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The Cumberland Islander Jul 28, 1923

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Array ?.*£.
fSM, CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
13'
6
■Ns,
Wltk which It consolidated Uie  (urn berland .News.
FORTY-SECOND  YEAR—No.  30.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA,   SATURDAY,  JULY  28th,   1923
• SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUS!.
Community Picnic
At Kye Bay Was
Largely Attended
The Courtenay-Comox Board of
Trade Community Picnic at Kye Bay
on Wednesday last was very largely
Attended, and from all accounts was
■a,
more enjoyable than last years'.
One ot the finest beaches on the
Paclllc Coast Is to be found at Kye
Bay and the huge crowd of kiddies
busy making sand-pies, paddling In
sea, chasing "baby" crabs and other
delightful pastimes dear to the hearts
of the children, testified to the popularity of this unequalled spot.
Free transportation was provided
for all, and from 8.30 to about 10
o'clock all roads led to Kye Bay. Arriving at their destination the picnickers found everything bad been
arranged for their convenience. Small
tables had been erected in the shade
of the trees and dressing tents tor
those who desired to go in swimming. Coffee and hot water for tea
was also provided for all who desired
lt.
The dancing pavllllon which had
been erected specially tor the occasion was well patronized both In the
afternoon and evening.
Tbe party commenced the homeward trek about 7 p.m. after a most
enjoyable and delightful time.
Baseball Game
Here On Sunday
The crack Alberni Baseball team
are billed to meet the local ball team
on the recreation grounds at" 5 p.m.
Sunday, July the 29th. The
Alberni team are a snappy bunch
ot ball players, having some University students on their line-up. The
locals will have to be on their toes
all through the game If they expect
to register a win. Much Interest Is being taken In this game as very few
teams have come in trom the outside
so far this season. Cumberland will
depend on the following players to be
on hand: D. Richards, T. Davis, R.
Bennie, T. James, E. King, A. Farmer,
R. Robertson, M, Mitchell, R. Strachan, M. Stewart.
DRUM AND FIFE BAND
The number of members enrolled
to date is 28. Practices will be held
each Tuesday and Thursday at 7.30
p.m. The following donations are
gratefully  acknowledged:
Silver Spring Brewery, per Mr. W.
Douglas       115.00
Dr. A. N. Neen   110.00
Capt. J. C. Brown     11.00
J.  L. Coates      $1.00
B flat Fife   Mr. R. Thomson
B flat Fife  Mr. Fraser Watson
The following additional instruments have been procured 2 E flat
piccolos; E flat Flute and a snare
drum.
Others will be procured as funds
are available.
MRS. A. SCOTT DIED
FRIDAY MORNING IN
LOCAL HOSPITAL
Amy Scott, the wife of T. W. Scott,
died In the Cumberland General
Hospital on Friday morning, .age 40
years. The deceased lady arrived in
this city three years ago and during
that time made a host of friends.
She was a prominent member ot Holy Trinity Church and took an active
part In Hospital work, having been
Honorary Secretary of the Ladies'
Auxiliary ot the Cumberland General
Hospital. The Funeral will be held
on Sunday afternoon from Holy Trinity Church to thc Cumberland Cemetery,  Rev.   Leversedge officiating.
New Stage Started
Safety First Stage Line commenced a daily service between Cumberland—Courtenay and Nanaimo cm
Monday with a twelve passennger
car. It Is the intention of Mr. Hyde
the owner of the stage line, to put on
another car during the coming week
to carry 16 passengers. He also
carries a passenger insurance policy
for the protection of his patrons in
case of accident.
GREAT ACTOR IN "THE
MYSTERIOUS RIDER"
SHIPPING
Shipping at Union Bay loading
wharves of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited:
Gleeful, coastwise; QuatliaBki &
Scow, Quathaski Cove; Beatrice,
coastwise; Fearless, coastwise; Star-
sion & Scow, Duncan Bay; Wyruna,
Australia; Chuston, coastwise;
Dauntless, coastwise; Tees, Prince
Rupert; Spray & Scow, Victoria.
One of the greatest actors ot either
stage or screen today has a powerful
and totally "different" role in "The
Mysterious Rider", the newest Hod-
kltison release from the novel by
Zane Grey, which Is the attraction
at the Ilo-llo Theatre, Friday and
Saturday. That actor Is Robert Mc
Kim, justly famous with motion picture goers for his "heavy" roles of
the past and now reaching a new
fame in bigger, finer, more sympathetic roles.
Mr. McKim plays "Wade," the title
part lu "The Mysterious Rider." He
begins as a character surrounded by
mystery, and all the mystery Is not
solved until the action of the startling climatic scenes, where he ascends, to great emotional heights.
"Wade" has been following the vague
trail of the man he has sworn to kill [
some day, and at the same time Is
searching for his daughter. The way
he finds this man, and the daughter, is
startling and dramatic in extreme.
After this discovery comes a great
hand-to-hand struggle In which Mr.
McKIm Is a principal. This Is followed
by emotional scenes of a variety and
tensity seldom seen on the shadow-
stage. Rough clothes of the sort he
uses in this picture do not hide the
well-known McKim handsomeness,
and he shows the polish and perfect
technique that distinguishes his acting .always, whether playing in full
dress or in rough outdoor characters.
Mr, McKIm is a native Callfornian,
born in the little desert town ot San
Jacinto. He was educated at Berkeley, and his theatrical education began at the old Alcazar ln San Francisco, where so many famous stage
and film folk had their Initial try-
outs. He toured the Orpheum Circuit three seasons with Lillian Lang-
try, and in stock and road companies had an extensive stage career before entering pictures. He Is now on
long term contract as a star in Ben.
B. Hampton's pictures, has a line permanent home In his native Btate, and
his chief pride In life, aside from
his work, ls In another "native son"
-Robert McKim, Junior.
Big Crowd Attend
Employees' Picnic
ANNUAL EVENT PUT OVER IN SUPERB STYLE—SOME
CLOSE CONTESTS WITNESSED AT SPORTS.—KIDDIES
CONSUMED CAR-LOAD OF REFRESHMENTS.
PASSED MUSICAL EXAMS
The following pupils presented by
Mrs. Oliver for the Associated Board
Theory exams were successful:
Rudiments of Music—Christine Mc
Kinnon, Gladys Dando, .Mildred Oliver.
Grammar of Music. Div. II—Leslie
Dando.
Owing to slight error In the announcement, Mrs. Carey's name was
given ns having passed the Higher Division Violin exam, instead of which
lt should have read, Gladys Dando
entered by Mr. Robertson and prepared by Mrs. Carey L. C. V.
At the Cumberland Relief Committee meeting the Secretary stated
that the total receipt of the fund
were (9277.95
Paid out 2139.30
Balance $7038.63
The employees of the- Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited of the
Comox Mines, held their Sixth Annual Picnic at Royston Beach on
Saturday. The surroundings were
delightful and the weather was all
that could be desired and although
there was some three thousand present from Cumberland, Bevan and
Union Bay and other parts of the district, the day passed oft without
an accident of any kind. The committee in charge had made special arrangements, but pleased to say their
services were not needed.
The special train of fifteen cars
pulled, out of Cumberland for Royston at 8.30 in the morning, gathering up the employees, their wives and
families for the annual day's sport.
The Cumberland City Baud accompanied the excursion train and rendered suitable selections during the day
Royal Feast (or tbe Kiddles
The grounds as usual were an excellent shape. The Canadian Collieries having built the various Grand
Stands, Merry go-round, Shoot the
Shutes and other places of amusement for the children. There was
an abundance of refreshments, supplied tree, Including 1500 oranges.
1500 sacks of peanuts,'200 gallons of
Ice Cream, 6,500 Ice Cream Cones,
3,600 bottles of Soft Drinks. The
children had a regular Royal feast
and were taken care of by fifteen
attendants at the refreshment booths.
At noon the President o fthe Employees Picinic Committee, Mr. Edward
Hughes made his opening speech.
He spoke of the pleasant relations
between the employer and employees
of the Comox Mines and then called
upon .Mr. Thomas Graham, General
Superintendent who delivered an
eloquent address, giving a brief history of the past twelve months and
announced the prize winners of the
Garden Competition as follows:
winners of Home (iiirdeiiliif Competition.
(Cumberland District)
1st prize-
Mr. W. G. Evans 94 points
2nd  prize-
Mr. S. Horwood 90 points
Mr. P. Mullen 90 points
3rd   prize-
Mr. Hugh Strachan 89 points
Mr. Victor'Frelonl 89 points
* (Uulon Bay and Devon District)
1st  prize—
Mr. A. H. Glover 97 H points
2nd prize—
Mr. J. Mllier (Bevan)        95% points
3rd prize-
Mr. Edward Navey 90V4 points
Mr. A. H. Glover won the Special
Prize, having the best garden in the
whole district with 97% points.
Employees and officials mingled
together for the mutual benefit of all
Special mention should be made of
the various picnic committees who
seemingly made It a pleasure to see
that others enjoyed themselves. In
other words, lt were as of a large family gathering, ami the Sixth Annual Picnic gave further evidence of
the pleasant relations that exists be-
MOUNTED POLICE STORY
TO BE SEEN AT THE
'     ILO-ILO THEATRE
An extra attraction on Friday and
Saturday Is Irving Cummings In "The
Avenger" one of the best northwest
stories seen for some time.
A Fox Sunshine Comedy "The Wise
Cracker" completes an exceptionally
good show. .
Three big features at Ilo-llo Theatre Monday and Tuesday. On thesa
two days Herbert Rawlinson will be
seen ln "Nobydoy'a Bride". Baby Peggy In "Peg of the Movies" and the
big special attractive "Man vs. Beast"
These are the most wonderful pictures of big game In Africa.
tween employer and employee in and
around the Comox Mines.
The program consisted ot 57 events
including Tug of War and sports of
every description.
George Wilkinson, chief inspector
ot Mines, who in the absence of the
Hon. the Minister of Mines, presented the shield to Capt. William Beveridge of No. 4 Underground team,
who won first prize In the First Aid
Competition. Among those present
were: James M. Savage, General
Manager and Mrs, Savage, C. E.
Thomas of Victoria and Thos. Sprus-
ton of Ladysmlth.
Judge's Remarks
The Judge's report of the Garden
competition  reads   as   follows:
CUMBERLAND COMPETITION
According to the rules, this competition was to encourage both beauty
and utility in the gardens. Although
Mr. Carey's garden was perhaps the
.most beautiful, the judge has to take
Into consideration the lack of sufficient space given to vegetables ln
his otherwise most creditable garden.
Although Mr. Horwood's garden
carried some weeds, this was offset by
the fact that this garden exhibited the
only ripe cauliflowers seen. The successful raising of cauliflowers Is one
of the supreme tests of the gardener's art. i
Mr. Victor Frelonl is the grower of
some climbing beans of a new imported variety which will evidently need
telegraph poles tor support before
they are through growing.
Bevnn—t'nlon Bay Competition
Would say that Mr. Glover (who Is
over 60, I understand) and has done
.Til the work himself, "ivSU. deserves
his win as his garden is on a very-
dry hillside without watering facilities ot any kind. This garden shows
what constant hoeing and cultivation
will do. His rose garden is beautiful and he has tree fruits, small
fruits and the proper amount ot
everything. Indeed this is a well-
balanced garden made under difficulties.
The garden of Mr. J. Miller, Bevan
Is an object lesson of what can be
done under difficulties such as poor
stump land, and It is a pity that this
garden is so far off the travelled road.
The judge regrets that the absence
of the ornamental features (flowers
etc.) In the exhibit of Mr. George Davies, Union Bay, prescribe the awarding of a prize by a few points, as
this vegetable garden is a great credit, the plot of sweet corn being the
best seen. Mr. Kay's garden Is on
the small side.
In conclusion, would say, that I
am surprised that there were not
more entries especially considering
the encouragement given.
Respectfully yours.
S.   H.   HOPKINS,   Judge.
Prizewinners In the different events
will be found on pages 3 and 4.
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
ASSOCIATION TO HOLD
SPECIAL MEETING |
The local St. John's Ambulance Association will hold a special meeting
on Monday, July 30th at 7 p.m. ln the
First Aid Hall. A full attendance Is
most earnestly desired as lt is intended to commence and arrange
for teams to go to Ladysmlth on Labor Day.
POLICE COURT
Mah Chong of Nanaimo was
charged with carelessly driving a motor car on Dunsmuir Avenue on Sunday 15th July. He pleaded guilty and
was fined $10 and costs.
New Postmaster
Capt. John C. Brown of "this city
has been appointed to the position
of Postmaster of the City of Cumberland, made vacant by the resignation of John W. Cooke, who is
leaving for Vancouver.
Capt Brown Is a returned soldier,
saw active service overseas and was
the successful applicant of Fourteen
applications.
SPLENDID ADVERTISING
FOR PROVINCE OF B.C.
Nanaimo City
Gained 3 Goal
Lead On Series
On Saturday last at Calgary, the
Nanaimo City Football team defeated
Coleman, champions of Alberta, by a
score of three goals to one, giving tbe
Vancouver Island team, a clear three
goal lead. Nanaimo's goals came fast,
after thirty-four minutes play, tho
first goal being scored from a penalty against Jackson. Inside 5 minutes
Nanaimo were leading by three goals,
Appleby and Dickenson being tlio
scorers. Iu ihe second half the olay
became a trifle rough, but the referee kept control and tbe Ill-feeling
subsided. Teddy Appleby and McDou-
gall starred for Nanaimo throughout
the series.
The Nanaimo team left Calgary
Sunday last for Winnipeg, carrying
with them the best wishes and hopes
of the west.
The Vancouver Island team was
composed of Routledge; Linn and
Bell; McMillan, McDougall and Stobbart; Minto, Dickenson, Flowler,
Appleby, Husband.
The Coleman team was made up
as follows:
Wilson; Mitchell and Fish; Pockson,
Frame and Dunlop; Yates, Bedding-
ton, Redfern, Sharp and Muir.
Council Held Busy Session
ROYSTON TENNIS COURT
An extra large crowd attended the
Tennis Court Dance at Royston on
Saturday, July 21st, attracted by the
superb floor and excellent music.
The City Council held a very Interesting session on Monday evening
and transacted some very Important
business, and judging from some ot
the statements that were made, the
City of Cumberland is In a flourishing  condition.
Business Administration
The present administration are doing great work, grading and improving the street. Signs of improvement are visible In all directions
and the City was never in better
shape in every direction, during the
past twenty years. This Ib due to
the business administration of the
present mayor and Council.
Public Works
Aid. John J. Potter, Chairman of
the Board of Works, announced on
Monday evening that 1000 feet of
twelve Inch sewer pipe had arrived
and would be placed Into position In
the near future, making peparatlon
tor the coming winter.
The chairman ot the Board of
Works also announced that Louis H.
Finch, contractor of this City, had
| been given the contract to remodel
the Fire Hall at a cost of almost
$2000.00, and Mr. P. W. Fouracre's
tender wns accepted for the Plumbing at a cost of $320.00, when thc
arrangements are completed for the
removal of the Huge Fire Bell and
the Electtrlc Wiring of the Fire Hall,
work will be commenced, which Is
expected to be next Monday.
Club Licence
Several applications were received for a club licence. Hla worship
fthe Mayor pointed out that lt would
he necessary to Introduce a By-Law
before the Council could consider
nny club licence. The chairman of
the Board of works was again on the
job and under the heading ot New
Business, Aid. Potter made application for permission to introduce a
club licence By-Law, which on motion was granted.
The timber Industry in British Columbia has been placed on a sound
basis, and largely through the activities of Hon. T. D. Pattullo, minister of lands, and bis forest branch
officials. For the first six months of
this year the timber sales amounted
to 1,206,930,927 board feet, as compared with 878,026,789 feet for the
lirst six months of 1922.
It may be recalled tbat the period
ot timber expansion In this province
dates from the historic meeting In
Hon. Mr. Pattullo's office shortly after the war. As a result of that meeting the Associated Timber Exporters
grew up and with the encouragement
of the government, and promised financial backing, the latter proving
unnecessary, large export-ord«r*
were accepted and filled. Since that
time the advance in this Industry ha"
been steady and rapid.
.     .     .
The, Oriental problem involves a
new menace. Action has been taken
by the Attorney-General to curb the
brewing and sale of "Sake," the favorite Japanese whisky. Protests have
been sent to Ottawa against the trafficking carried on by Japanese among
Indian fishermen, sake being the persuasion used lu many Instances to Induce the Indians to part with tholr
fish. In future It will be very difficult for Japanese to secure permits
to manufacture the strong stuff,
which Is a distillation of rice and
other IiigredlehtB. The practice of Ottawa has been to issue no permits
unless approved by the province af-
I fected, and Attorney-General Man-
! son states he will not give consent
i to any such ventures ln future.
*     *     •
British Columbia is caring well for
! her  mentally    incapacitated.      Last
■ week  Hon.  Dr.  MacLean,  provincial
secretary,  laid  the  corner  stone  of
I the new mental hospital at   Essou-'
j dale, a structure which will cost upwards of $600,000 and be one of the
finest Institutions of lis kind on thc
continent.
.     .     .
British Columbia will have splendid advertising through Ihe Empire
Exhibition, to be held next year In
I London, the Capital of Empire.  Ex-
' hiblts from the departments of mines,
lands and forests, agriculture and
fisheries will acquaint all who view
j them  with  the wonderful opportunl-
I ties of the Pacific Province.
Big Open Air
Dance Saturday
Another of the popular open air
dances will be held on the Royston
Tennis Court (today) Saturduy, July
28th, commencing at 9 p.m. prompt.
The promoters extend a cordial Invitation to all to come and enjoy a
dance In the open, amidst pleasant
surroundings.
A special slx-plecc orchestra has
been engaged, and the price of admls
sion has beenjplaced at 50c for both
ladles and gentlemen. There Is lots
ot room on this, thc finest opcu-alr
dancing floor on Vancouver Island.
Parking space for 200 cars.
CUMBERLAND LOOSE
CHANCE IN PLAY-OFFS
Courtenay Take   Long-end   of
6—1 Score.
What many Cumberland supporters believe could have been made a
victory, had the full team turned out
all went to Courtenay last Sunday on
the latter grounds. •
The game was very Interesting to
watch and not till the latter part did
Courtenay gain a lead on the home
boys. The Cumberland battery were
exellent for many of the Dairy boys
went out by the strike, out route, but
It takes nine men to make team work
possible and here Is where Cumberland failed to put in an appearance
In all fairness to Courtenny wc
must say they sure played good ball
and won the day and as all champions must be declared this week-end.
Courtenay wins and goes Into the
play-off for the B. C. Amateur championship. Millard's catch of a bard
line drive into the outer garden proved
one of the many brilliant plays of tho
game.
NOTICE
ELIZABETH HAWTHORNE
DIED IN VANCOUVER
Elizabeth Hawthorne, wife ot William Hawthorne, died at St.    Pauls
Hospital, Vancouver on Sunday, July
22nd.    The deceased  lady    was    50
: years of age and a resident of Courtenay and Union Bay for some time,
leaving for Vancouver twelve months
ago.   Tlle funeral was held on Tuos-
I day and in charge of   the   Eastern
! Star of which she was an esteemed
j member.   She leaves a husband and
I two brothers, Jomes and John Hal-
! llday of this city to mourn her loss,
| also two sisters and one brother, re-
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, Employees' Picnic
Committee.
All persons having claims against
the above committee, are requested
to have them In tbe bands of the
Secretary, Mr. Charles O'Brien, on or
before July 31st 1923.
SHOWING THE
ADVANCED STYLES
Campbell Bros, arc showing this
week their first shipment of advance
styles in Ladies' early Full coals,
dresses and Spori Felt Hats, also
Allover Laces and million novelties.
Sec window for latest New York
Htyle*.
Ancient order ot Foresters will
hold a grand Ue-Unlon In this City
on August 26lh and 27th. The City
Council will give the order permission to erect a welcome arch, near
the G. W. V. A. building.
siding ln Scotland.
The City Clerk informed Aid.
Mumford, that he had collected taxes
amounting to $11,180.00 out of a possible   12,950.00. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JULY  28th, 1923
country using up gas and time thinking he might get it a few cents cheap-
MARKED COPY OF THE
YOUTH'S COMPANION
RECEIVED HERE
WHY WE DON'T PRINT IT
The Cumberland Islander has the
reputation of being a booster, and it
has always been the aim of the publisher to boOBt every enterprise, be It
of public or private nature, of a
worthy character. Boosting is a game
however, that more than one can play.
"I boost you, you boost me." is a good
motto, and "we will boost together"
is another good motto. The newspaper man can boost in a very effective
way, even by not "knocking" when
people want him lo "knock." He
can boost a good deal more by coming out flat-fooled and upholding the
good that Is In an individual or an
institution and leaving unsaid what
he knows to be bad. But when this
is done there is no occasion for the
person or institution which is boosted
to assume that the newspaper has to
do It in order to hold its job with the
public, as that is indeed a serious
mistake. A newspaper man sees and
hears more things, bad or good, about
individuals and about the way institutions are conducted than other individual, a gossiping old maid not
excepted, and it is unfair to assume
that it is because he does not know
that be does not print it. It is because be has a sense of honor and a
sense of feeling, and last but not least
a love of peace and harmony 111 the
community. Many things might be
printed about Cumberland' which
would make spicy reading, but why
herald such things abroad! The least
said, the better. The newspaper man,
however, has a keen sense of appreciation and is susceptible to praise of
the right sort, and to substantial business support. He appreciates the
spirit of the man who, when he has a
few dollars' worth of job printing
does not go gnlavanting about   the
We are in receipt of a marked copy
of the Youth's Companion of July 5th,
containing two Editorials which we
think will be of interest to our readers, and which we take pleasure in
publishing:
CANADA
Americans may well extend to the
people across the northern frontier
their heartiest congratulations on the
healthy expansion of their country.
There is and can be no jealousy in
our hearts, for in the prosperity of
the Dominion there is nothing for us
but benefit.
It is real prosperity of the Bort that
in the forties autl fifties was making
the United States great. The country
is filling up with immigrants of the
best class, such as were then coming
in swarms to the United States. The
population is moving west and taking
up land. The new Canada already furnishes much of the wheat on which
the Old World depends.
Manufacturing too is doing for
Canada what it did for us a half
century or more ago. The transportation lines of the Dominion are already magnificent and are steadily
improving. .No other railway project
was ever more daring than the building of a line through tbe wilderness
almost at the northern limit of possible human habitation, to the shores
of Hudson Bay* to open for a few
months of the year the shortest route
from the gralnfields of the West to
European markets.
Canada Is under free institutions
—self-governed and well-governed. It
has bred a body of public men ot ability and high character. Americans
may not appreciate the worldly wisdom that leads Canadians to cling to
the British connection; but they can
appreciate the sentiment behind their
willingness to forgo the last rights
of complete sovereignty In their pride
as a part of the British Empire, for
there is now no material benefit for
them In the connection. Once the
statesmen of the Dominion might have
regarded separating from the empire
as sacrificing protection that they
needed. Now, if any duty remains, it
rests on Canada to help England. The
child looks naturally to shelter and
protection at the hands of a parent;
when it is grown up filial affection
holds tt true to Its allegiance.
History can be searched in vain for
a parallel to the relations, (physical
and political, between Canada and the
United States. There has never been
another such stretch of unguarded
boundary between two countries,
never two peoples living side by side
for so long a period in entire harmony and good feeling. It is all the
more remarkable when we consider
that the two peoples are almost absolutely alike In everything except
that one of them cherishes a sentimental allegiance to the British
crown. A stranger alighting from
the air in a town in New York or Ontario would need to Inquire ln which
country he was; for the houses, the
people and the modes ot life are Identical.
Ex.
MARQUIS WHEAT
Man has learned to do some remarkable things with organic life,
both animal and vegetoble. He must
do the work experimentally, for, although he has found out much about
the laws that govern heredity, he cannot account for some of the things
that happen or fall to happen when
living stocks are blended. But still
he usually finds a way to get what
he wants from Mother Nature. Let us
consider, for an example Marquis
wheat.
Northern Canada is a land of widespread prairies well adapted, so tolas soil is concerned, to wheat farming and too far north for any other
crop that is nearly ^so profitable as
wheat. But you cannot grow winter
wheat In Canada or even In the
northern tier of Btates In our own
country. The severe winters'are sure
to kill any plants that hove sprouted
and begun to grow In the fall. Canada must have a spring-sown wheat,
Canada Faces the Future
With Confidence
CANADIANS have always been
noted for courage, optimism
and faith in their country.
Canada was not built up by pessimists, nor will Canada continue to
develop if her people allow themselves to become croakers and
grouchers. Canada
is fundamentally
an agricultural
country. We have
a soil and climate
which can grow
the world's finest
agricultural products.
Canadian farmers who have
earned the capital
invested in their
farms Out of profits
in farming are
numbered in thousands. These successful farmers
have paid off their
mortgages, stocked
their barns and
stables, bought their
machinery, made a
good living and
brought up their families. It meant hard
work, but today they
are independent.
Money in Mixed Farming
In recent years, at different points
on the prairies, oats fed to steers have
brought from 70c to $1.07 as against the
Fort William price of 42c per bushel,
while barley used for the same purpose
has brought as high as 99c as against the
Fort William price of 57c per bushel.
Farmers marketing their coarse grains
in this way lower marketing cost, have
a sure market and make money on their
grain, while at the same time they market
their roughage, otherwise often wasted.
The cattle embargo is now off. Steers
are worth more money and certain to
make good money for the Canadian
farmer from now on.
Money in Pigs
The Dominion Experimental Farms
have proved by actual test that there
is a profit in feeding pigs. Last year at
the Central Farm, Ottawa, after paying
We Must Cut
Production Costs
Canada is meeting with the
keenest competition in the marketing of her products. To hold
her own and regain her place on
the world's market, Bhe must reduce cost of production.
The only way to do this ia to
increase production per acre, per
cow or per other unit.
But improved quality, also, is
essential to meet market demands.
"The quantity and the quality
of the products and the coat of
production in competitive countries is beyond our control.
Prices of agricultural products
are regulated by world supply
and demand.
for feed, labor, interest and depreciation,
the net profit per pig waa still $4.63.
Profits from Sheep
As money-makers, sheep are hard to
beat. In every Province trom Prince
Edward Island to British Columbia are
found many flocks returning generous
profits to their owners.
Poultry Pays
Poultry makes
money for those who
adopt modern methods, whether East or
West. Little Prince
Edward Island markets co-operatively In
carlots, (hipping annually upwards of one
million dozen eggs.
The British Columbia
Co-operative Poultry
Men's Exchange
market! In the same
way, thus saving
ruinous glut in their
local market.
There Is a market
for good Canadian
horses, whether light
or draught.
Grow Seed
Hence, decreasing production
will not help the Canadian
farmer.
Canada'! Northern
grown seed possesses
extra vitality. There
is a large market for
It to the south- Canada export! seed potatoel, but imports
other leeds. She has the opportunity
to grow seeds fcr herself and for export.
The Future
Ten yean from now the pesiimisti of
today will have been forgotten. Britain
has removed the embargo against our
cattle.- She want! our beef and bacon,
our cheese, butter', egg! and apple!, our
wheat and flour. Al the population of
the United States increase!, ihe will
compete leu and leas against us on the
British market. Eventually, she will
herself be an importer of many other
food stuff! beiidei wheat from this
country.
Canada has the men, the climate, the
land, the atock and the potential market! necessary for agricultural success.
Let us farm with all the industry and
science we can muster. Let's get to work
and pay our debta. Canada ia moving
forward with confidence In its future.
Let us keep going ahead.
J|4
Have Faith in Canada
Authorized for publication by tht
Dominion Department of Agriculture
W. R. MOTHERWELL, Minister. Dr. J. H. GR1SDALB. Otpotr MlnUtsr.
' V*.
SPECIAL SHOWING THIS WEEK
of new arrivals in
DOROTHY   DARE  DRESSES
Canton Crepes, Crepe De Chine, Pariet Twills and Serges in Black, Navy, Sand,
Henna, Jades at popular prices. ;,        '
The balance of our Stock of Billie Burke Dresses in Ginghams, Willow Suitings
Crepes and Voiles at Special Sale Prices.
Voile and Dimities Waists
values to $6.50. Your choice for
$2.25
Remnants of all kinds marked to clear at about half the regular price.
SJiMfflaSJSIBJBIHEISE^^
GROCERY SPECIALS
Jellied Veal, large tin  50
Dri Pak Prunes, Del Monte tins
Special per tin  40
Pure French Castile Soap.
Large Bars     .45
Table Salt, 3 lb. sacks, 2 for 25
Empress and Malkins Pure Jams x
asstd. 4 lb. tins in Blackberry, Gooseberry, Apricot  and
Damson, per tin  $1.00
ijsiBisiBiaisiaiaEiaBiBiBitra
Quaker Corn Meal, 2 pkts    .35
Purity Food, 5 lb. sacks 40
2 in 1 Shoe Polish, in Black, White
and Ox Blood, 2 tins ., .25
Canfied Grape Fruit, tins 50
Fresh Tomatoes, Honey Dew Melon's New Green Apples, Peaches,
Pears, Cantaloupes, New Beets, Green
Pears, Wax Beans and Cabbage.
iaasjsiaa/§BJ6ffiiaia/siaiBiaiaH3Ma
and, it its people are to take advantage of the fields that spread up
to the Peace River Valley within a
few degrees of the Arctic Circle, it
must be a rapidly growing variety,
one that matures within ten weeks
of planting.
There are other qualities that a
useful variety must have. It must be
able to resist drought no less than
cold, tor western Canada is often
both cold and dry; if it is to sell at a
good price, it must mill well and bake
well; and lt must produce a high
yield to the acre.l There have always
been varieties of wheat that have
one or two of those Ave essential
qualities, but until recently there was
none that combined all ot them. That
there ls one now is owing to the long
and patient labor of Dr, William
Saunders of Ottawa and his two sons.
Beginning with a Russian wheat
that will ripen in a latitude of more
than sixty degrees north, they crossed It with the well-known Red Fife
wheat, which has superior milling
qualities. When they had got a hybrid variety that would ripen within
seventy days and make excellent
flour they bred ipto it a Calcutta
wheat that is notable tor productiveness and tor Its power to resist
drought. Aud so year after year they
worked away, trying one combination
after another, selecting this and re-
jectlng'that, finding that one hopeful
kind of crossbreeding wodld not answer and that another, tried on the
off-chance, would answer very well,
until at last they had produced a
stable seed that would produce wheat
with every desirable quality for subarctic culture. That wheat they call
Marquis,,
Incidentally the Saunderses* established another variety that they called Prelude. It will ripen ln eight
weeks and has been raised at Dawson
within three degrees of "the Arctic
Circle. It may perhaps bo grown even
in the lower Yukon Valley, lt does
not produce heavily, however, and
for that reason ls not worth planting
where any other variety will grow.
The service of the Saunders family not only to their native country,
but to mankind as well is worthy of
more recognition than it has received. They are men who have done
better than those whom Dean 8wift,
praised so highly—the men who make
two blades of graBs or two ears of
corn grow where only one grew be
fore. They have caused whole acres
of waving grain to spring up where
before none would grow. They have
pushed forward the domain of civilized man in the face of cold and
drought and given to Canada new
homes for its people and new sources of Inexhaustible wealth.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and Residence:  Willard
Block.   •   'Phone 116.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Gleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.   " •
Our  Work  and  Service.
'      Will Please Ton  i:   ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTOBIA, B. C.      :      Phone 8802
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
3
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons  • -    Proprietor
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNEB
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Mule Co
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11  CUMBERLAND
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—FIVE ROOMED HOUSE
Bath room, Pantry and Oarage. For
further particulars, apply to Mrs.
V. Marlnelll, Derwent Avenue, Cumberland, B. C. A 25
HOUSE FOR SALE AT ROYSTON
Beach, also lot on Highway, snap
price for quick sale. Apply owner,
29th Ave. W„ Vancouver, B. C.
FOR SALE—MCLAUGHLIN LIGHT
Six Automobile. 1922 Model In first
class condition. Only been driven
6,000 miles. Apply Hewlett, Royston. Phone 95 M.
FOR RENT
COMFORTABLE THREE-ROOM COT-
age for rent, $8.00 per month. Apply Mfs. Bifnbury, First Street,
Cumberland.
WANTED
WANTED TO RENT FROM SEP-
tcmber 1st, five or six room house
or bungalow by careful tenant. R. J.
Selfe, c.o. TarbellB.
WANTED TO  RENT FROM SEP-
tember 1st five or six room house
or bungalow, by careful tenant. R.
J. Sette, c.o. TarbellB.
FOUND
FOUND—ON PICNIC GROUNDS AT
Royston—A Camera. Owner can
have same by proving property and
paying tor this ad. Apply Islander
Office. SATURDAY, JULY  28th,  1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
THREE
ess
a
I
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People Trade
APRICOTS
»
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR PRESERVING
APRICOTS
NOW
. ■-..-.',
MumforcPs Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY ~
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
Prize Winners In Grand Raffle
Prizes must he claimed by Tuesday, July 31st, and all prizes not
claimed' by that date will be sent lo
Ladysmith for their grand raffle.
List of Winners in Grand Raffle:
171—Electric Coffee Percolator
Bob Peters, Cumberland, B. C.
1108—Order for $10,011  Lumber
Mrs. A. Alartiuello, Cumberland
1158—One 14" Stlllsou Wrench
Geo. Wagstaff, No. 8 (Puntledge)
1668—Five Dollar Bill"
Mrs. D. Walker, Union Bay, B. C.
776—Carpet Sweeper
John Bond, Cumberland, B. C.
2399—Thermos Lunch Kit
II. Cornwall. No. 8  (Puntledge)
1170—Pair of Miners Pants
Mrs.   A.   Robertson,   Bevan
2337—Five Dollar Bill
Jack Ramsay. Cumberland
689—24 lb. Sack of Flour
Mrs. Shilllto, Cumberland
1180—Pair of Gloves
Mrs. Margaret Mitchell, Cumberl.
1178—Order for $5.00 Lumber
Mrs. Violet Huby, Cumberland
G65—Five Dollar BUI
Hugh   Docherty,  Cumberland
531—One Razor
John Little, Cumberland
1174—Pair of Miners Pants
Mrs. Yarrow, Cumberland
1297—Order for $5.00 Banco Goods
J. Stewart. Cumberland
1176—Five  Dollar  Bill
Mrs. J. Frelonl. Cumberland
166—Garden   Fork
Robert S. Adamson, Comox Lake
93—24 lb. Flour
Geo J. Richardson, Cumberland
lias—One lb. Tea
Geo Miller, Cumberland
280—Five Dollar BUI
Fred Pickard, Cumberland
700,-Palr ot Miners Pants
Sam Cameron,  Bevan
555—Order for $5.00 Lumber
Ada Fos, Chinatown
210—Electric Iron   ■
Mrs. Walters, Union Bay
558—Five  Dollar  Bill
Jas. Baird, Cumberland
417—One Razor
Dick  Saunders,  Cumberland
113-24 lb. Sack of Flour
Frank Bond, Cumberland
597—Pair of Miners Pants
James Robb, Cumberland
1698—Five Dollar Bill
E. J. Greig, Royston
223—Combination Shaving Set
Walter Taylor, Cumberland
76—Cocoa Urn
H. Brown, Union Bay
379—Garden Fork
H. L. Bates, Cumberland
382—Five Dollar Bill
James  Smith, Cumberland
1629—Order for $6.00  Lumber
Bert Geary, Union Bay i
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."   a
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
,   ,i --.■:.- .j.    . . ■-
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF ;
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY PHONE 154 TEA ROOMS
Durant and Star Car Depot
We can give immedite deliveries of the following:—
STAR Touring, 5 passenger  (.  $825.00
Fully equipped, oiled, gas and accessories
STAR Roadster  ¥795.00
Equipped as above
STAR Coupe -..  $1150.00
5     Equipped as above
The above prices are for delivery in Courtenay or district. License and registration for balance of year is
$21.25 only
STAB Cars are now to be seen all over the district on Vancouver Island.   ABk any owner how they perform. We will be
glad to give demonstrations at any time or place. Spare
parts always on hand.
We Specialize In  Repairs und Overhauls and Guarantee alt
Work done by l's.
WHEN YOU ARE SATISFIED' " *
that you have the brand ot gas you have decided to use, let us
adjust your carburetor (free) to operate properly on that brand.
Best results will then have been obtained and yon will always
buy that one brand, and that only. We are satisfied with
IMPERIAL
Phone 182 MEREDITH BROS.       P. O. Box 121
(Opposite Liquor Store), COURTENAY
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        -        -        -        -        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH-GRADES  AT  LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159 : Night—134-X  Courtenay
****•
R O Y S TON
Tennis Court
I SNOW    OPEN
RATES
$10.00 Season Ticket — $10.00 Family Ticket, or
50c per Set
i
ASH AND IDIENS
Proprietors
ROYSTON, B. C.
aiEMtVaiBM^50EIEKIEJ3ISIEiajai^^
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We tan Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 50—We Deliver.
OFFICE   I>0(1  PHILOSOPHY
When a bit of sunshine hitB ye,
After passing of a cloud,
When a fit of laughter gits ye,
An' your spine is feeling proud
Don't forglt to up and feelln' It
At a soul thats feelln' blue,
For the minut that ye sling It,
It's a boomerang to you.
*     *     * i I
Tho horn makes a lot of noise but
It doesn't help mako the car go. I
J.EMILY
AUTO HIRE
Leave Post office Daily except Sunday for Comox
Lake at 12.15 and 5.15 p.m.
Available for hire between 1 p.m. and 4 o'clock,
also after 5 p.m.—Phone 56 Cumberland.
202—Pair of Sliners Pants
■B. Sweeney, Cumberland
92—24 lb. Sack of Flour
Mrs. G. J. Richardson, Cumberl.
663—Five Dollar Bill
.Mrs. H. Docherty, Cumberland
661—One lb. Tea
James Robb, Cumberland
712—Jardinierre ,
Wong Faw, Chinatown
247—One Razor
Thos  Cunliffe, Cumberland
1184—Five Dollar Bill
Mrs. W. Whltehouse, Cumberland
323—Pair of Miners Pants
Jas. Mutter, Cumberland
680—Football
W. Mossey, Cumberland
418—Order for $5.00 Lumber
Dick Saunders, Cumberland
2377—Five Dollar BUI
W. Braes, Cumberland
1626—24 lb. Sack Flour
Jos. Halgh, Union Bay
2359—Garden  Fork
Syd Hunt, Cumberland
2323—Pair of MlnerB Pants
A. M. McKenzie, Cumberland
66—Five Dollar Bill
Geo Davis, Union Bay
229—Electric Iron
Jock McWhlrter, Cumberland
2351—One lb. Tea
Rees Evans, Cumberland
298—One Razor
Ed Williams, Comox Lake
127—Five Dollar BUI
Er. Hughes, Cumberland
2.170—Order for $5.00 Lumber
I. I. Grieves, Bevan
683—Pair ot Miners Pants
Tom Bates, Cumberland
106—24 lb. Sack of Flour
Mrs. J. Lockner, Cumberland
Prizes   Allotted   Ut  Ludysmlth
One set of Stainless Carvers; One
14" Stlllsou Wrench; One Base Ball
Catchers' Mitt; One pair of Hlllcrest
Oxfords; One Military Conipass; One
Thermos Lunch Kit; Four pairs Miners pants; One Clinton Tea Set (Cutlery); Two Razors; One Electric
Iron; Box of Cigars; Electric Toaster; One pair of Gloves; One BUI
Fold; One Safety Razor; One Jewel
Case; Two Sacks of Flour; Four
$5.00 Bills; Two lbs. Tea; 50' Garden
Hose:
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WIU50N
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these hlgh-
grad. confections arrive .v.ry
two weeks, ensuring fresh foods
all tb. time.
. *
Henderson's
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland, B. C.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
Cumberland Hotel Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5,30—7 to 9 p.m.
nf
H
ere an
dTke
ere
A jersey cow owned by a Montreal man has broken all Canadian
records by producing 1,200 pounds
of butter in a year.
The average annual per capita
cost from fires in United States is
$2.26, while Canada loses $2.73 per
capita by fire; Spain, $1.86; France,
97 cents; England, 64 cents; Germany, 28 cents, and the Netherlands,
,pnly 11 cents.
Bungalow Camps in the wild, of
Ontario have been opened by the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
at French River, Nipigon, and near
Kenora, Lake of the Woods.
Traffic through the Lachine Canal
during the moniS of June showed an
increase of two million bushels of
grain and one hundred thousand tons
of coal with increase! in pulpwood,
produce and passengers over the
aame month of the previous year.
The wheat crop of Alberta and
Manitoba has progressed so well on
account of the abundant moisture of
the early season that farmers, business men and railroad companies are
preparing for a harvest in excess of
the record one of 1915.
Prince Rupert, B.C., claims the
world's best record for a one trip
fish catch. A fishing schooner arrived at this port recently after being at a«a IM days, with 38,000
pounds of halibut, which sold for a
sum that netted each man of the
crew of five $727.80.
In th. Province of Ontario, it is
estimated, the lumber cut in 1922
amounted to 309,000,000 board feet,
and   in   addition   289,113   cords of
Surpwood. The Province of Nova
cotia cut 125,000,000 feet, New
Brunswick 210,000,000 feet, and
British Columbia 279,146,000 board
feet.
The Dominion Express has just
effected a shipment from Hamburg
te Kobe, Japan, in 32 days. The
average time consumed between the
same two points via the Suez Canal
is 49 days, and the saving thus made
by the Canadian route will be of
great importance in helping make
this country the road between Europe and the Orient.
The total value of the pelts of fur-
bearing animals taken in the Dominion during the season of 1921-22
was $17,438,800, an increase ever
the previous year of $7,287,273, or
72 per cent., and the number of pelts
of all kinds was 4,366,790, an increase over the previous season of
48 per cent. These figures comprise pelts of animals taken by trappers and pelts of ranch-bred animals.
Tests of ceramic clay resources in
British Columbia are being planned this summer by the British
Columbia Government. The tests
will be made under the auspices of
th. Department of Education and
the Department of Industries. There
are many varieties of clays in British Columbia and some an reported
to be particularly suited to the
manufacture of high class pottery
war*.
A reduction of express rates on
westward moving business between
Europe and Canada was announced
by the Foreign Department of the
Dominion Express Company recently. This reduction on westbound
shipments follows a similar cut on
shipments from Europe to Canada
mad. a little while ago, and amounts
to a reduction of approximately
twenty per cent, on the trans-ocean
trip. The rates came into effect on
July 9 between all points in Canada
and Europe.
The Banff-Windermere highway,
th. last link in the 8,000-mile chain
of good roads which extend from
the heart of the Canadian Rockies
to California and return is now open
to motor traffic, having been officially opened on June 30th by the
cutting of a riband at Kootenay
crossing in the presence of a number of Federal and Provincial Government officials, and a, host of
automobile tourists. The completion of this road has rendered accessible the most beautiful scenic
country on the continent.
T.WHERRY
IDERMtSFtVTANNCR
w'rt&ht.'n.,0.
Wds. «u.
•2S Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, ■. C. -
second-hand
furniture
Comox Exchange
Courtenay, B.C. ,
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requhed
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
Admired Hair
Shampooed
This Way
Hair that gleams with life and color
Women admired and envied (or their richly
beautiful hair know this seerct. Hair specialist agree that it beautifies hair.
Olive oil for the shampoo!
It lias been used since history began For
ils gentle cleansing action removes all dirt
and oil from scalp and hair. Dandruil is
dissolved and washed away. And the bright
sheen of life and color is greatly increased.
It leaves hair fluffy —never dry or brittle.
Il leaves hair silky and pliant as a baby's—
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OP CANADA, Limiled
Montreal, Que. Toronto, Ont. Winnipeg, Man.
PALMOLIVE
SHAMPOO
The Blend of Palm and Olive Oik
with the inimitable gloss so much desired.
Thousands of women now regularly treat
their hair this beneficial way. They use
PALMOLIVE SHAM POO-olive oil in
its most perfect form for the shampoo. Easy
to use. And very economical.
You can get full-sized bottles at your dealer's. Or, by mailing coupon, you may have a
15c trial bottle free. Get some at once. Use
it. See the results that follow even one
shampoo. (
15c TRIAL BOTTLE FREE
Fill ln name nnd address, and mall to Tha
Palmolive Company of Canada, Ltd., Dept. B243
Toronto, Ont., for 15c trial bottle free.
Addresi...
City _....
m
Midsummer   Carnival
ALL
Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay
TUESDAY, JULY 31st
FULL MOON
KisjaEisiBiBi^^
KEEP      THIS      DATE     OPEN
ITEMS OF INTEREST
REAL HARDWOOD FLOOR FIRST CLASS ORCHESTRA
Special Arrangements to Have the Theatre Cool
GAMBLE DANCES WITH PRIZES
SUPPER IN OPEN AIR, ADJOINING THEATRE—WEATHER PERMITTING
FREE    ICE     CREAM
GENTS, $1.25
PRICES:—
SUPPER EXTRA
LADIES' 50 Cents
DON'T  MISS A GOOD TIME THIS NIGHT
Prize Winners At The Picnic
jjjpi|3||j!])n^^
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
—AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue
SSIEIgljijfiJBB
r
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE I
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very |
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
 »       —
Phones 4 and fit Cumberland, B. C.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and deeds of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE    (TO    TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Tendome Hotel
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office MM Bridge Street, Victoria, B.O.
Event 1.—Boys' Race, 6 years, 50
yards.—1. Arthur Good; 2. G. Foley;
3. Andrew Foley.
Event 2.—Girl's Race, 6 years, 50
yards.—1. M. Westfleld; 2. Maggie
Williams; 3. N. Jones.
Event 3.—Boys' Race, 8 years, 50
yards.—1. D. Balrd; 2. H. Westlield;
,1. E. James.
Event 4.—GlrlB' race, 8 years, 50
yards.—1. Muriel Partridge; 2. L.
Picketti;  3. Violet Davis.
Event 5.—Boys' race, 10 years, 50
yards;—1. E. Watson; 2. J. Davis; 3.
N. Bird.
Event 6.—Girls' race, 10 years, 50
yards.—1. B. Westfleld; 2. Jean McWhlrter; 3. Violet Williams.
Event 7.—Boys' race. 12 years, 75
yards.—1. H. Watson; 2.J. Stanaway;
3. I, Caddell.
Event 8.—Girls' race, 12 years, 75
yards.—1. P. Cloutier; 2. Annie Walker; 3. Muriel Foster.
Event 9.—Boys' race, 15 years, 75
yards.—1. W. Bergland; 2. J. Stanaway;  3. Ross Ray.
Event 10.—Girls' race, 15 years, 75
yards.—1. Mabel Jones; 2. Jose Bono;
| 3. E. Smith.
j Event 11.—Boys' Tilting the Buc-
! ket.—1. Stanawaj, McDonald; 2. John
; Strachan, S. Stanaway; 3. Tom Adam-
i son, W. Shearer.
: Event 12.—Girls' Egg and Spoon race,
1 15 years.—1. E.   Caddell;    2.    Jose
! Welch; 3. Ethel Hunt.
Event 13.—Boys'    Sack    race,    12
i years.—1.  H. Watson;  2. W. Revie;
■ 3. Joe Ducca.
i    Event   14.—Girls'   Shoe    Scramble
' race, 12 years.—1. Prlseilla Cloutier;
i 2. Mary Hunt; Jose Welch.
Event 15.—BoyB' Three legged race,
14 years.—1. Orestl Frelonl, H. Watson;  2. Victor Bono, Joe Ducca;  3.
1 Isao Abe, Tadao.
t t t 1 I 1 I M tit f I t t I I t 1 I ft t t t
• ••••••••••••••••• •***••••
"DUNLOP
II
The World's Most
Envied Tire
Record Mileage-Faultless Anti-skid
AI8)
tit t t t I t t M M t t t t I t t ffftt t I
MIlsFUKK
Enjoy the
—mbined pieatures
oe a
■Y^V • ESr'JN        Rail and Water
k\-xl^ Trip
THAVKI.  UN    IIIU
CONTINENTAL MMITED
From Vancouver 9:50 p.m.
and
M>u..ul\>   NAVIQATION   SIKAHKIIS  frum  I'OH'I   tllllMK
BUMMER TOURIST FARES
Iti.'lmlr    IhU    KOIHlnv
E. W. BICKLE C. F. EARLE
Agent DM- Pass. Agent
CUMBERLAND, B. a        VICTOBIA, B. C.
t«t>ffilSlSI3igs|g|ig|^jg|^^
It Is Yours
Five-sixths of the timbered area in B. C. belongs to
the People.
Each year, it is increasing in value as the more accessible timber is cut.
In 1922 there was received from the sale of such timber thc sum of $620,000.
This helped to keep your taxes down, and to build up
the Province.
Green Timber is British Columbia's assurance of Perpetual Prosperity.
Why Burn It?
0
Event 16.—Girs' relay race, three
girls to the team, 14 years—1. E.
Caddell, M. Foster, E. Hunt; 2. P.
Cloutier, Mabel Jones, Jose Bono; 3.
Lena Bogo, I. Picketti, B. Westfleld.
Event 17.—Boys' Pillow light, 16
years.—1. Oresti Frelonl; 2. C. Fran-
cloll.
Event 11.—Quoiting competition
Scotch style, 18 yards.—1. William
Herd; 2. Jock McWhirter.
Quoiting competition English
style, 11 yards—1. Jock McWhirter;
2. Sam Robertson.
Event 18.—First Aid contest, Ladies.—No. Entries
First aid contest—Gents—1.
W. Beveridge and team; 2. Robert
Reid and tenm.
Event 19.—Girls' Potato race, 15
years.—1. Mabel Jones; 2. Mary Hunt;
3. Ethel Hunt.
Event 20.—Boys' Cracker Eating
contest, 10 years.—1. Joe Frelonl; 2.
C. Walker; 3. Tadashl.
Event 21.—Girls' Rope skipping
race, 10 years.— l.B. Westfleld; 2. M.
Watson; 3. Josie Welch.
Event 22.—Boys' race 8 years, 50
yards.—1. H. Westfleld; 2. H. Halgh;
3. Bruce Good.
Event 23.—Girls' race, 8 years, 50
yards.—1. Annie Taylor; 2. Adu Davis; 3. Dorothy Charnock.
Event 24.—Boys' Human wheelbnr-
row race, 10 years.—1. G. Fruncioli.
C. Walker; 2. Isao Abe, Fasko.
Event 25.—Girls' Potato race, 10
years.—1. E. Picketti; 2. U. West-
Held; 3. V, Williams.
Event 26.—Boys' 100 yard dash, 15
years.—1, J. Prez; 2. Sam Davis; 3.
G. Keenan.
Event 27.—Boys' race, 6 years,
yards.—No Entries.
Event 28.—Girls' race, 6 years, 50
yards.—1. M. Westfleld; 2. M. Dunn;
3. Ada Davis.
Event 29.—Boys' Spring Board
High Jump.—1. P. D, Graham; 2. O-
resti Frelonl.
Event 31.—Bosche competition.—1.
A. Bono; 2. Scavardo.
Event 32.—Single Ladles' race, 76
yards.—1. Miss J. Slllence; 2. Miss
Etfle Young.
Event 33.—100 yards dash, juniors,
18 years.—1. W. Marshall; 2. n. Pollock.
Event 34.—Married Ladles' race, 75
yards—1. Mrs. King; 2. Mrs. McEwan.
Event 35.—First Pull Tug of War.
No. 4 Underground, Union Bay, No. 4
Surface (Bye).
Event 36.—01d man's race, 50
yards.—1. John Enoch Boffy; 2. A.
H. Glover.
Event 37.—Chinese ruce, 440 race.
—No Entries.
Event 38.—Running high Junmp —
1. W. Auchlnvole; 2. Jack Fouracre.
Event 39— Putting 16 pound shot.
—1. A. Mortimer; 2. Only two entries
No. 2nd prize.
Event 40.—Place Kick.—1. C. Hit-
chins; 2. D. Bannerman.
Event 41.—Running hop skip and
jump—1. W. Marshall, 36'10"; 2. I.
Elliott 35'9".
Event 42.-Japanese race, 440
yards.—No Entries.
Evnet 43.—Tilting the bucket.-1.
John Strachan, Sam Stanaway; 2. O.
Francloll, Joe Stanaway.
Event 44.—440 yard race*—1. Jack
Fouracre; 2. W. Marshall.
Event 45.—Returned Soldiers race,
100 yard*.—1. C. Hltchlns; 2. Tucker
James.
Event 46.—Married Ladles' null
driving contest.—1. Mrs. Yarrow; 2.
Mrs. Robertson.
Event 48.—Chinese Tug of War, 7
men to the side.—No. 4 Tom Kee's
team.
Japanese  Tug of War,    7
men to the side.—No. 1 Japanese.
49.—Ladles' Needle Threading contest—1. Marjorie Michel; 2. Mrs.
King.
Event 50.—Bandsman race, 100
yards handicap.—1. A. Pilling; 2. C.
Caddell.
Event 51.—Chinese race, 220 yards.
—1. Tom Kee; 2. Mah Hung.
Event 52.—880 yards race.—1. Jack
Fouracre; 2. Harry Jackson.
Event 63.—Committeemens Barrel
race, 100 yards.—1. Bob Brown; 2. A.
H. Kay.
Event 64.—Juniors' IS years, 880
yards.—No Entries.
Event 55.—Weight lifting contest.
—1, Bob Brown; 2. C. Dando,  .
Event 56.—Bapco Cup race, 100
yards dash for employees only—1.
Jack Fouracre; 2. Tucker James.
Final of the Tug of War, 10 men
aside, on cleats, 7 minutes.—1. No. 4
Underground;   2. No. 4 Surface.
Event 67.—Grand Raffle. SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
sss-issaa..>ss_ai_i_sssi>.s_>—•»——-ssssi—na
FIVE
m
fy&fa"
CASCADE
OR-
U. B. C. BEER
PURE FULL-STRENGTrKBEERS
They Wear Well
On the market as long as the Oldest inhabitants remember and still the most' -
POPULAR   BEERS
Sold in British Columbia
Old Friends Are Best
—   Leave Your Order at any Government Store   -
WE DO THE REST
Brass Bed Specials
1 only Brass Bed (HQ(C Aft
regular $42.50, now     «pOU«UU
1 only Brass Bed (fi QP Aft
regular $40.00, now  tJJOtJ.UU
1 only Brass Bed (JLOA  ftft
regular, $28.50, now *J/£ii±.\J'J
1 only Brass Bed ,   flJOl   ftft
regular $25.00, now  .....«?£ l.vU
A new stock of Linoleum and Lino squares just
opened out.
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT—
English Flannellette the very best qua-    Kft/»
lity in white, at per yard       tJUl/
Flanriellettes in White and colors *)(>/»
per yard from    Aut
Ladies Cotton Hose in white, black and Of>/»
brown, special to clear per pair    uDxr
Ladies and childrens Vest's Ot\t*
special, each      sUUt
New Ratines in plain and     (fi-t   AA   (fi-t   *jr
fancy colors at per. yard «pX»UU> «pX« I D
A now lot of Valencines Laces, in r 0 1 ft/>
neat designs at per yard DC     and   J.UC
Silk Sweaters (MAAA          (JIAQt
at, each JplU.UU   and $1U.0D
Ladies Pull-Over (fiA  AA
Sweaters, each         tprreUv
Special prices on Rompers and Coveralls to clear.
We carry a full line of Simmon's Beds, Springs
and Mattresses.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
ATTRACTIONS AT
VANCOUVER EXHIBITION
AUGUST UTH TO 18TH
There will be many thrills and
many demonstrations of expert Horsemanship at the "Range Days" exhibition during the Vancouver Fair.
Entries in these competitions are confined to British Columbia Cow Boys,
and will Include Rough Riding, Bareback Riding, Wild Horse Riding, Relay Riding, Steer Roping, Calf Roping, Wild Cow Milking, Cattle Separating, Old Timers' Race, Packing
Contest, Stage Coach Races, Trick
Riding, Fancy Riding, Trick and
Funny Roping, etc.
All the romance of an old-time
"Round-up" will be in evidence at
these "Range Days" competitions.
There will be forty or Fifty Cow Boys
with their ponies, carloads of range
steers and wild cattle and all the
other exciting episodes that have
made Pendleton with Its "Round-up"
and Calgary with Its "Stampede" the
Mecca for sight-seers from all over
the continent of North America. The
Auto Races in the last two days of
the Fair will also provide a number
of thrills. Some very fast cars
have already been entered. Geo. Lott
bas a special Oldsmobile which he
declares will make any other driver
who attempts to pass him step on it
pretty hard.
EXPERT APIARIST TO
MAKE INVESTIGATION
Government Calls Rev. Thomas
Menzies to Settle Foul Brood
Dispute.
Rev. Thomas Menzies, M.L.A. for
Comox, known as an expert'apiarist
has been called in by the government
to settle the bee war that has been
raging on the lower mainland between
the Williams Hugh and the anti-Williams Hugh factions over efforts to
enforce foul brood protective regulations.
Mr. Menzles has left for the mainland, where he was met on arrival
by K. D. Paterson, M.L.A. for Delta,
who is taking an active part in the
war. Mr. Paterson and Rev. Menzles
will make a tour of the whole District to meet the beekeepers individually in an effort to settle all the
troubles. Tomorrow he will attend
thc conference of honey producers
that has been called at Ladner.
Because of the trouble over regulations, fould brood has been spreading fast and creating heavy losses
among the hives of the whole, lower
mainland.
A cat, wh^ch is supposed to have
nine  lives, can    afford  to    take
chance. You have only one.
Kodak as you go
Out of the. pocket, into position, release the
shutter and the picture is yours.
That's the Kodak way. It's simple and sure
and leads to pictures you'll be proud to show.
Let us be your photographic service station. We
carry a full stockof Kodaks, ?6.£b up, Kodak Film and
Eastman accessories.
Our developing and printing is
of the superior sort
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
Send Us Your Mail Order
It Pays To Deal At Lang's
SHEEP EXHIBIT
Last year Vancouver had the distinction of having the largest exhibit of sheep ever held in the Province
with some 445 entries, and there is
no doubt but that this year the sheep
pens will again be crowded to capa
city. Every breed of sheep suitable
to our climate will be shown, Including a few specimen of the famous
Karakule or Persian sheep which always creates great interest among
both exhibitors and visitors.
97ioo /o
Made-in-Canada
The entire Ford,
with the exception
of very few parts
(2.83 per cent.) is
produced in
Canada.
POHD MOTOR OOMMNY OF CANADA. LIMIT*
rono, - ONTARIO
Corfield Motors, Limited    "^
ISLAND MINES
PRODUCE MORE
(WIITKNAY, T|. C.
Coal Output for June Greatly in
Excess of That For May—
Fordney Tariff Has Destroyed
Important Crows Nest Market.
The coal production of British Columbia for the month of June totalled 186,160 tons, an Increase of 28,-
848 tons over the output ot the previous month. The collieries of Vancouver Island produced 129,616 tons
last month, which is 32,252 tons in
excess of that for May. It Is clear,
therefore, that the coal business has
been improving on the Coast and falling off in the interior. Greater mercantile activity, it is said, accounts
for the growing strength of the coal
market on the Coast. This should be
felt more and more as the shipments
of wheat via the Panama Canal develops, because few of the ships handling grain are equipped for thj; consumption ot oil. At any rate the present prospect, as tar as the Island collieries is concerned, is encouraging.
If the demand holds during the summer many operating difficulties will
automatically  solve   themselves.
In Crows Nest
The Nicola-Princeton    fleld     also
shows a slight Increase  tn  produc-
tlon,  one   thounsand  odd   tons,   for i
which the Middlesboro and Coalmont
collieries    are    largely    responsible, j
In the Crows Nest Pass  fleld there |
was a drop of 9507 tons in the pro- ■
ductlon for June as compared with
May. The Coal Creek Colliery fell off j
8694 tons;   that at Corbln, 954 tolls,
while the Michel colliery Increased Its
output 141 tops. The poorer showing !
ln this section of British Columbia no
doubt Is accounted for by the barrier
erected by the Fordney tariff, making
export to the United States at a profit practically out of the    question,
and the lack of demand in the Middle
West.
June Figures
Following are the  production  figures for June:
Canadian Collieries— Tons
Comox   Colliery  22,661
Extension       20.264
South  Wellington         5,164
Total        48.0S9
Western Fuel Corporation   *
of Canada—
No. 1 Mine  27,002
Reserve Mine      17,801
Wfckeslah Mine        7,377
Total        52,180
Other Collieries—
Granby M. S. & P. Co  19,626
Nanoose-Welllngton Colliery ..   5,176
East Wellington Colliery        3,723
King & Foster          822
Total        29,317
Total for Vancouver Island .129,616
Nicola Valley—
Middlesboro Collieries      6,397
Coalmont Collieries        9.609
Princeton  Collieries           809
Total for Nicola Valley   16,815
Crows Nest Pass—
Coal Creek Colliery   22,254
Michel Colliery      15,388
Corbin       2,087
Total ifor Crows Nest Pass
district        39,729
Total for Province  186,160
STAR PERFORMANCE
Durant Motors of Canada, Limited,
held its annual meeting at Toronto
on May 18th with a large attendance
of Cniiadaian stockholders. All directors were re-elected and tho
course pursued hy the officers of the
company throughout the year 1922
was approved through unanimous ratification of the annual report.
Star and Durant Cars are sold by
Meredith Bros., Star Garage, Courtenay.
H
Important Auction Sale
G. J. Hardy has received instructions from Howe Hewlett
Esq., who is leaving for England, to sell hy Auction at his Residence, Royston, on the Royston to Cumberland Road, about
M >nlle from station and Post Office and about 4 miles from
Courtenay, on
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8th, At 1.30 pjn. PROMPT
The whole of his valuable Household Furniture, Farm
Stock, Implements, Machinery, Hay, Real Estate, etc. including:
Heal Estate—10 acres of productive land, all fenced, about
5 acres cleared and under cultivation, balance part cleared and
good pasture. Fruit Trees, Small Fruits, never falling water
supply, Good live-room House with Pantry and Bathroom, water laid In. Convenient Barn and Stabling, Garage, Range of
Chicken houses and runs. 8 acres of good land adjoining the
above with the two room cottage thereon, about 3 acres cleared
and fenced. These two holdings are now in the occupation of
the Vendor and will be sold 111 two lots Without any Reserve
Whatever.
Live Stock.—Grade Jersey Cow, 6 years old, now giving .1
gallons and due to freshen 26th Febr.; Grade Jersey Cow, 7
years old, now giving 2V2 gallons and due to freshen 7th Dec;
Grade Jersey Heifer, 2(4 years old, now giving 2\t, gallons, just
bred; Grade Jersey Heifer Calf. 4 strong store Pigs, 4'^. months
old; about 30 yearling Hens.
Outdoor Effects.—Planet Junior Cultivator; Wee McGregor
Drag Saw; Miscellaneous Tools und Implements; Pulley Blocks;
Cross Cut Saws; Carpenters Tools; 4 Louden Cow Staiicheoni;
About 3 tons of well harvested Oot Hay; 3 sneks commercial
Lime; Hotbed Lights, etc., etc.
Household Furniture and other Effects.—Cook Range; Fitted Kitchen Table; K. Table; Coffee Grinder; Kitchen Scales;
Mincing Machine; Quantity of Aluminum Ware; Quantity of Enamel Ware; Usuol Cooking and Kitchen UtenBils; Crockery unci
China; Linoleum; Meat Safe; Lamps; Gasoline nnd nil Lanterns; Oil Stove with oven; Small Heater; Wash Boilers and
Tubs; Washing Machine and Wringer; Child's Bath; Child's
High Chnlr; Wicker Baby Carriage; Large quantity of Child-
ronB Toys and Garden Tools; Child's Swing, etc.; Field Glasses; 2 Rifles; Deck Chairs; Badminton Net; Racquets anil
outdoor Shuttle Cocks. Handsome Fumed Oak Dining Suite,
new, comprising Extension Dining Table with extra leaves, 6
Chairs with leather seals, Buffet with mirror cupboards anil
drawers; Lady's Fitter Secretaire In English Ouk; Scl of Bonk
Shelves; Japanese four fold Screen; Cabinet Columbia Grafn-
nolu In Rosewood; 20 Double faced Records; Sea Grass Rocker;
Sea Grass Easy Chair; Child's Sea Grass Chair; Sanitary Extension Couch with Mattress; Sprott Shaw Long Distance Radiophone with Magna Box loud Speaker, one set Ear Phone.
extra Valve. B Battery, A Battery complete with Aerial; Small
Table; Axmiuster Carpet 9'x6'; Framed Water Colour Paintings; Framed Artists Proofs; Curtains and Cushions; Coleman
Gasoline Lamp; Door Mats; Fancy Tea Tray; Singer Hand Sewing mnchlne, new; Dresser with bevelled mirror and 6 drawers;
Brass Bedstead, Springs and Mattress; Rocker; Occoslonnl
Tables; Bedroom Crockery; White Enamel Bedstead with
Spring and Mattress; White Enamel Dresser with Mirror;
White Enamel Chest of Drawers; Camp Bed and Mattress; Inlaid Trinket Chest with drawers; Curney Heater; 2 Rugs;
Child's adjustable Cot; Mattress; Numerous other effects.
For further particulars, see Circulars to he had from the
Auctioneer.
G. J. HARDY
PHONE in
COURTENAY, 11. C.
■CBBWncyTJWBBMH WtttOBtLWt
m SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
News of  Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY OUR  SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Open Air Dance
Saturday, July 28th, 1923
Royston
TENNIS  COURT
SPECIAL 5-PIECE ORCHESTRA
Everybody knows what a good time can be had at the
ROYSTON OPEN AIR DANCES—DANCING 9 P.M. PROMPT
GENTS
50 Cents                                                     LADIES' SO Cents
Refreshments 25 Cents
ELECTRIFY
FOR THE WARM WEATHER
— We Have in Stock —
RANGES, FANS, WASHERS, TOASTERS, TABLE
STOVES, IRONS, PERCOLATORS, ETC.
Complete Lines of SHADES and FIXTURES
— Radio Sets and Parts —
We are Electrical Contractors
When in need of Electrical Work, Phone 164,
Courtenay.
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone 164
Courtenay
"How often does your street car
kill a man?" asked a facetious traveling salesman of the conductor the
other day. "Just once" replied the
conductor, sorrowfullly.
THE VOICE IS THE SOUL OF TELEPHONING
When you complete a long distance conversation
you experience a satisfaction that does not follow under other circumstances. Your message has been conveyed as you would have it, and you know exactly how
it has been received by the person at the other end.
The reason o fthe satisfaction is the intimacy
which the telephone gives. It is your voice and the
voice in reply that makes long distance telephoning
real conversation.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Vacation
Stationery
We can offer you some
Excellent S t a t i o n e ry
qualities, all the newest
shades and tints, and
you certainly can buy
paper cheaper here than
anywhere else right now.
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
Cumberland, B. C.
It Pays to Deal at Lang's
Send us your Mail Order
Courtenay Are
Champions Of
District League
Last Sunday at the Courtenay ball
I park the Cumberland and local ball
j teams clashed in the second league
' fixture to determine the champion-
I ship of Comox District. The Cumberland team was three men short on ar
rival at, the playground of the Cow-
I boys and accepted the services of
! Thomson, Brown and Dave Robinson
| of Courtenay. The loss of the game
I by Cumberland cannot be chalked up
I against the boys who voluntarily came
j to their assistance. Brown at first
: played a stellar game, coming through
' the fray without an error, and the
other volunteers played good ball.
Eddie Brown pitched for the Cowboys
and Jack Downey did the receiving.
Downey also emulate Babe Ruth and
slammed out a long clean three bagger
that Lefty Larson, playing in the
centre garden could not reach. Many
of the fans have been wondering
since last Sunday's game just why
McGraw released Millard to Courte
nny for he certainly picked up a dai
sy cutter that was laballed for a safety and which piece of contortion
work earned him the glad hand from
the homesters. Jeff Davis, speed king,
erstwhile of Powell River, twirled for
the visitors and though he got by, he
had nothing much ou the ball but the
cover and a furiously grand and picturesque wlndup which reminded one
of a dollar Ingersoll and was so beloved of the Courtenny bunch that
some of the boys had little difficulty
ln purloining bases after they had
reached first. Cummins was a particularly rare bird at this thieving
game. Mitchell was behind the bat
for the Miners and played a good
game. There was a small crowd on
hand to witness the game but there
was a lot of good humored bantering
on both sides and the afternoon was
passed very pleasantly. Pat Fletcher, umpired and gave general satisfaction. A couple of decades ago
Pat was some catcher nnd has always
taken a very keen interest in the
pastime. Courtenay has been conceded the championship of the Comox
District League and will now compete with Nanaimo In a series of three
game for the Up-Island championship, the winner of the series being
pitted against the best team in Victoria, and, being successful there, will
play off for the championship of the
province with the class ot the mainland. Next Sunday the Port Alberni team plays at Courtenay at two
o'clock promptly and at Cumberland
at Ave o'clock. These games will be
called on time as lt Is a long distance
to Alberni.
Courtenay
Billiard-
Parlor
Has Power To
Place Embargo
At the last session of the Dominion
Parliament  power  was  granted  the
Government to place an embargo on
the export of wood pulp. Great Quantities of this product of the forests of
Canada have been exported   to   the
United  States  where  it    has    been
| manufactured  into  paper.  American
I paper makers say that If the   power
| granted the Canadian Government is
j put into effect, It will hurt American
! Industry and retaliation  by  placing
' an embargo on the exportation    of
| American  coal  will  be  resorted  to.
The logical reply to this threat to
I bulldoze is "You say it    will    hurt
: American Industry If an embargo Is
placed  against thc    exportation    of
Canadian pulp" but Canadians, who
| have the best interests of their country  at heart say "It will hurt our
1 natural industrial growth If   we   do
not."   We are tired of the exploitation of our natural resources by non
residents.   Suppose the yanks do put
an embargo on their coal. We should
worry, for the Canadian West is full
of it, and most coal mining   camps
would be tickled pink if the American embargo were put into    effect.
Right here In Comox-Alberni constituency there is the greatest opportunity for the development of the wood-
pulp and paper making Industry and
the contemplated action of the Don-
inlou  Government  would    do    us a
world of good.   If we can grow the
raw materials there Is absolutely no
reason why we should not also use it
In manufacture, creating an industrial pay roll that spells prosperity for
everybody concerned.
FORCED INTO THE DITCH
Mr. and Mrs. George Pldcock and
family are on the Mainland, having left
tor Hope on Monday morning.
A large car, belonging to a Cumberland resident was returning from
Kye Bay District, (via the Detour),
on Sunday evening last, and In
about the narrowest portion of this
Joke of a road was forced into the
ditch to enable another car to pass.
In about 10 minutes there were over
50 cars tied up, whilst willing workers, led by Bob Brown of Cumberland, who happened to be returning
from a fishing trip, had the car dug
out in about 10 or IS minutes' time.
The car was not damaged in the
slightest, and none of the passengers
even received a scratch. One would
think that the powers that be, would
endeavour to have the bridge open
on Sundays, as the amount of traffic  passing through    Courtenay   on
Sundays is tremendous. Someone
said the bridge was closed because
there was a load of gravel left on
It, left over from the previous days'
work and that It was easier to close
the bridge than move the gravel.
Let's hope the bridge Is open next
Sunday. Our cub reporter ls going to
Point Homes and he just hates that
detour.
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
NURSING HOME
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
.-      Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 TEARS' EXPERIENCE
PREPARE YOUR CHILDREN
NOW FOR THE
Summer Vacation
WE STOCK
CHILDREN'S BLOUSES — CHILDREN'S SHOES
CHILDREN'S HATS and CAPS,
CHILDREN'S TIES
AND OTHER GALA-DAY WEARING APPAREL
We can also outfit adults and our Prices,Are Right
Open Saturday Night till 10 o'clock
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
L
s
Baseball Notes
(By Dan Bannerman)
INTERMEDIATES BREAK
LOSING STREAK
Bevan Gets Sound Trimming at
Hands of Local Ball Tossers.
Cumberland Intermediates got into
their stride on Sunday last, gettiug
full revenge for their detent at Bevan the previous week, hy trimming
the Bevan Huskies by a score of 14—
8. A small crowd turned out to see
the game and were treated to u
most Interesting game, especially the
first live Innings when the score
stood 2—1. From then on lt wns ull
Cumberland. The local boys scoring
two and three runs In almost every
Innings, whilst Bevan had to be content with two in the second and four
In the ninth. Both Bennett and Robertson pitched good ball and wont
all the way. Robertson being specially effective when the bases were
loaded.
Royston  Mill  Win  Game
local Japanese Take- Evenly   Con*
tested Game
What proved to be one of the best
and even sporting events of the season was witnessed by almost every
person In Campbell River last sun-
day, when the local Japanese Baseball team proved their superiority
over the Campbell River Ball Club by
the score 9—12.
Both team battled along until the
fifth innings with the score . 1—1,
when a bad grounder stuck the home
boys pitcher in the face, breaking
his nose.
Jameson took up the fight but before he got adjusted the opposition
had scored twice and were' never
again headed.
This is the first game for Campbell
River team and are to be congratulated on making such a good showing, under the handicap of losing their
pitcher in the early part of the game.
Bevan team will make the trip to
Campbell River on Sunday nnd another rousing contest Is expected.
Hojrstun Mill «—Bcran 8
Last Wednesday saw another Intermediate League game fixture between
Royston Mill and Bevan which proved
another win for the Bevan tribe 6—S.
Only the heavy work of Bevan
bats in the early innings staved off
defeat, for the wily Japanese' who
Is never beaten until the last man Is
out, staged a come back after an 8-1.
lead had been taken on them and
crawled up where any minute defeat
might be changed to victory.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - • B. C.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
MM) ac. Permanent I.oim llldfc
PHONE 2.113      VICTORIA, 11.1.
Car  For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    ■    Cleaning    .    Repairs
Telephone 1.    -    P. O. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
mtam SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
Ilo=Ho Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, July 27th and 28th
—q A BENJ B. HAMPTON PRODUCTION J—
Zi\NE GREYS
Popular Story
WHAT YOU WILL SEE
The tragic outcome of the poker
game at Ed Smith's ranch.
How Jack Bellounds betrayed the
father who idolized him.
How Hell-Bent Wade stepped in to
prevent a wrong from being done.
How the ranch hands selected Lem
Billings as a sacrifice to Cupid.
Modern methods applied to the old-
fashioned pastime of cattle stealing.
A sentimental interlude which includes Lem, Maria, a trombone,—
and a flowerpot!
How Columbine's happiness was
threatened,—and how it all came out
right in the end.
The death struggle in the turbid
waters of the creek between Hell-
Bent Wade and the man who called
himself Ed Smith.
Extra Special—Irving Cummings in
"The   Avenger"
A story of The Northwest
"THE WISE CRACKER"
A Sunshine Comedy
Matinee Saturday, 2.30 p.m.
Don't forget the big dance Ilo-llo
Hall Saturday Night.
MONDAY and TUESDAY
Big Double Feature Show—Herbert Rawlinson in
"NOBODY'S BRIDE"
and Baby Peggy in
'TEG OF THE MOVIES"
Extra Special
"MAN vs BEAST"
.  These are the most wonderful picture taken in the big game country of Africa.
Regular prices—Next Friday and Saturday Gloria Swanson in "Prodigal Daughters! "
Ohe
MYSTERIOUS
RIDER'
with
Robert M«Kim -Clalte Adams and Carl
Gantvoott-Pmduced
t>y Ben/ B. Hampton and Ms associates
Zane Grey Pictures Incorp.
Historical Research for The Dominion
0
Wm. Webber. Hontrtal. Mirmili ol Bllio. Captain I. Griffith!, SUM, "Kss»rss» .t ttmrnt..- MutUaiM al Bills,
A FTER a two-year holiday, completing a mileage
** of 46,000 miles on Canadian Pacific railway and
steamships, thc Marquis and Marchioness of Sligo
returned to theli London home. During their stay
in the Western hemisphere, the Irish peer diverted
from his main course of travel, visiting all the leading
republics of SoufJh America and in the latter days of
his travel diverted his course to Southern China,
where ht narrowly escaped hy some few minutes being taken by bandits.
Prior to his departure on the S.S. "Empress of
Prance," the distinguished visitor forwarded to tha
Canadian Government an interesting document found
in the Sligo family correspondence, being a letter
from tho lion. Henry Browne, who was associated
with th* captor* of Quebec
For some time pat, the Marquis has been occupied
in gathering data about his family and th* part they
played in the history of Canada and the Dominion is
to reap the benefit of his research. The Marquis
began his researches with the famous picture af the
death of Wolfe, by West, and after careful investigation he has succeeded in identifying a number of the
Individuals who surrounded the general aa he lay on .
the ground. Chief among these is Lt Henry Browne
who was the standard bearer in the Louisburg Grenadiers which fought on the right of the line in Wolfe's
army. In the picture tbe Lieutenant is shown holding
the standard. Later, according to evidence gathered
by the Marquis, his ancestor helped to carry-the
general off th* battlefield after h* had died,
TAKE AWAY MATCHES
FROM FOREST VISITORS
Considerable Interest lias been
evoked ill the culture ot loganberries
in the district by the announcement
that a wine manufacturing plant has
begun operations nt Victoria to uti
lize the fruit of the Saanlch fruit
growers. A meeting of the local
fruit growers' Association wns held
on Wednesday night In the office of;
Mr. E. Felix Thomiis, at which the
subject  wns discussed.        , ,
Grcnt   success   haa  attended    the'
growing or lhe Logan berries 111 Comox Valley and, If ns stated by n
mini who has Investigated ihe situation, there Is n greater market tliiin
can he supplied by the present crops
tlle outlook should he very bright for
berrygrowers here, especially on n
co-operative marketing hnsla.
The Quebec Provincial forest permit, which every visitor to the forest of the Province Is required to
take out before they are allowed to
enter the wooded country, does not
entitle a person to carry matches as
a portion or personal equipment, according to the latest interpretation of
the regulations Imposed by the Provincial Department of Lauds and
Forests. Fire Rnngers In the vicinity of Lac La Peche and Lac des Cinq
and near the St. Maurice River are
culling upon all sportsmen, guides,
tourists and others to give up matches
and smokes before they proceed further, even though they have the required forest permit. Because of
heavy fire losses In June, the rangers throughout this section arc making this stipulation until August 1,
it has been announced.
BERRY PICKERS
Each year the hills and valleys of
British Columbia yield great crops
of wild berries. Each year the men,
the women and the children ln the
small scattered communities harvest
part of this wonderful crop and tho
busy housewife prepares the winters' jam supply at no cost other
than the purchase of sugar.
Thus does nature generously provide for the wants of the inhabitants
of this fair Province.
Unfortunately, thoy who reap tho
harvest of berries; quite often by
their wantoiu carelessness with fire
in thc woods, destroy the chance of
Nature providing them with an abundant crop In future years. Forest
fires caused by berry pickers have annually run up n heavy bill for lhe
people of the province in destroyed
timber.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Denial Surgeons
Off je:   Cor.  of   Dunsmuir  Ave.
Opposite   Ilo-llo   Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBKKUMI, 11. ('.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service.
20   rooms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent  cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
R. YATES, Manager. EIGHT
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1983
EMPRESS OF CANADA
ESTABLISHES NEW RECORD
DURANT SPECIAL
AT INDIANAPOLIS
£rAPP£SS OF CANADA - QUEEN OF TW& PACIPI C
FOLLOWING the announcement that the Canadian a large portion has been fitted for the carriage ot
«            „m    _.  /i._.j.»   l_.   k«„- silk and refrigerated cargo.
The first class accommodation is indeed of the
premiere classe, including luxurious suites with private bathrooms In addition to the single, double and
family rooms. The staterooms ure of the most modern type, a telephone Bystein between all rooms and
offices affording an additional attraction to travellers.
There is even a well appointed swimming pool on
board with a gymnasium adjoining. The large lounge
provides ample room for concerts and the moving pictures which are a special feature of the Canadian Pacific service. It was remembered when designing
the Interior of the Empress of Canada that she was
for semi-tropical service and the rooms are large and
airy, and the last word in marine architecture.
Captain Hailey, R.N.R., the ship's Captain is well
known on both the Atlantic and Pacific, having joined
the Canadian Pacific as junior officer on the "Empress of Japan" in 1900, and he is the recipient of
many congratulatory messages on his distinction as
Commander of the fastest and best appointed ship
on the Pacific.
Pacific liter "Empress of Canada" has been
chosen to show the world to 500 tourbits in a 30,000
mile Round the World cruise, leaving New York in
January next, comes the news that this majestic vessel has added to her laurels by establishing a new
trans-Pacific record. On her last eastward voyage,
the "Empress of Canada" mad* the run from Yokohama to Vancouver in 8 days, 10 hours and 55
minutes, nearly eight hours less than the previous
record which was established In 1914, and held since
by tho "Empress of Russia," a sister ship. The aver-
aije speed of the "Canada" en her record trip was
2(M knots per hour.
As with all Canadian Pacific liners the speed attained was no more than was compatible with safety
in the opinion of the Commander of the vessel, and
comfort for the passengers.
The "Empress of Canada" with a gross tonnage of
22,000 tons has accommodation for 1,708 passengers
nf all classes and a crew of 647.   Of her cargo apace
Smashing all records for consistent performance, five Durant Specials,
designed and built by R. C. Durant,
Motor Company of California, finished "ln the money" In the eleventh annual 500-mlle race—the great international sweepstakes on the famous
Indianapolis motor speedway, May
1 30th. I
This record Is without parallel In
the history of the Indianapolis classic.
I     Second, third, fourth, sixth and seventh  places  were  captured  by  the
'great racing team headed by    R.-C.
Durant.
Durant Special No. 7, driven by
Harry Hartz, finished second with an
average speed of 90.6 miles per hour.
Jimmy Murphy, driving a Durant Spe-
clal, finished third.' Eddie Heame in
i a Durant Special finished fourth.
Frank Elliott, driving a Durant Special, finished sixth. R.-C. Durnnt captured seventh honors, finishing ahead
of all Ihe foreign drivers entered ln
the race.
Several of the fastest laps In the
race were made by R. C. Durant, who
took the lead and held it until Ignition trouble forced him to , lose 14
laps. Both Hartz and Murphy also led
the race for many laps.
Never before has an American or
foreign racing team scored such a
victory in the great classic, and the
performance of the Durant Special Is
a worthy contribution to the history
; of the American speedway.
Star and Durant Cars are sold by
Meredith Bros., Star Oarage, Courtenay.
QUESTIONS
AND ANSWERS ON
. FORESTRY
(By
Q.
the  Canadian  Forestry   Asso.)
A. Nine-tenths ure due to human
recklessness. One of the worst sources is unextinguished camp fires. These
fires usually are made too large or
too close to trees, grass, shrubbery,
or moss. Lighted matches and tobacco are also great destroyers. Many deliberate fires ure set by prospectors to uncover rocks where minerals may or may not be found. Fires
set by settlers to, clear ground or to
REPORTS VERY
BRIGHT FOR GREAT
FAIR THIS YEAR
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
' burn slash are also proving costly to
Canadian public-owned timber assets.
The Directors of the Vancouver Exhibition Association are delighted
with the prospects for a more successful and larger Pair than ever before. With less than a month to go
everything is fust rounding Into
shape and.entries are pouring in at a
greater rale than in former years.
Space  for exhibits  iu    lhe    various
A lot has been said about   the
s>
forests ot the Eastern and    Middle
United States having been stripped
or destroyed by commercial Interests
or by bud fires. It has also been declared that the American consumer
has turned to Canada for his lumber
supply. Can you tell me briefly how
much lumber Is being shipped to the
Slutes? J. K. H.
A. Five-sixths of nil lumber made In :    "' ls tht'rc a"-v reconl of M torM
Canada is sold to United States con-1 "res '" European countries in recent
sinners and the exports are steadylly I *ears' out8ltte oi' ,Ue destruction of i to  ils  full  .•apu.-iiy
growing.    This Is excellent business
for Canada but it shows the extreme
urgency for conservation ot our timber  supply  and  protection    against
Speaking
of Service
buildings' is being reserved at a greni j
lire.
* *     *
Q. How much does Canada spend In
a year on forest research and how
much for agricultural research?
What urea do the forests occupy In
Canada? A. B. L.
A. Canada spends about $800,000 a
year on agricultural research and only about $35,000 on forest research.
The forests of the Dominion occupy
about 80 per cent, of the habitable
area.
* *     *
(J. What arc the most common
causes of forest fires thot have beeu
destroying so much timber in Canada? L. O. O.
wooded land in the war zone? P. F. R.
A. There was a recent report of a i
forest fire in tho South of   France |
whicli destroyed only 600 acres of tlm
ber.   This was considered a terrible
disaster and  au  irreparable  loss by
the  people  ot  France.   Many  forest |
fires covering five million acres occur
in Canada and usually through rank
carelessness.
pace. The lnrge Manufacturers
Building is completely contracted for
The Industrial
building will be the centre of numerous extremely interesting exhibits,
and the demand for space iu tills
building is greater than ever before.
There is nothing tliat will cure a
reckless driver like thirty- days observation of the sun thru a barred
window.
PILES
Nu onti but tiif luffirw koowi Ui« terrible iiony
or tht It'liliiK naiuro nf I'lln and how li-wlrm
H MMli in try ffa reiki In ulntmruu, Injci'lluni
ninl illinium.
(lentils produces
"PAX"
Internal Pile Remedy
P« l* tliv prucrlfttfon nf a mil known phyileUn
■nd 1ms pram! luccauful in hundred! of cum.
Tax   in   Internal   distinct  from   any  other   irral-
nifiit.    A | ipl I rations from tln> OU tilde  an- futile.
No  otntnuntf.   Injections  or  dllaturi   are  litres.
nrf.    I'm Is complete and Is a U'gitalilt* remedy,
nmtalns no driift* or alcohol.
H  yen   hove  nut   hitherto  found   relief   tin  not
cleipilr,   plica  your   faith   ln   I'm.
Except  In   antuutlly stillborn cases one  hot   U
UlUllll suniclcnu
';<■! "PAX" from your Dmjrttlst or if he cannot
lUpply you tend One Dollar ond "PAX" will be
lent you lu u plain ptckuo.
CBOWH CHEMICAL
PRODUCTS OF CANADA
1015 Dominion BnUdlnr
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
UtBetrW.1tauio.htr
and
U. B. C. BEER
B
REWED and Bottled in B.
C.'s Million Dollar Brewery
—in prime condition always.
-Do you know that we not only make Delicious Chocolates
and all sort of Delicious Candy.
—But likewise we serve Light
Lunches and Ice Cream-
—BUT. This is a Confectionery
Store: That is a Joy to all,
who know it.
Busy Bee
Confectionery
COl'HTENAV, 11. e.
Next to Malpas & Wilson
Order   To-Day   and
Have* It Delivered
Vancouver Breweries Ltd.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
L'nion Bay Road
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS.
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKKRI FIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.      Dtinsmulr Avenue, curoberiami
NEW
GOODS-
JUST ARRIVED
Ladies' House dresses at
Mens Khaki Coveralls at
per suit 	
.Boys' Khaki Blouses
at, each    	
Boys' Khaki Pants
at, each    ..'	
GORDON'S
Phone 133
TheCost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. In other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical instillation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man wh6 knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest practise in electrical wiring.
For the BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
White figured Print, suitable for children (fi-t  AA
dresses, 4 yard for    tpAavfU
Childrens wash suits at $1.75 each
Girls dresses at tPOaZt)* (PO*t)U     ft
$2.50, $3.00
$4.00
$1.35
 $2.25
Mothex Garment Storage Bags, priced at ?
$1.25
Each
Royal Candy Co,
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY. JULY 28th, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
NINE.
ril
Thirty-First Annual Report
To the Chairman, Executive Committee and Members ot the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited Medical and Accident Fund.
I beg to submit the Annual Report
of receipts and expenditure tor the
year ending June 30th, 1923, showing
a balance on hand of $3,272.48
a decrease ot 286.84
from the balance of 1922.
During the  past  thirty-one years,
the fund has been In existence there
has been collected the sum
ot $397,169.41
"and expended 393,896.93
leaving a balance on hand      $3,272.48
Medical Staff
Our Senior  Medical    officer,    Dr.
George K. MacNaughton, assisted by
Dr. E. R. Hicks has given every satisfaction,
Alexander Ward
No repairs were found neveccary
to this ward during the past year.
Cemetery
The only work found necessary in
connection  with  the  cemetery  ware
repairs to fences and roads.
Hospital Agreement
The  services   rendered   under  the
agreement with the Directors of the
Cumberland  General    Hospital    has
y
/ U L Y~~
Sale Bargains
$6.50
Until tiie end of July, only a few days left, in which to
take advantage of our BIG SALE REDUCTIONS.
The opportunity is yours. '.
Below are only a few of the   MARKED DOWN
Prices:
Mens Genuine Panama Hats
Regular $9.50.   Sale price	
Mens and Boys Caps from 50 cents to $1.75—a reduction of from 25 to 50 per cent off.
Mens work Shirts CkfUtt.       <£ 1   OP*
Sale Prices t/llCj     *J)l\.£lO
Boys Khaki Bib Overalls. d»-j   IA
Regular, $1.50. Sale Price     «pl.lV
Mens Khaki Pants. Sale price   $1.95
Mens Fine and Heavy Work Sox, 25 cents per pair.
Mens Heavy Police Braces, regular 75 cents, now 50
cents pair. *
Boj's Braces per pair 25c and 35c
Boys Summer Jerseys, Navy Blue trimmed Red. On
sale for  50c
Ladies' All Wool Pullover Sweaters, reg. $4.50. Sale
" price   $2.75
All Wool Bathing Suit for Ladies and Men. Only a few
left at $3.95
Childrens Hose from 15 cents a pair.
Ladies Summer Vests. Regular 75 cents, now 50c
Ladies' Hose at 25c, 35c and 50 cents a pair.
See Our Tables for Bargains in other lines, they will
save you money.
SHOE DEPARTMENT—
The immense reductions made in our Shoe Stock
for our July Sale Still holds good.—We can save
you money on your Shoe purchases.
Frank Partridge
MODEL CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
Cumberland, B. C.
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
carries passenger insurance, Co nnects with all stage
lines and C. P. R. Boats.
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
CUMBERLAND—COURTENAY AND NANAIMO
"SAFETY FIRST"
STAGE LINE
Cumberland--Courtenay
and Nanaimo
Ask for "Bill Hyde"
Phone 9 Courtenay or 13 Nanaimo
Leaves Cumberland every morning for points
South at 8.20 a.m. returning, arrives 5.40 p.m.
-TIME TABLE
Leave Arrive
8.00  Courtenay  6.00
8.20 Cumberland 5.40
8.35 Royston 5.25
9.00  Union Bay  5.00
9.10  C. Johnson's  4.50
9.30  Grant's Camp 4.30
9.40  Robert Dollar 4.20
9.45 S. A. Lumber 4.15
10.00 Bowser 4.00
10.25 Dashwood 3.36
10.35  Log Cabin .'. 3.25
10.45    Parksville    3.15
11.25  Straits L. C 2.35
11.45  Wellington  2.15
12.00  Nanaimo  2.00
been all that could be desired   and
satisfactory to all concerned.
I am sorry that we have been unable to live up to our part ot the
contract on account of the reduction
in our revenue caused b ythe reduced
staff of employees, and to set our finances in order. The Directors ot the
Cumberland General Hospital agreed
to deduct three thousand dollars from
the amount we promised to pay.
■Taking everything into consideration the depression In the Coal trade
the reduction in the numbers of employees, the financial condition of the
fund Is a credit to the members of
the Medical Board, and with the same
careful administration the receipt
tor the fiscal year, ending June, 1924,
should show a similar surplus.
Thanking you for courtesies extended to me, during my term ot office I Beg to submit the annual report tor the fiscal year, ending June
30th,  1923.
JAME   DICK,   Secretary.
NOTICE
Tbe annual meeting of the Medical
and Accident Fund of the employees
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd, Comox Mines, will be held ln
the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland
Literary and Athletic Association on
Saturday, August Uth at 7 p.m.
By Order of the Medical Board.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNO ACT AMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class
to $2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must, occupy claims
for five years and make Improvements
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivation ot at least 5
acres before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate ot
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
ot $360 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than 5 years, and improvements of $10.00 per acre, including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holdhig Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land in conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory improvements
made and residence maintained .on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as homesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
-timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions inolude
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate ot one-halt of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purohase price, Is made.
Pre-Eniptors' Free Grants  Act.
The scope of this Act ls enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended from for one year from the death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion ot the great
war. This privilege is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes are remitted for five
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1914. on account ot payments,
fees or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31. 1920.
Hub-Purchasers ot Crown Lands
Provision made for issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase. Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
must be made by May 1, 1920.
Crailng
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits IB-
sued based on numbers ranged; priority for established owners. Stock-
owners may form Associations foi
range management. Free, or partially free, permits for settlers, campers
or travellers, up to ten head.
Disbursement For Medicines
—Medical Fund
July, 1922—Hygiene Produce
Co $    12.94.
Sept. 1922—National Drug &
Chemical  Co       88.16
Sept. 1922—R. E. Frost, May
Account            66.30
Sept. 1922—R. E. Frost, June
Account            78.86
Sept. 1922—Freight on Drugs 7.95
Oct. 1922—R. E. Frost, July,
August and  Sept.  accts     202.45
Oct. 1922—Park Davis & Co. 211.70'
Oct.   1922—National  Drug  &
Chemical  Co     257.61
Nov. 1922—J. Larrigan—Refund acct. paid R. E. Frost 4.00
Nov,  1922—National  Drug &
Chemical Co.       18.61
Nov.  1922—National  Drug &
Chemical  Co        7.98
Dec.  1922—R. E. Frost. Oct.
and Nov. accts      81.35
Dec.  1922—National Drug £
Chemical  Co     144.12
Dec. 1922—Freight on Drugs 3.75
Feb. 1923—R. E. Frost, Dec.
Jan. and Feb. accts      116.00
Feb.  1923—National  Drag &
Chemical Co     209.H8
Feb. 1923—Cassldy's Limited 58.711
Feb. 1923—Chandler & Fisher 24.84
March     1923—Freight       on
Drags            17.51)'
March 1923—B.C. Pharm. Co. 23.13
April,      1923—Lang's    Drag
Store           198.21
May. 1923—Park Davis & Co.      35.4t;
TOTAL    ..: $1,859.37
March, 1923—
Refund,  Specialists'    Fees
paid by S. Fraser   114.70
Dr. R. E. McKechnie   10!00
Dr. C. W. Proud   100.00
Dr. Robt. Crosby    197.00
April,  1923—
Dr. R. B. Boucher   170.00
May, 1923—
Drs. Gillies & Gillies   300.00
Dr. F. B. Anthony   85.00
TOTAL      $1,967.70
..$    20.50
38.55
10.00
74.75
Hospital Nursing
July, 1922—
Vane. Gen.  Hospital
October, 1922—
Vane.  Gen.  Hospital
Vane.  Gen. Hospital
November, 1922—
Vane. Gen. Hospital
Vane. Gen. Hospital       20.00
Vane. Gen. Hospital         7.50
February, 1923—
Vane. Gen. Hospital        57.70
Vane. Gen. Hospital        62.75
St.  Paul'B  Hospital         13.50
March, 1923—
Vane.  Gen.  Hospital         87.25
April, 1923—
Vane. Gen. Hospital      202.75
TOTAL      $   595.25
Cumberland Hospital
July,   1922    .-. $1,000.00
August,   1922     1,000.00
September, 1922   1,000.00
October,  1922   _....  1,000.00
November, 1922   1.000.00
March, 1923   2.000.00
May,   1923        650.00
June,   1923        650.00
June.  1923      650.00
Special Nursing
July, 1922—
Mrs. -J. Whyley 	
November,  1922—
Miss H. Reese    	
MrB. J. Whyley 	
Mrs. G. J. Richardson 	
j    Mrs. W. Maxwell 	
j January, 1923—
Miss A. E. Armstrong 	
March, 1923—
Miss W. A. Bellhouse 	
'<■ April, 1923—
Mrs. J. Whyley 	
$    25.50
18.00
4.50
7.60
1.50
26.00
12.50
1.00
TOTAL      $   104.50
TOTAL
..$8,950.00
Donations
October.  1922—
H.  Wright 	
A. Colman   	
January, 1923—
A.   Colman   	
June, 1923—
J. Crawford 	
200.00
10.00 i
25.00
TOTAL      $   240.00
Attendance Allowances to Board
Members
July, 1922      $
August, 1922    	
September, 1922  	
October, 1922   	
November, 1922   	
December, 1922        	
January,  1923     	
February, 1923    	
March, 1923	
Aprils 1923           24.00
Ma>,1928          28.00
June, 1923           24.00
TOTAL       $   324.00
22.00
26.00
44.00
30.00
32.00
26.00
22.00
20.00
26.00
Specialists' Fees
July, 1922—
Dr. R. B. Boucher  $ 5.00
Dr. R. E. McKechnie   25.00 j                           »	
Dr. r. b. Boucher  75.oo i   Miscellaneous Disbursements
Dr. R. B. Boucher   35.00 | juiy, 1922—
Dr. R. B. Boucher   115.00 |     Secretary's  Salary  ....
Dr.   R.  B.  Boucher    105.00 j    car Hire, Union Bay
:f..oo
5.00
August,   1922—
Dr. H. W. Rlgga      125.00
Dr.   Robt.  Crosby          8.00
Dr.   Robt. Crosby           8.00
Dr.  Robt. Crosby       150.00
September, 1922—
Dr. M. J. Keyes 	
Dr. F. P. Patterson	
October, 1922—
Dr. William S. Rice 	
Dr. R. B. Boucher	
Dr. W. A. Whitelaw 	
November, 1922—
Dr„ A. H. Saunders      100.00
10.00
10.00
30.00
~ 5.00
5.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
Drs. Gillies & Gillies
Drs. Gillies b Gillies
Dr. C. H. Brooman 	
December. 1922—
Dr. R. B. Boucher        82.00
January. 1923—
Dr. Ii. B. Boucher          8.00
Dr. R. B. Boucher      105.00
August, 1922—
Secretary's  Salary    25.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   10.00
September, 1922—
Secretary's  Salary    26.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   5.00
B. C. Telephone Co  6.70
Cumberland   Islander     66.15
October, 1922—
Secretary's  Salary    25.00
Henry Blrks & Sons Ltd  45.43
Cumberland & Union  Water Works   4.00
B. C. Telephone Co  11.10
Car Hire, Union Bay ........ 5.00
November, 1922—
Secretary's  Salary    25.00
Car Hire, Union  Bay    5.00
December, 1922—
"Secretary's  Salary    25.00
B. C. Telephone Co  5.55
ljgigjajaigicjijgjgisiasj^^
You Will Have To Hurry
if you want your share of the bargains in   Tennis
Shoes that are being sold at Cavin's Shoe Store.
Prices still further reduced-
Boys Black Sneakers, sizes 1—5    $1.35
Boys Brown Sneakers, sizes 1—5  1.50
Boys Brown Boy Scout Sneakers, sizes 1—5 ... 1.50
Youths Black Sneakers, sizes 11—13  1.25
Youths Brown Sneakers, sizes 11—13   1.25
Childs Black Sneakers sizes 5—10"/2   1.00
Child Brown Sandals, sizes 5—101/.   I-00
We will sell for cost any -lines of tennis we have
left.
Ladies; we have four lines of high grade shoes
every pair welted. Black and Brown 1 line, 2 strap, 2
lines colonial style with baby Louis Heels, and 1 line
of nice two tone sport Oxfords — which we will sell
for $5.75.
These are without doubt the best value ever offered in this town.
Cavin's Shoe Store
Anything Wrong Your Money Back
January, 1923—
Secretary's  Salary    25.00
Cumb.    &    Union    Water
Works      3.00
Cumberland Islander      ' 31.50
Car Hire, Union  Bay   5.00
February,   1923—
Secretary's  Salary    25.00
B. C. Telephone Co  25.20
Car Hire, Union Bay   5.00
Car Hire, Union  Bay   5.00
March, 1923—
Car Hire, Union Bay   5.00
Secretary's Salary     15.00
April, 1923—
Secretary's Salary     15.00
J. Sutherland, New  Blinds 16.70
W. Gordon     " .30
May. 1923—
Secretary's Salary     15.00
June, 1923—
Secretary's Salary     15.00
Car Hire, Union Bay   5.00
C. H. Tarbell   1.45
Cumberland & Union Water
Works    5.00
Cumberland  Islander   11.00
Secretary's Salary     15.00
Car Hire. Union Bay   5.00
TOTAL     $ 568.08
Alterations to Surgery
December, 1922—
Proportion to Can.  Collieries   (D.)   Ltd     961.13
January, 1923—
Proportion  to Can. Collieries   (D.)   Ltd       10.20
February, 1923—
Proportion to Can. Collieries (D.) Ltd y       42.90
TOTAL      $1,014.23
Repairs to Cemetery
April, 1923—
William Brown          26.00
Paid Medical Officer
June 11 to June 30, 1922 ....$1,047.40
July 1 tp August 5. 1922   1,042.45
Aug. 6 to Sept. 2, 1922   1,180.23
Sept. 3 to Sept. 30, 1922   1,109.68
Oct. 1 to Oct. 28, 1922   1,108.84
Oct. 29 to Nov. 25, 1922   1,043.98
Nov. 26 to Dec. 23, 1922   1,054.50
Dec. 24 to Jan. 21, 1923   1,011.29
Jan. 22 to Febr. 17, 1923   840.76
Febr. 18 to March 17, 1923 .... 729.54
March 18 to April 14, 1923 .... 792.13
April 15 to May 12, 1923   799.64
May 13 to June 9, 1923   656.86
TOTAL      $12,417.30
Summary 1922—23 Receipts
June 11 to June 30, 1922—
Payroll Collections     $2,291.84
July 1 to August 5, 1922—
Payroll Collections      2,263.90
Sale of Plot, Cemetery          6.00
August 6 to Sept. 2. 1922—
Payroll Collections      2.624.74
Sept. 3 to Sept. 30, 1922—
Payroll Collections      2,470.14
Sale of Plot, Cemetery .... 5.00
Oct. 1 to Oct. 28, 1922—
Payroll Collections      2,479.39
Oct. 29 to Nov. 25, 1922—
Payroll Collections       2,327.20
Sale of Plot, Cemetery ......      10.00
Nov. 26 to Dec. 23, 1922—
Payroll Collections      2,338.70
Dec. 24 to Jan. 21. 1923—
Payroll Collections       2,248.51
Jan. 22 to Febr. 17, 1923—
Payroll Collections      1,864.88
Febr. 18 to March 17, 1923—
Payroll  Collections     1,619.35
March 18 to April 14. 1923—
Payroll Collections      1,735.44
April 15 to May 12, 1923—
Payroll   Collections     1.776.77
May 12 to June 9,1923—
Payroll Collections      1,640.62
Sale of Plot. Cemetery       10.00
TOTAL      $27,711.51
Summary, Financial Statements
July, 1922—
To  Balance    ..: $ 3,569.32
Collections      27,681.52
Sale of Cemetery Plots          30.00
Interest on  Savings Acct.        08.07
TOTAL      $31,338,111
Respectfully submitted.
JAMES   DICK,   Secretary.
Cumberland, B. C. June 30th, 1923.
Medical Officer     $12,417.30
Cumberland   Hospital     8,950.00
Miscellaneous   Dlsburscm.   .. 568.08
Attendance   Allowances   to
Board Members      324.00
Specialists' Fees      1.967.70
Special Nursing      101.50
Hosp.   Specialists'   Patients 595.25
Medicines      1,859.3"
Donations      240.00
Alterations to Surgery   1,014.23
Repairs to Cemetery  ... 26.00
Bal. Current Account    951.81
Bnl. Savings Account      2,320.64
TOTAL     $31,338.91
Balance      $ 3,272.48
Approved Finance Committee.
P.  McNIVEN
H. WALKER
M.   McADAM
ED.  NAVEY TEN
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JULY 28th, 1923
GOSSARD Corsets
are designed for
every type ol figure.
Because there are
many Gossard models
especially designed
to fit your very own
figure, you 'frill never
have that tied-in,
pinched-together look,
that "corseted look"
that is just as fatally
ageing as its sagging
uncorseted reverse.
Understanding your type ii one of give you the proper proportions of the
thc most important aids to beauty you type to which you belong.   Gossards
will ever find.   Remember that what- are moderately priced, launder beauti-
ever your figure may be there are fully, will outwear two or even three
Gossard Corsets with just the support ordinary corsets and will give you s
you need at your age and weight to comfort auchaa you never knew before.
Gossard trade marked Corsets as low in price as 22.50
NEW   SILKS
We have just received a shipment direct from London,
England of some very smart Silks.
Shot Mousiline in Light and Dark shades of blue 36
inches wide, these are really beautiful, and will make
a dainty dress. (fin QC.
Price per yard        *p£it*jD
Shantung Silk in the newest Tut designs colors fully
guaranteed. Wide width. (fin ff A
Price        tP«£ •OU
Natural Spun Silk in shades of Cream. Helio and Nat-
tural. Wide width. (fi-t   PA
Price, per yard       tpJL««JU
Brocaded Spun Silk nothing newer, only two shades
white and pale blue, washes beautifully. (fit) PA
Price     *PU .01/
Canton Crepe in three designs, bought at a Bargain price, and you will be given the benefit (fi-t Apr
Price per yard     «J)x»t/<J'
New Ratines in subdued colorings. Every color in this
lot is guaranteed fast. (fi-t   PA
Price per yard     «P-l-»tlU
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
Before Buying Your
Building Material
Phone, or write us for quotations
OUR SERVICE TO YOU
We will gladly assist you in planning any building you have in mind, also tell you the amount of Material you will require for the job.
Express Delivery Anywhere
Prompt Attention to All Orders
EDWARDS & ORR
Phone 17
COURTENAY, B. C.
P. 0. Box 62
RETURNED SOLDIERS'
INSURANCE
The Secretary,
Great War Veterans' Association.
Dear Sir:—
It Is desired to Invite your attention to the fact that September 1st
of this year is the last date upon
which applications for Insurance under the Returned Soldiers' Insurance
Act can be accepted. The Act defl-
nltely provides for expiration of the
privilege of Insurance on September
1st and the period cunnot now be extended.
Your co-operation Ib requested In
bringing this Information to the attention nf members of your branch
as no doubt a number of them will desire to take out Insurance while it
Is still available. I nra enclosing you
herewith copy of a poster which It Ia
requested that you have displayed In
your club rooms. Detailed information and application forms con be obtained at any local office of the Department, or will be sent directly
from this office on request.
Your attention Is Invited particularly to the fact that this Insurance is
available entirely without medical
examination, except In cases where
the applicant Is seriously 111. An impression 1h known to be prevalent to
Ihe effect that recent amendments
to thc Act debar all persons not physically lit. This Impression Is most
Incorrect. Insurance le being granted dally under tho Act on the lives of
individuals who could not under any
circumstances be accepted for insurance by ordinary companies. The
recent amendments to the Act eliminate only those who are in a very
serious state of health.
Insurance is granted under the
Act in amounts from (500 to 15,000
Policies are available on standard
plans including, Whole Lite, 20 Payment Life, Payable to age 65, etc. and
the premiums are lower than those
charged elsewhere for similar policies.
It additional copies of the enclosed
poster, or other printed matter, are
required they will be forwarded immediately upon request.
Yours faithfully,
C. B. TOPP,
For Director of Administration.
B. C. JUNIOR
FOOTBALL ASSOC.
5784 Fraser Street, Vancouver, B. C.
July,  22nd,   1923.
The Sporting Editor
Cumberland Islander.
Dear Sir:—
I should esteem It a favour if you
will kindly intimate through your
columns that registration forms for
season 1923-24 are now available tor
affiliated clubs to re-sign their present players. After July 3rd, all play-
era are free agents to sign for any
club who desires their services. These
forms are obtainable trom me at 10
cents each.
Local Briefs
Mrs. T. Lewis and daughter Muriel Bpent the week-end with Mr. and
Mra. W. Williams, of Bevan, returning to Nanaimo on Wednesday.
Mr. Thomas Oraham and Mr. J. M.
Savage left tor Nanaimo and Victoria on Thursday.
Mr. M. Tappella of California, who
has been spending the last two weeks
with his parents, left on Monday last.
Miss Ethel, Mra, Everfleld and son
of Victoria, are the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. D. Hunden.
Mrs.  Mc. Mutrie  ot Ladysmlth  is
visiting Mrs. W. Harrison.
Miss M. Bannerman left on Friday
last for Vancouver, to spend two or
three  weeks' vacation.
Mrs. A. Gntz and her sister, Miss
Helen Reese, left last week-end for
Seattle, to spend a short vacation.
Mrs. Ernest Horwood and daughter
Marjorie of Victoria, Mrs. Fred Bell
and daughter of Nanaimo were guests
of Mrs. Sidney Horwood last week.
A. F. Haegelstetn arrived last Saturday and ls the guest of H. Roy at
Royston.
R. E. Frost, who sold out his Drug
Store iu this City a little over four
months ago has purchased a similar
business at Ventura, California. Thc
numerous friends of Mr. and Mrs.
R. E. Frost will wish them every
success in the State of California.
Miss Annie Haywood, returned on
Saturday last, from a two weeks vocation to Seattle and Vancouver.
Mr. Colvllle Graham left for Victoria on Monday and returned on
Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Carey motored to Victoria on Monday and returned on Thursday.
Mr, and Mrs. C. E. Thomas arrived
ln town on Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. William Richards of
Extension arrived tn town on Friday and returned on Sunday.
Mr. Andrew Thompson left for Victoria on Monday and returned on
Tuesday.
Mr. A. S. Jones returned from Victoria on Tuesday.
Last Monday morning a small roof
Are was noticed on the residence of
W. M. Graham, of the camp. An alarm
turned in brought the brigade out in
record time, who soon had the blaze
under control, a few dollars damage
was done to the roof.
Mr. A. J. Merry, has now received
a full quota for his Drum and Fife
Band, thirty-two boys having enrolled
A few Instruments have arrived and
the boys are all making favorable progress.
Mayor C. H, Parnham received an
invitation to attend the luncheon, in
Vancouver, July 26th In honor of the
visit of President Harding.
Mr. R. Strachan, jun. has secured
employment with Campbell Bros, and
will take up his duties the beginning
of the week.
Messrs. S. Henderson and H. Tarr,
who left two months ago on one of the
government marine boats for the orient have arrived back in town.
Mr. R. Hassell met with a painful
accident while at his work on Tuesday laBt, when a chain broke, striking him in tbe face, cutting him severely and breaking his nose.
Born—To Mr. and Mrs. J. Damonte,
Tuesday, July 24th, a son.
Mr. and Mra. F. Dallos and daughter, accompanied by Miss Sehl of the
hospital nursing staff, returned on
Thursday after a three week's motor
tour in California. The party were
Joined at Portland hy Mr. Joe Dallos. '
The Fraser River Logging Co. are
holding their Annual Picnic at Oyster River Beach (today) Saturday.
FOR SALE
12 ACRES, ROYSTON ROAD, SOME
cleared,^ 2 wells, Barn partly built,
16x36, also small out-houses $800.00.
Apply Wm. Devoy, No. 22 Camp or
Box 519 Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart ot Victoria
arrived ln town on Thursday and are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. T. Carey.
Mr. R. McLean, Vice-President ot
District No. 18 A. M. W. of A. also
Mrs. McLean and family of Seattle
arrived on Saturday.
Harry Thompsett who has been
acting Government Liquor Vendor in
this City during the past week left
for Duncan on Thursday.
Mr. Robert Thomson, Government
Liquor Vendor and Mrs. Thomson
returned from a ten day vacation on
Wednesday having visited Crotton,
Vancouver and Victoria.
J. W. Dormald and several men arrived on Monday and commenced
work on renovating the inside and
repairing the Cumberland Post Office. They will reconstruct the
walls that fell down a year ago and
lay new floors and other needed repairs. '
Postage stamps only are to be
used on cheques after the Ilrst of
October 1923.
On and after August the First one
dollar Ib the maximum amount of
tax payable on cheques. Excise stamp
can be secured from the Collector of
Customs.
Morton H. Graham of the University Military school of Victoria, son
of Mr. and Mra. Thomas Graham of
this City was successful in the recent
McGlll University matriculation examinations.
Before they were married she
used to read poetry to him. Now she
reads the riot act.
HOEING HIS
GARDEN WHILE
HOLOCAUST RAGED
North Bay, Ontario.—Three settlers ln the vicinity of North Bay have
been prosecuted by Ontario forestry
officials because ot negligence with
regard to ilre and. in each case, con-,
viction was secured before Magistrate
McOaughey at North Bay when the
charges were heard. In one case,
Fire Ranger Garvin swore that he j
had found a settler calmly hoeing his !
garden while a Are was getting a good
Btart in a nearby forest. The lire
burned for 13 days before it could be
extinguished and the services of no
less than 42 men were required for
lire-lighting work during that period. The accused was charged with
neglecting to report the Are and a
fine was Imposed, with costs.
Two settlers at ,Widdifield were
charged with setting fires without a
permit. Serious damage was prevented in both o ftheae instances but
convictions were registered and
Ones were imposed along with costs.
The manner in which a Mate can
take hold ot wooded country, even ln
the proximity of cleared sections, Is
indicated in the first case mentioned.
Valuable timber waB being destroyed
for a period of practically two weeks
and 42 men were called from regular
occupations to fight the menace at
the taxpayer's expense.
SLATS' DIARY
By Robs Farquhar
Thanking you in anticipation,
I am yours truly,
H. J. EDWARDS,
Sec. J. F, A.
Friday—Ma and pa has al ways
taut me that to borry Money was a
bad habit to accumllate.
But I hare cum to the
decision tbat lt alnt a
Habit a tall. I went and
tryed by best to borry
a dime all day. and I
bave found ont that If
you borry enny money
It issent a habit. It Is a
unfourseen Accident.
Sat.—Pa got tn bad
as usual then a lady
cum and called on ub
tonite. She ways about
S hundderd lbs. and la
pritty tat and she is
trying to reduse ao she
wont be bo nervy and she ast pa did
he reely think she was Fat and pa
sed No I woodent say you was fat
but that you was wonderfly upholstered. She diddent act like Bhe liked
lt for the Rest of the evning very
much and now I hear ma tawking to
pa ft he dussent answer so I no what
In a going on.
Sunday—I think sumbuddy better
take Ant Emmy and learn her what
modren wirds means Etc. Up Ull today she never new but what the Ml-
shunary movement was sum kind of
a new Jati dance of sum kind a rather.
Specials for the Week
Fresh shipment of North West Biscuits, just arrived.
Graham Wafers 25c per lb., 2 lbs. for 45c
6 lb. boxes Graham Wafers, per box $1.25
Chrup Ginger Snaps 20c lb. 2 lbs. for 85c
Sodas Pkgs. plain or salted 25c, 2 for 45c
7 lb. boxes Sodas, per box   $1.00
6 lb. boxes Honey Biscuits assorted per box $1.35
Fancy Biscuits Mixed per lb 50c
4 lb. tins Raspberry and Strawberry Jam, each .... 95c
Potted Meats 10c tin, 3 for  25c
Potted Meats, 15c tin, 2 for 25c
Sliced Singapore Pineapple 25c tin, 5 for $1.00
Quaker Pork and Beans, Extra Special, 4 sizes lOe
15c, 20c and 30c per tin..
Catsup, Sweet Relish or Marmelade, per bottle .... 35c
Special each 25e
Libby's Pickles
Sweet Gerkins, Sweet Mixed, Sour Mixed, Sweet Chow
Sour Chow, Sweet Relish and White Onions 1>5c
3 for    85c
Je'ly Powder, assorted, 6 pkg. for 55c
Sardines, 3 tins for  25c
Corn Flakes, 2 pkg. for 25c
Matches 40c pkg. 2 for  75c
Matches large box 15c each 3 for 40c
Royal Crown Cleanser, 2 tins for 25c
Pink Salmon flats, 2 tins for 25c
Pink Salmon tails, 25c tin, 2 for * 45c
Juicy Oranges, 25c dozen 4 doz. for 95c
35c dozen, 3 doz. for $1.00
Full Stock of
Fresh Fruits and Vegetable arriving daily.
Leave your order for preserving Apricots.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Used Cars
CHALMERS 7 PASSENGER TOURING
This is a great bargain and would make an excellent stage car. It has good top and curtains, good
tires, is repainted and in very good mechanical shape.
Only—
$550
We have several other good used cars, priced to
sell quickly.
These include two FORDS and two CHEVROL-
ETS, all in A 1 shape.
Easy terms can be arranged.
We have Best Values in Used Cars.
Blunt & Ewart Ltd.
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone 61
Phone 61
Monday—I had planned to go a
fishing this morning but ma had a
diffrunt object In her view point. She
thot it wood be a good time to hoe
the potatoes and onyans and etc. It
seems like aa if the garden wlrk and
the llshln Bcason all ways seems to
meet each another Just xactly where
I happen to be at.
Teusday—Mrs. Heston told ma she
was in a Dlllemma last nite and I ast
ma what did she mean and ma re-
plyer and sed that ever since they
got there new car she was all ways
bragging because she new we only
got a 2th hand ford to ride In,
Wensday—I aat pa If he diddent
wish sum good harted old uncle wood
die and leave him a lot of money and
he sed Well my boy I wood just as
leaf em It my own self for I have
noticed that them witch gets there
money by heredity must usually alt
ways dont keep lt very long,
Thirsday—Pa ast Jim Tollman
what he Realised frum the sale of
his house when he sold lt and he sed
be realised what a dern fool he wu
for selling It. When he tryed to by a
nother 1.
REDUCED RAILWAY
FARES FOR THE
VANCOUVER EXHIBITION
Word has been received from the
Canadian Passenger Association advising the Exhibition Officials that
reduced Railway Fares will be in
force for visitors to the Exhibition and
will be placed on sale from August
9th to 17th, the return limit being
August 20th. The ratcH will be a
single fare and a third for a return
fare ticket. These rates coupled with
an extensive publicity programme
will undoubtedly attract many visitors to Vancouver during Fair week.
RABBITS GALORE
Rabbit Fanciers in the Province are
showing great Interest lu the coming
Exhibition, Already numerous entries have arrived at the Exhibition
Offices and some very fine specimens
are Included among these. The entry
fee for this class is only 25c. Those
wishing to make entries are requested to do to at once, •
SSSBI

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