BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Jun 24, 1927

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0070735.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070735.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0070735-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0070735-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070735-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0070735-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0070735-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0070735-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0070735-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0070735.ris

Full Text

Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1<
p*k>vliicia,
mth which la consolidated the Cumberland New*.
Llbr"y   Mar.j,27
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR—No. io.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Blair Mystery Is Solved
Cumberland's Old Goalie, Impersonated
EXPOSURE OF MYSTERY MAN'S POSE
AS  THE  WELL KNOWN  TOM  BLAIR
On June 10th the Islander published
a short story taken from an Old I
Country paper, setting forth the fact j
that Tom Blair, Cumberland's old
goalie, had worked his passage back
to England, where he was stranded.
The following story, taken from the
Glasgow "Sunday Post" of May 29th
Is self-explanatory:
Clangow, Saturday, May 28.
"The Sunday Post" ls able to reveal
tonight that Tom Blair, the well-
known goalkeeper, of Kilmarnock and
Manchester City, who recently accepted an offer to go to America, has been
Impersonated by someone with a
knowledge of the Kilmarnock man's
career.
This Individual arrived at Hull on
the 12th of May last, and, stating that
he was Tom Blair, he was Interviewed
his story being widely circulated lu
the Scottish and English newspapers.
This mysterious individual told the
reporters that he had arrived ln Hull
from New York, having worked his
passage In thu capacity of messroom
steward. He advised professional
football players to "keep away from
America, ns It was far from being a
bed of roses."
Tom Mini*', it should be explained,
was transferred from 'Kilmarnock to
Manchester City in 1922, and some
time later he accepted an offer to go
to Americu us goalkeeper to the Fall
Hiver Club, Mass.
According to Ihe pseudo Blair, the
terms were fifty dollars a week for
playing anil a joli at his trade, which
would bring another thirty dollars
weekly.
_ A False Story
From Ihe story circulated by his
inipersonutor. Tommy, ufter fourteen
months, wns told that, owing to bad
times, he would have to play for
twenty dollars a week. Then he received that same night a letter from
an engineering firm stating that his
services were no longer required.
Following this came an Intimation
thnt another goalkeeper had been
appointed, and his agreement with his
club was terminated.
ThlB brought "Blair" home, having
to work his passage! He was "almost penniless," and at Hull he said
he had no money to travel to his
home in Scotland. On May 12 he left
Hull, ostensibly to join friends In
Reililltch. He appealed to the Hull
police, who put themselves out of
their way to assist him.
Since then his relatives in Scotland
and England have neither seen nor
heard of this man. Rumours that
Tom Blair had been seen in Glasgow
and Kilmarnock reached his sister.
Mrs. Moore, 15 Jardine Terrace, Garl-
cosh, who could uot understand why
Tom did not visit her, as his twin
children, who were horn while lie was
ln America, and whom he has never
seen, were ln her care.
Her suspicions that he, had been
Impersonated were aroused when site
received from Tom's uncle ln Barrow-
in-Furness. Mr. Geo. Blair, ovldenco
which demonstrated that on 12th May,
the day on which he had arrived at
Hull, Tom wns ln Fall River. This
was a newspaper addressed ln his
handwriting, posted in Fall River on
12th May, nnd containing n report of
a match played on 8th Mny ln which
he figured, and n photographic group
which Included Tom. This picture
hud.bt'i'ii taken on the day of lhe
match—8th May.
Tom Blair's Cable
Inquiries hy "The Sunday Post" at
Barrow-in-Furness proved to tlie hill
that an Impudent hoax had been
practised. On behalf of his relatives,
"The Sunduy Posl" Immediately
cabled Tom Blair, and tonight there
reached  us full  confirmation  of all
NORMAN HILL
WINS LANG CUP
suspicions ln the shape of the following cablegram:—
"Sunday Post," Glasgow.
Still ln Fall River.   Like lt     .
Immensely.   Doing well.
TOM BLAIR.
This is welcome news to the  relatives of the player, who have been
naturally   much   distressed   by   the
stories circulated.
"To say that I was surprised at
these stories ls to put lt mildly," said
Mrs. Moore, Blair's married sister,
who resides at Gartcosh.
The last letter I received from Tom
in Fall River contained no hint of his
coming home. What puzzled me still
more was the statement that my brother had worked his passabe home,
and was practically penniless. Neither
his nor his wife's letters Indicated
financial difficulties. On the contrary, there was every reason to believe that they were in comfortable
circumstances, and perfectly contented. Naturally. I expected that Tom
would immediately come to Gartcosl»
He has friends in Glasgow, but I felt
(Continued on Page Two)
New High School
Site Reported On
By Committee
COURTENAY, Juno 22—Much of
the time of Monday night's council
meeting was taken up discussing the
assistance to be given tbe Diamond
Jubilee celebration. In co-operation
with the Volunteer Fire Dept., the city
wlll erect an arch and prepare a suitable lloat for the occasion. In addition to covering the cost of these, thc
council voted a further sum of $200
for general decorating purposes.
Aid. Douglas submitted his usual
reports for the Are department and
the pubic works committee. These
gave details of changes in Arc equipment, the burning of rubbish piles,
painting of Are hydrants, construction
of nearly a thousand feet of sidewalks, ditches, and repairs to the auto
park, etc. He announced that practically all the work of the proposed
years programme was completed with
the exception of minor jobs.
Report on School Site
In connection with a site for the
new high school, Aid, Pearse reported
for the committee that had inspected
the site proposed by Mr. Gibson. The
report iu part is as follows: "As a
site It does not seem the equal of that
already chosen. It Is apparent, even
now, that a considerable area was
until recently under water, and your
committee was informed on reliable
authority that the back portion ls a
swamp for half the year. There Is a
portion of the site, on which there
nre several big stumps, that lies high
and dry and would be suitable for the
school buildings, but the remaining
portions of the land do not seem
suited as so elaborately shown In Mr.
Gibson's plan, at least without the
expenditure of very much more money
than the taxpayer should be asked to
provide. It seems a pity to erect a
building, that should be an asset to
the town, in other than a conspicuous
place, a reason that had considerable
weight with your committee when deciding on the site on the Cumberland
road. Thc suggestion that the traffic
there Is so heavy that It would be
dangerous to children of the age to
attend High School appears to your
committee fur fetched. The only
grounds for changing the site would
be of saving the taxpayers money and
lt Is stated that there will be a considerable saving in draining, and further that on the new site the Government will bear half the cost of clearing, not actually a saving as the cost
of clearing the new site will be double
that of the other. The actual figures
(Continued on "-ige Five)
Mr. L. Hardie, of the Cumberland
High School teaching staff, announced
during the week that Norman Hill Is
this year's winner of the Lnng cup.
The trophy was put up In September
to be competed (or by nil hoys In the
High School, every sport entered to
be considered.
Norman Hill gained first place with
33 points. He was a steady member
of the basketball and soccer team:*.
and gained his other points by competing in the dashes and relay races
on May 24 and June 3.
Harold Conrod was second with 32
points. This player deserves groat
credit for his able support of the Cumberland High School.
Similarly In Iho Public School, tho
cup donated by Mr. Lnng was won by
J. Watson with 4!) points. Hunueri
up wore Tndno Dol, 18 points; nnd
Barbara Westfield, 34 points.
BASEBALL GAMES END IN
WINS FOR HOME TEAM
Cumberland and Japanese put on a
snappy exhibition of baseball last
Sunday on the Recreation Ground, the
former team winning out by 12 runs
to 3. The score might, perhaps,
appear one-sided, but the game certainly was not, as those who saw It
wlll testify. Features were the brilliant batting of the Cumberland nine
as well ns some excellent plays by
both infields.
Cumberland won again Wednesday
evening, taking the measure of Camp
3 by 14 runs to 6. "Chot" Bobba
dazzled the fans with his four base
clout over the fence, while BUI Boyd
did tho same for the loggers. Riley
also did some great hitting, bagging
three doubles.
Apparently Cumberland has a fast
hold on the $75.00 prize being offered
for tho baseball game at Courtenay
on July 2nd.
The Cumberland Baseball team has
developed Into a snappy aggregation,
and the management is now bemoaning the fact that other teams ln the
district are not strong enough to furnish worth-while opposition.
JUNE PROMOTIONS
GRADES 9 AND 10 AT
LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL
June promotions lu Grades 9 and 10
of the Cumberland High School are
as follows, names being in order of
merit:
GRADE IX
First class rank—Stephen Jackson,
Norman Frelone.
Second class rank—Harold Conrod,
Jack McLean, Andrew Brown, John
Wrlgley, Marlon Brown.
Pass rank — Josephine Freeburn,
Dick Marpole, Mary Gozzano, Robert
Collins, Barbara Grant.
Passed   with   supplemental—Norman Hill, Kathleen Emily.
GRADE X
Second class—Tatsuml Iwasa, Marjorie Brown, Gordon Walker, Jean
MacNaughton, Norma Parnham, Annie
Mann and Jack Hill (equal), Mary
Little, Nobuo Hayashl, Jack Horbury,
Walter Hughes. *
Pass rank—Archie Dick, Nina McKee, Victor Marinelll  (2 supps.).
Granted partial standing—Alastalr
MacKinnon, Claudia Harrison, Lillian
Grant.
VICTORIA VISITOR
RECEIVES SHOCK
Combined Open-air
Service July 3
At a meeting held in the Vicarage
at Sandwick last Monday afternoon,
when there wore present the Revs.
Alexander, Bourdillon, Corker, Hewitt and Robathan, It was decided to
hold a combined Open Air Service on
Sunday afternoon, July 3rd, at 2:30
p.m. In the Held near thc Sandwick
Calm. The service will conform with
the order that has been Issued by thc
Dominion Government for the occasion of "Natlonnl Thanksgiving by tlie
people of Canada" to commemorate
tho Act of Confederation sixty years
ago. On that dale there will be a
continuous chain of services extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
It Is hoped that all organizations will,
If possible, make an effort to bc
present ut the service held In thc
Comox District. Tho Panpipes orchestra,  under the direction of Mrs.
A resident of Victoria, who, for the
time being, Is doing quite a lot of
business In Cumberland, was surprised to be told by a man working
on a job in this city that "Courtenny
ls a good place to trade ln." The
visitor from Victoria took him to task
over the remark, considering he was
earning money In Cumberland. Ono
could hardly blame the chap as he Is
a resident of Courtenay, but working
here temporarily.
Two days ago this same Victoria
gentleman had occasion to visit thc
Post Offlco and on coming from there
accosted a well known resident of
Cumberland. "Say Friend, I am u
stranger here," said the Victorian,
"where Is a good place to buy a pair
of boots?" The answer was: "If you
want a good pair of boots, I would
advise you to go to Courtenay." Of
course quite an argument followed;
but honestly, can you beat It? A man
living here, earning his money here,
and not only spending his money In
Courtenay but advising visitors to tlic
city to go to our neighbors at Courtenay. To the writer, it appears there
Is only one thing for the merchants
of Cumberland to do—give more publicity to the goods tbey are handling.
This Is not a bunco yarn, but was
related to the writer by a well known
Cumberland merchant.
Council Favorable
To Insurance For
Local Firemen
Entries Called For
Club Championship
Entries for ladles', men's and mixed
doubles are asked by the executive of
the Cumborland Tennis Club to bo In
the hands of Miss P. Partridge on or
before June 30th next These are for |
the club championships. Entries for
the Stevens' Shield, emblematic of the
men's singles championship of the
district, are also asked for on or before .July 15th. This tournament is
open to any player in the district.
This week the executive drew up
the men's and ladies' singles competition for club championships. First
round draws must be played off before June 30th. The complete draw
for first and second rounds are as
follows:
LADIES' SINGLES
First round—Miss Browne vs. Miss
Maxwell, Miss Conway vs. Miss N.
Parnham, Mrs. Bryan vs. Mrs. Cameron, Mrs. Clinton vs. Miss McFadyen,
Miss Burrows vs. Miss Banks, Miss
MacKinnon vs. Mrs. Finch. All other
players, byes.
Second round—Miss Brown or Miss
Maxwell vs. Miss Conway or Miss N.
Parnham, Mrs. Bryan or Mrs. Cameron vs. *Mrs, Clinton or Miss McFadyen, Miss Burrows or Miss Banks
vs. Miss MacKinnon or Mrs. Finch,
Miss MacNaughton vs. Mrs. Pickard,
Miss Bono vs. Mrs. Cope, Mrs. Conway
vs. Miss O. Richardson, Miss Partridge
vs. Mrs. Stacey, Miss Bickle vs. Miss
H. Parnham.
MEN'S SINGLES
First round—Cameron vs. Stacey,
Mumford vs. Rennie, Cope vs. Treen,
M. Graham vs. Malcolm Stewart. All
other players, byes.
Second round—Cameron or Stacey
vs. Mumford or Rennie, Cope or Treen
vs. M". Graham or Malcolm Stewart,
Dick vs. Matt. Stewart, Partridge vs.
Stevenson, McLellan vs. Marlnelli,
Dr. MacNaughton vs. T. Graham, Dr.
Hicks vs. Millar, H. Stewart vs. P. D.
Graham.
Carey, will be In attendance, and It
needs only a fine day to make the
service a memorable one. The service will be printed so that all may
follow It, and will make a happy
souvenir of this year in which tlie
Canadian Confederation is remembered. The Rev. G. Bourdillon, who
recently nrrlved from the Old Country
to take charge of the Parish of Courtenay, will deliver the address.
Present at Monday's council meeting were His Worship Mayor Maxwell
and Aldermen Parnham, Ledlngham,
Henderson and Williams. Aid. Mumford was in Victoria, whilst Aid.
Symons Is on a three months' vacation
in England.
The Esquimalt Nursing Home wrote
ln connection with the late William
Wesley Willard, presenting a bill of
$669.89 which ls yet outstanding. The
city, however, Is not liable for this
amount and referred the Nursing
Home back to previous correspondence in this matter.
Having learned that the city hail
discontinued insurance on members of
the local fire department owing to the
excessive cost, Mr. T. H. Carey submitted a policy for the consideration
of the council. The benefits to be
derived from the company Mr. Carey
represents nre very liberal, and the
premium Is only $7.50 per member
per year—much cheapen than thc
insurance offered by the Compensation Board. The council was In favor
of insuring the fire department under
these terms, and turned the matter
over to the FJre Wardens for action.
Another communication was from
Mr. G. W. Stubbs, chairman of the
parade committee for the jubilee celebration at Courtenay. Mr. Stubbs extended an Invitation to the council to
be present In the parade, and also
asked for a float representative of
Cumberland and the attendance of
one of the Are trucks. This latter
suggestion was also left to the Fire
Wardens, who In all probability wlll
send down the chemical truck suitably
decorated.
Aid. Henderson, reporting for the
Board of Works, said that all stumps
on Fifth street had been removed and
the road was now being gravelled.
Bills and accounts for the preceding
two weeks totaled $703.06. which Included the remuneration of the mayor
and aldermen.
The presence of Mr. M. Brown, caretaker of the Post Office, resulted In a
general discussion of tlic forthcoming
Diamond Jubilee of Confederation,
and it was decided to hold a mooting
the following Wednesday evening in
nn effort lo arrange sports for children on July 2nd. Mr. Brown has
been Instructed by the Dominion Dept.
of Public Works to decorate the Post
Office for the Jubilee, but was advised to get in touch with local officials flrst, hence his presence at the
Council meeting. Mayor Maxwell
thought that Mr. Brown should attend
the meeting on Wednesday, when hc
would receive more specific information as to local plans for the Jubilee.
Union Stage Company's Bus
Rolls Over Embankment
ONE MAN SERIOUSLY HURT—19 OTHER PASSENGERS
RECEIVE CUTS AND BRUISES.
Two Cumberland people were passengers in the Union Stage Co's Bus
which on Tuesday last turned over at
Beaver Creek on Its way up the Island. Miss Hannah Harrison and Mr.
J. Coombs, tlie two Cumberland pas-
Hengers, were badly cut and bruised,
but ut the time of writing arc resting
easily.
The Cumberland stage wns following the Alherni stage on its road to
Cumberland. Coming round n corner
at Beaver Creek 15 miles north of
Nanaimo, tbe driver wus suddenly
confronted with the road grader in
the middle of the road, the Alberni
stage to the right of it und an oil
Iruck to tlie left, the latter coming
soutli. The driver had the alternative
of crashing into the other stage or
the grader or of attempting to get by.
He tried to get by but there was not
enough room. The stage turned completely over once and came down on
its wheels again, the fore part resting
against a tree. This probably saved
the lives of Mr. Lewis Parker, of
Plncher Creek, nnd Miss Harrison, of
Cumberland, who were under the running bourd. One man was thrown
out into the bottom of the fifty foot
ravine and did nut regain consciousness for u quarter of an hour afterwards. Tlie singe itself must have
gone down tlie bunk twenty or thirty
feet. Medical assistance was olrtalned
from Parksville nnd flrst aid was administered. It was. [ound that all
could proceed on their journey but
Mr, Parker, who was taken to Parksvllle for treatment. The stage, itself,
is completely wrecked.
School Report And
List Of Promotions
i'uplls of the Cumberland Public
School entrance class flnlsued writing
tlielr examinations yesterday. Several also wrote the Candlan History
examination In the Diamond Jubilee
medals contest.
Miss Aspesy's class, with a percentage of 96.7, won the attendance shield
(or June.
The schools re-open on Tuesday, C
of September. Parents nre asked to
note that children who are six years
old by October 31 may attend.
Geo. E. Apps, Principal.
DIVISION I
H. E. Murray, tencber. No. on roll.
38; lates, 1; perfect attendances, 32;
percentage of attendance,  97.6.
Honor rolls—Punctuality, Beatrice
Cavallero, Sadako Iwasa, Lena Merlettl, Alex MacDonald; Deportment,
Joe Williams; Proficiency, not to be
announced until  later.
Promoted to High School on recommendation of Inspector Patterson, and
Principals Shenstone snd Apps--
(not iu order of merit): Tadao Doi,
Sadako Iwasa, Louis Hurt old). Ccorg"
Brown, Isabel Brown, Beatrice Cavallero, Alven Freloni, Dorothy Gordon,
Ping Lowe. Lena Merlettl, Alex MacDonald. Kathleen O'Brien, Oswald
Reid, Hltoshi Suginiori, Marguerite
Devoy, Barbara Westfield, Violet Williams, Rudy Bonora, Hatsuml .Mlyahara.  Yoshio Kawaguchl.
DIVISION II
T. A. Gallivan, teacher. No. on roll,
33; Iotes, 0; perfect attendances, 21;
percentage of attendance, 92.7.
Honor cards for Ji^ic—Cyril Davis,
Cazuko Iwasa, Nina Shields, Nellie
Jackson, Sheilali Conway, Edna Watson.
Honor rolls — Proficiency. Cnzuko
Iwasa; Good Conduct. Willie Mcintosh; Attendance. Josie Hurghiner.
Mildred Lockner, Heroshl Okuda, Shl-
geru Kujona.
Writing Certificates—Hatsue Malsukura, Nina Shields, Cazuka Iwasa,
Hlsako Nakano, Yoshio Madakosa.
Annie Taylor, Muriel Partridge, Hlroshl Okuda, Margaret McDonald, Thora
Keeler, Shigera Keyona, Kinuya Kaga.
Norio Herosc, Wilton Dalby, Alden
Francescini, Nellie Jackson. Mildred.
Lockner, Mary Small. Cyril Davis, !
Klyoka Abe. Jennie Lawrence, lhlys
Williams.
Promoted lo Entrance—Cazuk n
Iwasa, Nina Shields, Cyril Davis.
Sheilali Conway, Nellie Jackson, Hlsako Nakano, EdiM Watson, Yoshio
Madakosa, Hlroshl Okuda, Hatsue
Malsukura. Mary Smnll. Annie Taylor.
Thorn Keeler, Norlo llerose, Josin
Burghiner, Kinuya Kaga. Alden Francescini, John Combs. Mildred Lockner,
Margarel McDonald.
On trial—Dllys Williams. Douglas
Baird, Wilton Dalby, Klyoka Abe.
Willie McNaughton, Jennie Lawrence.
Willie Mcintosh, Clarence Lewis.
DIVISION   111
I c. MacKinnon, teacher. No. on roll,
183; lntes. 4; perfect attendances, 23;
percentage of attendance, 94.8.
I Honor cards—Takeru Kawnguilii.
Muslim Sura. Ilessle Nicholas. Main-
oru Tahara, Tom Mossey, Archie
Welsh.
Honor rolls — Proficiency, Bessie
Nicholas; Deportment, Choo Foo
Lung; Attendance, Second Merlettl
and Robert Brown.
Promoted from tirade 7 to Orade 8
—Bessie Nicholas, Takeru Kawaguchl
j Archie Welsh, Tom Mossey. Muslim
| Sora, Margaret Smiih. Mary McMillan, lien Nicholas, Second Merlettl,
Edith  Cavallero,  Audrey  Gear,  Low
(Continued on Page Four)
July Celebration
For Cumberland ?
Mayor Maxwell wan unavoidably
absent from the meeting held in the
Council Chambers on Wednesday
evening, and as a result it was considerably after 8 o'clock before the
chair was finally taken by Aid. Parnham and tlie meeting called to order.
Some twenty-five citizens were meeting for the purpose of arranging .some
suitable celebration to mark the sixtieth anniversary of Canadian Con-
fedreation on July lsl.
Dr. MacNaughton, a member of the
Ways and Means Committee appointed
at a previous meeting, reported that
he and Mr. Bickle had interviewed
the City Council and bad been promised a donation of Silon for the celebration, if such he held. Mr. Tom
Carney spoke also on behalf of the
Eagles Lodge. Informing that If a
parade is to be held the EalgeB will
be present in regalia, and in addition
will donate a sum of $25.00
Mr. J. Williams then moved (and J.
Robb seconded) that the children's
sports as run off on May 24th, lie
duplicated here on July 2nd. Messrs.
Strachan and Taylor, however, moved
.tii amendment to the effect that thc.
Jubilee be commemorated In soine
suitable manner in Cumberland, the
amendment winning on a vote being
taken.
Some of those present laid the
blame for lack of initiative in this
matter on the City Council, but both
Aid. Parnham and William.* defended
the Council on the grounds that tiie
citizens in general hnd nol shown
enough Interest to attend the meetings
when such had been called. Even
most members of committees appointed at an earlier gathering were not
present on Wednesday.
it was finally decided to meei the
City Council on Friday evening (tonight) at 8 o'clock, and for this purpose the following committee wa-
appointed: Dr. MacNaughton and
.Messrs. M. Brown, R. Strachan, R. C.
Lang, J. Robb, ll. Jackson and II. K
.Murray.
BIRTH—To the wife of Mr. Charles
Hitchens, at the Cumberland General
Hospital this morning, a son.
The Jay-Jay Cafe, which was opened a considerabe time ago by Mr. J. J.
Potter, is to he offered for sale as a
going concern, wo are given to understand. This business has made rapid
strides ever since opening, nnd it is
(only on account of Mr. Potter's dis-
j ability that the business Is being sold.
I It is nn excellent chance for a married couple or two young ladles to
get into business for themselves.
Public School Boys
Win Relay Race
Tlic two events which were to retried from June 8rd School Sports on
account of improper pace-making,
were run again in Nanaimo on Saturday, June 1Mb. It bad bei n hoped to
secure the Mime ground the football
Held-but, in spile of appeals made,
those in charge refused to allow tlie
events to be run either In the two
hours while people were waiting for
(lie game (o begin, or at halt tim-
when thousands waited with ii" entertainment whatever, ll was therefore
necessary iu run lbc races on the
grass Held on which Nanaimo had
been practicing, Instead of on din as
tbe lirst races Iiad been run. In spite
of ihe handicap thus placed on tho
visiting hoys, two splendid races wero
witnessed by the few who wero able
to see them.
in the half mile, Vli tor Poma 11,
Cumberland, losl to Harewood School.
In  the boys'  relay.  Cumberland   ham
took flrsi place over Quennel School,
.N'anaimo. As a result, Cumberland
gains another cup and there are only
three points between Cumberland and
Nanaimo for the Challenge Cup, Had
Cumberland Insisted ou Its protests
in other races there is no douhl that
Nanaimo would have lost the Championship Trophy. However. In the
interests of the harmony of future
meets. Cumberland droppi tl other protests.
Cumberland, however, is the only
scliool, both Public and High, which
has won cups outrighl by three successive years.
The relay team was composed of
Louis Bartoldi, John Davis, Tadao Doi
and George Brown, -lack Wa bou,
who ran in the llrsl race, was unable
to take part in tho second owing to
an accident to his eye. Tiie team
was voluntarily taken to Naniimo hy
Mr. M. Brown, and the expenses for
meals, etc., were md by the Scliool
Board.
"THE SCARLET LETTER," Ilo-llo, Friday, Saturday PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C
FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
F=
5
Rounds
Decision
Island's Greatest
Boxing Carnival
July 2nd at
Courtenay
CLIFFE
(Courtenay)
versus
(Winnipeg) BELANGER
- BOXING -
Courtenay Stadium
JULY 2nd 7patm.
Reservations, Riverside
Hotel, Courtenay,   /        ^
Phones 9 and   / Q
Island's
Greatest
Boxing
Carnival
All Star
Bouts
t
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES fMiBht calls:  134X Courtenay
I Olllce: 15!) Cumberland.
SOMETIMES THE
INFORMALITY OP THl*.
SPOKEN WORD IS
MORE EFFECTIVE
THAN A LETTER.
"LONG DISTANCE, PLEASE"
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
..»,*
iOflUt.NbLU MILK.
FORMER CUMBERLAND
RESIDENT IS AWARDED
DAMAGES FOR SLANDER
According to official notification
received by Mr. F. S. Cunliffe, counsel
for plaintiff, Mr. E. J. Cronk, of Port
Alberni, has been awarded $500 and ,
costs In a reserved decision by Mr. '
Justice McDonald, in the Supreme j
Court, Nanaimo registry, on a slander ]
charge which he laid against John
Edwards, of that city. The case dates
back to last January, when the plaintiff alleges that Edwards, ln referring
to a police court case in Port Alberni
in which a man Garvin was charged
with selling intoxicant liquors, hail
made statements to the effect that
"Garvin Is going to surprise them,
and is going to get off. He is going
to tell all he knows about what is
going on in the city and how he has
been paying Cronk (meaning the
plaintiff) $50 a month to keep quiet."
BLAIR MYSTERY
IS SOLVED
(Continued from page 1)
--doctors have been prescribing Eagle Brand as
an infant food when
mother1 s milk is not available.
Use it with confidence.
IN THE MATTKK OF THE ESTATE
OF JOHN PETER LEWIS, Deceased,
lute of Ciuupbell River,
llritish  Columbia.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against thc late John I'etcr Lewis are
required to send to Robert McCualg
nnd John Perkins, executors of the
will of the said deceased, at Campbell
Hiver. U.C, their names alld udilresses
and full particulars of their claims,
properly verified, and the nature of
the securities (lf any) held by them,
AND take notice thnt after the 30th
dny of July 1927, said executors will
proceed to distribute the assets of the
said decedent among tlle persons
entitled thereto, having regard only
to the claims of which they shall then
have had notice, and lhe said executors will not be liable for the assets
or any part thereof to any person*,
whose claim they shall not then have
received notice.
Dated at Campbell River, B.C., this
11th day of June, 1927.
JOHN PERKINS!    „     „.„„.
ROBERT M0CUAI0)-E"CUt0r"
24-27
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland, B. C.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
I'hene » Phone lt
sure he would flrst come to visit me.
Never Seen His Twins.
"For one thing"—here Mrs. Moore
pointed to two curly-headed youngsters—"there are his twin kiddies,
whom he has never seen. They were
born after he went to the States, and
when his wife joined hilm they were
loft in my charge until their dad and
mother came home.
"1 knew Tom would be keen to .iee
them, and, for my own part, 1 was
keen to see liim. We were always
such good pals, and I was anxious to
know what had brouglit.htm home In
Ibis strange way.
"On the Sunday after his reported
arrival I could wait no longer. Every
'bus on the road I fancied was a taxi
witli Tom. 1 got very worried, mid
before Sunday night I managed to get
a wire through to Ills uncle in Barrow
in-Furness, asking if he had seen or
heard anything of Tom.
"On Monday morning came the reply from Barrow to the effect that no
trace of Tom was to be found. I
worried myself 111 after that. We have
friend:; in Glasgow and Kilmarnock,
and not one of them had a scrap of
Information concerning Tom'" whereabouts.
"Then I got another shock. A
neighbour came in one day very excited, lt appeared that a gentleman
friend of hers had been speaking to
a taxi-driver whom he knows at the
Central Station, Glasgow. This driver
said to him—'You'll never guess
whom 1 drove from the Central to St.
Enoch. Why. big Tom Blair, tlle old
Kilmarnock 'keeper. He put his box,
whicli was addressed to Kilmarnock,
into the left-luggage department.
"Although this piece of news worried me still more I turned the thing
over in my mind time and again, and
tiie conclusion I reached was that
Tom was being impersonated, probably by someone not unlike him.
"My uncle in Barrow and all our
other relations held the same view.
A few days ago pretty positive proof
that the whole thing was a hoax came
in the form of these papers."
Conclusive Proof.
Here Mrs. Moore picked up an
American paper, the Fall River Globe,
dated Monday, 9th May, and containing a full report of a Soccer match
played on Sunday, the 8th, between
Fall River and Newark F.C. Tom
Blair's name and photograph were
there. He had played a great game
for Fall River.
"This is the wrapper that held the
paper," Mrs. Moore went on. "It Is
addressed in Tom's handwriting to
his uncle In Barrow—It was lie who
sent it to me—and the postmark is
Fall River. May 12, the very day Tom
was said to have arrived in Hull.
"I have sent Tom a letter-and a
newspaper containing the report of
his arrival."
Tom's uncle, Mr. G. Blair, who Is a
tobacconist at 156 Dalton Road, Bur-
row-in-Furness, said he was convinced his nephew was being Impersonated when the newspaper arrived
addressed in Tom's handwriting.
The Identity of the Individual
responsible for tlle hoax is a mystery,
but he apparently bears a marked resemblance to Tom Blair, as several
people who knew tlie latter personally
were completely deceived.
How People Were Deceived
Tho Glasgow taxldrlver who spoke
of driving Tom Blair from the Central
to St. Enoch Station told "The Sunday
Post" Ihat he was positive the man
was Tom Blair.
"I know Tom by sight.   I know his
walk and build," he said. "He arrived
at the Central Station with another
fellow on the morning train from the
South on Friday, May 13. I drove
them over to St. Enoch Station, and
when I was moving the luggage I distinctly noticed the name 'Tom Blair'
on a big box.
"When we got to St. Enoch and my
passengers stepped out, a gentleman
who was standing near stepped forward with a smile and hand outstretched. 'Hello, Tom,' he said,
When did you get back? I expect
we'll be seeing you at some of the
sports meetings this summer?"
" 'Sure,' replied Blair. Then they
parted, and I did not notice where my
fare went. ' 1
"Of course," went on the driver, "I
read in the papers about Blair's arrival and his being hard-up. Well,
he wasn't very hard-up. Why, for
that short run from Central to St.
Enoch he tipped me four shillings
above the ordinary fare. Hard-up?
What nonsense!"
Mr. Hugh Spenco. manager of Kilmarnock F.C, said that on Wednesday evening a gentleman remarked
that he had seen Tom Blair in Kilmarnock the previous week.. Mr. I
Spence was surprised that Blair did'
not vli.it Rugby Park.
Tom Blair's (ihost.
Bill M'Crucken, the famous Irish
International ond ex-Newcastle United full back, who ls now manager of
the Hull City Football Club, nlso met
the stranger, and he was convinced
that he was speaking to Tom Blair.
Mr. M'Cracken told a "Sunday Post"
representative that he was rung up
by a Hull detective, who stated that
Tom Blair was stranded in Hull, and
they were helping to get him back
home.
He was asked lf he knew Blair, and
replying In the affirmative, he suggested that the detective should send
the young man along to see him.
The visitor 'phoned—hlB accent was
distinctly Scotch—and an appointment was made at my office.
"I was finishing my career with
Manchester City when Blair came to
tlie team. I remember him distinctly.
Light-haired, tall, a personality not
easily forgotten.
"My visitor (lid not seek any assistance. He talked quite naturally
about football of days gone by, and
talked of men he had met ln America
—players whom I know.
"His conversation was thoroughly
knowledgeable, and his Scottish accent most marked. Never for a single
moment did I question In my own
mind whether or not he was Blair. I
thought he was. He spoke of his bad
times in America and his experiences
generally.
"'Tom,' I said to him, 'when you
snw things were not shaping very
well, why didn't you try to get away
earlier?'
"•Well, Bill,' was the reply, 'I
thought matters might improve, and
that everything would come back to
normal.'
I walked with him to the tramcar.
bade him farewell, wished him good
rier to board the train, but I could
not find him in any compartment,
although I searched the train from
end to end for a quarter of an hour."
The stranger, It was ascertained,
besides visiting a Hull newspaper
office, went to the Police Station
there, revealed his identity, stated he
was penniless, and asked to be put in
touch with  friends in Stockport.
The Stockport police were informed
and the friends required sought out,
and from them a sun was guaranteed
to provide the man's railway fare
from Hull to Manchester.
Later the Hull police had an Inquiry from a gentleman In Manchester
stating thnt "Blair" had not arrived
there. •
SIX PER CENT WAS
PAID BY COLLIERY
Crow's   Nest   Coul   Company   Elects
Directors nnd Reports on
Year's  Business
luck, handed him a trifle, and saw thc
I young man proceed In the direction
of the station en route for Manchester, so he informed me.
"All I can say now is that, if it was
not Blair I saw, it was his ghost,"
Lunched With HnU Director.
A touch of comedy was revealed in
the story related to a "Sunday Post"
representative to-day by a Hull City
Director—Mr. Ernest Proctor, of the
Grosvenor Hotel, Hull—who entertained the man who declared he was
Blair to lunch.
"He called upon me," said Proctor,
"about two hours prior to the time
he was supposed to be leaving Hull
by train for Stcokport.
"I hadn't met Blair or seen him
play.
"On his arrival the young man said,
'Good afternoon, Mr. Proctor. I am
Tom Blair, the goalkeeper. Thought
I would pop in and see you just to
tell you a bit about American football.'
"Naturally," said Mr. Proctor, "I
thought that the man was perfectly
genuine. I had heard he was In the
city, and I assumed that he visited me
because he knew I was actively Interested in football.
"He talked in very convincing
fashion and said that the police had
made arrangements for his departure
that afternoon by getting him a railway ticket.
"'Well,' I said, 'you'd better have a
hit of lunch here.' He thanked me
profusely, nnd I sat with him listening to his American tales of disappointment whilst he took his meal,
drank a bottle of beer, and smoked
my cigarettes.
"When he said he would have to
catch the four o'clock train I sent my
boots with him to the station.
"I followed later. My boots told me
Mr. Blair had gone through tho bar-
At the annual meeting of the Crows
Nest Pass Coal Company, recently
held, the thirtieth annual report was
presented. In the report the following relative to thc finaiiclnl affairs of
the company appears:
"The balance at the credit ot the
profit and loss account brought forward from 1926, was $223,401.37. To
this had been added the sum of $4.-
999.77, being the amount set aside in
1926 in excess of the actual amount
required for Dominion Income Tax
for 1925, (due to changes ln the Taxation Act after your books had been
closed); making a total brought forward of $228,404.14. To this has been
added the sum of $266,421.53, being
the company's not profit from all
sources of the operations for the year
1926 (after making provision for the
Dominion Income Tax for the year
1926, amounting to $19,094.79) making
a total of $4114,825.67. From this
amount, your directors have paid four
dividends of one and one half per cent
for tiie year, and amounting In all to
$372,690, leaving n balance at credit
of profit and loss account to be carried forward to  1927, or $122,135.67.
SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
"Thc operative profit of the subsidiary company. The Crow's Nest
Pass Electric Light and Power Company. Limited, for the year was $11,-
383.84, all of which was transferred
to depreciation reserve.
"The operative profits of the other
subsidiary company, The Morrisey,
Fernie and Michel Railway Company,
for the year were $27,512.13, all of
which was transferred to depreciation reserve.
"During Ihe year tho coal company
spent by way of capital expenditures,
for improvements and development,
$94,710.58; The Crow's Nest Pass
Light alld Power Company, $16,444.35,
and the Morrisey, Fernie and Michel
Railway Company,  $25,399.22.
"The coal mined during the year
amounted to 817,431 tons 310 pounds,
ns against S79.951 tons 1,415 pounds
in 1925, and the coke produced was
104,660 tons 410 pounds, as against
83,207 tons 1.700 pounds lu 1925."
The following directors were elected
for the ensuing year: Mr. W. R.
Wilson, Mr. A. H. MacNeill, K.C., Mr.
W. H. Robinson, Dr. G. W. Howland,
Mr. James T. Maher, Mr. James F.
Edgur, Mr. L. C. Gilman, Col. J. T.
Crabbe and Mr. A. Haydon, K.C.
At a subsequent meeting of the
directors the following officers were
elected: President. Mr. W. R. Wilson;
first vice-president, Mr. A. H. MacNeill; second vice-president, Mr. W.
II. Robinson: general manager, Mr.
H. P. Wilson; treasurer, A. Klauer;
comptroller, Mr. tl. H. Hess, Jr., and
secretary, Mr. J. S. Irvine.
A WHISKY   ESPECIALLY
ADAPTED FOR MEDICINAL
USE;  OF  FINE  QUALITY
AND WELL MATURED
CWffiSKY
MATURED IN CHARRED OAK CASKS
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the I
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
All Canada    I
You let it everywhere — the
pearly gray enameled were
that spells long service and
real, old-fashioned satisfaction.
This splendid kitchen ware,
SMP Pearl Enameled Wan,
defies wear and tear and its
surface, like all SMP Enameled
Ware, is so china-smooth and
dean it harbors no taints at
impurities.
You need no steel wool et spedal
deuuen to keep *$MP Piarl Ware
sparkling clean. Soap and hot water
Jo ihe trick in a fSy. Made la
•very new handy shape and riio
by an old established Canadian In-
dmtfy,
m Shut Mstai Pnooucn Co. *££"•
MONTREAL       TORONTO       WINNIPIO
atUOHTON    VANCOUVM    CALOMY
SMP ..,
Pearl Enameled
WARE FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
CELEBRATE
CANADA'S
JUBILEE
PAGE THREE
IN
COURTENAY
Friday - Saturday - Sunday
JULY 1,2,3
SPORTS, ENTERTAINMENTS, BOXING, DANCING
REAL OLD TIME MERRY-MAKING
B. C. CHAMPIONSHIP LOGGING COMPETITIONS
$2,000  IN  PRIZES
$50 Cash Prize for Best Decorated Passenger Car.
Trophy for Best Decorated Float
Tire for Best Decorated Business Truck
Prizes for Decorated Baby Buggies, Delivery Wagons
and Bicycles, etc., etc.
PARADE STARTS 10 A.M.
SPECIAL TRANSPORTATION FROM ALL PARTS
ADDRESS BY JUSTICE M. A. MACDQjNALD
NOON, JULY 1st.
SPORTS AND BARBECUE FROM 1 PJW.
Variety Entertainment
in Agricultural Hall
MONSTER, WONDERFUL
Fireworks Display
Concluding Sunday with Open Air Service at 2:30 p.m.
at the Veterans Memorial Cairn.
YOU'LL ENJOY COURTENAY
1867 1927
Boxing Program
An Ambitious One
Saturday, July 2, gives promise ot
being a red letter day in the annuls of
professional boxing on Vancouver Island, when at the Courtenay Stadium,
Promoter Bert Farrell will present a
program acclaimed by critics to be
without a peer.
Headlining the card, fans will see
Roy Cliffe, Courtenay light-heavyweight, opposed to Charlie Belanger.
Winnipeg, Man., in a ten rounds decision battle, and from past performances of the big fellows, action is
certain to be seen every minute they
are in the ring. When they clashed
in the neighboring city twelve months
ago, Cliffe gained the decision, but ln
return battle in Vancouver, the
Eastern boxer was adjudged winner
by a fair margin. Both nre out to
finish hostilities by the short route a
week from Saturday, both having
been in active training for the melee
for the past two weeks, Cliffe in his
home town and Belanger ln Vancouver.
Young Townsend, Vancouver, and
Tommy Fielding, Victoria, who furnished the main event at the recent
mill in the Capital City, are scheduled
to travel six (or less) rounds in the
seml-windup on the Courtenay card,
and judging by past performances,
the mix-up should be interesting.
Wing Hay, the Port Alberni Chinese
welter, is matched to meet Tommy
\V*hite, Vancouver, over the four
rounds distance, and although the
latter is highly scletniiic, the Celestial
is a never-say-die milling battler who
can always be depended upon to deliver the goods.
Constable (Kid) Stubbs, Port Alberni, holder of the welterweight
championship of the Island, 1103
drawn Billy Baker, Seattle, In one of
] the special events of four rounds duration. The American Is out to capture the "title," but the holder who
has defended his property successfully for tlle past seven months, will
have to be sent to dreamland ere he
lets go.
Battling Slim, Belllngham middleweight, makes his first appearance in
this section and brings with him
credentials of a high order. These
will have to materialize, as he hooks
up with Billy Cox, perhaps one of the
hardest hitting lads In his division in
the Province. Slim, who as an amateur athlete  made  a  big  name  for
JE      (
NORTHWEST LIFE
VIVIDLY FILMED
TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOB CHARLIE DALTON
Licensed Taxi Driver
himself across the imaginary line, has
a good record since joining the professional ranks, and carries a deadly
piston-like left that in training looks
to be loaded with T.N.T. He has been
daily working out with Cliffe at Courtenay and ls liable to "steal the show"
if preliminary trials can be accepted
as criterion.
With at least twenty-eight rounds
of boxing, Cumberland sportsmen are
assured of a fitting conclusion to thc
two-day Dominion Jubilee celebrations at Courtenay. The advance sale
of tickets Is already opened at the
Riverside Hotel, Courtenay, and reports vouchsafe a big attendance
TO EXCHANGE PULPITS
FOR SUNDAY SERVICE
Rev. J. H. Hobblns, of Union Bay.
will preach in the Cumberland United
Church on Sunday evening, June 20,
at 7:00 o'clock. Rev. John R. Hewitt
will take the service at Union Bay.
Gtnijberlarid
^Commercial
^Headquarters
Hotel
Rates
Reasonable [
The Poet's Corner
Mr. T. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines for this district, attended the
football game at Nanaimo last weekend and became so enthusiastic over
the display of the Scotchmen that lie
was Inspired to "dash" off the following verses:
Wha wur they? that came o'er the sea
An' crossed the Rockies, us tne gie
Some fitba' o' a high degree
Wha wur they? but some Scotchmen.
What soccer stars were they thnt came
Tae gle Up-Island socc's a game
And show us how they'd won their
fame.
Wha wur they? but some Scotchmen.
Wha wur they? just the other day
Regaled spectators wl' sic play
They'll no see mon for mony a day.
Wha wur they? but some Scotchmen.
Wha wur they? when the game wus
done,
Declared another victory won.
Who beat Nanaimo—five to none?
Wha wur they? but some Scotchmen.
Oor Island lads guid soccer play,
And  Campbell  wasna'  fear't  to  say
They wur the Best met on the way
By these same bonny Scotchmen.
Worthy o' notice was the fact
The Upper-Island socc's were capped
By Campbell, honoured fitba' chap.
Held o' the canny Scotchmen.
These visits here must stimulate
Our boys with power to Imitate.
And maybe yet to emulate
The  fitba'  kings—the  Scotchmen.
—T. R. Jackson.
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
Mr. Sam Williams weighed 111 al
Mumford's Grocery on Tuesday morning another fine trout, caught the
previous evening at Jock's Point.
Comox Lake. It weighed five pounds
two ounces, falling just three ounces
short of the record trout caught a
few weeks ago by Mr. Joe Tobacco.
<m
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY
The Cash Store
CAN WE DO BETTER THAN OTHERS?
Let the Quality and Price of our Goods answer the
Question.
Quick Quaker Rolled Oata (China)   39c
Quick Quaker Rolled Oats (Plain)   29c
Robin Hood Rapid Oats (China)   40c
Puffed Wheat, per pkg  15c
Puffed Rice, per pkg  17c
Christie's Cream Soda Biscuits, tin   38c
Red Arrow Soda Biscuits, per pkg  23c
Fairy Soda Biscuits, per pkg  19c
Kellogg's Corn Flakes, 2 for   25c
Roman Meal, per pkg  39c
Quaker Corn Flakes, per pkg  12c
Shredded Wheat, per pkg  15c
B. & K. Wheat Flakes, per pkg  40c
Sliced Pineapple, per tin   17c
Burford Pears, 2s, per tin   20c
Horse Shoe Salmon, ijs, 2 for  45c
Pink Salmon, '/Vs, per tin      9c
McLaren's, SherrifTs Jelly Powders, 3 for  25c
Royal Crown Soap (6 bars), per carton   25c
White Swan Soap, 6 bars for  25c
Royal Crown Washing Powder, per pkg  28c
Soap Chips, good for Washing Machine, per tb  19c
White Star Tea, none better, per tb   05c
Blue Ribbon Tea. per tb  70c
Blue Ribbon Coffee, per tb   70c
Magic Baking Powder, 12-oz.,   33c
White Star Baking Powder, 12-oz„   25c
Sesqui Matches, per pkg  40c
Royal Purple Tomatoes, 2s, 13c; 2 Us  17c
Aylmer Pork and Beans, 2s,   17c
Oranges, special, 4 doz. for   95c
Also Cherries, Bananas, Watermelon, New Potatoes,
Tomatoes, Strawberries, Cabbage, Carrots,
at lowest prices.
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY
THE CASH STORE
Phone 155
PPPfol^^
One man and ono woman, marooned
and cut off from the world, fighting
their way to wealth. She, with
nothing but hate nml fear in her
heart; he, strong, stoical, wondering
whether or not he really loves her.
How do two such people come from
the ends of the earth lo meet ami
marry?
Nora Marsh, up lo the ago of 20,
had lived all her sheltered life within
the confines of n London home. Suddenly, walls, seemlngy secure, had
crashed. Where before she hnd been
rich, she is destitute. So, Nora sots
out for the only haven she knows, her
brother's farm In far Canada.
There, she meets Frank Taylor, a
horny-handed tiller of the soil, temporarily working for Ed in uu effort
to recoup the monetary loss sustained
the preceding winter. At first, Nora
repulses him. Then, after quarreling
with her brother's wife, she asks
Taylor to take her away.
And now, they were leading a living death. To her, it wus merely
existing. But bit hy bit, Taylor begins gaining her respect. The things
he does and says, all for her happiness and comfort, gradually cat into
her unfounded hate. Soon, she Is
actually looking forward to his homecoming each  night.
Then, to disturb their happiness,
comes tragedy, sweeping down without warning. Overnight, everything
is wiped out. Failure opens tlie door
and stalks in.   What happens?
See "The Canadian" nt the Ilo-llo
on June 29-30 or at lhe Gaiety on July
1-2. Thomns Meighan's latest starring vehicle Is a real picture, one that
shouldn't he missed by movie lovers.
William Beaudine, director of "'Hold
That Lion!" and "Sparrows," directed.
Annual Picnic Of
Holy Trinity W.A.
Brilliant Success
The Holy Trinity Women's Auxiliary held their annual picnic al
Gartley's Bench on Wednesday afternoon. June 22ud. The duy is one
which will live long in the memory of
those who attended it. Tlie mo.-,:
exciting event of the afternoon wns u
"baseball" match under the respective
leadership of MesrsB. Keeler ami
.Mumford. The game waxed fast nnd
furious, and there was un added excitement In the fact llint new "rules"
were coming Into action every minute.
The captains on both sides kept a
close watch on one another, and many
run wan nptched us tiie sides disputed about the Intricacies of foul
balls, strikes, nnd how many were
out. The ladles who took pari In Ihe
gunie proved themselves gum] players
und good runners. Mrs. Richardson
nnd Mrs. Clinton vied with Babe Ruth
In the number of home runs thoy
made, whilst all the razzing from the
bleachers could not shake the coolness of Mrs. Conway und Mrs. MacDonald, who acted us pitchers. Mi*.
Finch on one occasion strayed far
from third base as he was running
for It, and recovering, managed to end
lu a very graceful •■split" near the
bag. George Tarbell, however, wns
too quick, and with a chorus of "he'.i
out." .Mr. Finch retired. Mr. Keeler,
who noted us catcher, kept up u cnn-
linuous barrage ot wise-cracks, and
only the advent of the tide Baved liim
from a snd and early end to a useful
life. The game ended with Mr. Mumford's team as easy winners. Afterwards n camp lire was lit, and a very
happy day concluded with choruses
and songs.
The Sunday School of Holy Trinity
Anglican Church will hold their annual picnic nt Royston Beach nexl
Wednesday. Juno 29th. Scholars and
parents wlll be notified ol tlie arrangements which are being made [or
the outing. Tho School wlll close for
the months ol July and August.
Royston Gossip
On July 3rd the llrsl at the Bunday
evening services wlll be hold al Roys
ton Beach, commencing nl T::i» p.m.
Those Bervlces wlll continue during
the months of July and Augusl unless notification Is given to the contrary, 11 Is hoped thai ii will bo
possible to arrange for members ot
the Panpipes orchestra under the
direction of Mrs. Carey, and the Hand
under the direction ol Mr. Murray, to
supply snored music ai Bome ol the
services, l'laiis are also being made
to hold a service ot sai red music one
Sunday evening in the Imperial Pavilion. Thero will ho no services in
Holy Trinity Church during tho Sunday evenings in these months.
A verv  interesting and  Instructive
meeting    ot    Hi"    newly    organized
brunch of lhe Women's Auxiliary  I"
tho M.S.CC.  was hold al  Ilio h'linc ol'
Mrs. S. Watson, Royston, Thursday
last, June 18th. This branch lias n
membership ot seventeen, vil illy keen
on following the various motives for
which this liig missionary raovemonl
stands, always remembering thai "in
us much ns yo did li in Hio leasl of
these my brethren, ye did li unto me."
Various methods wore discussed for
sending aid to those In our own land
who need n helping hand. Meetings
wlll he discontinued during July nud
Augusl. ■pi
PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
School Report And
List Of Promotions
(Continued from Page One)
Hong.  Oeorge Strachan,  May  Beveridge,   John   Davis,   Tom   Robertson,
Momoru    Tahara,    Helen    Morrison.
Alfred Jones.
Unranked—Muriel Harrison.
DIVISION  IV
V. J. Aspesy, teacher. No. on roll,
L'T: lates. 2; perfect attendances, 20;
percentage of attendance, 96.7.
Honor cards—George Saito, Sidney
Hunt, John Bannerman, Enis Uonora
ami Irene Oyama (equal), Olgu Uon-
nni. Teruko Hoi.
Honor rolls — Proliclency, George
Saito; Deportment, Juckie Marpole,
Attendance, Irene Oyama. Special
Grade. Olga Bonora. proficiency.
Promted to Jr. VII -Oeorge Sail,,.
John Bannerman, Jessie Rohb, Sidney
I linn, Wilberl Auchterlonle, Irene
Oyama, Enis Bonora, Barbara Martin.
Bryson Parnham, Jack Pattlnson.
Promoted to Special Jr. VII—Chi-
yoko Suglmorl, Shigera Yuguohi, David Marshall, .Muriel Thomson, Hugh
Irvine, Jackie Marpole, Clifford Webber, Olga Uonora, Edniond Carrigan.
Arnold Derbyshire, Teruko Doi. Minion Comb, Tokio Nakano, Alice Taylor
Chow Chee. John Burghiner.
Tn  Jr.   VI—Walter  Handley.
DIVISION  V
E. C, Hood, teacher. No. on roll.
•II; lates. 2; perfect attendances, 23;
percentage of attendance, 93.is.
Honor curds. Grade VI—Howard
Wrlgley, Jackie Morrison, David Hunden. Grade Sr. V—Audrey Phillips.
Madge Bryan, Gertie Davis.
Honor rolls—Gr. VI, proficiency,
David Hunden; Gr. V, proficiency,
Josie Wong; Grs. V and VI, deportment, Margaret Drummond; Attendance, Willie Home, Peter Bono, .Margaret Marpole, Kate Oyama.
Promoted from Gr. Jr. VI to Sr. VI
in order of merit—David Hunden,
Jackie Morrison, Doris Drew, Howard
Wrlgley, Alex Somerville, Lem Hing.
Preston Bruce, Willie Home, Hero-
mitsu Saito. Harold Hughes. Margaret
Westfield, Donna Meltae. On trial—
May Graham, Clyde Lewis, Johnny
Robertson.
Promoted from Gr. Sr. V to Jr. VI
iu order of merit—Josie Wong. Madge
Bryan. Shlgeml .Maruya, Audrey Phillips, Voshltoshi Kawata, Gertie Davis.
Arthur Wong. Kate Oyama, Muriel
Shortt, Margaret Marpole, Tsuglno
Matsukura, Mitsuo Obara, Leland
Bannerman, Takashf Ogakl, Johnny
Mali, Mituuo Hayashl, Willie Cloutler.
On trial—Peter Bono, Ettie Buchanan,
Marion  Webber.
Ill VISION  VI
II. M. Bickle. teacher.   No. on roll.
37;  lutes. 1; perfect attendances, 22;
percentage ot* attendance, 94.1.
June  honor  list.  Gr.  V—Ada  Tso.
Teruko Kiyonaga, Tommy Wong.   Gr.
IV Sr. -Haru Nakano, Ina Robertson,
Isabel Vincent.
Honor rolls—Ada Tso (proficiency)
Grade V Jr.; Haru Nakano (proficiency) Grade IV Sr.; Attendance, Isohel
Vincent, Alice Brown, Ronald Brown;
Deportment, Margaret Beveridge.
Promoted from Grade V Jr. to V Sr.
-Ada Tso. Sheiii!'' Wong. Alice
Brown. Jean Quinn, Bessie Brown,
Teruko Kiyonaga, Margaret Beveridge
Tommy Wong. Stanley Lawrence,
Masahlko Tateishi, Yacko Obara, Klso
Son). William Bccleston, Audrey DeCoeur, Susumu Kawaguichi, Dudley
Keeler, Doreen Bickerton. Edith Tay-
lor and Kiyoshi Okuda (equal). James
Williams, William Combs, Ynsuslii
Yamnshl, Alex .Mossey. Betty Malpass,
Margaret Williams. Ou trial—Gladys
Miller, Shori Kujonaga, Wardens
Thompson.
Promoted from Grade IV Sr. to V
Jr.— Haru .Nakano, Ina Robertson,
[sobel Vincent, Jean Dunsire, Albert
Drew. Ronald Drown, William Tobacco.
DIVISION VII
E. M. Hood, teacher. No. on roll,
38; lutes, n; perfect attendances, 22;
percentage of attendance, 94.5.
Honor cards, Sr. IV—Cheung .Ming.
Harry Tong, V.isiiharu Kadoguchl.
Jr. iv -Freddy .Martin, Heroshl Ogakl
ami Heroshl Kawaguchl.
Honor rolls —Sr. IV. Prolicioncy,
Yashuhuru Kndoguchl; Jr. IV, Proficiency,  Heroshl  Ogakl;   Deportment,
I'ri  SaltO.
Promoted from Grade Sr. IV to Jr.
V Ynsuharu Kadoguchl, Mary Baird,
Cheung Ming, Hurry Tong. Moy.slii
Kimoto, Hose Marocchi, Billy Paitin-
Bon, Joo Aida, Tommy MacMillan, I'ri
Saito, Low Foo, Mary Mobley, Violet
Robertson, Jimmy Tong, Kojhi Kiyonaga, Herbert McRae, Irene Jackson,
Edith Hughes, Chrissie Edward;.
James MonkB, Sammy Armstrong,
David Davis, Arnold Bonora, Shizeo
Mat8umaza. On trial John liickcn-
■ on. Hilly Merrifield, Alice Jackson.
Promoted from Grade Jr. IV to Sr.
IV Heroshl Ogaki, Freddy Marttn,
Walter Hunt, Heroshl Kawaguchl,
Lily Tobacco, Tsuyuko Yaguchi, Muslim Heroshl. On liiul -Irene Simis-
ter, Thelma Freloni.
Home, Sakae Fuylmoto, Jackie Bong,
Dhryl Thomson.
GRADE  IX
Charlotte Carey, teacher. No. on
roll, 34; lates, 12; perfect attendances
!); percentage of attendance, 92.7.
June honor cards, Jr. Ill—Albert
Hicks, Mlchiko Iwasa, Cameron Wilson, Masaka Hara (progress). Sr. Ii
—Norma C'avellarn, Keen .Mali, Bobby
Rutherford (progress).
Honor rolls—Jr. III. Proficiency,
Albert Hicks; Sr. II, Proficiency, Ronald Spooner; Deportment, Oswald
Wycherley; Attendance, Norma Cav-
ellara, George Nicholas.
Promoted from Jr. Ill to Sr. Ill -
Albert Hicks. Cameron Wilson, Mlchiko Iwasa. Haruheko Tateishi, Masa-
yuiki Kuinube. Edna Williams, Aikera
Saito. Masaka Hara, Billy Hunden.
Violet Scayardo, Furaoka Matsabaohi,
George Nicholas, Lem Quia, Uneana
Williams. Herbert Webber, . Jackie
Graham, Charlotte Hoffhienz, Robert
Mossey, Thelma Waterfleld.
Promoted from Sr. II to Jr. II—
Norma Cavellaru, Ronald Spooner,
Keen Mali. Sukne Aida, Bobby Rutherford, fOnclii Yoslilliiinin. Minoru Nakanishi. Oswald Wycherley, William
Ramsell, Dnvid Logan, Viola Martin-
elli. Billy Walker.
DIVISION X
P. Hunden, teacher. No. on roll,
39; lates, 3; perfect attendances, 25;
percentage of attendance, 90.5.
Honor list, Gr. II Jr.—Margaret
Armstrong, Leone Brown, Jack Thomson aud Dorothy Lobley (equal). Gr.
II Sr.—Tetsuo Aoki. Bessie Carney,
Fanny Tol, Helen Lawrence.
Honor rolls—Proficiency, Grade II
Jr., Dorothy Prior; Proficiency, Grade
II Sr., Bertie Marshall; Deportment,
Leono Brown; Attendance, Tetsuo
Aoki and Bessie Cumey.
Promoted from Grade II Sr. to III
Jr.—Tetsuo Aoki, Bessie Carney,
Bertie Marshall. Fanny Toi, Helen
Lawrence, Knneko Tahara, Kiyomi
Ampi, Mitsko Yagauchi, Lilian Docherty, Nohuko Ynno, Tsneyoshi Ki-
nuirn, Dorothy Hunt, Gilbert Davis,
Jessie Robertson, Willard Gilmour,
John Dakers.
Promoted from Grade II Jr. to II
Sr.—Dorothy Prior, Margaret Armstrong, Loone Brown, Dorothy Lobley,
Jack Thomson, .George Ogaki. Annie
Fong. Jessie Mali, Charlie Scavardo,
Miyokl Kadoguchl, Iwao Harada,
ToshikI Obara, Albert Watson, Phyllis Robertson. Murie Jackson. Lem
Wong. Lille Waterfleld, Marcus Grant.
DIVISION  XI
J. E. Robertson, teacher. No. on
roll, 36; lates, 4; perfect attendances,
23; percentage of attendance, 90.44.
June honor list. Jr. II—Beatrice
Brace and Lizzie Baird, Vera Wrlgley.
Sr. IA—Guy Curwen. Jackie Williams
and Margaret James. Sr. 1B--Chris-
sie Robertson, Dot Thomson and Paulino Harrison.
Honor rolls—Jr. II, Proficiency,
Beatrice Brace; Sr. I, Proficiency.
Evelyn   Stacey;   Deportment,   Jackie
Williams; Attendance, John Martin,
Peggy Roberts, Bobbie Weir.
Promoted from Grade II Jr. to II
Sr.—Beatrice Brace, Lizzie Baird.
Vera Wrlgley, Mario Galeazzi, Darcey
Harrison, Melford Devlin, Ella Pattlnson, Alfred Botich, Dorothy Malpass,
Herbert Woods.
Promoted from Gr. I Sr. to II Sr.—
Evelyn Stacey, Jackie Williams, Guy
Curwen, Margaret James, Peggy Roberts, Irene O'Brien, Denis Shields.
Gordon Devoy. Lizzie Conn.
Promoted from Gr. I Sr. to II Jr.—
Chrissle Robertson, Dot Thomson,
Pauline Harrison, Norman Raga, Dot
Smith, John Martin, Hughle Strachan,
Robert Brown, Kenneth Gibson, Jackie Webber, Edith Williams, Louis
Buchanan, Chester Bonora, Robert
Weir.
DIVISION XII
C. Richardson, teacher.   No. on roll
35;  lates. 0; perfect attendances, 23
percentage of attendance, 94.S7.
Honor cards, Gr IA—Jenny Cheung.
Masiilo Sorn, Sawako Ikegami and
Kakutchlro Suyama. Gr. IB—Belle
Wong, Chizuru Okuda, Toyoko Yano.
Honor rolls—Proficiency and Regularity and Punctuality, Masato Sora;
Regularity and Punctuality, Hironil
Saito;   Deportment.  Sawako Ikegami.
Promoted from Grade IA to 213 —
Masato Sora, Jenny Cheung, Kakui-
chlro Suyama, Sawako Ikegami, Fu-
mle Kaneko, Shizeo Obara, John Tso,
Tetsuo KawagauchI, Yoshlna Kimoto,
Kltaji Kiyonaga, Yashero Kaga. On
trial—Yukio Mariya, Yoshinori Mat-
sui.
Promoted from Grade IB to IA—
Chizurie Okuda, Belle Wong, Toyoko
Yano, Fumi Makimoto, Hiroml Saito,
Tomae Shil, Kazuo Yoshlkuml, Knzu-
mi Yoshikumi. On trial—Toshlko
Yamamoto, Toshlko Yano.
DIVISION  XIII
Eva G. Drader, teacher. No. on roll,
28; lates, 4; perfect attendances, 17;
percentage of attendance, 92.
Honor cards—Marguerite Goodall,
Willie Robertson, Ethel Shellito, Wyu-
tour Vaughan, Lillian Saunders, Barbara McNeil.
Honor rolls—Proficiency, Laureen
Frelone nnd James Leighton; Deportment, Frank Mobley; Regularity and
Punctuality, Margaret Graham.
Promoted from Orade IA to 2B—
James Leighton, Marguerite Goodall,
George High, Mary Cass, Willie Robertson, Davedina Derbyshire, Frank
Mobley, Jimmy Jackson, Jimmy Small.
Promoted from Grade IB to IA—
Laureen Frelone. Ethel Shellito.
Violet Tobacco, Barbara McNeil,
Mavis Sutherland, Wyntour Vaughan,
Ruymond Stockand, Ellen Sommerville, Lily Saunders, Rita Baird, Allan
Mitchell, Reno Bono, Margarel Graham.
DELICIOUS /
DELIGHTFUL//
That's what they all say
who have tried the
famous
Jlr. Thos. It. Jackson. Inspector of
Mines for tlle district, was In the city
this week on a business visit.
CAMP-FIRE
PERMITS
THIS YEAR IT IS NECESSARY TO HAVE A PERMIT FROM SOME FOREST OFFICER BEFORE ANY
CAMP-FIRE MAY BE SET IN ANY  FOREST  OR
WOODLAND
BE SURE TO GET A PERMIT FOR YOUR CAMP-
FIRE AND FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS
PRINTED ON THE BACK OF IT
PURE
JERSEY
ICE CREAM
Be sure and ask for it at your favorite
fountain. "THERE IS NONE BETTER"
Manufactured from pure Comox Cream at the
Comox Creamery
Courtenay, B.C.
awtssaaMasasatarwsssasataira:
P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
YOU CAN HELP
jP^Wg«'**Jt*4UU)-l'.^^
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay           Ph-tae 251
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel ln Eveuinfe.
Telephone  HSR or 24
DIVISION   Vlll
0. McFadyen, teacher. No. on roll.
36; laics, l; perfect attendances, -4;
percentage of attendance, 00.
Honor curds I'or June. Gr. IV Jr.—
Siisumi Uchlda, Hilly Westfield, Dnvid
Bell. Gr. Ill Sr. -Mnsiiko Iwnsa,
Jean Somerville, Shunko Saito.
Honor rolls—Susural Uchlda, Proficiency, Grade IV Jr.; Masaka Iwasa,
Proficiency, Grade Hi Si*.; Deportment, Jinn Somerville; Attendance,
Margarel Home, Billy Westfield, David Bell.
Promoted trom Grade III Sr. and
IV Jr.—Mnsako Iwnsa. Jean Somerville, Shunko Saito, Betty O'Brien.
Charlie Chin'. Tom Tso, Kazuo Iwnsa.
Arthur Rnnisell. Sumoyo Okuda, Hal-
sue Vumnznki. Sam Robb, Margarel
Shortt, Willie Conn,
Promoted trom Grade IV Jr. to IV
ar— Susuml Uchlda, Billy Wostfield,
Gladys Colling. David Bell, Mmie Buchanan, George Simpson, Irene Minium. Deslay Harrison, Tsuglo Iwatjn,
Willie Irvine, Klyoko Kiyona, Hldeko
Tsuoroka, Malile Somerville, Margaret
For the Choicest of Meats
try
WILCOCK BROS.
MEAT MARKET
WE HANDLE ONLY THE BEST
Our Cold Meals sliced any thickness you desire on our
NEW DAYTON SLICER
are ideal for the dinner bucket or for lunches.
-: GIVE US A TRIAL :-
For
Quality and Service
Phone
111
CITY MEAT
MARKET
The BEST QUALITY of
FRESH and SMOKED
MEATS
at popular prices
Try our
Cooked Meats for I
Cold Lunches
Johnson's Wax
Electric Floor
Polisher
Beautifies all your Floors and Linoleum*
quickly, without stooping, kneeling, or even
soiling your hands.
Price complete, with Johnson'i Lamb Wool
Mop for spreading Wax:
$48.50
Rent it or buy it from
Cumberland Electric lighting
Co., Ltd.
»-»-*-J-fc*Ja*4MWM'-***^^
WE SELL ICE
GIVE US A TRIAL
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vi-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director. FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
THE CUMBERLAND TISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
News of Courtenay and District
New High School
Site Reported On
By Committee
(Continued from Page One)    .
showing the amount to be saved have
never been mentioned, but lt sufficient to compensate for the disadvantages mentioned tt might be desirable to agree to the exchange. It
should, however, be made very clear
just what the Government ls prepared
to do ln the way of extras. Your
committee does not recommend the
purchase of any lots as this would
make the site exceed two acres."
Attention was drawn to the fact
that cows are frequently in the auto
park. There was some discussion as
to how the cows got in. It appeared
that children going to the bathing
pool sometimes leave the gate open.
The police will be asked to warn tho
children to close the gate, lt was
decided to request the Agricultural
Association to complete the renovation of their fences before the 1st of
July, If possible.
Electricity Cheaper
The matter of re-valuing city owned
lots came up when an olfer for a lot
on Victoria Avenue was received trom
Mrs. Herbert Smith. The Ways and
Means committee, with the addition of
the mayor, are to set prices on city
owned property.
ln connection with a recent trip of
the city clerk to Vancouver to get
information concerning the sale of
electric cooking stoves by the city to
consumers on the installment plan,
Aid. MacDonald reported that Mr.
Wood had been successful. His committee was of the opinion that some
forty or fifty stoves could be sold in
the district on this plan. At the reduced rate, cooking by electricity
would be a saving of money. Both
the city clerk and Aid. Lloyd corroborated this opinion.
Aid. Fielder reported three new
water service connections and said
thut lhe water iu Brown's River was
too high to admit of work on the pipe
line. Aid. Fielder also made inquiries
concerning sanitary conditions, and
said central sewage accomodation
was shown to be becoming a dire
necessity.
Major Declares Holidays
Aid. Whllls, who had previously
given notice that he would bring in a
by-luw governing publlc holidays, reported, after having taken up the
matter with the city solicitor, that
statutory holidays were made by
declaration, and did not concern the
council. Concerning holidays other
than statutory, the mayor could declare them holidays and could ask
the citizens to govern themselves
accordingly. The two-day celebration
on tbe 1st and 2nd of July are both
to be declared holidays.
Aid. Douglas brought up the matter
of a road down to Kye Bay. Tho
council went on record as favoring
the construction of the road, to be
completed this year. A copy of the
resolution is to be sent to the assistant district engineer.
|H|mimi na im... in* mi iiui im immnm
DROSS
FROM THK MELTING POT
BBErajajjEl
LIKE FATHER LIKE SON
Teacher—"Johnnie, what does 'note'
mean?"
Proverbial Johnnie—"It means girl.'
Teacher—"What makes you think
that, Johnnie?"
Proverbial Johnnie—"Well, the day
before yesterday the nurse comes in
and says to pa, 'It's a girl,' and pa
says, 'That's a hell of a note'."
"There's no present like the time,"
remarked the Incorrigible punster as
he gave his wife a wrist watch.
FATHER'S NOMINATION
Visitor—"So you have triplets at
your house? Has your father names
for them yet?"
Willie Willis—"Yes; but I don't
think any minister would baptize
them with what pa calls them."
"The collection this morning," said
the vicar, "will bc taken on behalf of
the arch fund, and not, us erroneously
printed In the service papers, on bo-
half of the arch-fiend."
"Oh, Able, Abie, such extravagance!
At four o'clock In the afternoon you
buy already an all-day sucker,"
"I told my wife that if she bobbed
her hair I would leave her," confided
a man to his friend.
"But she. bobbed it; and you're still
living with her."
"You bet I am. I'll show ber she
can't bluff me."
"Oh, look at that scarred old hillside," exclaimed the gushing young
thing.
"Yes," said her prosaic companion,
"that's where it was operated on for
gravel."
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Successful Tea
Isenor of Merville, and W. Qrier of
Arden, as well as others.
COURTENAY, June 20.—On Saturday afternoon ln the basement of St.
George's United Church, there was a
sliver tea and an exhibition of needlework in connection with the Home
Economics course of the scliool. The
numerous articles displayed showed
that the pupils of Miss Ethel Till have
made good progress in the few
months in which home economics
have been taught. Next term, when
it is hoped the new High School will
be completed, making more accomodation available, lt is expected that a
cookery course wlll also be Included
in the home Economics. A number of
girls of the various grades assisted in
preparing and. serving the tea. The
proceeds, which formed a neat sum,
will go towards the purchase of books
to form a reference library.
At the Riverside
COURTENAY, June 21.—Guests ut
the Riverside Hotel over the week-end
included Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Armstrong, Mr. and Mrs. D. 0. Crossley of
Vancouver; Mr. Win. Byers, Nanaimo;
Mrs. D. Leatherdale, Vancouver; Mr.
J. Moon, Victoria; C. F. Hine and S.
U. Mulholland, Vancouver; R. Bramley, Nanaimo; J. W. McAlpine, W. R.
Regan, Ernest Graham and J. Brown,
all of Victoria.
Courtenay Teacher
Honored
COURTENAY, June 20.—On Friday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. Thos.
Gwllt, some of the mothers of the
pupils of Miss Ina Smith who Is giving up teaching to be married, met
and presented her with a miscellaneous shower. The many very useful
gifts were brought Into the drawing
room on a decorated cart, drawn by
little Betty Booth and Lome Gwilt,
who presented the packages one by
one to the recipient. Tea was daintily
served by the hostess, assisted by
Mrs. Percy Bootli.
Semi-Formal Coats
Are Always
a
Needed
s
Jasper Park Lodge, Jasper National Park, Now Ope
Comox Cattle
For Shanghai
COURTENAY.—The advantage of
keeping careful records of their dairy
animals has just been brought home
to some of the farmers of the Comox
Valley in no uncertain manner. Those
termors who have made a point of
keeping breeding dates on record, and
who were able to definitely tell when
their animals are due to freshen have
been successful in making some sales
at satisfactory prices.
Mr. T. H. Orchardson and Captain
Grant, acting for tho Culty Dairy Co.
of Shanghai, China, have been in the
valley purchasing Jersey heifers,
either pure bred or grade, that will
freshen with their first calf in September. Capt. Grant, who has acted
as manager for the dairy in Shanghai,
selected the animals and expressed
himself as very pleased with the
Comox Jerseys. The selection ot the
animals was narrowed down very
considerably as many of the farmers
were unable to state when their stock
Is due to freshen.
The Culty Dairy Co. purchase from
eighty to a hundred head per annum
and are willing to pay good prices
for the right kind of stock. They do
not haggle over the price if breeding
and quality are right. If the animals
live up to their representation, the
buyers will be back for more.
The Jersey breeders of the district
contributing to this shipment Include
J. E. Marriott, Royston; A. Knight
and John McKenzie ot Comox; R. U.
Hurford, Courtenay; T. H. Brazier,
G. W. T. Carwlthen and John Crockett
of Sandwick; J. B. Cleland and D. M.
Revision of Rates
For Electricity
Is Approved
COURTENAY, June 22.—A revision
of the electrical consumption rates
for the purpose of inducing consumers
to use more electricity for cooking
was approved at Monday night's
meeting of the city council. Aid. E.
L. MacDonald claims that the reduction of twenty per cent will make
cooking by electricity cheaper than hy
wood or coal. This opinion was conflrmed by city clerk C. S. Wood and
Aid. Lloyd. The reduction will, it Is
surmised, greatly increase consumption, which, according to the chairman of the electric committee, should
reduce the mill rate by three per cent.
That the meter card reading system
has been successful was Indicated by
the co-operation of ninety per cent of
the consumers. No meter rents will
be charged in future to those who
read their own meters and return the
cards, but a charge for reading the
meters of those who do not wish to
co-operate will be made equal to the
former rental.
Industrial rates are to bo given on
application and will be governed by
the amount and period of consumption. Aid. MacDonald said it would
be necessary to bring In a new by-law
to replace the old one and he gave*
notice that he would introduce the
new by-law at the next meeting. His
report was received aiid the recommendations and new rates were endorsed and adopted on motion of Aid.
Lloyd, seconded by Aid. Douglas.
DINING ROOM
l Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service,  reasonable charges.]
King George Hotel
As f.vfuv smart woman knows, there is
noiliin** like a straight-line black silk
coat for a thousand and one different
occasions ot morning, afternoon and
eve.ii::)* of summer, spring and fall, and
even of winter when a warm twill lining
is added. This style lends itself readily
of course to any other color that you may
. prefer, and may be made in satin, ribbed
silk, moire, wool crepe or cashmere with
harmonizing lining. The flat-haired lur
that faces the long collar may Ik replaced
by moire ribbon, and the fashionable
looped Ixnv ol sell material may be placed
at Hit shoulder rather than at tlie closing.
Round Trip Fares
TO EASTERN POINTS
In Canada and tbe United States
Also a
Edmonton-Calgary
and
The Triangle Tour
VANCOUVER PRINCE RUPERT JASPER
Tickets on sale dally to Sept. 30.  Final return limit Oct. 31
Canadian National*
'SEE CANADA IN CANADA'S DIAMOND JUBILEE YEAR -UU.I9M"
For full particulars  apply
Cumberland E. W. BICKLE Telephone 35
Or write C. F. Earle, District Passenger Agent, Victoria.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
j COURTENAY, B. C.
GUM-DIPPED TIRES
Help Tea Save Money
The Firestone process of saturating the cords in rubber
solution, insulates every fibre of every cord with rubber,
minimizing internal friction and wear.
It gives stamina to the cords and makes possible the
strong, flexible sidewalls of Firestone Full-Size Balloons,
that give you full cushioning on rough roads—absorbing
the bumps and bridging the ruts. The scientifically
designed Firestone Balloon tread grip* the road—resisting
skid and giving traction in slippery places.
Firestone Balloon Gum-Dipped Tires on your car will
deliver greater safety and comfort and materially lower
your tire costs. The nearest Firestone dealer is equipped
to serve you better with these better tires.   See him now.
FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY OF CANADA, Limited
HAMILTON, ONTARIO
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
FIRESTONE BUILDS THE ONLY GUM-DIPPED TIRES
YOUR DISTRICT AGENT:
HARLING & LEDINGHAM
Automobile Specialists
Phone 8 Cumberland, BC.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted hy
British subjects over 18 years of age
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation
and Improvement for agricultural
purpoaes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east ot that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
ls situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least live
acres, before Crown Grant can lie
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmherland.
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land Is ia
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding -10 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
slumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the flrst year, title being
obtained after residence and Im-
provement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grating and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under tha Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based ou
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
E. L SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER. g
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear g
longer after repairing than when new. A*
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and g
Service at— jee
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS g
Note addreta—                    Opposite the Drug Store. =
r'r^'ir'rrjTr'rr '.",'';■.• y,-':;'-. ;■ v.; ■;;_■ , .■ ",;-\ .,.
STAR LIVERY STABLE I
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
■:*-;
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, II. C.
BaBBBBnBBgffiBBBi^g^^^^gJ '■■ ••'■ * • *5 >•■ ■ *,
RILEY'S TRANSFER
COAL    —     GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
—     WOOD
David Hunden, Junr.
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
IW     PROMPT ATTENTION        .; |
isMtMsz&Z^Mrt*-: *f:c $< % ■
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY W
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND Phone 150    ||
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description     .7
At Reasonable Prices. *'.*'-
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will   ft'
receive prompt attention. W
iA
■ __   1*1*   ■ A** I l*-**  lllj.l'l.l     l,l'l.,-.,l     ,        II.,, PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 24, 1927.
LADIES' COATS
For one week wc will offer our complete stock of Ladies' and
Mlpsea' Coats ai a REDUCTION OK 20%. You save twenty
tuns on every dollar; the season is backward, so we are willing
to take our loss now. Secure a snap of a good Coal at a greal ly
reduced Price, and have the use Of your Coat during the bright
days.
hi our slock wc have a very smart assortment of the newest
Tweeds and Cloths that the season has produced, and the styles
are right up to the minute.    Von cau save real dollars by buying
now; only a limited quantity, so be on time.
SUTHERLAND'S
Personal Mention
Gove mm onl  of British Columbia
PUHLIC WORKS DEPT.
Rlttuninouf,   Surfacing  of   Roads  u
C urn norland ■ C oitrtenny-ltor ston
AU persons using the roads in the
vicinity are requested to drive slowly.
Every effort will be made to avoid
delay of traffic.
IV  PHILIP,
Deputy Minister and
Public Works Engineer.
Victoria. B.C.
June 20',  1!':'
.Major Hilton, of the July 1st celebration committee at Courtenay, has
advised the Islander of the change of
schedule of the Ss. Princes Royal.
This vessel will leave Vancouver on
its regular run on midnight of June
30th (Thursday), and will stay over
until Friday, July 1st. when it will
leave Comox at 7 p.m.. instead of its
regulur sailing time,
POR REST- Furnished House, apply
307 Windermere Ave., between the
hours of 2 and 4 p.m. and ti and 7
p.m.
Mr. James Vaas, uncle of Mrs. J.
Thomson, motored up from the State
of Wyoming during the past week,
covering a distance of 1900 miles.
Mr. Vaas, who is accompanied by his
two daughters, says he found the
roads in excellent condition praeii-
cally the whole of the 1900 miles.
Whilst in Cumberland the party will
he guests of Mr. and Mrs. John
Thomson. Third street.
* *   *
The Misses Carrie and Katie Richardson left this morning for a two
months' visit to England.
* *   •
Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Shenstone left
this morning for their annual vacation which will he spent in motoring
at tin' south end of the Island.
* *   *
.Mr. and Mrs. W.m. Tickle and Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Davidson, of Victoria,
motored to Cumberland Sunday last
and returned the following afternoon
lo the Capital. Whilst here, they
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Graham, First street.
* *   *
Dr. and Mrs. E. R. Hicks and son,
Albert, were in Vancouver this week.
Dr. Hicks attended the annual convention * of the British Columbia
Medical Association, held in the new
Georgia Hotel.
* *   *
Mrs. M. Watson was visiting friends
in Vancouver this week.
* *   *
Mr. T. Hi Mumford motored to Victoria last Saturday, returning Monday
evening. He was accompanied home
by Mrs. Mumford and Mrs. E. Robinson, who were visiting friends in the
Capital City.
Mr. George Holt, of Thacker and
Holt, Victoria, arrived in Cumberland
last week-end on business.
*' *   *
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spooner and
children spent a lew days this week
camping and fishing at the head of
Comox Lake.
* ' * *
Mr. James Millar left this week for
Vancouver to holiday with his parents. He is heing relieved at the
Royal Bank by Mr, Gordon McLeod,
of Union Bay.
»   *   *
Mr. George Hunden returned Saturday last from Vancouver, where he
had been undergoing treatment for an
injury to his eye.
Mr. T. H. Carey, the first grand
Principal of the Grand Chapter of
B.C. Masons, presided over the annual
convocation held at New Westmnister
last week, at which over 100 delegates were present. The annual report, presented hy "Mr. Carey, showed
that much progress has been made,
both In numbers of the order and
financially. He said, that after visiting constituent chapters of the province, he was able to form most
optimistic conclusions with regard to
tbo work being done.
DEATH WEDNESDAY
OF HENRY DEVLIN
Ladies Wanted
To address and mail cards at home.
Earn   upwards   of   $15.00   weekly.
Whole or spare time.   Send stamp
for particulars
Ladies' Agency Service
TORONTO, 3.
NANAIMO, June 23.—Henry Devlin,
for 14 years inspector of mines from
which position lie recently retired due
to ill health, died at his home. Nicol
street, Wednesday night, following a
lingering illness. He, who was well
known, and always active in mining
during 43 years residence here, was,
for u time, manager of Brechin No. 1
and South Wellington mines, and a
member of Doric Lodge A.F. and A.M..
Ancient. Order United Workers, the
Knights of Pythias, and Ancient Order
of Foresters. He is survived by live
sons: John and James, Nanaimo;
William. Vancouver; Harry, Cumberland, and Edward, in the United
States, alld one daughter, Mrs. James
Bonnie, Nanaimo. He w*as born in
Cumberland. England.
1  .   NW,
IH   A A.A J      pJI
EAGLES TO CELEBRATE ON
JULY THE FIRST
At least one organization will celebrate on July 1st, for that is tbc day
set apart by thc local Fraternal Order
of Eagles for their annual Basket
Picnic, whicli will be held at Millard's
Beach. Haces and sports will be held
for the kiddles, and an invtatlon is
extended to all who want a real good
day's outing to join the Eagles at
their Basket Picnic. Cars will leave
the Hall at 9 a.m. sharp.
No feature of the mechanical construction ot" a car is so important
as provision for safety. Modern
conditions of driving demand particular attention to this detail. One
of tne recent improvements in
Ford cars has been the adontion of
heavier and wider brake bancit, and
drums. With them bra! ing is
smoother and much more positive.
This means instant stopping in an
emjrqency, a lessening* of wear
unci reduction of maintenance
expense.
Tliis is only one of many improvements which have been made in
Ford car? that add definitely to
their safety, comfort and quality.
PRODUCTS OF TRADITIONAL QUALITY
CARS      .      TRUCKS
TRACTORS
v^ Delivered for 1 st of July
■ "■si
BEST BUYS in Used Cars
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
Phone* 46 & 182
Courtenay, I. C.
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-llo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladies' hair cut, any atyle 60c
Children's hair cut any style 35*
^k SPECIALS
CANDY
Neilson's Chocolates, reg. $1.00 per tb., special... 69£
Neilson's Chocolate Bars, reg. 25c, special   20<*
Neilson's Toffee Bars, reg. 25c, special   19ttt
OTHER SPECIALS
afl
Pint Thermos Flasks  98^
Bathing Caps all less 20 per cent.
CREAM of LILLIES
for Sunburn	
sesssesesMssasase
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Have you cashed your Discount Bonds
aMwese-asHtaso'**-********^^
Miss T. A. Gallivan has as her guest
her brother, Mr. A. Gallivan, of Toronto. They will spend a portion of
the summer at Royston Beach.
• •   •
Miss Sadie Brown returned last
week-end from Victoria, having completed and successfully passed her
course at the Provincial Normal.
Miss Edna Gear and Miss Jessie
Baird were among the students who
successfully completed their studies
at the Vancouver Normal . They returned to Cumberland last week-end.
* •   •
Air. L. Hardie, of the Cumberland
High School teaching staff, left Tuesday of this week for his home ln Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Wood.
Allan Avenue, are at present visiting
friends In Vancouver.
•   «   •
Miss Dorothy Renwlck, of Vancouver, was visiting her parents at Union
Bay this week.   She returned to the
terminal city yesterday.
»   •   •
Mr. Desmond Roe ls relieving at
the Royal Bank, whilst Mr. G. Curwen
is on his holidays.
Mr. and Mer H. Keeler and family
have moved to Royston where they
will reside for the summer.
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. Sutherland. Miss
Chrissle Sutherland and Mr. C. J.
Parnham motored to Nanaimo on
Sunday.
1
I!
USED CAR   SALE
Positively THE GREATEST BARGAINS EVER OFFERED on Vancouver Island.
These cars have all been carefully checked over by competent mechanics and are
easily the best values we have ever advertised for sale.
•Si
is
TJ   aj
ef-i
us
'* 9
75"3
s W
Full Price
McLaughlin Master Six Touring  $275.00
Studebaker Touring  $475.00
Chev. Superior Touring   $325.00
Chev. Special   $225.00
1924 Chev. Special   $450.00
1923 Ford Touring  $150.00
1925 Ford Light Delivery  $300.00
1922 Ford Touring (Starter)   $ 75.00
1924 Chev. Touring   $425.00
Chev. Baby Grand   $250.00
Ford Sedan, 1923   $275.00
Studebaker Touring, 4 cylinder,  $125.00
Ford Ton Truck (with Ruckstell axle)   $275.00
1921 Ford Touring (Starter)   $ 75.00
"THE SAFEST PLACE TO BUY A USED CAR"
Blunt & Passie, Ltd.
Courtenay
Phone 61

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0070735/manifest

Comment

Related Items