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The Cumberland Islander Apr 30, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
lilt 12 &
THE CUMBERLAND ISLA
Vith which Ib consoUdated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 18.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
City Will Collect
$5.00 Poll Tax
Applicable in Cumberland School
Area—Usual Routine Business Dealt With.
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held on Monday evening.
His Worship Mayor MacDonald was
ln the chair, the following aldermen
being present: Aid. J. C. Brown, T.
Bannerman, L. Francescini, C. J.
Parnham and F. Pickard.
A request of an unusual nature waB
received from a gentleman, writing
from Delia, somewhere ln the United
States, for information on possibility
of getting a store suitable for a flrBt
class gent's furnishings business, how
many white men were employed, etc.
The City Clerk was instructed to supply the information.
All men in the district who are not
taxpayers to the extent of $6.00 annually to the City Council will, it the
intended bylaw is passed, be called
upon to do bo under the head of a poll
tax. By an amendment to the Municipal Act last session the legislature
gave the municipalities to do this.
Fraternal Hall Co. Dissatisfied.
A communication was read from the
Fraternal Hall Co. to the effect that
they were disappointed ln only receiving $25 towards the cost of Joining up
the drain from the company's property
to the sewer on Dunsmuir Avenue.
Owing to the sewer ln the lane at rear
being too high this course had to be
adopted, necessitating the expenditure
of $100 in getting pipes to their lot.
The City Clerk was Instructed to take
up with the company the cost of the
pipes, which the council claims was
excessive.
The Board of Works was authorized
to procure the necessary pipes to lay
sewers and connections with properties on Dunsmuir Avenue, between
Third and Fourth Streets.
Tax Rate and School Rate Bylaws
Adopted and Passed.
The School Rate and Tax Rate Bylaws came up for final consideration
and were read and finally adopted
without alteration.
Poll Tax of Five Dollars.
During the session of tbe Provincial
House an amendment was passed giving the municipalities power to collect a five-dollar poll tax from all
male persons coming under this
clause, within the municipal area or
school area who do not pay municipal
taxes to the amount of five dollars.
If a person pays less than five dollars
he will be called upon to pay the balance. Where the tax Is collected by
the municipality the government will
not collect the $5.00 poll tax; those
who hav# already paid it for this year
will be exempt.
The City Council wlll bring in a bylaw authorizing the collection of this
tax. This is expected to produce a
revenue of about $1500, and will
supersede the $2 road tax.
Aid. Brown reported that the residents of No. 5 Japanese Town had
finished the road to their locality, and
pipes were laid to and connected with
the'water hydrant. A railway crossing will have to be installed.
Prosecutions to Follow Indiscriminate
Dumping of Rubbish.
The old city dump for refuse has
been closed and another opened at
rear of City Park. Complaint was made
at the meeting of the indiscriminate
(lumping of rubbish from stores, and
the council intends to stop this practice. A motion was passed asking the
Police Commission to instruct the
Chief of Police to put up notices to
that effect, and to stop violations.
Pipes for Septic Tanks.
The Council empowered the Board
of Works to secure some more 4-inch
pipes and fittings for connecting
septic tanks to the sewers. The price
has dropped considerably of late and
several property owners Intend putting ln septic tanks.
Bills and Accounts.
The following bills and accounts
were read and referred to the Finance
Committee:
Kelly A. Scott, meals, etc  $ 8.65
Cumberland Electric Light Co.
Lamps, etc     6.30
Light      43.78
Water Works Co., water     1,75
Workmen's Compensation
Board       19.95
W. A. Owen, expenses     27.60
Memorial Arch, labor     47.77
Street labor   100.60
T. E. Bate, supplies     11.10
Evans, Coleman & Evans,  200
sacks of cement, and freight 220.40
Carnival Dance
Unique Affair
Jolly   Fellows'   Dancing   Club
Gives One of the Jolliest
Dances of Season.
The Carnival Dance given by the
Jolly Fellows' Dancing Club in the
Ilo-llo Hall on Tuesday, evening
proved to be a decided success, soel
ally as well as financially.
Some three hundred Invitations
were sent out, the majority of which
were accepted, as evidenced by the
large number who attended the novel
affair. Many out-of-town guests were
present, coming from Union Bay, Royston, Courtenay and other outside
points.
The hall was beautifully decorated
for the occasion, having long streamers of various colors running to a
maypole which hung from the centre,
this being brightly illuminated with
many colored lights, giving the hall
a very gay appearance.
Of the outstanding features, the
"kewple waltz" made a decided hit,
kewpies being given to the couple
in front of the flashlight when the
music stopped at various times. The
"confetti one-step", which was danced
through flurries of confetti, was repeatedly encored.
The orchestra, consisting of Messrs.
Robertson, Oraham, Pilling and Win-
ningham, played. splendidly.
It is the intention of this club to
give another Carnival Dance in the
near future.
Empire Day
Celebrations
Naval  Representatives  Unable
To Attend, as Ships Ordered
To Esquimalt May 18.
Many Important Matters
Discussed At Banquet
Rev. Thos.' Menzies and Mr. Geo. I. Warren Give Comprehensive
Addresses at Board of Trade Banquet—Capt. Adams of H. M.
C. S. Aurora Wants Children Interested in Navy—Mr. Thos.
Graham Says Pacific Destined to Be Scene of Greatest
Shipping Activity Ever Seen.
The Cumberland Board of Trade held their annual banquet on
Tuesday evening in the Union Hotel, when some forty guests and
members sat down to an appetizing repast. After the inner man
had been amply satisfied, glasses were filled and a very pleasant
and interesting time spent with toasts, songs and speeches.
Matters of great interest to Vancouver Island were dealt with by
the various speakers. The result of the get-together should be
the inspiring of the local board to greater activity for the district.
Preliminary work in connection
with the Empire Day Celebration Is
well under way, the tew who are
showing Interest in the affair devoting
their time and energy in the way of
making the children's day a success.
In proposing the toast of "The Army
Among those present were Captain
Adams, H.M.C.S. Aurora; Lieutenant
Bailey, H.M.C.S. Patriot; Rev. Thos.
Menzles, M.P.P.; Mr. Thomas Oraham,
General Superintendent of Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.; Mr. Geo.
I. Warren, of Victoria, President of
the Associated Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island, and Mr. G. W.
Clinton, vIce-preBldent; Mayor D. R.
MacDonald; Mr. Charles Graham,
District Superintendent of Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.; Dr. E. R.
HickB, Capt. J. C. Brown, Messrs. J.
Sutherland, T. H. Mumford, Jas.
Grainger, Wm. Marshall, Fletcher, M.
Brown, Jas. Burns, F. Partridge, J.
H. Cameron, Ben Hughes, Courtenay,
Watson, A. C. Lymn, F. Wllcock, T.
Rickson, F. Pickard, L. R. Stevens,
ChrlB Edwards, C. H. Tarbell, T. E.
Bate, S. Davis, F. A. McCarthy, J.
Walton, T. H.1 Carey.
Messages expressing regret for inability to attend were received from
Mr. Jas. M. Savage, General Manager
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.;
Mr. Beatty and Mr. Nicholas, President and Vice-president respectively
of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce,
and Mr. Hugh Savage, Duncan.
Mr. A. MacKinnon, president of the
Cumberland Board of Trade, waB in
the chair and opened the meeting with
a few appropriate remarks.
Tbe toast of "The King" was duly
honored, followed by the singing of
Wednesday evening, Mayor MacDonald
ln the chair, routine business was
dealth with and chairmen appointed
for the various committees.
Navy Unable to Be Represented.
A communication was received from
Captain Adams, of H.M.C.S. Aurora,
stating that the oflicers and men would
be unable to attend the celebration as
orders had been received from Ottawa
that the warships were to be in Esquimalt on May 18, In order to take
part in the celebrations at Victoria on
May 24.
Secretary Brown was Instructed to
write the City Band re supplying
music for the occasion.
Chairmen of Committees.
Chairmen of committees were appointed as follows, with power to add
to the various committees:
Sports and Programme—S. Davis.
Finance—J. Davis and N. Bevis.
Grounds—Hugh Bates.
Collection—J. Sutherland.
Parade and Maypole Dance—J.
Davis.
A committee will visit Union Bay
this week to make arrangements for
the May Queen and her attendants.
Meeting on Tuesday Next.
Everyone interested In making the
celebration a success and giving tbe
children a good time on the Empire's
festal day, are urged to attend the
meeting to be held In the City Hall on
Tuesday evening next, at 7.30.
Rod and Gun Club
Meeting Monday
An important meeting of tbe Cumberland Rod and Gun Club will be
held in Jim English's Pool Room on
Monday, May 2, at 7.30 p.m.
Ail sportsmen, whether members of
the club or not, are cordially invited
to be present, as a strong appeal to
the powers that be is about to be made
with regard to the stocking of the
lake, etc. Election of oflicers will
also take place at this meeting.
Remember the date, Monday, at 7.30.
Owing to a typographical error ln
our last issue, we stated that ticket
No. 36 won the centrepiece raffled by
the Maccabees Lodge. It should have
been No. 316.
NEW TENNIS COURT
Work is procedlng apace on the new
tennis court and It Is expected that
It will be completed and ready for
play some time next week.
and Navy," Mr. MacKinnon welcomed
Captain Adams of the Aurora, and
Lieut. Bailey, of the Patriot, representing the Navy, and also Capt. J. C.
Brown, representing the Army. They
all knew what a great benefit the
Army and Navy had been to the Empire. He called on the assembly to
fill their glasses and drink tbe toast
of "The Army and Navy," coupled
with the names of Captain Adams and
Captain Brown.
Captain Adams Responds.
Capt. Adams, ln responding, said It
gave him great pleasure to be present
that evening. Lieut. Peterson was
unable to* be present owing to another
engagement. The British Navy, said
the speaker, were always Interested lu
the coal question, and he understood
Cumberland produced very good steam
coal. The coal used for tubular boilers has to be very good, said the
speaker. Of late years in the Navy
oil fuel has somewhat taken the place
of coal, but oil has* the disadvantage
that it has to come either from foreign
countries, or British possessions where
it has enormous freight cost.
Coal should be our main source of
supply, said Capt. Adams. He thought
the use of oil ln the Navy was largely
caused by industrial unrest, which
was very acute before the war. If
coal was cheap he had no doubt it
would be used ln the future lu the
Navy.
Vancouver Island Gateway to Orient.
This Island might be described as
the gate to those great empires, China
and Japan, and as the volume of
ocean trade increased he thought
there would be an Increase in the
Navy.
Encourage Children.
Ships, continued the speaker, were
noc sufficient in themselves—they
have to be manned, and the Navy
looked to those parts of the Dominion
contiguous to the sea to supply men
for the Navy. The Empire had been
very proud of the great deeds thc men
from this Dominion had accomplished
during the war. But those had been
comprised very largely to the Army.
We should try and show encouragement to the children—try and turn
out a portion of them as sailors.
It we have a Canadian Navy we
must see to it that it was 100 per
cent, efficient, Bald the captain. An
100 per cent, navy had an advantage
over one only 95 per cent, efficient.
(Applause.)
Responding for tbe Army, Capt. J.
C. Brown said he felt very much unfitted to extol the great deeds that hail
been accomplished by the Army. He
was proud to belong to that part of
the Army known as the Canadians. Thc
Canadian Corps had done more to
bring Canada to the front than anything ever before, thought the speaker.
Canada has taken her place among
the nations ot the world.   It ls now up
to thc commercial branch of the country to keep her there.
There were men of great ability in
the Army, most of whom were now in
business life. But the men who had
returned are not the same that went
away. People did not understand
them. Most of the men had some inefficiency, perhaps not visible to the
naked eye, and the public should remember this and make allowances for
It. We have no fault to find with this
district, continued the captain. The
returned men have* done better here
than in any other part ot Canada.
(Applause.) The employers iu this
district have had great patience. The
general public had also been good to
the returned men. They had now a
Memorial Hall which had been built
by the Canadian Collieries and the
general public.
Another thing is the Memorial Arch.
From this district 28 men who went
paid the supreme sacrifice, aud this
arch is being dedicated to their
memory. It ls hoped to unveil it on
Empire Day. Those of us who are
left feel very proud of the way the
public have responded to the call.
A variety in the proceedings here
occurred, when Mr. J. Walton sang a
humorous song, entitled "Paddy Mc-
Ginty's Goat," which caused much
merriment. Mr. Chris.. Edwards acted
as accompanist during the evening.
Associated Boards of Trade.
The chairman then proposed a
toast, "The Associated Boards of
Trade," coupled with the names of
Mr. Geo. I.-no-eren and Mr. G. W.
Clinton.    C*tS5»&
I'rgC*. "Capitalization of Assets.
Mr. Warren, responding, said it gave
him great pleasure to be tn Cumberland again, especially as representing
the Associated Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island. He strongly urged
the people of Cumberland to capitalize
their assets. You have a lake second
to none on Vancouver Island, which,
If you would only capitalize and let
the tourists know about, would get
results greatly in excess of your expenditure, said Mr. Warren,
The Coal Inquiry.
Severe criticism had been made by
a portion of the press in Vancouver
about the coal industry on Vancouver
island. Vancouver had placed a
stigma on the coal interests, and It
should be the business of those Interests to look into tbe matter and
take some action to show the loyalty
of the coal interests.
Eleven Boards of Trade on Island.
The Associated Boards of Trade of
Vancouver Island now consisted of
eleven boards. A new board had
been formed at Esquimalt and the Alberni one had been reorganized. The
Associated Boards takes up matters
of particular interest to Vancouver
island, it took up with the Railway
Commission the arbitrary freight rates
on lumber, which had now been somewhat reduced.
Telephone Rates.
The matter of the proposed Increase
in telephone rates was given considerable attention by Mr. Warren. The
Telephone Co. had petitioned for permission to Increase the rates In Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo, and If
this was granted he had no doubt the
rates in Cumberland and other districts would be Increased later, Owing to opposition shown, the hearing
bad been adjourned so as to allow
of evidence to be put in to refute some
of the statements in the exhaustive-
report submitted by the company.
Secession of Vancouver Island.
Touching on the agitation In Victoria for the secession of Vancouver
Island as a separate province, the
speaker aald the Associated Boards of
Trade were nut making any recommendation on the matter, hut were
only asking thc boards whether they
wished to discuss it at their meetings.
Ciinilierland-Mrnlllo Road.
Another matter of great Interest to
Cumberland wns the construction of
thu road from Cumberland tn Merville.
This had been unanimously endorsed
by the Associated Boards of Trade of
the province, consisting of 113 boards,
at their recent convention. The Vancouver Island boards had been succes-
ful ln having every resolution they
submitted carried and endorsed.
.Mudr.lii.lt. ('. Campaign.
We should all strongly support thc
"Made-in-B.C. Campaign," said the
speaker. By purchasing products
manufactured In B. C. we were building up our own Industries and not
those of foreign countries.
Other things touched on hy the
speaker wero the agitation for a II. C.
representative on the Canadian National Railway board. At present thc
board consisted solely of eastern men.
The shipping of Canadian mall to
(Continued on Page Two)
Children's Fancy
Dress Ball Friday
Great Interest Being Taken By
Young Folks — Indications
Point to Big Success.
The girls and boys are eagerly looking forward to the Fancy Dress Ball
which is to be held in the Ilo-llo Hall
on Friday of next week. The ladles
of the Hospital Auxiliary are working
hard to make It a success.
It is expected that a large number
of children from Union Bay wlll come
up to take part ln the ball. A similar
affair was held there recently, which
was a pronounced success.
Tho management of the llo llo
Theatre have donated the use of the
hall, and the musicians are donating
their services.
Besides the prizes already published
there are quite a number of specials
to be given. All children in costume
will receive Ice cream nnd candy.
The Grand March commences at 7
o'clock sharp, and from then until 111
the children wlll hold the floor, prize
dances being Interspersed with songs
and recitations. After 10 o'clock the
grown-ups will be allowed to dance.
Admission ls 26 cents for children
and 50 cents for adults. The proceeds
will be devoted to the funds of the
Women's Auxiliary of the General
Hospital.
Judging will commence with the
Grand March, so it ls imperative that
the children be at the hall promptly
at 7 o'clock. The programme has
been arranged as follows:
"God Save the King.
1. Grand March and Maise.
1.  Circassian Circle.
3. Prize Waltz.
4. Fairy Float.
5. Recitation, Rhoda Walton.
6. Song, Master Abrams.
7. Prize Two-Step.
8. Song, Charles Bradley.
Recitation, Edna Bell.
Prize Three-Step.
Song, Laura Brown.
Recitation, Duncan Marshall.
Prize Fox-Trot.
14. Song, Greta Kay.
15. Dance (Highland Fling), Jean
MacNaughton and Helen Parnham.
-16. One-Step.
Maxlxe.
Song, Janet Marshall.'
19. Vernon Castle Fox-Trot.
20. Waltz.
21. Trio, Willie McKay, Norman
Bird and Sidney Mulr.
22. Brownie Two-Step.
23. French Minuet.
24. Song, Jean Abrams.
25. Song, Mary Neil.
26. Three-Step.
Two-Step.
Waltz.
Recitation, Audrey DeCoeur.
29. One-Step.
30. Fox-Trot.
31. Waltz.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
17.
18.
27.
28.
LEIGHTON DENIES HIS
COWS ARE INFECTED
In our advertising columns Mr. H.
Leighton, dairyman of Royston, denies Mie allegation that his cows are
Infected with tuberculosis. He informs his patrons that his cows are
properly and duly tested and Inspected, and are free from disease.
Annual Meeting
General Hospital
Presentation of President's Report, Financial Statement and
Election on Saturday.
Tho annual meeting of the Cumberland Gonerul Hospital will be held ou
Saturday evening at 7 o'clock lu the
Council Chambers.
Mr. (.'buries Graham, President, will
give ills annual report. Other business will include the presentation of
the financial statement, elections of
directors, etc. a,
BASEBALL CLUB
At the meeting ot thc Cumberland
Intermediate Baseball Team held in
the Council Chambers on Tuesday
evening, It was decided to ask Mr.
Harry Conrod to manage the team for
tho coming season. Have Richards
wob elected to the position ol captain
and Albert Winulngham as treasurer.
Practice will start right away and
thc club should be In full swing in
a short time.
The following will do duty for tbe
team: D. Richards, A. Farmer, A.
Wlnningham, C. Graham, V. Dalby,
M. Stewart, J. Bennle, A. Sommerville.
R. Robertson, Hojaml and J. Clark.
School Children
Visit Warships
Despite Inclement Weather All
Children Delighted With Trip
To the Canadian Fleet.
At tbe last meeting of the Parent-
Teacher Association. Dr. tl. K. MacNaughton and Hev. W. I.overseilge
were appointed to interview Captain
Adams, commander of li. M. C. s.
Aurora, now lying in Comox harbor,
to see if arrangement.; could bo made
for an Inspection of the ships by the
teachers ami ohlldren ol" our schools.
Captain Adams received the deputation in his usual genial way ami
assured them that he would make all
the necessary preparations if they
could provide transportation ol" the
children to Comox.
The deputation reported back to
President J. Sutherland, who along
with Dr. Hicks undertook to see those
who had cars anil get their assistance
to make the trip a success. The time
suggested by Capt. Adams was Thursday afternoon, at 'IhiVe o'clock-, as the
most opportune for the occasion.
The principals of both schools, Mr.
C. B. Woods ami Mr*. Chas, B. Burbrldge, made tho necessary arrangements with tlie teachers as to the
number who could go, as tlie number
was limited to 150 on the day sel. As
all the school could not go il. was
(Continued on Page Four)
Allen Players
Here Next Week
First-Class Company  Has Just
Concluded Eighteen .Months'
Engagement at Tacoma.
On Monday and Tuesday ot next
week theatre-goers of Cumberland
will have tbe unusual opportunily of
witnessing plays staged by a first-
class organization, when tho Allen
Players, comprising twelve people,
wlll stage two playB. On Monday tho
ijlg laughing success, "A Pair ot"
Sixes," will be played, and on Tuesday
the comedy-drama sensation, "Tho
Lady nf the Scarlet Poppy" will bo
tho attraction.
The Allen Players have just closed
a successful eighteen months' engagement at the Hippodrome lu Tacoma,
their visit to Vancouver Island being
in the way of a vacation.
This high-class company should ho
greeted with crowded houses on their
brief visit.
'THE THREE PRINCIPLES
OF FIRST AID" SUBJECT
OF ADDRESS SUNDAY
The monthly meeting ot St. John's
First Aid and Mine Rescue Association will be held on Sunday morning
at 10.30, in the First Aid Hall. Mr.
Frank Bond will read a paper entitled "The Three Principles in First
Aid."
CHINESE NATIONALISTS
HOLDING CONVENTION
The Dominion, Convent ion of tha
Chinese Nationalist League, together
with the opening of the new building
t corner of Pender Slreel and Qore
Avenue. Vancouver, will take place at
the latter city on May I. The success
of the party In the rocenl election of
lit*. Sun Vet-Sen as prei Idenl ol the
Republic oi* china I:; to h<> celebrated
at the same time.
Foon Sien. secretary ni tin- local
board, and a formor student ot" the
Cumborland school, has Just retur I
from an ollicial lour ot' thirty difTori al
branches in Alberta ami British Columbia,    lb-  has   Iii-i-ii   tin.un i Ij
nominated as the Cumberland delegate for tlie coming convention, which
»in extend from May i to is. lie lias
the appointment of one ol tlie vice
secretaries for the avont
It Is understood thai Important
luestlniis regarding China nml the
Chinese Nationalist Party iu Canada
anil China are to lie discussed.
Chinese Aviator Special attraction.
One of the features for the convention will he the aerial flights by a
Chinese, which wlll be tlie lirst time
ii Chinaman aviator has performed on
the Coast. Tliis will take place on
May 11.
Another feature will be tlie footbal
match between a team of Chinese from
Cumborland against a city team.
SCHOOL BROKEN INTO
Thursday night some miscreants
broke into die now scliool, entering
through Un' basement ami ransacking
the wiiulo building, going through all
ihe drawers anil cupboards ot the
teachers ami scattering things about
Among ibe damage done was tbo
breaking or a plate in a microscope
Instrument in Principal Wood's cupboard. It is hoped tbe persi n or persons responsible will be apprehended
and dealt with as they deservb. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April 30, 1921.
RIDE A BICYCLE
All real boys like
cycling.
Your doctor says
ridct a bicycle.
Wc have the
famous
PERFECT
C.C.M.
BlfiYCLES
Fitted with the
new guaranteed
Here jles Coaster
Brake.
T.  E  BATE
P. O. Box 279
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31     =
III!
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C,
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe lirpulriiig a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND.  B.C.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pics, etc,
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. 1IAU.I1MY,
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
Wood for Sale
S 1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
w. c.
Happy Valley
WHITE
Phone 92R
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; A. G.
Jones, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEKRIFIKLD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
"Nothing succeeds like success."
Standing solidly behind local Industry means success lor tlmt Industry,
II' the people of British Columbia put
Ihelr shoulders to tho Miide-ln-U.C.
wheel, uml make their weight felt—
the weight of their money, the weight
of their example, nnd the weight, of
their enthusiasm—this province need
never concern Itself about the future.
MANY IMPORTANT
MATTERS DISCUSSED
(Continued from Page One)
WHY YOU SHOULD SAVE
To insure yourself against an unknown
future.
To insure happiness and comfort in your
old age.
To insure provision for your family in
the event of your dentil,
Commence Saving to-day with
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
F. A. McCarthy, .Manager Cumberland Branch
the Orient on slow Oriental boats,
whilst the United States sent her mails
to B. C. to be shipped on the fust
Canadian Pacific liners, came in for
strong comment at the hands of the
speaker,
.Mr. Warren said unemployment was
acute aud would probably be more so.
He said the government should be
urged to have all work possible held
for the winter months to relieve the
situation.
Tourist Camping Kites.
The inauguration ot* tourist camping sites in unorganized districts,
where sanitary arrangements could
be installed under the supervision ol"
the engineers or road foremen, was
strongly urged. These should be Inaugurated by the government throughout the province, especially on Vancouver Island, which would have very
heavy tourist traffic this season.
Egg-Marking Art.
The Associated Board of Trade
wanted all eggs coming into B, C. from
foreign countries to be marked. Tho
net required that eggs from China
should be so marked, but the shippers,
to avoid ibis, shipped them to Seattle
lirst, und then to B. C, thus avoiding
the marking regulation.
Experimental Farm at (uurleuaj.
They were asking the government
to Install an Experimental Farm at
Courtenay, which could be located on
the Indian Heserve. Failing this the
government should appoint a deputy
there.
Cameron Lake Forest.
Mr. Warren laid emphasis on the
necessity of retaining tlie standing
limber along the highways, especially
adjacent to Cameron Lake, which contained some of the most beautiful
lorest scenery in the world.
At the conclusion of bis address Mr.
Warren was heartily applauded.
Mr. G. W. Clinton, Vice-President
ol* the Associated Boards of Trade,
oiietly addressed tiie gathering,
ilr.  Harold  Roberts delighted  the
meeting with his song, "Alone on the
Kail."   He was heartily encored and
responded with "Little Irish Girl."
Member for Comox Speaks.
Chairman MacKinnon then called on
Rev. Thos, Menzies, member in the
Provincial House for the t'ouiox District.
Mr. Menzies said he was pleased to
be present that evening and take part
in contributing to tbe success ot the
meeting, jokingly remarking that the
people in Courtenay had to look up to
Cumberland, as tins place is 5UU ieei
biguer than the valley.
it gave him pleasure to welcome
the representatives of the Navy. They
had beeu lent to Canada for possibly
three years, but he thought they were
almost Canadians aln^isli. and would
remain here after their leem was up
and help us to get a lleet tol Siis vast
Dominion.
The speaker then dwelt on some ol
the things accomplished during the
past session oi the House, wbieii ban
been unique iu one respect, in thai
they had to solve one matter which
had never beeu done before, the act
for tho government control and sale
of liquor. Unless the people get behind the act and carry it out, it will
not prove a success and we will'be in
a worse condition. They considered
this tlie most important piece ot legislation put through, and have endeavored to carry oul tlie people's
mandate. Under this mandate they
could not allow clubs anil other places
the privilege of selling beer, oul u
the people lind the act unworkable or
unsatisfactory, they could give another mandate iu say six months ot a
year's time aud have it changed lo
permit of the sule of draught beer.
Tlie government expected a revenue
of $2,500,000 under the act.
DM Well us Independent.
It had been said that if Comox sent
an independent member to the House
they would not get us good treatment
as if a government member was sent,
but the speaker claimed to have done
as much as a government member
could have. There were only live
other districts in the province with
larger grants than Comox. He bad
secured $60,500 this year. This was
lightly smaller than last year, but it
was well known that a government
going out of power spent all the money
they could in the constituencies in the
hope of being elected again.
Head System Unsatisfactory,
.Mi*. .Menzles said he wns not in favor
of tlie present system ol* rnadnniking
as conducted in the province. The
people didn't got value ior their money
(applause). Wo haven't men who are
qualified to make good roads. The
United States have men who ure
thoroughly qualified to make anil keep
mi good roads, They mnke It a special
tudy.
We In British Columbia must remodel our rond system altogether.
The cry all over the province was [or
better roads. As an Illustration of Inefficiency he Instanced the dllatorl-
ness ln repairing a culvert. In which
12 days were consumed in doing work
which should have been done in three.
Comox district had very Utile to show
for the $00,000 spent on roads last
year. A government that hadn't a good
road policy will go to the wall, said
the member.
He had been after the department
to send up a rock crusher, as the
shingle used on the roads was ot little
use under the present system.
Mr. Menzies believed this was the
richest district in the whole of Britisli
Columbia, it was a wonderfully rich
district and contributes more to the
coffers of the province than any other
district. It was too large for one
member to cover, with its 61 polling
stations and 6000 voters. It contributes more than its share toward
the upkeep of the province.
Wants Liquor Store for Cumberland,
As far as Cumberland wns concerned
he believed It would come Into its
own. He had taken up the different
matters with the departments which
the Board of Trade had put   iu   his
SAVE $10.00 ON
YOUR NEW SUIT
JUST ARRIVED THIS WEEK—A NICE RANGE OF MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S
TWO AND THREE-PIECE SUITS, AT THE NEW PRICES. FROM
$27.50 to $35.00
A reduction of $10.00 to $12.50 on prices that were asked only a short time ago. Prices
may stiffen up, so you are perfectly safe in making your selection right now. We
guarantee satisfaction or your money back.
Boys' Bloomer Suits and Pants
A NICE RANGE OF BOYS' IiLOOMER SUITS, in &rj £(. up (PIP AA
Navy Serge, Grey and Brown Tweed effects.  Priced at  «JJ I oO\J to tPAtloU"
50 PAIRS BOYS'KNICKERS, in Tweeds; ages 4 to 8 years. <J*-t   PA
Price, per pair    tp J. #OU
50 PAIRS BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS, in Navy Serge, Grey, Brown and      (PO 7j»
Dark Tweeds.   Good value .it $3.50, now selling at    •\uLnui O
BOYS' SWEATERS, in all sizes. <J»-|   AA up <J»n  PA
Prices from  JpAoUU to tp«" Uv
Boys' and Children's Shoes
Another shipment direct from the factory of BOYS' and CHILDS' SCHOOL <I»Q PA
SHOES. See our Boys' School Shoe—it cannot be duplicated anywhere at «pO»OU
A FULL LINE OF WHITE CANVAS, RUBBER and LEATHER-SOLED FOOTWEAR
AT RIGHT PRICES
THE MODEL
CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
CUMBERLAND
OPPOSITE POST OFFICE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
hands. He had spoken for a liquor
store for Cumberland, as well as six
others in the district, being, Union
Buy, Campbell lliver, Powell River,
Alert Bay and Port Alice.
Mr. Menzies said the Board of Liquor
Control had in their power the making
or breaking of the,government.
.Mr. Menzles said he had acted Independently in the House, voting with
the government and also with Mr.
Bowser. He believed in voting for
what he thought right. He looked
forward to the time when the old
party lines would be sunk into oblivion, nnd the province be ruled by a
directorate. Best men must be sent
to legislate for und by the people. Wo
live in an ago of evolution, continued
Mr. .Menzies; new ideas ure being
evolved as a result of the war. Party-
ism will soon be a thing of the past.
Outcry Against Lowering oi Wages.
There was a great outcry against
the government lowering tlie wages
<5 cents a day on road work in the
province, which the speaker said was
a great mistake. The government
bad acted rather hastily in reducing
the men's wages when the prices of
foods had only come down slightly.
He hopes and expects wages will be
raised 37 lk cents a day as a result of
an interview he and another member
iiad with the government.
Mr. .Menzies talk was listened to
with close attention and was heartily
applauded.
"Cumberland and District."
Mr. MacKinnon then called on the
assembly to fill their glasses and
drink the toast of "Cumberland and
District," coupled with the names of
.Mayor .MacDonald and Mr. Thomas
Oraham, saying they had every good
wish lor tlie Collieries and Its oltlcers
and appreciated what it had done for
Cumberland.
Mayor MacDonald thanked the
meeting for tho toast. Cumberland
was prosperous, and the city was improving every year. They had paved
two blocks last year and hoped to do
another two HiIb yenr. Koyston Koad
ivus In very lind condition, said the
mayor; It kept tourists away from
Cumberland nnd the Luke. He hoped
the new member would do his best to
have this road put iu good condition.
He had snld he would and we will hold
blm to his word (laughter).
Canada Centre of Empire.
Mr. Thomas Graham said it gave
blm great pleasure to be there that
night and also to see tho representatives ot our new Canadian Navy.
Canada, practically speaking, said
Mr. Graham, was the centre of the
British Empire. Being washed by the
Pacilic and Atlantic the Navy must be
a very Important part of our defences.
The Pacilic is going to be the scene
of the greatest shipping activity the
world has ever seen. We should lend
every effort in encouraging the upbuilding of our Canadian Navy.
Speaking in a humorous vein Mr.
drahnni said he was much interested
in some of the remarks made by Mr.
Warren, especially to splitting up of
the province into other provinces—
particularly in view of some of the
laws passed by the Legislature, especially In reference to raising the
salaries*of the legislators. (Laughter.)
If tbe province was split up perhaps.
we could all   become   members   and
raise our own salaries.
Cameron Lake Should lie Keserveil.
Cameron Lake should be reserved
for posterltly—It was one of the most
beautiful tracts of timber on the North
American continent.
Speaking of the attacks of the Vancouver Sun derogatory to the coal interests of Vancouver Island, Mr.
Graham said in all communities there
were people who will step over the
bounds of reason. He was pleased to
see the other papers had treated the
question fairly. The coal mines on
Vancouver Island are as Intelligently
managed as any mine on eartli (applause).
As regards Capt. Adams' remarks
on coal, the speaker would suggest
that the coal from this district was
looked upon as among tile best steam
coal produced anywhere. He instanced tlie famous run of thc United
States warship Oregon on her hurried
trip to Manila, at which time she was
burning Comox coal.
We have many tilings in this province to be thankful for. In Eastern
British Columbia we have coal not
surpassed on   this   mundane  sphere.
When transportation improves this
coal can be brought to tidewater.
Here in Cumberland our mines have
worked very well and I have no doubt
they will continue to do so, said Mr.
Graham. Nature had been rather unkind in her coal deposits about here,
as tlie coal occurred in such broken
seams, making the cost of mining
heavy.
He thanked the Board of Trade and
people for their co-operation and
assistance, which had done much towards the success ol the company.
During 1920 the citizens of British
Columbia increased their Imports of
farm products from other provinces
by $312,767; but they increased their
Imports from foreign countries by
$3,51)9,175, according to ligujes compiled by the government.
If the purchasers of British Columbia will make use of the goods that
they produce ond manufacture, there
will be no unemployment in the
country.
The Corner Store
NAVEL ORANGES 3 dozen for $1.00
NICE FRESH DATES, per lb 20c
RHUBARB, per lb 10c
RIPE TOMATOES, per lb 45c
RIPE STRAWBERRIES, per basket 40c
SUGAR, per sack   $2.65
PURITY FLOUR, per sack $3.00
OLD DUTCH CLEANSER 10c
MRS. HAINES' MARMALADE, 4-lb. tins $1.00
Ladies' Heather Hose, $1.00
Ladies'Brown Oxfords $6.75 pair
THE  CORNER STORE
WM. GORDON Phone 133 April 36,1921.
MB  CUMBERLAND   iSLANDEft
1<
Three
What's a
Guarantee ?
Our idea of a guarantee is that the
manufacturer who givesone^which hasn't
any tags and loopholes—believes in his
product.
So much so that he stands ready to make
good any loss suffered by the purchaser
through defective material or workmanship.
It's mainly because of the guarantee that
goes with them that we are selling and
recommending Ames Holden "Auto-
Shoes."
Ol course, we know they give the cheapest mileage too—tbat they are dependable tires for any
make ol car, anywhere. But it's the guarantee
that we talk about most. It's the straight and
clean-cut, without time or mileage limits, ft
shifts our responsibility on to the manufacturer
and he lives up to every letter of it. Come in and
let us tell you about thc guarantee that goes with
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Size
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,  LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer  The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
Cascade Beer  The Beer Without a Peer,
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
HOME IS NO FURTHER AWAY THAN THE
NEAREST TELEPHONE
The man who is frequently on the road realizes the
value of the telephone. "Weighed against the comfort
and help the assurance from home that all's well gives
me," says one, "the small sum of the toll charge
doesn't count at all."
The telephone highway is always the shortest way
home.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small sums, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End End End
Deposits of: IstYr.       SndYr.       8hr1tr.
$ 1.00 Weekly       $ 52.69        $106.95        $162.84
10.00  Monthly        121.65 246.92 375.98
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J, GRAINGER, Manager.
GENERAL NEWS
St. Thomas, Ont, Horticultural
Society, tn its annual report, says:
"War Is being waged upon the billboard nuisance and the tacking ot
cards and signs upon fences and other
places   without   permission   of   the
Campers and travellers were responsible for 246 fires starting in the
forests of British Columbia last year.
This was a considerable reduction
from the previous year.
The forests of British Columbia ln
1920 yielded products to tbe value of
(92,628,807, an increase of (22,000,000
over 1919.
Over '"."OO trees have been planted
In the parks and on the streets of
Calgary since 1912 by the Parks
Board. What these trees will mean
in comfort for the pedestrian and ln
the appearance of tbe cltly ln a few
years can bardly be appreciated.
Digging for water, J. F. Irwin, of
Ardell, on the Moose Jaw-Asslnlboia
line, came across a seam of coal,
which may prove one of tbe most
valuable in Saskatchewan, and for
which at the present time the discoverer is considering the offer of a
quarter of a million dollars. The And
was made last fall when Mr. Irwin,
prosecuting his search for water, came
on the seam 27 feet befow the surface
after passing through a bed of quicksand. During the winter months he
sunk a shaft to the coal deposit, the
quality of which ls somewhat similar
to the western bituminous coal.
liim
I Milk Consumers!
| Notice the Cream Line on the
| Comox Creamery Milk Bottles
( THAT TELLS THE TALE I
H OUR MILK IS CAREFULLY SELECTED FROM COMOX JERSEY' * 1
= HERDS KNOWN TO BE ABSOLUTELY  HEALTHY  AND  KEPT
§g UNDER THE BEST HYGIENIC CONDITIONS
U You are taking no risk on Comox Creamery Milk |
p Milk is now being delivered daily in Cumberland and Courtenay :
=§f Phone 8, Courtenay, for Representative to Call. =
Comox Creamery Assn
6     =
Several specimens of Karakule
from which breed is obtained
the best grade of Persian lamb, are
being sent to tbe Vernon district as
experiments. Climate and natural
conditions are said to be ideal for the
raising of these sheep, resembling
very much those of Asia, from which
the best Karakule pelts came from in
the past.
Alberta coal shipments to tbe North
Pacific Coast, for the bunkering of
steamers plying out of Prince Rupert and for Industrial purposes, will
soon begin on a larger scale than
hitherto.
COURTENAY, B.C.
NANAIMO AMENDS
CITY MILK BYLAW
There is a movement on foot in Penticton to have the municipality donate
a site for a boys' building and to have
the edifice constructed out of public
supscriptlons.
The American Civil War began in
1860, when South Carolina seceded,
followed by many otber states, and
ended with the fall of Richmond,
March 29, 1865. This war put an end
to slavery ln the United States.
Many campers and hunters add
greatly to the danger of forest fires
by their carelessness. They are not
asked to curtail their enjoyment of
the forest, but Just to exercise that
care which they always use wheu
handling fire about their own places.
HISTORY OF POTATO
Next December, the tercentenary of
the planting of the first potato in
North America will be celebrated.
"The potato entered this country,"
Dr. Laufer said, ln an address before
the American Association for the Advancement of Science, "not as surmised by De Candolle, through an
alleged band of Spanish adventurers,
but ln a perfectly respectable manner from Bermuda, where it had been
introduced some years previously
from England. It ls a prank of fortune that the potato, originally a
denizen of Chile and Peru, appears
as a naturalized Englishman in tlie
United States. The potato had arrived In England about 1586, or a
little later."
The City Milk Bylaw was amended
at Nanaimo City Council, following the
closing of dairies owing to the prevalence of tubercular-infected cows,
and now reads as follows: "Before
a dairy licence is Issued a clean bill
of health must be shown by the
dairyman, and compulsory inspection
of herds must be made every six
months.
THE NIGHT LIFE OF
"LUNNON  TOWN"
London Is rapidly becoming tbe
centre of the world's nocturnal pleasures. At one time, of course, Paris
held the palm, then Berlin made an
attempt witli some success to become
queen of the pleasures of the night.
But now in our own Empire's capital
there is on every side a straining after
the weird and the bizarre, and some
of the effects produced are certainly
remarkable, even If the taste ia questionable.
At one of Heath Brandon's "harlequinade" dances the other evening, a
knight attired In black armor entered.
All the lights sank save one, and In
the gloom was heard the voice of the
black knight announcing that death
had entered. The band softly played
the "Danse Macabre," and then there
slowly appeared a procession of
monks with candles, and a draped
coffin. This, on being deposited on
the floor, was opened, and out of It
appeared a beautiful model who is
appearing at the London pavilion
revue. Attired In black, she proceeded to execute a series of fantastic
dances.
CONVICTS RUN "STILL"
IN MICHIGAN PRISON
BATTLESHIPS WILL
HAVE "GAS-MASKS'
A plan for the protection of battleships at sea against an enemy's poisonous fumes by the installation of "gas
masks" for the whole ship was outlined In an address to oflicers and
students of the military academy at
West Point, N.Y., by Prof. W. Lee
Lewis, bead of the chemistry department of North Western University
and inventor of the deadly gas "Lewisite" perfected just as the world war
closed. "We face the possibility ln
naval warfare of the future of armor-
piercing toxic and tear shells, smoke
screens, toxic smoke clouds and Invisible toxic fumes," said Prof. Lewis.
"We may also consider in this connection parallel defensive measures
such as a gas mask for the whole
battleship."
There are three antycyclops In the
United States. An antycyclop Is a
person that is totally blind in tlie
light but in the dark can see very
well. If a flashlight ls Bhown In their
eyes at night a thin, bluish film
passes over the eyes.
IONIA, Mich.—The great, unquenchable thirst must bo appeased, and It
does not seem to matter much whore
the drouth is, for it always seems to
obtain easement.
Major Marsh, In charge of Ionlu
State Prison, discovered n liquor still
In full operation In one nf the cell-
blocks of tho prison. There was every
Indication that the still had been
functioning for some time, anil Ihe
stuff that it manufactured carried "n
kick ln each heel."
It was found that the convicts had
Htolen molasses from the prison
kitchen and were distilling It In the
cell. The outfit was a most complete
one, according to the Jail officers, und
could turn out hulf a gallon of a most
vile concoction every day.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE~a^d MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $150,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,00
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
SAFETY FIRST
P.O. Box 93 Established 1907
Does Your  House
Need Repairs?
WHEN SUNSHINE APPEARS
IT MAKES US FEEL BRIGHT
Look around the house and see
if it needs repairs.
Now after the winter
Your house with dirt appears thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
Call  in  tho  Painter and  have your
house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter Cumberland, B. C.
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY.
ESTIMATES GIVEN.
Lies slumbering here
One William Lake;
He heard the bell
But had no brake.
At fifty miles
Drove Ollie Pldd;
Ho thought he wouldn't
Skid but did.
At ninety miles
Drove Edward Shawn;
The motor stopped,
But Ed. kept on.
Beneath this sod
Lies William Whlssen,
He didn't stop
To look or listen.
Here six feet deep,
Is William Jolley;
His engine stalled
In front of a trolley.
Ashes to ashes
And dust to dust,
Hill was showing speed
When a tire "bust."
In memory of
A. Cbancen Takelt,
lie didn't mnko It.
METHODIST CHURCH
INSTALLS PICTURES
VANCOUVER.—No notion wns taken
by the finance committee at tlle city
hall on the application of Wesley
Church lo be relieved from thetbeutre
licence fee charged against it because
the church hns been giving moving
picture shows, to which It. advertlsod
that a contribution was expected at
the door.
The church will, nevertheless, escape the licence fee as long as It carries out Its announced Intention for
the future to discontinue this form of
advertising and leaves visitors entirely free to contribute or otherwise.
It was explained to the committee thai
as a matter of fact these motion pictures nre not run for profit at all, hut
as a method of attracting people to
church, and an expenditure of $1400
had been Incurred In making the
necessary preparations for showing
them.
The committee. In deciding to take
no action, did so in order to avoid
creating a precedent, but with the
understanding that the licence charge
in this instance will not he made.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phono <!«
(illlll li rllllld
Young Steer Beef, lender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
llome-inade Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Lonf
Hollod Hani
limn llologna
Headcheese.
Hare you tried our I'iekled I'ork
and Corned Motif 1 II is dolicious.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AMI WORKMANSHIP
aUARANTEEl)
RUBBER   HEELS
Fixed  While II  Wall
I'llII.I.II'.S'   MILITAItY    It..     '•#•',•;
SOLES ANI) HEELS.      U";*'--^*/
I &3
S. DAVIS, DAU
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $5.00 Four*
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
April 30, 1921.
Tlir     PIIMDCDI  Akin    IQI ANflCD   raeetiI*S in Toronto, there undoubtedly would lie a great
I lit     UUlTlDCnLAIlU    luLHllUaCIl  switching off of the Canadian buying power that is now
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY. APRIL 30, 1921.
BOOST AND BUY GOODS MADE IN CANADA
An Editorial from the Toronto Mail and Empire.
Among the resolutions passed at the joint conference of
the Dominion Retail Merchants' Association, The Canadian
Credit Men's Trust Association, thc Wholesale Grocers'
Association and the Canadian Manufacturers' Association
was one calling upon these several organizations to petition the Government to include in the forthcoming budget
a sum of money to promote an advertising campaign for
ecluc nting the people as to the Importance of buying goods
made In Canada.
Thut the Government recognizes the need for such a
campaign is shown by the fact thut ministers themselves
seize every opportunity to impress upon the public the
grave need there Is for our consumers to give their preference to articles of Canadian production. Especially bj
the Minister or Finance have appeals been made in thi;
behalf, in the twelvemonth ending with February oui
Imports exceeded our exports to the amount of nearly
$76,000,00*0. Tbe tolal value of the goods we Imported
from tbe United States in that period was $335,000,000
greater than the total value of the goods we exported to
the United States in the same time. How heavily this odds
is telling upon the value of the Canadian dollar in United
States exchange is shown by the current quotation of 12
per cent, discount.
Within Canada itself increasing unemployment ls another adverse consequence of this unequal trade, it is
contrary to the interest of the Canadian people that such
a state of affairs should continue, and we feel sure that
all that is needed to rally the "people to the support ol*
home industry on which most of them depend and to the
support of the worth of the Canadian dollar is a campaign
of education, carried on systematically and under Government auspices. Such a campaign cannot lie waged effectively without liberal use of tho weapon balled printers'
Ink. Of the potency of advertising the Governments no
longer need to be told. On that point thoy had their own
enlightening education in the war time, when with such
telling effect they summoned to their aid tho principal
organs of publicity. Victory loans, Red Cross appeals,
movements to raise patriotic funds, "drives" for increasing production, wero crowned with .undreamt of success
by the use of the enginery of the press, witli its "tnnk"-like
power of climbing over difficulties.
With good results some of the leading banks In this
country have made use of newspaper advertising for tin.
education of the people ns to the Importance of givin*
their preference to articls produced in Canada. These
advertisements were directed to the particular object
showing why antl how the Canadian dollar
before the American dollar. If the Governments were to
carry on such an advertising campaign as tlle one recommended by the conference   of   commercial   organizations
applied to the United States market and a transfer of that
power to our own market. Our monetary stock would rise
across the line, trade would brighten up on this side of the
line, plants that are now shut down or are running light
would come to life again, and, many of the people .who are
idle would be back on the pay list again. The people of
Canada have heretofore always shown themselves ready to
answer a call that comes from headquarters, as long as
thnt call is carried from one end of the country to the
other by relays that make It perfectly clear to all. As we
hnve said, the appeals that were made In war time through
the press of Canada In every case brought forth the wholehearted response thut wns needed. When the message is
earnest enough and sent along all the wires, the people
will answer to' it. Canada's splendid volunteer army was
enlisted iu this way, Now let us nll^get in earnest about
the revival of business, the upholding of Canadian industry, and the bringing of the Canadian dollar back to a
parity with the American dollar. It is a time for advertising on the part of our men of business nnd our Governments, und every Canadian should make himself u medium
of advertising Canadian goods.    Blow Ihe trumpet for the
'made in 'Canada" movement, and   buy  Canadian-made
goods as well as "boost" them.
CONTEMPORARY  QUIPS
As long as we don't beat our swords Into oil shares
we're sure.
It is getting to be impossible to tell tbe seasons by tbe
weather, says u New York paper.
Great Britain appears to he n body of land wholly surrounded by hot wnter.
One renson the country is short of homes is that too
much money has been put into tlie cellars.
The most wonderful thing about the tree of liberty is
the amount of grafting it is able to survive.
Germany is undoubtedly willing to pay its debt to the
Allies if permitted to nnme tlie nmount of the debt.
Farmers complniu that ut the present price of hides a
carcass isn't worth skinning. The shoe makers still hold
that the public is, however.
European kings appear to adhere to the Salvation Army
doctrine thnt a man may be down but is never out.
The wnges of sin nre about the only ones that are not
being reduced.   .
Either the crime vyave is subduing or the people are
getting used to it.
Perhaps Mr. Ford's attitude may be explained by the fact
thut nenrly nil Jews prefer better cars.
The end of Heinle's obstinacy Is nenr. The Allies are
taking over the breweries in occupied territories.
You can't expect the dove to settle down while the
riveters keep up such a din on new battle-ships.
Nothing else in nil the range of human experience Is so
expensive, but nothing else pays and repays so much as
honest-hearted, intelligent loving. Love is the only word
In the language big enough to make a definition of God.
"God In Love." Decent lovo of one man for one woman,
wns humblediand of one woman for one man—on such sanctity Ia the
human rnce builded. Within the gleaming glory of such
charmed circle do the children come and grow to the
splendid soldiery of service.—Los Angeles Times.
TIIE
I ANNUAL  MEETING |
= OF THE SUBSCRIBERS TO THE |
| Cumberland General Hospital |
H will be held in the City Council Chambers on 3
| Saturday, April 30th, at 7 p.m. j
jf for the purpose of receiving the Annual Report and the |
=j Annual Election of Officers and Directors of the Hos- M
|p pital for the Ensuing Year. |§
jjj If you are satisfied—COME AND SAY SO.   If you are H
H| not satisfied—COME AND SAY SO.   ONLY COME H
H ANYHOW—7 p.m. sharp, in the  Council  Chambers. f§
!§ T. MORDY, Secretary. H
NEW WINDOW KOI! JIODBL STORK
To allow of tbe better window display of goods, .Mr. Frank Partridge
has made alterations to his building
whereby nn additional window has
been Installed, I'osldes giving needed
additional display facilities for his
many lines, it gives u decidedly pleasing appearance to the store.
.Mr. Hicks, of Victoria, representing
Helntzman and Co. Pianos, und Mr. P.
V. Hicks, Inner from lleintzninn *i, Co.
store, Victoria, are expected lo register nt the Cumberland about May 3rd
Orders for tunings may he left for P.
V. Hicks ut tlie Cumberland Hotel or
ut S. Davis' Shoo Store.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sunday, liny I, Fifth Afler Easter
2.30 p.m., Sunday Scliool.
7 p.m., Evensong.
SCHOOL CHILDREN
VISIT WARSHIPS
(Continued from Page One)
In the County Court of Nanaimo
Holden at Cumberland, B. C.
In the matter of the Estate of NELS
0. I.KI.AM), deceased) and In the
matter of tiie Administration Act.
ROHAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Rev. Futher K. Beaton, Comox.
Sunday, May I, iii'ih After Enster
Mass at 11 a.m.
I'ltKSHYTKItlAN SERVICES
Rev. Jus. Hood, Pustor.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
ORACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. G. B. Kinney, IM, F.R.G.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
TAKE NOTICE tliat by order of
Judge Barker mndo the loth day of
April, 1921, I was appointed Administrator to the estate of Bald Nels G.
Leland, deceased, and ull parties having claims against the said estate are
hereby required to furnish same, properly verified, Urine on or before the
1st day of June, A.D. 1021, and all
parties indebted to tlie said-estate are
required to pny the amount of their
indebtedness to me forthwith.
WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 22nd day of April, 1921.
£-18
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
April 22—Charmer, Vancouver.
April 23—Active, coastwise.
April 24—Swell and Scow, Victoria.
April 25—Moerijk, Rotterdam, Holland; Masset, coastwise.
April 26—Coutli, coastwise.
April 27 —Melanope, Vancouver;
Faultless, coastwise; Active, coastwise.
thought most advisahle to start with
tlie High School and go right down
the various classes until the lull number was arrived at. It was felt that
the visit would be a great source of
education to the buys and girls in the
higher classes who were dealing wilh
national affairs in their regular curriculum.
The response for cars was most generous, and the Parent-Teachers request us to express their deep appreciation to the many well-wishers of
the children for their consideration iu
giving their own time as well as providing tlie means of transport.
The only cloud in the children's
sky was that, instead of the sun sinning as it should on such an occasion,
rain poured down ull the time, hut
even that was not enough to daunt the
optimism of the hoys and girls who
were looking forward witli great expectation to tlie event.
The cars, to the number of thirty,
made an imposing army as they lined
the main thoroughfare of our city
■waiting for the signal to go, which
was given promptly on time. To avoid
possible accidents in racing or any
such events, .Mayor MacDonald led
the procession, and no one was allowed
to travel faster than the leader, which
ensured that everyone arrived at
Comox at 2.4.r), in plenty of time tor
Ihe first trip across.
Captain Adams made all arrangements for tho transportation of tlie
visitors from the wharf lo Uie vessels,
and great credit is due his oflicers and
men for tlm expeditious manner in
which tlie whole number of the 150
children and IH teachers, as well as
the owners of cars, were conveyed to
the ships.
Once on board, Ihe various olllcers
formed parties and groups, wliieh they
led all over tho vessels, giving the
necessary information and detail uf
the very intricate pieces of machinery
and gunnery; in fact the whole ship is
ono vast arrangement of the ingenuity and genius as displayed in the
ever-increasing array of tho implements of war, or perhaps, as it should
be rather said, the Implements tbat
stand for peace, or which tend to
keep peace.
Some of the teachers were specially
interested in the officers' moss room,
where tea was served very daintily,
and should their choice lie in that
direction no doubt they will enjoy
many afternoon teas in tlie future.
After the inspection was fully over,
the rapidity with which 200 people
can be transferred such a distance was
again shown in tho speedy manner
they were brought to tho wharf again,
and the cars lined up were soon loaded and on their way back to Cumber-
laud.
The Parent-Teacher Association desire to heartily thank Capt. Adams and
his staff for their most generous attention and consideration in thus making it possible for so many of our rising citizens to view the fleet.
1
MAY   DAY   SPECIALS
Children's Play Suits, in Cotton Jerseys,
in Rose, Navy and Copen. ! pedal at,
per suit   $2.00
Ladies' Fine Black Mercerized 1 isle Hose;
regular 75c; special price, pail* 50c
Ladies' White Lisle Gloves;.special value,
pair   25c
Wool Special—Heavy Black Fingering
Wool, put up in |4-lb. skeins, each 50c
Shoe  Specials
Child's Black Patent Strap Slippers, per
pair   $1.75
Ladies' Black Patent Pumps, low heel;
special value at   $4.75
Ladies' Vici Kid Theo Tie Slipper, white
kid lined, with Louis heels. Special, per
pair   $7.50
Ladies' Chotolate Vici Kid Oxfords, newest lasts, with medium Cuban heels.
Special, per pair $7.50
Sole Agents for the district for Invictus
Shoes, "The Best Good Shoe for Ladies."
0
Just received, a large shipment of "Mon- §|
arch" Floss and "Monarch" Down Knit- §
ting Wools, in all the popular shades. =i
Gent's Department (§
Special Sale  of Men's  Black  Chambray =
Shirts; regular'$2.25; sale price $1.25 ==
Special Sale of Men's Worsted and Tweed S
Pants; regular $8.50; sale price.... $5.50 B
Special Sale of Boys' Bloomer Pants; reg. §
$3.00 to $3.50; sale price, pair $2.25 g
Special Sale of Boys' All-Wool Button-on- =
Shoulder Jerseys; regular $2.50 to $3.00 Ws
value; sale price $1.95. §j
The balance of our stock of Football Boots, j§§
regular $7.50 a pair, to clear at.... $5.50 ||
Sole Agents for the district for Invictus ||
Shoes, "The Best Good Shoe for Men." M
Men's Tape-Neck and  Sport Stripe All- H
Wool Jerseys; special price $6.00 =
Men's One-Piece Auto Combination Over- HI
alls, in khaki shade, at special values. 3
Just received, a large shipment of Men's §|
Ready-to-Wear Clothing, in brown, navy §g
and grey, from $27.50 to $45.00 H
H
Illllllllllllllllllli
■Illl
illl
Illllllllllllllllllli
The Studebaker
Light-Six
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks Motors
LIMITED
m     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C
.     . .   .■ April 30, 19SJ1.
-THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
1(
Fi-
FOOTBALL GAME WAS
ONE-SIDED CONTEST
Cumberland United Had Little
Trouble in Scoring 10 Goals
Against Yarrows Sunday
Music and Photoplays
MARGUERITE MARSH IN
"CONQUERED HEARTS'
The football game played last Sun
day between the Cumberland United
and Yarrows of Victoria turned out to
be a regular farce, very little good
football being shown. Pilling scored
the first goal after seven minutes of
play, Milligan repeating two minutes
later, and the same player making it
No. 3 after 20 minutes. From this
period on right up to the final whistle
Is was a most uninteresting display.
Half-time arrived with the local team
leaders by 3 to 0.
On resuming play in the second
period it was hoped the Victoria boys
would put up a better exhibition and
extend the locals a little more, but
the fans were to be disappointed. It
was a case of centreing the ball and
the local forwards walking right
through, no less than seven goals being scored in this period. All the forwards with thc exception of Banner-
man took a turn at scoring, Milligan
being top scorer with 4 goals to his
credit. Home scored 2, Irvine 2,
Hitchens 1 and Pilling 1.
The game was played under the
Vancouver Island league schedule
and ended with Cumberland United
whitewashing the Yarrows by 10 goals
to nothing.
NOT FED ENOUGH BALL.
Mrs. Bannerman took great pride ln
her husband's prowess ou the football
field, and nearly always went to see
him play.
On one occasion Bnunerman only
got the ball once or twice. "They
don't teed Bannerman enough," remarked; one spectator. "He'd do a
lot more for the team it they fed him
properly."
Crash! An umbrella came down on
the speaker's head, while Mrs. Bannerman screeched angrily in his ear:
"I'd have you know he's fed alright
young fellow! The very idea! He
gets eggs nnd becon every morning
for his breakfast, rump steak for his
dinner, and tripe and onions for his
supper.   What more can he want?"
A Picture Showing a Thrilling
Fight, Dance Hall Scenes
and Brilliant Parties.
"Conquered Hearts," a vehicle peculiarly suited to the subtle appeal
that ls Marguerite Marsh's, will be
the drawing card at the Ilo-llo on
Thursday night. The story has an
underlying foundation of true character, is well represented and is replete
with what amongst fans is known as
genuine heart throbs. The choice of
the star was a peculiarly happy one.
"Conquered Hearts" presents an
old-fashioned theme in a new fashioned manner and is based on the
belief that "right must win." It deals
with tho new type of woman as she
Is popularly conceived these days—
ambitious, climbing step by step
against odds, disregarding home ties
and trying to put love out of her life.
When she Is at the height of her
career she suddenly realizes that she
has overlooked the one thing that
makes life worth while. She goes
back to the tie that binds.
TENDERS FOR COAL
COSY ICE CREAM FABLOH
Wm. Henderson, the confectioner
and ice cream purveyor, is having
considerable alterations made to his
parlor. It is being thoroughly renovated and divided into cosy compartments, in an artistic manner. Patrons
will he pleased with the new arrangement.
Where Mere Man Shines.
Of course the women wear funny-
looking things, but a celluloid collar
is not one of them.
SEALED tenders addressed to the
undersigned and endorsed "Quotation
for Coal, Dominion Buildings, British
Columbia," will be received until 12
o'clock noon, Monday, May 16, 1981,
for the supply of coal for the public
buildings throughout the province of
British Columbia.
Combined specification and form of
tender can be obtained from the Purchasing Agent, Department of Public
Works, Ottawa, and from the Caretakers of the different Dominion
Buildings.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the forms supplied by
the Department and in accordance
with the conditions set forth therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to tbe order of the Minister of Publlc Works, equal to 10 p.c,
of the amount of the tender. War Loan
Bonds of the Dominion will also be
accepted as security, or war bonds and
cheques if required to make up an odd
amount.
By order.
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, Ont., April 15, 1921.      2-19
GEORGE WALSH IN
"PUTTING ONE OVER'
A Story Replete With Humor
And Tense Dramatic Situations and Complications.
William Fox's breezy and versatile
star, George Walsh, is to be the attraction at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Friday
night next, when he will appear in a
thrilling mystery comedy called "Putting One Over." Some Walsh feats of
extraordinary daring are promised;
but primarily the story is said to be
an admirable one, replete with humor
and tense with dramatic situations and
complications which apparently defy
solution.
As Jack Trevor, a New York salesman bound for Texas, Walsh is caught
In a train wreck and a party of daring
crooks manipulate his appearance
while he is unconscious, so that he is
made a "double" of the heir to a big
estate who has been killed in the
wreck. Of course, Trevor falls in love
and finds himself ln a maze of exciting and mysterious happenings.
He can't convince people that he is
not the heir to the estate. Then he
gets wise Id an amazing conspiracy
of which he Is the Innocent tool aiid
through five reels he fights the plotters toe-to-toe, ultimately defeating
them and winning a pretty bride—
who, by the way, Is the rightful heir
to the rich estate aimed at by the
conspiracy.
Oeorge Walsh ls known for his extraordinary athletic prowes sand his
dare-devil nerve in taking chances
before the camera. He ls also a
superb actor, who knows how to convulse an audience with wholesome
hearty laughter.
By insisting on Made-in-B.C. goods,
the people of British Columbia will
help their province through the present difficult period, by keeping men
at work In B. C. factories. This wlll
keep money In circulation In this
province, and when money ls circulating, all share in prosperity.
The "Made ln B. C." movement ls
but a part of the "Made-ln-Canada"
movement. Boosting British Columbia Industry boosts the output of Canadian Industry ln general. As instancing the importance of the "Made-
in-B.C." campaign to Canada, it is
only necessary to mention that ln two
of British Columbia's greatest resources, Canada produces twenty per
cent, of the world's supply of lumber,
and cured and canned fish.
I Monday and Tuesday, May 2nd and 3rd
MISS VERNA FELTON |
AND
THE   ALLEN   PLAYERS
Presenting MONDAY, the big laughing success     ■
A Pair of Sixes
TUESDAY, the Comedy-Drama Sensation
The Lady of the Scarlet Poppy
General Admission, 50c.   Reserved Seats, 75c.
Box Seats, $1
The Allen Players have just concluded an eighteen
months' engagement at the Hippodrome Theatre,
Tacoma, their visit to to Vancouver Island being in
the way of a vacation and for the purpose of renewing
old acquaintances and friends.
llllllllllllllllilllllllllllilllllilllllilti'illllilJJlllllfllllHIIil H IIIIIIIIIHIIIIIJIIill IIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIlHIli
Illllllllllllllllllli
I L0=IL0 THEATRE
Friday, April 29th
Miss Shirley Mason
— IN —
The Little Wanderer
Saturday, April 30th
A   SENSATIONAL   PICTURE
Behold My Wife
WEDNESDAY, MAY 4th
BOXING
— AND-
Wrestling
Tournament
Three Hours of Solid Fun.      Special Jitneys
for Royston, Courtenay, and outside districts.
Ringside, $1.50       Reserved, $1.25
General Admission, 75c.
See Posters for further particulars
u    m
Thursday, May 5th
MARGUERITE  MARSH
— IN —
Conquered   Hearts
Woman's Will Rises Above Temptation—The Dynamic Power of Great Ambition—
Tho Triumph of Inherent Rights—Sounding the Clarion Note of Triumph — Moral
Purpose, Nover Wavering, Conquers Over All Opposition — An ice-Armored Hear)
Melted by Real Love—Sensational Battles for tho Right—A Great Screen Drama Per*
fectly Portrayed.
Friday, April 29th
GEORGE  WALSH
— IN —
PUTTING   ONE   OVER
How'd you like to wake up as heir to millions? And in a strange house, surrounded
with luxury? And with identification marks on your body you never saw before?
Some mystery to solve! Well, this happens to George Walsh in "Putting On<* Over."
One of tlie funniest comedies ever put upon the screen. Train wreck, crooks and a
pretty girl, all in a fine jumble.   A scream of a film. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April 86,1921.
I
H
&
MAKE  YOURSELF
COMFORTABLE!
SEAGRASS FURNITURE
LARGE ARM CHAIRS
at	
LARGE ARM ROCKERS
at	
S1L50
$12.00
Round and Oblong Tables
$10.50  and  $11.50   each
Wc Invite Your Inspection of Our lines of
Beds, Springs and Mattresses
IRON AND BRASS BEDS—A full range of prices up
to $50.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE AND COIL SPRINGS.
SANITARY FELT MATTRESSES
nt 	
OSTERMOOR AND RESTMORE
MATTRESSES at	
816.00
$25.00
SEE  OUR  NEW  LINES
OF   WALLPAPERS
A. ^MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
$M aaj   MBBBPaaaai faf*M   iTaa*T aPI   al
WHEN  YOU  WANT  A  SATISFYING,  HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
AT  ALL   THE   LEADING   HOTELS   AND   BARS
WILLIAM  DOUGLAS,  Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
r=7E
m
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open llnjr mid Night.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Olllce:   WILLARD I1LOCK
Phone Illl Cumberland, 11. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. C.
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
Learns Vancouver 7.15 p.m. Dull}*.
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
PORT ARTHUR
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
Connections for nil points in I'linndn nnd United States.
Compartment Observation Curs, Sliindurd and Tourist Sleepers.
Canadian Narional Railwaqs
EDWARD \V. UICKLE, District Agent.
PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL NOT CONDUCIVE
TO BEST IN SPORT
Major General Macdonnell is quite
correct in remarking that the Ideal
of sport is not exemplified by professional baseball! says the Mail and
Empire. That is the reason why the
game is never likely to become internationally popular. He says thatthe
frequent disputing of an umpire's decision nnd the efforts of the spectators
to confuse and dishearten the opposing players are inimical to sportsmanship. Yet these features, which should
be objectionable, and even fatal, in
any other kind of sport, are of the
very essence of baseball. It cannot
be said they are unfair, for what one
team or crowd of spectators can do
can also be done by the others players and their home crowd of spectators. To deprive baseball of its "rooting" and its "riding" of umpires and
unpopular opposition players would
be to dostroy the game. We do not
suppose the umpires are as greatly
modified by the loudly expressed
opinions of their incompetency as
would be supposed by an English
spectator. Players, too, soon grow
accustomed to tlie hostile cries and
hisses of tlie crowds when they are
away from home. Their violent disputes with the umpires, are, we suspect, not quite as real as they seem
to be. They are carried on rather in
pursuance of a general principle than
to change a particular opinion. They
argue tliat, when a close decision is
to be made, the umpire will probably
give it in favor of the party to the
play who would be loudest in his de
nunciations if it went against him.
This is baseball, it is not sport,
Vet the baseball Influence has a ten
dency to affect other games in Canada,
although it Is impossible to Imagine
a Canadian crowd worked into such a
frenzy over any game comparable to
that which seizes American crowds
when one of their favorites makes a
sensational play.
The "roasting" of officials is commoner than It ought to be. This is a
bad habit we have derived from the
United States when wo adopted baseball. To old countrymen trained in
the tradition of cricket, these baseball
manners are hardly short of disgusting, and thoy immediately prejudice
them against a game that hns many
admirable points.
Another objection to baseball is the
prepondereuce of the professional element, and the absurd amount of space
the American newspapers devote to
the performance of players. Professionalism readily links up with gambling, and the scandal about tlie
World's Series of 1910 shows what Is
likely to happen when individual
players form an alliance with gamblers. There has been little evidence
supplied in favor of the belief thnt the
baseball magnates are as much interested in baseball as a game as they
are In baseball as a means of making
money. It is well that General Macdonnell and others should point out to
the Canadian youth, addicted as it is
to many kinds of sport, that games
ought nol to be the ends in themselves
but means to an end, and that this is
to make good sportsmen who accepl
defeat with a smile and success without boasting.
SYDNEY HAS FINEST
HARBOR IN THE WORLD
Could    Accommodate    All    thc
Navies—Rio De Janiero
Has Next Best.
All the world knows that Scap
Flow could and did hold at their jiu
Chorage the Hritish and German
Fleets. "Wo nre also proud of our
splendid Mllford Haven, one of the
most capacious harbors in the world
Hut the two finest harbors in thc
world are Port Jackson, often called
Sydney Harbor, and the harbor of tin
capital of Brazil, known to all sailor*
men as Rio, short for Rio de Janiero
The harbor of Rio wilh its seventy
islands, its palms, its while buildings,
its wooded hillsides, Is one of the
great sights of the world. Port Jackson is its one and only rival, and the
Australian beauty spot heats It In
everything hut its majestic mountains.
The people of Sydney are exceedingly
proud of their lovely harbor, which is
the finest in the world. It Is capac
ious, land-locked, and sheltered. With
its bays and coves it possesses a deep-
water frontage of over one hundred
miles. Large vessels can lie at the
quays and wharves of the city, and
the harbor could accommodate the
combined navies of the whole world
The National Park overlooking this
splendid inland sea contains 35,000
acres of the loveliest woodland, forest,
mountain and river scenery, and has
a frontage of eight miles to the Pacific
Ocean.
jt&rd
Service At One Price
NO matter where you buy a Ford Car it is always the same
price. It is t!ie same with Ford Service. Spare parts are
always sold -it fixed prices. Charge for repairs made by
our skilled mechanics are made according to rates which do not
vary.
If your Ford needs repairs you can learn from us exactly
what the cost will b ■ before you tell us to proceed with the work.
Our contract with the Ford organization requires us to keep
a complete stock of genuine Ford parts. Ford owners never have
to wait for us.
Ford service begins by giving you the greatest car value ever
offered. Afterwards we see to it that your satisfaction is continuous.
E. C. EMDE, Ford "Dealer
COURTENAY, B.C.
Ii. G. LAVER, SALESMAN, CUMBERLAND.
PHONE 115.
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1
PRESIDENT OF WORLD
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
VISITING CANADA
There la enough uncut tlmher In
British Columbia to build a board
walk, a quarter of a mile wide, around
tbe equator and a ladder to tbe moon.
Dr. Chalm Welzmann of London,
England, distinguished scientist und
President ol* the World Zionist Organization, tlie ollicial agency of the
Jewish people In thc work of rebuilding Palestine, is due in Canada on
May 1. Dr. Welzmannn will be accompanied hy a number of ills distinguished colleagues, who sailed
With him from Palestine,
In tbe event that Ilr. Welzmann Is
able to extend his stay on this side
of tbe Atlantic, he will visit a number of other cities in Canada.
Dr. Cbaim Welzmann Is in a large
mea'sure responsible for the Balfour
declaration and the Sau Kcmo man-
dale, under tlie terms of which England bas become the mandatory over
Palestine, and the Jewish people are
to he enabled to establish a homeland
in that country. His coining lias been
heralded for months and has been
eagerly awaited by tbe millions of
Jews in the United States and Canada,
lie was formerly Professor of Chemistry at the University of Manchester,
and placed at thc disposal of the
British Bureau of .Munitions certain
chemical formulas which proved of
ihe highest Importance, and for which
be declined compensation, in July
mill tho University of Manchester
conferred upon blm tbe degree L.L.D.
Honoris ('ansa.
The arrival of Dr. Welzmann will
be everywhere the signal for tho
actual commencement of the campaign
for the raising of one million dollars,
which Is to be the contribution of the
Jews of Canada to the fund of £25,-
1)00,000, to be raised In 1021 for the
reconstruction of Palestine, by tbe
Jews of the world. Mr. Charles A.
Cowen, now in Montrenl, Is in charge
of the campaign.
■II
At the San Quentin prison in California a baseball game was being
played by tbe white prisoners and the
hlack prisoners. The game was very
close; but in the last inning the
whites tilled tbe bases, and the pitcher
for the blacks—who was serving a
hirty-nlne year sentence—began to
how signs of nervousness. Noticing
tlie black pitcher's tendency to hurry
the delivery of the ball, a black prisoner in the bleachers yelled:
Take yo' time, black boy, take yo'
time! You got plenty ob time—you
got thirty years yet!"
EXTENSION
OF REBATE
PERIOD
Commencing from February 15, the
rebate period on current Electric Light
accounts will be extended to the end of
the month.
Thus the period in which discount will
be allowed in future will be from the
1 15th to end of each month
PAY YOUR ACCOUNTS PROMPTLY AND SAVE
THE DISCOUNT
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it Is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended tbey will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent .of the law. April 30,1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
GET YOUR
RIGHT SIZE
Chiropodists and foot specialists say it is
more important to wear a shoe that is comfortable when walking or standing than one
which "fits like a glove."
Women are prone to consider smartness
and style rather than foot ease.
We'll measure your feet—both feet—and
fit you right. That means "both" style and
comfort.
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
FOOTWEAR ONLY
il.ll
FRESH
VEGETABLES
To Arrive Saturday Morning
I ■■ ,      ■       m
iiil YOUR TEETH
, CONTOURS
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
The shape of a tooth ls the result
of ages of evolution. It would be
impossible for us to Improve upon the
plan of a normal tooth. When decay,
or caries, has destroyed a part of the
contour of a tooth, that contour must
be restored if the tooth Is to do its
work and remain a desirable neighbor
to the other teeth In tbe mouth and
to the gums. After the cavity Is
shaped right, the dentist thoroughly
dries and sterilizes It and places the
filling material so that every part of
the cavity Is exactly filled. Then he
builds tbe filling to Imitate the original shape of the tooth. Every little
line and every ridge and cone Is duplicated. The margins of the filling are
so carefully and closely approximated
that the cavity Is hermetically sealed.
The most difficult place to shape and
finish a filling ls at the gum margin
between the teeth. If a filling should
be left rough or should become roughened from hard use, it becomes a
source of danger to the health of the
mouth because It retains food, causes
Irritation to the tonge or cheek or lip
and many times holds food tightly
packed against the gum, If there Is
too much space between the teeth, or
if there Is a projected filling or a
roughened area, pyorrhea will usually
be started by infection that follows
constant brushing of the gum.
If a filling ls too high, the tooth
will have more than Its share of pressure and either the filling will give
way or the tooth will be loosened ln
its socket and the pulp will be destroyed. The correct filling of a tooth
Is one of the most skilful operations
that man has ever learned to perform,
Like many other good things, the better they are, the less we hear about
them. It ls the bad ones that raise
Cain.
LARGE CAULIFLOWERS
CABBAGE
' HEAD LETTUCE
LEAF LETTUCE
VANCOUVER ISLAND ASPARAGUS
GREEN ONIONS
ONIONS
VANCOUVER ISLAND TOMATOES
CUCUMBERS
STRAWBERRIES
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
A NEWSPAPER PLANT
IN A BAGGAGE CAR
A complete newspaper plant In a
railway baggage car was one of the
unicue features of a special train
which bore Cincinnati business men
to a San Francisco convention. They
decided that they must have a dally
newspaper on the five days' Journey,
hence the newspaper printed en route.
This was an afternoon paper. The
reporter gathered the news of the
coaches during the" morning hours,
then wrote them up. The city editor
handled it ln the usual way and sent
It to the composing room to be set up.
From the composing room It went to
the press, and In short time the news
of the train (all scoops) was tn the
"Herald" and being read throughout
the speeding special.
It Is thought that this is the first
time that a newspaper was ever
Issued, from the gathering of the
news to the printing of the paper, on
board a speeding train. There was
telegraph news too. Parties at home
interested in the venture sent paid
telegrams of home events which In
tercepted the train at stations; hence
the addition carried vital home news
besides a complete story of ivjiat
happened on the special, composed of
seven passenger coaches, diner, baggage cars and a special refreshment
car.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
BOOTS AND SHOES
GIVE BETTER SERVICE
IF PROPERLY TREATED
The proper drying of boots and
shoes after they have become soaking wet has much to do with their
lasting qualities. The use of the
proper kind of oil or grease will
greatly increase the wear of shoe
leather. When leather Is wet It Is
soft and therefore readily stretches
out of shape. Tbe stitches 'cut
through the wet leather easily and
wet soles and heels wear away more
quickly.
Great care must be taken in drying
wet boots and shoes, for they often
burn before It seems possible; moreover, If dried too fast tbe leather lie-
comes hard and the boots shrink out
of shape. To dry wet boots properly,
first wash on all mut or grit with
tepid water, and, if they are heavy
work boots, oil or grease them at
once. Straighten the counters, toes
and uppers to the proper shape, and
stuff the toes with crumpled paper, to
hold the boot ln shape while drying.
Set the shoes tn a place where they
will dry slowly, as wet leather burns
very easily. The shoes should not be
worn until thoroughly dry.
Before oiling or greasing boots,
brush them well, warm them carefully, apply warm oil or grease, and
rub in with the palm of the hand.
Work tbe grease well In where the
sole Joins the upper and along the
edges of the sole.
Neat's-foot, cod and castor oils and
tallow and wool grease, or mixtures
of them, are the best. Castor oil is
the most satisfactory oil for use ou
polished shoes. If applied lightly the
shoes may be polished at once, if
necessary, but- It is better to wait a
few hours.
A questionnaire was sent out by
the "Made-in-B. C. Campaign" olllces
asking what employment would be
given In the vicinity of Vancouver If
the people of that locality gave pre
ference to the products produced In
B. C. The data has not been com
pleted, but answers to date show that
34 firms will give employment to 051
workers if the citizens of British
Columbia are loyal to their own
products.
ASTHMA
USE
RAZ-MAH
ie smkiii-ii iimtai-Hi iwrff
Jut SwiUtw I CMiule
RAZ-MAH Im Guaranteed
to restore normal breathing, stop mucus
Ktheringi In the bronchial tubes, give
u nights of quiet sleep; contains no
habit-forming drug. 11.00 at yonrdrug-
Ilit's. Trial free «t onragencies or write
•hmpteoM,   142 King W.,   Toronto.
Sold by
R. E. FROST    ■    Cumberland
'ALGERIA" A SHIP
WITH MARBLE HALLS
A ship with strikingly beautiful in
teriors and a rather romantic history
ls the new addition to tbe Anchor Line
service, the "Algeria," sailing between
Glasgow and New York.
Remarkable features about her Interior decorations are the marble in
her public rooms. The visitor, or
passenger, entering her dining room
stands amazed at tbe sight of the
golden marble with which all sides
of the room are finished. Marble also
adds to tbe beauty of the lounge,
smoking room and reading room. The
decks and cabin interiors are also
very attractive in appearance, large
windows taking tbe place of the customary port holes.
The "Algeria" was purchased by tbe
Anchor Line from the British Ministry
of Shipping aud Is a splendid example
of naval architecture. She was built
at Hamburg in 1914 for tbe German
East Africa Line and was intended for
use in "Around Africa" tours.
Shortly after war was declared, sbe
was taken over by the German government and carried troops to Russia. Later she was fitted up for the
express purpose of taking part In the
projected German invasion of Great
Britain, her capacity being 8,000 soldiers. It was from ono of her signal
yards that German naval oflicers wero
hung during the uprising at Kiel. At
the end of the war she was allocated
to Great Britain and later carried
German prisoners of war back to their
home country.
The "Marble Ship," as she is generally called, is a twin-screw vessel of
8156 tons. Her principal dimensions
are: Length, 449 feet; breadth, 55 feet,
and draught 30 feet. She has accommodation for 397 cabin and 118 third-
class passengers.
Could tho author of "1 Dreamt That
I Dwelt in Marble Halls" awaken on
this beautiful ship, his dream would
be fully realized.
HENS WITH PALE LEGS
ARE HEAVIEST LAYERS
"I wbb very much impressed,"
writes R. H. Walte of the University
of Maryland, "with the Interest taken
in culling by tbe patrons of some of
the fairs held lately ln this state.
Culling hens was new to them and It
was interesting to observe what a
large number of poultry raisers bad
the idea that pale legB and late moulting Indicated low vitality In the layers,
Of course they did not practice trap-
nesting or they would have known different. These people have been killing off or selling their best hens and
keeping the culls for breeders.
"It was equally interesting but a lot
more comforting to see how readily
they got hold of the Idea that the
white-legged hens had been laying
heavily when It was pointed out to
them that the coloring material in
the skin, which of course includes
the legs, is used up In the production
of yolks for eggs. They also grasped
quickly the logic behind the late
moulting idea—i.e., that the late
moulter is a late moulter because she
haB been tending to her business of
laying eggs, while the early-moulting
hen 'knocked off' work to get her new
plumage.
A large number of breeders were
Interested in knowledge whether or
not the early moulters would make
good winter layers. This brings up a
culling question which I believe needs
considerably more study.
I believe that the modern culling
methods are especially valuable for
selecting breeders. Hens with
bleached-out legs and beaks, those
that moult late and lose no time in
the operation, and those with strong
constitutions as shown hy their general condition ami bearing, are the
ones to select for thc breedlng-pon,
The breeder who does not have time
or facilities for trap-nesting can mate
Intelligently for Improved laying
qualities by this kind of selection."
THE  REASON   WHY
Why should we give money to save
heathen abroad when there are
heathen In our own country?
There ore other "why's" equally
logical:
Why should I give money to save
those in other parts of this country
whon there aro needy ones in my
own state?
Why should I give for those In
other parts of the Btate when there
are needy In my own town?
Why should I give for the poor In
the town when my own church needs
money? -**
Why should I give to tho churcli
when my own family wants It?
Why should I waste on my family
what I want myself?
Why? Because I am a Christian;
not a heathen. —A. B. Upton
Life ls not so bad for the man who
meanders down the path leading to
eternity hand in hand with a sympa
thetic woman.
The Rexall Store
ALL your favorite
*i centers—each ia
• substantial chocolate
overcoat. You'll have
to eat one to learn how
good they are—and eat
many to leant that
they are all equally
good. Come in as you
go by today, and get
some. Packed in a
handsome box that
will please  anybody.
N.
"^he Chocolates "with
the 'Wonderful Centers
uJ
Burdock and Sarsparilla
FOR  THE CURE  OF
Skin Troubles, Boils, Pimples
and General Debility
A  GREAT  SPRING   MEDICINE
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a
largj
Dry Kiln and are now in a posi
tion to
supply complete
house
bills.
Send
us  your  specifications
and we
will give you a
close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
FOU
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY  WORK
write for prices lo
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2020 Bridge Streot, Victoria, IM'.
. Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April 36, 1921.
c
Advanced Styles in Ladies'
Ready-to-Wear
LADIES' SUITS
In new styles and now cloths. If you have difficulty
about fit we will be pleased to take, your measure
and so give you a perfect fitting garment.
LADIES* JERSEY CLOTH SUITS
So easy and comfortable Coi
wear. We can supply you
reasonable prices.
Spring  and  Summi t
with   any   shade   at
LADIES' WAISTS
Our stock of Ladies' Waists arc constantly kept up
to the mark, new numbers coining forward fren
time to time. At present Georgettes, Crepe de Chinos
and Voiles are well represented, nnd our showing
of these represent tlie very latest designs.
LADIES' SKIRTS
We represent one of the best houses for Skirts,
and can assur you of every satisfaction. Navy Sergo
Skirts from $7.50 to $13,60 are well worthy of consideration, and  will give the best service.
LADIES' SILK HOSE
We carry the proven lines tn Silk Hose and can give
you most of the wanted shades and colorings. Note
our stock of VENUS Hose, so well known to all
wearers of Silk goods. And note the price, $2.01) per
pair.
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
ENJOYABLE TIME AT
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
A good crowd turned out to the
whist drive and dance given by the
Women's Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A. on
Wednesday night. After the whist,
dancing was indulged in, the music
being supplied by Mrs. Frost and Mr.
C. Graham.
The whist drive winners were Mrs.
C Graham, first, and Mrs. Waddington, consolation, iu the ladies' division,
and B. Hunden, first, and .Morris Waddington, consolation, in the men's.
BADMINTON SOCIAL
The prizes won in the recent tournament will he presented at tlie social
to he held this (Friday! evening, in
the Anglican Hal. commencing at 8
o'clock. Whist will occupy the lirst
portion of the evening, to he followed
by dancing, music for which will be
supplied by Mrs. it. E. Frost and Mr
C. Oraham.
Miss Browne, matron of the General
Hospital, acknowledges the recipt of
home-made candy from Mrs. Kinney
ilowers from Rev. W. Leversedge, and
linen from .Mrs, Dalby.
FOR SALE
FORD CAR, 1919, GOOD CONDITION
Demountable rims, shock absorbers
Call and see at Chas. McMillan's
53, Camp. 3-20
M NOTWITHSTANDING  THE  FACT
|jj that
| Heintzman & Co. Pianos \
=} rank among the highest-grade pianos in the world,
Is their price is exceedingly moderate.
fj Easy Terms Can Be Arranged  jj
H On   view  at  MACKINNON'S  FURNITURE  STORE
H and DAVIS' SHOE STORE.
"Ye Olde Firme"
Heintzman & Co.
p=     Nanaimo
li
QIDEON IIK'KS, Manager
VICTORIA Cumberland
111
I Public Notice
H I take this opportunity of informing the general
|= public and my customers in particular that there is no
HI truth whatsoever in certain rumors regarding any of
H my cows being infected with tuberculosis.   My solicitor
HI has interviewed Mr. R. Machin of the Comox Creamery
|H Association  in reference to such  rumors, and Mr.
|| Machin emphatically denies that he ever asserted or
eg insinuated that my cows were so infected.
§§ I might add that my cows are properly and duly
H tested and inspected, and are now and always have
= been, in perfect health.
H Dated, April 22, 1921.
1 H.  LEIGHTON
JH DAIRYMAN                                     ROYSTON, R. C.
.iM.iuHliliihlih'liih'lhilh'lLHii,;;^,;) hi,1!!,;!!!,*; Ill, ,.ili:, ,11, ,!ll!nii,i,
GRAY-DORT TOURING CAR (LATE
model), in perfect condition; new
tires, with spare tire and tube;
$875.   Apply Cameron's Garage. 1-18
FOR QUICK SALE—$850 CASH-
1920 Model 4 Overland; has just
been completely overhauled; all
worn parts replaced; equipped with
cord tires on back and Dunlop
Specials ln front; nearly new; spare
tire and rim,
1 CECILIAN    CABINET    CONCERT-
phone, with about 60 records.
1 REMINGTON No. 10 TYPEWRITER
1 SINGER SEWING MACHINE.
1 SOLID OAK DINING SUITE, fumed
finish.
AND A QUANTITY OF HOUSEHOLD
Furniture and Utensils.
Apply E.  J.  Cronk,  Cumberland.
Phone 12SL.
LOOSE OAT HAY, FROM ONE TON
upwards; cheap for cash.   Apply It
Waddell, R. M. D, 1, Cumberland
4-20
BABY BUGGY, ENGLISH STYLE. IN
good order. For further particular
apply Mrs. Waddington, opposlti
.Methodist Church. Cumberland.
THREE ACRES GOOD LAND, parti)
cleared; house, barn and garage;
one cow, two dozen chickens; mile
and a half from town. For furthoi
particulars apply Islander Olllce.
8-17
HOUSE    ANI)    lot    F()R    BALE
Houso  contains six  rooms  with a
concrete   foundation;   garage   and
necessary outhouses.    Also a
GRAY-DORT SPECIAL AUTO.MO
bile, in llrst-class condition. Foi
further particulars apply to R.
Adamson, Cumberland.
POR SALE—FORD TOURING CAR.
1918, In Al condition; spare tire
and carburetor. A good buy for
$500.    Apply Box 343, Cumberland.
CHEVROLET 5-PASSENGER CAR
1919 model, in first-class condition;
fully equipped, five new tires, live
spare tubes. A snap, $050 cash
Apply Ben Evans, Camp, Cumberland. 4_i7
Personal Mention
Mrs. George Kerr MacNaughton will
not receive on Monday. 1
The friends of Mrs. Geo. Richardson
will be pleased to hear that she is
making some improvement towards
recovery since going to the General
Hospital.
.Mr. it. F. Hate, who lias been con-
nected with the local branch of the
Flank of Commerce, has left to enter
ihe service of tho C. P. R. offices in
Vancouver. His position is being filled
by Mr. James Deuholm, of Edinburgh,
Scotland, recently of the Kitsilano
Branch.
Mr. Norman Searle, of Union Bay,
returned Saturday after a weeks'
visitlng'in Vancouver aud Victoria.
Mrs. J. II. McMillan returned from
Vancouver on Saturday.
Miss Irene Hntemnn, of South Wellington, arrived Thursday and Is the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. G. Richardson.
Miss Lorna Dalby has returned
home from St. Ann's Academy, Nanaimo.
Mr. Wm. Gatz of Vancouver was in
[own during tbe week.
Mr. W. S. Wilson, formerly of Cumberland, arrived from Vancouver on
Tuesday anil will reside here In future.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, Safety Engineer,
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
left for Ladysmith Monday morning.
Miss Gladys Dando left for Victoria
Monday morning, where sho will spend
two weeks' vacation.
Mr. A. R. Stacey, Superintendent of
Electrical Operations, Canadian Col
llerics, spent last week-end in Na
nalmo,
Mr. P. Rowe left for Nanaimo Saturday and returned Monday.
Miss A. Richardson of Nanaimo
arrived in town during tho week and
will take up ber residence here.
Miss Nell Ronald left for San Francisco, Cal., Tuesday "morning, where
she will reside in future. Miss Ronald
will be greatly missed by her many
friends in town.
Mr. Robt. Hindmarsh, of Nanaimo,
was in town during the week.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Nanaimo Monday
and returned Wednesday.
Mr. Harry Wilson, formerly of Cumberland, was in town during tho week.
Mr. Geo. I. Warren, of thc Continental Casualty Co., Victoria, was in town
during (lie week.
Mr. L, Marks, of the Canadian Explosives, Victoria, was in town last
Tuesday.
Mrs. W. S. Prior returned home on
Tuesday.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., lel't for Vancouver Wednesday afternoon.
Mr. Wm. Morton, of Nanaimo, arrived in town Thursday evening.
Mrs. T. Mordy returned from Van
couver Wednesday, accompanied by
George and Marjorie Mordy, who have
been attending the University of B.C.
BIRTH
DUNN—To Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Dunn,
of Union Bay, April 22, at Cumberland General Hospital,* a son.
CHANDLER—April 10, to Mr. and
Mrs. Chandler, at the General Hos
pftal, a daughter.
DAVIS—To Mr. and Mrs. Davis, of
Union Bay. April 29, at Cumberland
General Hospital, a son.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
Who got McGlnty's Goat? Ask
Paddy!
Who got "canned" for going to the
dance? Please, "sir," may I go? you
ought to have asked—I don't think.
Who swallowed the most confetti at
tlie Jolly Boys' Carnival.
Where — got Ills Inspiration from
Wednesday evening at the Badminton
court? Oli, fool (Ish), he was.
Who got their pants wet Thursday?
Who took a big shot of Scotch the
other night—then told hubby she had
-ecu drinking senna?
Who is tlie cheapest of all cheap
skates?
It* Hie goddess of tlie morning got
lost purposely because she was on tbe
"Aurora."
Why some girls are so fond of tht
kewples won at the Jolly Boys' jolly
dance?
If It ls better to have loved and lost
I luiii to be lost and loved (on n war
ship)?
Why the Mayor corralled nearly all
ihe teachers In bis car Thursday?
Can a Judge smoke In court? Ask
Mrs. .   She knows.
Who rode in the first car on Thursday—-and why?
PRESENTATION TO MR.
AND MRS. JAMES BURNS
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The   meetings   of   the   Great   War
Veterans Association are held every
1= I Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Ou Saturday night last the Bevan
Burns Club made a very pretty presentation to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Burns,
who have left that place and now living at Cumberland. Mr. Burns, together with Mr. M. Brown, having
taken over the store previously conducted by the old Iirm of Simon Leisei
& Co. Ltd.    *
A banquet opened tlle proceedings
and after tliat had ben done full justice to, toasts, etc., were In order. Mr.
lames Walker occupied the chair, and
with a few well chosen remarks
thanked Mr. and Mrs. Burns for the
interest they had taken in the club's
welfare in general. All present were
sorry to see such a popular couple
leave Bevan. Mr. Burns fitting replied. Mr. Burns was the recipient of
a set of French ivory military brushes
and Mrs. Burns a dressing table set.
The floor was afterwards cleared and
a pleasant dance concluded the proceedings.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
FOR
Service        Quality^ Value
CROCKERY
Just Arrived, in Assorted Sizes and Designs.
TEA POTS
CUPS ANI! SAUCERS
PLATES
OATMEALS
FRUIT DISHES
SUGARS
CREAM JUOS
WATER JUOS
SCALLOPS
BAKERS
BOWLS
EGG-CUPS
PLATTERS
SALT AMI PEPPERS
TUMBLE IIS
GROCERY SPECIALS
Dates, new stock, fresh and clean, per lb 20c
Netted Gem Potatoes, 100-lb. sack $1.00
Oranges  .'.  3 dozen $1.00
Lemons, dozen 35c
Grape-Fruit, dozen  75c
American Sodas 35c*"pkg.; 3 pkgs. $1.00
G-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each 40c
7-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each  50c
20-lb. sack Victor Rolled Oats, each $1.35
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 1 55c lb.; No. 2, lb. 45c
Bulk Tea No. 1, 50c per lb.; No. 2, lb. 40c
Quaker Pork and Beans, flats 5 tins for 50c
Aylmer or Libby's Pork and Beans, 2-lb. tfns, 4 for 90c
Pineapple, 1-lb. tins 2 for 45c
Pineapple, 2-lb. tins 35c tin; 3 for $1.00
4-lb. tin Wagstaffe's Pure Strawberry Jam, each $1.15
4-lb. tin Pure Cherry Jam, each 95c
4-lb. tin Pure Plum Jam, each 90c
4-lb. tin Libby's Pure Marmalade, each 90c
10-lb. sacks Snowflake Pastry Flour, sack   80c
50-lb. sacks Snowflake Pastry Flour, each $3.50
7-lb. sack Whole Wheat Flour 50c
Cream of the West Flour, 49-lb. sacks $3.10
24-lb. sacks $1.65
ALSO A FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUIT AND
VEGETABLES
Local Rhubarb, Local Asparagus, Cabbage, Cauliflower,
Head Lettuce,  Onions,  Carrots, Turnips,
Beets and Parsnips.
ASPARAGUS
TOMATOES
CUCUMBERS
Apples,   Oranges,   Lcniuns,   Grape-Fruit,   Lanunas,
Strawberries and Cocoanuts.
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the office at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at once.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The above Association will meet at 10.30 a.m. on
SUNDAY, MAY 1st, IN THE FIRST AID HALL
Mr. Frank Bond will read a paper at this meeting on
"THE THREE PRINCIPLES IN FIRST AID"

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