir John
French, commander of the British troops in France in appreciation of the Canadian expedition
has sent "the following cablegram
to Premier Borden: "They remained in the foreground of the
fighting and I feel assured that
their heroism and sacrifices which
are contributing so splendidly to
the attainment of our immediate
ends will bind us together with
those indissoluble bonds which
are forged on the field of battle."
Montreal, May 27.—The Gazette'this morning states that the
White Star liner Megantic has
arrived in England with 2200
Canadians bound for the front.
LOCAL ALIENS TO BE INTERNED
Nothing is known officially in
Cumberland of the statements
contained in the following dispatch in the Vancouver Province
of May 25:—
Nanaimo, May 25—Military
officials reached here this morning for the purpose of carrying
out a wholesale internment of
the alien enemy miners employed
here and in other Vancouver
Island camps. The authorities
frankly" admit that in taking this
action they are at the same time
trying to solve difficulties in the
local labor situation by providing
working vacancies for bona fide
British subjects who have their
families and homes in this district.
"One hundred and fifteen men
will, it is expected, be taken tonight by special train to Victoria
whete the provincial Government
has placed at the disposal of the
military authorities a new wing
of the Saanich jail forthe temporary housing of these men,
Later it is intended to take them
to Vernon, where they are to
spend the summer constructing
roads, a large highway between
the Okanagan and Arrow lakes
being in contemplat on. Only
single men among the Germans
and Austrians were being taken
from the mines today to form the
first party for the internment.
Others are to be taken later.
"The vacancies ci eated b> the
removal of the aliens from the
mines in this city and at Cumberland are to be taken by white
miners who failed to get employment following the strike of tv\ o
years ago. Austrians and Germans flocked in at that time and
until to-day positions could not
be found for many of the strikers'
after the trouble was over. Many
of the former strikers have been
given assistance by the provincial
government during recent
months. The interning arrangements today were being carried
out by Major Ridgeway Wilson,
of Victoria, on instructions from
the militia department and the
minister of justice, to whom the
attorney-general of British Col-
lumbia had made the suggestion
and presented the use of the provincial jail at Saanich."
Mrs. Hood will be " At Home" on Wednesday, June 2nd, from 3 to 6o'clock p.m.,
in aid of the Red Cross War Fund. Several musical selections will be given and
tea served. It is hoped that many ladies
and gentlemen will be present and help
this most worthy cause by the collection
that will be taken.
A. McKelvie left by Friday's
train on a visit to Ladysmith. TWO
thu; islander, Cumberland, b. c.
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, MAY 29th, 1915.
A Tribute to Sir Robert Borden.
"If Canada." says The Christian Science Monitor, of Boston,
one of the very best newspapers
in the United States, "were an
ally of Great Britain rather than
an integral part of the British
Empire its politics and its policies
would command on every side,
more nearly than they do now, a
measure of attention commensurate with their importance. The
present European war is on a
scale beyond any that history
records, but, tremendous as it is,
Canada's contribution to it in
men and money cannot be considered trivial, relatively or
otherwise. The other day at
Ottawa a Parliament was prorogued that during its session
had made provision for an army
and navy equipment estimated to
cost $100,000,000. The leader of
the party and the premier of the
Government, who brought this
measure successfully through,
who for nine months has met
every exigency forced upon Canada by the situation in Furope,
and particularly by the situation
in Great Britain, with comprehensiveness, clear-sightedness
and intelligent grasp, has long
been recognized in the United
States, and now is coming to be
recognized in his own country,
as no ordinary man.
"Of course, Sir Robert Borden
has long had his personal and
political friends, his admirers
alnd his followers, but for the most
part these have been confined to
his own party, and a very large
percentage of them, it is safe to
say, have had little knowledge
of his real quality as a statesman.
In the ordinary course of things
as Premier he would never have
such trials as those that since
August last have been testing his
character, and he would not
have had such opportunities as
these trials have afforded him of
proving his capacity in the face
of difficulty.
"Not the least of the trials that
have come upon him and have
tested him were those growing
out of the discovery that, in
common with other countries,
Canada has unscrupulous enemies
at home. The revelation of dishonesty in the furnishing of
supplies came as a shock to the
whole  country,   but  the  main
There are cheap corsets, but when the most graceful
and comfortable corsets cost but little more than the
cheap ones, why wear any but the best ?
Comfort and an air of refinement become
second nature to wearers of
CORSETS
(Made In Canada)
Come here and aee the latest models. Also let us
show you our many new styles in ladies' outer
apparel.
3     Ask for our Catalogue showing New Models,
force of it had to be borne by
the Premier; and he has borne it
manfully. He could not pause to
carry on a criminal trial, but he
has served notice on those who
have wronged the nation that if
the law of the country permits its
courts to force restitution there
will be restitution, and that if
the offenders can be more severely punished they will be so punished regardless of who they are
or of what in the past they have
been.
"In the greater glare, in the
larger field abroad, the thins s
that move and the things that
disturb a possession 3,000 miles
away arrest and hold little attention, but because the work of
Sir Robert Borden is only an incident in the daily activities of a
great Empire its value is  not
being overlooked at home. Liberals and Conservatives, people
of generous natures of all shades
of opinion, are now saying just and
pleasant things about the man
who for nine months has given his
days and his nights, his time and
his thought, his whole heart to
the task of enabling Canada to
perform what he believes to be
its plain duty to the Mother
Country."
No delay is being permitted,in
providing for the dependents of
our soldiers who have fallen. Last
session provision was made for a
pension system, and pensions are
already being paid. No sooner is
a d<.ath officially reported than an
order is at once sent to the paymaster-general and the pension
begins. In the case of men incapacitated for further active ser
vice action wiJl not be taken until
final reports as to their condition
are received. Many will be under
medical care for some time, but
meantime their pay is being continued. The special pension appropriation of parliament last
session amounted to two million
dollars.
Canada has now 50,000 men on
active service in Flanders, England, Bermuda and St. Lucia. The
total number under arms is nearly
115,000—a greater army than the
United States had in the Spanish
American war. Additional troops
are being enlisted and within a
short time the Canadian army
wih have 150,000 men under arms.
Of garden hose and sprinklers
we have a goodftstock. C, -.H.
Tarbell and Son.   «r
m.i*, lawman THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
tf
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
CAPITAL, $15,000,000
REST, $13,500,000
MONEY ORDERS
Issued by The Canadian Bank of Commerce, are a safe, convenient
and inexpensive method of remitting small sums of money. These
Orders, payable without charge at any bank in Canada (except in
the Yukon Territory) and in the principal cities of the United States,
are issued at the following rates :
$5 ind under       . •       3 cents
Over Saati not exceeding $10     .       6   "
it    }|      it it 30      ,      10   ••
ii   30      ii •• so      .      15   M
REMITTANCES ABROAD
riwuld ke mlo to means ef our SPECI AL FOREIGN DRAFTS tad MONEY
ORDERS.  Issued wftkout deity at leasanable rates. SU
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.      W. T. WHITE, Manager.
^dameA ts?.
eS&WeWi/anrf ant/ eS&ctt/i/ev
Phones ESTATES MANAGED Courtenay
42 & 48 RENTS COLLECTED B.C.
LAND   REGISTRY  WORK  A  SPECIALTY
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEANERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland, B.C.
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Mh
HOTEL UNION
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION
First CUss in every respect. Perfect Cuisine
Headquarters foy Tourists a)l£ Sportsmen ft
Wines Liquors and Cigars ■
John N. McLeod, Proprietor      I
MAROCCHI PROS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
t
New England Hotel j
EXCELLENT  ACCOMMODATION
RATES     REASONABLE
EVERYTHING    MODERN
JOSEPH  WALKER,    Proprietor.
Lunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
B.C.
.♦
r
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, ti, C.
Phone 14
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
*****
**m*t*9
**m
MEAT!   MEAT!
MEAT!
If you want QUALITY don't
forget to call at the
City Meat Market
WE BUY FOR   paqu
WE SELL FOR   ^AOtl
THEREFORE:
We are the best and cheapest
in town.
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter  and  have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL ANO  INSURANCE   AGENT
PHONES: OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE..   CUMBERLAND
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
General  Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing  a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Kebuilt, or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.
Kierstead & Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland. B.C.
CANCELLATION of RESERVE
^"OTICE   IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the reserve covering certain
lands in the vicinity of Carring-
ton Bay, Cortes Island, by reason
of a notice published in the British Columbia Gazette on the 27th
of December, 1907, is cancelled
in so far as it relates to Lots 865,
866, 867, 868, 869, 870, 871. 897,
898, 899, 900, and 801, Sayward
District. The said Lots will be
open to entry by pre-emption on
Tuesday the 18th day of May,
1915, at nine o'clock in the forenoon. No Pre-emption Record
will be issued to include more
than onc surveyed Lot, and all
applications must be made at the
office of the Government Agent,
at Vancouver.
R. A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,  Victoria,
B.C., March 12th. 1915.
-
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON  TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave. mm
POUR
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30. **
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Service, 7 p.m.
Bible  Study   (Sunday   School),
2.30 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday
7-30 p.m. .     a,
Cottage Meeting, Wednesday at
8.00 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7,30 p.m.
Rev. Wm. Elliott, B. A., Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for Trinity Sunday:
8.30 a. m.,  Holy Communion
11 a. m., Matins.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of intercession on Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
NoAdvance
In the Price of
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
At
FLETCHERS
Owing to the fact that we were in the
possession of an extra large stock of
musical instruments when the war
broke out, we have not been obliged
to raise our prices, and we are still in
a position to offen-
Violins.._ from $3.00 up
Mandolins from $5.00 up
Guitars from $5.00 up
Banjos from $5.00 up
Accordeons from $2.00 up
Mouth-organs._ from     .25 up
Cases for all instruments....from $2.00 up
When in Nanaimo call in and examine
our stock.   You are welcome whether
you buy or not.
G.A.Fletcher
Music Company,Nanaimo,B.C.
BRENT INHERITANCE
Case Made Lawyer Famous and
Happy.
By HAROLD CARTER.
"Yes, the Brent case made me famous, I suppose," eald the old lawyer
thoughtfully. "At any rate, I am sure
that lt was the foundation of my fortunes. Also, lt gave me more real
happiness than any case I have undertaken. You see, young Mrs. Brent
deserved the Inheritance, If ever any
woman deserved one. She had actually redeemed her husband, had mad.t
a man of him—but let me tell th*.
story ln my own way.
"Theodore Brent was one of those
pompous, self-sufilcient, heartless, and
withal scrupulously honest men whom
Massachusetts used to turn out ln the
middle of the last century—a sort of
transplanted survival of the John Bull
type. I believe it is still flourishing
in the old country. He had two sons,
Ralph and Jack. Ralph inherited his
father's business instincts and was
slated for succession to the company
after the father's death. Jack was a
spendthrift, a wild young fellow, who
was dismissed from Harvard, drank,
gambled, and broke his father's heart
—what there was of it. Withal, he
had done nothing worthy of being disinherited. However, his father sent
him west for five years to make a man
of himself, failing success in which
operation the money was to go entirely to the elder brother.
"When Jack Brent wrote home, a
couple of years later, that he was married to an actress, the father, with the
old prejudice against the stage, wrote
back informing his younger son that
he had cut him out of his will for good
and all. He politely invited him to
go to the devil and told him never to
show his face in the east again.
"Ralph was not quite so quiet as his
father imagined. In fact, where Jack
was open-hearted and open-handed,
Ralph was close-fisted and secretive,
and that was mainly the difference
between them. Jack had never had a
chance. When old age soflened the
old man's acerbity somev.'bHt Ralph
began to initiate him into the pleasures of life. Among other things, he
inspired him with a passion for motor-
coal miner may have some knowledge of
law but the lawyer has no knowledge of
coal mining whatsoever, and is not able
to express an opinion, thus making the
interview given by J. W. deB Farris to the
Vancouver Sun valuless and of no effect
to the thinking coal miner.
"Her  Soft Voice  and  Gentle  Wayi
Went Right Into My Heart."
cars, A strange fancy ln an old man
j—but we lawyers are used to these
strance streaks in human nature.
BICYCLE BARGAINS: Scores
of shop-soiled and second-hand
bicycles and motorcycles are
offered at snap prices during our
great clearance sale. Write for
particulars. Plimley's Cycle
Works, Victoria, B.C.
Wanted to rent—A nice comfortable five or six-roomed house
in a respectable locality; furnished preferred. Apply stating
terms to P.O. Drawer 430, The
Islander.
NEW MODELS
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION
'OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that
the reserve existing on the Fractional East Half of the Fractional
North West Quarter of Fractional
Section 8, Malcolm Island,Rupert
District, by reason of a notice
published in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 29th day of May,
1902, is cancelled for the purpose
of issuing a Pre-emption Record
covering same to one, Anti Kusta
Aho.
R. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria,
B.C., May 11th, 1915.
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hen-lemon, Proprietor
Kntin'ate-1 and Designs furnished
on Application
Is now open for
business in the
Willard Block
Dunsmuir Aye.
TAKEN     • *
DAY OR
NIGHT
First Class Work Guaranteed
■   at Low Prices.
Enlarging a
Specialty
Films Developed for Amateurs
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW FULLY STOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT TO CUSTOMERS:--No Orientals,  Agents,  or Solicitors
employed. THE ISLANDER, CUMR^RLANtV p q.
Synopsis ot Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
toriea and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one yean at an annual rental of
$1 an acre. Not more than 2,500 aores
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections.or le«*al subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the trace applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaiit himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine Bhall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the I'ssee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
$10.00anacre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agunt ofD< -minion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorized publication of this
* advertisement will not be paid for.
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
FIRE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
TotalAssets - $26,788,930.
W.   WILLARD,
LOCAL
AGE Nl
NEW SPRING HATS
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
OVER 68 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly uncertain onr opinion tta* whether an
liiTentlon Is probably patentable. Communications strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
■•nt free. Oldest agency for eeourlngpatents.
Patents taken through Mann k Co. nostra
tteclol notlc,, without charge, In tne
Scientific Hnterican.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest circulation of any scientific journal. Terms for
Canada, $8.75 a year, postage prepaid. Sold by
all newsdealers.
MUNN&Co™8^ New York
Branch Office, 625 F 8U Washington, D. C.
. "They were on an automobile tour
when the accident occurred. The car
ran into a ditch somewhere along the
boundary between two states of the
middle west, and both men were killed.
Witnesses proved that the father died
instantly, while Ralph Brent lived just
ten minutes longer than his father.
"That was where I came Into the
story. For the will was so drawn
that if the father died flrst all the
property—valued at about six millions
—went to the son and his heirs. As
there were no heirs this meant thr.t
some distant relatives would Inherit
lt. If the elder son died flrst the will
became null and void, and the property went to Jack, who was then
ranching in California. His wife had
made him a successful man ln a small
way—but I wanted her to get the
money with all my heart. And I did
not want it to go to the flock of vultures who came out of the uttermost
■ parts of Massachusetts, greedily demanding their moiety. You see, I had
sought out and found Mrs. Jack, and
her soft voice and gentle ways went
right Into my heart, and stayed there.
And the thing that most astonished
me was that she did not seem to care
whether she got the money or not.
"Well, the case came up for trial.
Ferdinand Qulpp, the famous legal
light, appeared for the claimants, and
the decision seemed inevitable. Witness after witness swore that Ralph
Brent had survived his father by several minutes. I went home feeling
pretty blue the evening after the other
side had rested its case; and yet, the
harder I thought, and the more hopeless our chances seemed, the more I
determined that Mrs. Jack Brent
should get what ought to have been
coming to her.
"We had offered to compromise for
a quarter share, and our offer had
been most impolitely laughed at. The
claimants seemed sure of their case,
as did Qulpp, who bullied Mrs. Jack
unmercifully, dragged out her past.
Into the light, and called her a designing actress and a worthless schemer-
much to the delight of the opposing
party.
"As I've said, I went home/ and
thought and thought and thought, and
at last—I don't know why—I got out
my big map of the United States and
pored over lt. Then I got my state
map and pored over that. I had hoped
to create some effect by the point
which I had noted—namely, that the
two men had died in different states
In fact the road was the dividing line
Ralph Brent fell Into one state and'
the father ln an adjoining one. But
that didn't seem of any ■particular
value—merely curious.
"I dozed off in my chair—and suddenly the significance of those maps
came to me ln the middle of a dream
ln which Qulpp and I were fighting for
the possession of a ghostly carbureter.
which persisted in trying to get into
Quipp's pocket. I Jumped up, yelling
like a madman.
" 'Your Honor,* I said, next day, 'the
defence f'l bring forward no wit-1
nesses. We accept the contention
that the father died before the son.
But I wish to point out that they died
ln different states.'
"Here I brought out a map and
cross-examined a few of the witnesses
of the other party. Nobody saw the
significance of the event.
'"What ls your point?' asked the
judge impatiently.   *
"'This,' I answered. "These states
are divided on some maps by a thin
line of red. It does not run parallel
with any meridian—lt ls a purely arbitrary line, zigzagging from right to
left as men have drawn it It signifies that the standard time ls one
hour later on one side of the boundary
than on the other. So the father died
some fifty minutes after the son.'
"And the court went wild.
"Yes, I don't mind admitting that
we comnromised rather than fleht the
PIVB
matter out in the higher courts. But
it was for half and half, not three-
quarters and a quarter. I said that
this case was the foundation ot my
fortunes, didn't I? You see, after
Jack Brent died I—Oh pshaw! come
home to dinner and let me introduce
you to my wife. But don't mention
the Brent case to her."
(Copyright, 1012, by W. G. Chapman.)
 i.	
FOOD WE ALL USED TO HAVE
Remembrance   of   Childhood   Feasts
Spoiled Wealthy Man's Expensive
and Well-Ordered Dinner.
Zona Gale, writing a story called
"The Bridge" In the American magazine, presents a broker named Cassoday* diping at his club in New York.
While he dines, Cassoday is visited by
a mental reincarnation of hlmfcelf
called Littlechild. The story then goes
on:
" 'What's this?' said Littlechild over
the soup. 'Green turtle. But I remember the chicken soup we used to have
the day after mother had had boiled
chicken dinner and dumplings. What's
that? I don't know "sole." The fish we
used to have was baked browner outside and whiter inside, with no hot
gravy-f-oh, not like this at all. What's
that? Mother wouldn't have done any
filet tricks. But I can smell the roast
beef when she was thickening the
brown gravy just after she took the
pan out of the wood stove oven—don't
you know how we stopped to sniff
with every armful of wood we brought
in? Endive? I can't place it—you
know we used to run out and pick the
lettuce last thing before we sat down
at table—we got it from the shady part
of the patch toward the well-house.
Glace what? Yes, but don't you remember her apple puddings with cinnamon in the sauce? Apples off the
j seedllngthat grew by the corn crib '
"Cassoday pushed back his chair.
" 'Wasn't it right, sir?'" asked the
waiter anxiously.
"'Devilish right, thanks,'" said
Cassoday.
Sleeplessness Cures.
If you are troubled with sleeplessness, try one of the following simple
remedies before going to a doctor with
the plea that he give you something
to make you sleep:
Drink a glass of warm water before
going to bed instead of the usual glas3
of cold water. Sip it slowly, and if possible eat a small biscuit or cracker
with it.
Avoid all mental exercise for at least
half an hour before retiring; allow the
brain to rest and become calm before
you attempt to sleep.
Stand before an open window and
breathe deeply, Inhaling through the
mouth and exhaling through the nose;
then lie down and continue doing this
until sleep overtakes you.
Keep the eyeballs looking down, or
roll them from one side to the other,
counting each time they move.
This is the principle hy which we
are told to count sheep leaping over a
log. The sound of water dropping
slowly into a pan or the ticking of a
clock will occupy and quiet the brain,
and looking steadily at one object or
a point of light will bring the blessing
ot sleep to weary, wakeful eyes.
Slight Disappearance
A man purchased some red flannel
shirts guaranteed not to shrink.   He
reminded the salesman   forcibly ol
the guarantee some weeks later.
"Have you had any difficulty with
them?" the latter asked.
''No," replied the customer; "only
the other morning, when I was dressing, my wife said to me, 'John, where
did you get that pink coral necklace?' "
Easiron <S.v5o*nwino
Baron Sidney Sonnino, again foreign minister for Italy, known as
the "Framer of Italian Cabinets,"
is one of the men Prince Von
Buelow, the Kaiser's envoy, was.
trying to influence against war.
Sonnino has been a big political
power in Italy and much pressure
wss brought to bear upon him, it
is said, even to the extent of large
offers, to prevent war.
Greater than Sonnino in the estimation of the German nation,
however, is G. Gioletti, former
president of the ministry, and
still looked upon as one of the
powerful men in Italy. It is intimated that the Germans and
Austrians have tried to persuade
him to obtain his old place as
premier and avert war.
O.OioIotjt/i
ACCIDENTAL DROWNING
Emil Renberg, Richard Holmes
and Hans Swanson, loggers at
No. 5 camp of the Comox Logging
& Railway Co.,. took a boat on
Sunday and went fishing off the
mouth of Oyster River. On Sunday afternoon, Richard Coe, Sr.,
who resides near the beach in
that locality, heard a noise as of
someone in distress. Upon looking around he raw nothing. On
Monday morning Mr. Coe found
two fedora hats and a boat that
had been washed ashore. On
Tuesday the bodies of Emil Renberg and Richard Holmes were
found on the beach by Provincial
Constable Hannay, between the
mouth of Oyster River and Black
Creek. At the coroner's inquest
held at Courtenay on Thursday
the jury returned a verdict of
accidental drowning.
1
< SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FOREST FIRE HAZARD REDUCED
Victoria. B. C.-The Hon. W.
R. Ross states that weather conditions throughout the Province
have still further reduced the
fire hazard, heavy rains having
fallen over the southern half of
British Columbia, while showers
have been the rule in the northern interior. From the Nelson
District news comes that the
Edgewood Lumber Co. at Castle-
gar is about to start sawing
3,000,000 feet and in the Lillooet
division the resumption of work
on the P. G. E. is expected to
cause much activity. Slash
burning is progressing along the
right-of-way The optimism felt
with regard to the crop prospects
is leading the prairie farmers to
place orders with the mills already, according to advices from
the Kamloops District. Much
satisfaction is expressed at the
large areas of slash which have
been dealt with on Vancouver
Island. It is estimated that considerably over 1000 acres of
farmers slash have been cleanedj
up between Victoria and Nanaimo, while great progress in the
same direction is reported from
the north end of the E. & N. grant.
Large areas of logging slash
bave disappeared,  notably   300
acres near Cowichan Lake, the
presence of which constituted a
great fire danger, also 100 acres
near Stone's Mill at Duncan
Other areas dealt with include
200 acres by the New Ladysmith
Lumber Co.: 500 acres by the
Anderson Logging Co. near Union
Bay; and 200 acres by D. Kilpatrick near Comox; also 300 acres
of farmers' land after being
logged-off by the Canadian Panama Co. in the Sooke and other
districts. Roadside slash has
been cleared throughout the
Island district, while the E. & N.
and Victoria & Sidney railways
have shown their customary attention to the safe-guarding of
their rights-of-way. It is impossible to over-estimate the importance of slash-disposal; first of all,
as removing a fire hazard, and,
secondly, as preparing the land
for production; or, if unsuitable
for agricultural purposes, then
for timber reproduction: and general credit is due to the logging
operators for their active co-operation in this direction.
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
"QUEEN" Beer
Makes you
Eat Better
Sleep Better
Feel Better
It's made of the very best B.C.
Hop and Alberta Barley—thoroughly filtered, aged and pasteurized.
Ask at the hotel for QUEEN BEER
—a beer you'll like.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Compan
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EF
"FI
EC
TP
\/E   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri.
Sat,
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.
11.05
P.M.
4.50
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M,
7:00
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
10.40
4.25
Bevan
7.25
2.55
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
10.35
4.20
Puntledge
7.30
3.00
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
10.30
4.15
(f)LakeTrail Road
7.35
3.05
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.35
3.55
6.55
3.55
3,55
10.25
4.10
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
3.10
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
10.20
4.05
(f)    Minto Road
"7.45
3.15
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
10.15
4.00
Royston
7.50
3.20
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3,30
10.00
3.45
Union Bay
8.00
3.30
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY
M
i -fii
1 -J i
I THE ISLANDEK, CUMBEKLAND, K. C.
SEVEN
' Hit Method
Mrs. Brown Blood ln the doorway ot
her suburban home and eyed the tramp
critically.
"Are you willing to work for a
meal?" she asked at last.
The tramp extended his hands expansively as though work was the one
thing in life he hankered after; and
his apparent sincerity overcame Mrs.
Brown's last scruple.
She retired into the house and presently returned carrying a large plate
of food and a businesslike-looking hoe.
When the tramp had eater, the food
she handed him the hoe, and, pointing
towards the garden path, remarked:
"Now, I want you to clean out thai
gutter.   You see it's filled with mud.'
The tramp glanced at the gutter,
then at the hoe.
"I never use a hoe," he said, "when
cleaning out a gutter."
"Never use a hoe! Then, what do
you use?   A shovel?
"No," said the tramp, as he moved
towards the gate. "My method is t*J
pray for rain!"
Naturally
"Do yer know why false eyes are
always made of glass, Willie?"
"Sure! How else could a fellow
see through them?"
One Good Effect
He was a lover of music who had
Just been to hear one of the great
operas, and he was expatiating upon
its beauties to an unresponsive friend,
whom he observed to yawn. The
music-lover was hurt.
"Look here, John," ho protested,
don't you think music is of some
practical benefit in life?"
"Oh, ye*\" said the unresponsive
one. "Why, judging from the portraits I have Been ot eminent musicians, especially pianists, I should say
that music is great to keep the hair
from falling out."
FIGHTING THE GERMS
Japanese    Led    the    Way In Battl*
Against Disease Among Soldiers
"What we and our gallant allies
have to fight against is germs, as
much as Germans and Austrlans,"
said a member of the Army Medical
Department to a correspondent. "Iu
practically every wa.* diseaie has
been more fatal than bullets, and thu
victorious general is tie who is moot
successful in guarding : gainst lt. In
six months in the Crimean War the
allied forces lost 50,000 men from
disease as against 2,000 from bullets.
In that war whole regiments were
wiped out by sickness without even
seeing the firing line.
"There were 500,000 fatalities in
the American Civil War of 1861-65.
Three-quarters of the deaths were due
to disease. In this respect, too, the
United States fared badly 'n the war
with Spain, no fewer than fourteen
soldiers dying from disease for every
one killed in action, while in the Rjs
so-Turkish War the loss from epidemics alone totalled over 80,000. In
the Boer War we lost 5,621 men frcm
typhoid, diarrhceal disease, rheuma
tism, and malaria, while no fewer
than 29,156 had to be sent home as
invalids. Yet in actual fighting we
had only, 2,936 killed, while some 864
died from wounds.
"As a matter of fact, the Japanese
were the flrst to show the world h>w
to grapple with disease on the battlefield. In their war with Russia they
placed in the field and in their navy
1,200,000 men. Their losses were as
follows: Killed in battle, 47,152; .died
of wounds, 11,424; and deaths from
disease, 21,802. These splendid results are a record in modern warfare.
The usual fatality in war is one from
bullets to four from disease. The
Japs lost three from bullets to one
from disease.
"These are the reasons why every
British soldier going to the front is
inoculated against typhoid fever,
while every precaution is taken to see
that the men drink only pare water,
have plenty o. good, wholesome food,
and warm clothing. We learned many
valuable lessons how to fight germs
on the battlefield in South Africa, and
so did the Russians in their struggle
with Japan."
1
w
Money no Object
"Yes, sir," said a pompous ignoramus, "I believe ln education, sir—the
best education that money can buy.
My father spared no expense on my
schooling, and I shall spare none on
my children's."
"Then I suppose you will give them
all an academic education?" remarked
his friend.
"Yes, sir," was the reply; "of course
I will. That's the kind of education
l got, and if lt takes every shilling
of my fortune my boys and girls
shall all be macadamized as their
father was."
Lord Charles Beresford is a special
suitable for Buckinghamshire.
On the Table
"Beanbrough ls very   fond of the
birds."
"Ah, ornithologist, eh?"
"No; epicure."
SAY
B'GOLLY, JEST
BECRU5E   FELLERS
CALL   MH.WILSON
"WOODY"  MINT NO
6|GN  DPT HE IS fl
BLOCK HEflD!!
WetSiimv.
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Eiuinielware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279 Phone 31
FOUNTAIN PEN
FLASHLIGHTS
We have just received a consignment
of Ideal Fountain Lights, the latest
wrinkle  in   vest   pocket   electric
torches. Slighlty larger than the aver-'
age fountain pen and clips on to the
vest pocket in the same way.   Just
the thing for motorists.   A remarkably BRIGHT LIGHT IN A REMARKABLY
SMALL CASE.
SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY
PRICES:-
Gun Metal finish (complete) - $1.35
Nickel finish (complete) -   -   $1.50
Refills .35
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75          Co., Ltd.          p. O. 314
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[established 24 years.] EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN   TOPICS
J. R. Lockard left for Vancouver on Tuesday and returned
on Thursday.
Dr. Millard, Mayor Kilpatrick,
Mr. and S. Calhoun were visitors
to this city during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bickle
and daughter returned by auto
on Monday after a week's visit
ir. Victoria.
Brighten—up ,with a little
Sherwin William's paint, lt wears
longest and looks the best of any
on the market.
Harry Wilson, local manager of
the B.C. Telephone Co., accompanied by Mrs. Wilson, spent
Victoria Day in Nanaimo.
The repairs to the S. S. Wellington, now tied up to the
passenger wharf at Union Bay,
are nearing completion.
W. K. Hancock, manager of
the Cumberland Electric Light*;
ing Co. is touring Vancouver
Island on an Indian Motor Cycle.
The Rev. A. Bischlager, on
behalf ot* the officers and men of
the 6th D.C.O.R. stationed at
Union Bay, acknowledges with
thanks gifts of magazines, etc.,
from Mr. W. Willard, Mr. W.
White, Mrs. Henderson and Mrs.
King.
DISASTER AT RESERVE MINE
NANAIMO, B.C., May27.-Adisastrous
explosion occurred at the resarve mine of
the Western Fuel Co. The accident took
place at four o'clock this afternoon, just
after the change of shifts. At the time
of the explosion there were 38 men in the
mine, and of this number 13 escaped unhurt and reached the surface safely within
an hour. Four others were recovered
shortly afterwards, of whom three were'
dead and (ne fatally injured.
The rescued are: R. Wilson, J. S. Jones,
A. Gold, J. Vukosic, T. Patterson, W.
Thompson. T. J. Neen, A. Cook. F. Cook,
H. Clarke, J. Graham, Al Mazs, J. Davis.
Injured: J. Floretta.
Dead, still in mine: Fred Crew, John
Leach, Wm. McEvven, Jas, McEwen, T.
Marker, T. Bewlay, F. Texchek; Nick
Selek. Wm. Goggoff, Alf. Williams, Paul
Vitta, J. Suter, J. Davies, J. L. Mazs, R.
Kirkbride, R. Broom, H. Haddow. L.Shaw,
Edward Beck.
AWARDED $3800 FOR LOSS OF LEG
Victoria, May. 22—For loss of
a leg sustained in an accident in
the mine of the Pacific Coast
Coal Mining Company on September 2, 1914, a supreme court
jury yesterday afternoon awarded
the plaintiff. William Jones,
damages to the amount of $3600
Mr. Jones was injured when a
mine car got out of control, and
overturning in a slope, crushed
him between car and mine wall,
with the result that the amputation of his leg was necessary.
He claimed the company had
been negligent in service superintendence and equipment. The
company replied that plaintiff
had been ne,gligent and that
whatever risk there was he had
accepted with his employment.
Following the verdict, H. B.
Robertson for the company held
that the case had not been made
out, and asked for a non-suit.
Mr. Justice Morrison set the
matter over until next week
when Mr. Robertson's argument
will be heard with H, A. MacLean
K. C. representing Mr. Jcnes.
' «A^WVN
THE   BIG   STORE
HIGH GRADE HOSIERY
All Penman's goods are guaranteed and any found
unsatisfactory will be cheerfully replaced.
Very Special Ladies' Hose, 300 pairs *}**.****  *** naii-
full-fashioned Penman's Hose    ****J\*** *% pall
Penman's Cashmere Hose, the best   9Cr   9 naL
value on the market today, 3 pairs for $1, or   ********** <* |#<**I
Penman's Very Fine Cashmere Hose   **\(\n  anaL
A really first-class line at    <vJW« tX pall
LADIES' MUSLIN WAISTS
Low Collar, trimmed pique and lace, five
different styles to choose from.
Price 75c.
Ladies'  Middy   and   Balkan
Waists
A leader for a few days at
Price 95c.
Ladies'   House
Dresses
Made of good gingham
$1.25 to $2.50
Ladies'   Street
Dresses
Marked at special reductions.     See these
before they go.   Prices
are right.
 i ,	
The House for the
D. & A.
Corset
At prices to meet all
(From the Victoria Times.)
TO THE CITIZENS
OF VICTORIA
Having been told that stories are afloat
which tend to injure me in my business
and social relations in this community, I
want to say :.-••
1. I am a British subject, absolutely
loyal.
2. My children are British subjects by
birth and British in sympathy and belief,
and by their education.
3. All my properties and interests are
in British Columbia.
4. Of my blood relatives in Europe, I
have only one of military age, my brother's son, Henry Leiser. and he joined the
Belgian army fighting against the Germans, and was wounded in one of the battles
in Belgium, and while recovering from his
wound he acted as interpreter for one of
the Highland regiments. My brother,
David, has been a citizen of Brussels.
Belgium, for forty years, and he has been
ruined by the German invaston.
5. I have no property or interests in
Germany, direct or indirect.
6. I am absolutely and whole-heartedly
in favor of the British and their Allies,
and am. certain of their ultimate success,
and the wiping out of the continental
system of militarism.
7. My great ambition has always been
to assist in the development of the City
of Victoria and its institutions, and towards this end I have given unreservedly
of my time and energies and resources.
8. My firm has contributed to the Patriotic Fund, and the members of my family
have contributed to current patriotic objects, and we are entirely British in hopes,
sympathies and affiliations.
Yours truly,
j
SIMON LEISER
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8
' *-^^S^>^>N-»X^^. 1

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0070738/manifest

Comment

Related Items