BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Oct 23, 1920

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0070712.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070712.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0070712-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0070712-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0070712-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0070712-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0070712-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0070712-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0070712-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0070712.ris

Full Text

Array t%
Provincial Library
HI
.9.
■Lilt]
r4A«t.v>
-   'V
9h -, -C\ 4
cuMMrland islander (6
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 43.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATt'RDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1920.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Mrs. Hassell Has
Serious Accident
Receives Full Gun Shot in Her
Arm While Out Hunting
With Mr. Hassell.
Mrs. W. G. Hassell, of Cumberland,
met with a serious accident on Sunday
morning last while out hunting with
her husband, near Cook Creek. While
climbing a hill her gun accldently
went off, the whole of the charge entering her arm near the shoulder. Notwithstanding the distressing pain and
shock, Mrs. Hassell, wtth the aid ot
Mr. Hassell and Mr. Larrlgan, who was
one of the party, managed to walk a
mile and a half to their car. This was
immediately rushed to the Cumberland
Hospital, where Dr. MacNaughton and
Dr. Hicks attended the wounded lady,
At the time of going to press Mrs.
Hassell ls progressing very satisfactorily, her splendid physical condition
adding greatly to her chances of recovery. Unless complications set ln
Mrs. Hassell should not suffer any
serious permanent disability.
BIG GATHERING AT
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
Men's Club of Holy Trinity Held
Very Enjoyable Affair on
Thursday Evening.
Upwards of one hundred people took
"part in the whist drive and dance held
under .the auspices of the Holy Trinity
Men's Club on Thursday evening In the
Parish Hall. Nineteen -tables were engaged at whist, which lasted until 10
o'clock, when refreshments were
served. Mrs. Cronk' won the ladies'
first prize, a silver fruit spoon, while
Miss Campbell won the consolation
prize, a more-or-less dressed dinky
little kewpie. ln the gent's lists Mr.
Ben H. Gowen won the first prize, a
flashlight, and Mr. Knappen of Bevan
the consolation.
After refreshments were served the
floor was cleared and dancing indulged
In until midnight. The affair was the
most enjoyable held this season, and
the club Intends to hold these socials
frequently during the winter.
Mrs. R. E. Frost presided at the
piano during the, dancing, while Mr.
Val Dalby was master of ceremonies.
Champions Play
Granby Tomorrow
Cumberland United wlll receive a
visit from Granby United tomorrow,
and given fine weather a good game
should be witnessed. Thc Cumberland
team is now playing better than ever,
aud as the Granby management has
been scouting for new players, and
signed ou one or two, It Is expected
that Cumberland boys will have to
step some to annex the full quota of
points. The local luauagenient Is hoping for good weuther tomorrow, as
the lost three games huve been played
under very wet conditions. Consequently the takings at the gute have
suffered considerably. All fans should
make a point of attending tills game
and contributing freely to the collection.   The game starts at 2.30 prompt.
The Cumberland team wlll be composed of: Goal, Clark; backs, Strang
and Campbell; half-backs, Irvine,
Conti, Smith; forwards, Wylle, Nicol.
James, Boothman, Home; reserves,
Bannerman, Brown, Carle and Harrison.   D. Wilson, manager.
NANAIMO TEAMS PLAY
IN A FIELD OF MUD
G. W. V. A. MASQUERADE
BALL NOVEMBER 11TH
The local branch of the Great War
Veterans Association will hold a big
masquerade ball ln the Ilo-llo dance
hall on the evening of November 11th,
Armistice Day.
Band Concert
Sunday Night
The first of the winter series of Sunday evening band concerts to be given
by the Cumberland City Band will be
held in the Ilo-llo Theatre tomorrow
evening, commencing at 8.15, under the
direction of Mr. P. Monte.
The programme Is as follows:
"God Save the King."
Overture, "Sweet Old Songs."
Song (selected), Mrs. J. Baird, accompanied by Mr. J. Baird.
Waltz, "Grace and Beauty."
Selection, "Sweet English Songs.*
Song, "Asleep in the Deep," Mr. Geo.
Ramsell.
Selection, "II Trovatore."
Serenade, "Night in June."
March, "Jubilant."
NANAIMO.—In pouring rain and a
held of mud like the Nile Valley when
the big river overflows Its banks, Nanaimo City and Nanaimo United
plucklly played out their full time in
the Up-Island League match Sunday
afternoon. The City took three and
United two, all goals being scored in
the second half.
Granny Defeated Ladysmith.
Ladysmith's ardor was dampened by
both weather and score at Granby,
losing by two goals to nil.
Correspondence
TO THE SPORTING PUBLIC
Ladles and Gentlemen—
For several obvious reasons the
schedule of the Upper Island Football
Association has to be carried out on a
Sunday. One reason is, that to carry
the schedule out on n Saturday afternoon would mean that the visiting
teams would have to lose a day's work
on that day ln order to make the trip.
Tt would also mean that the supporters of the team would also have to
lose time, because owing to the shortening of the days, tire games of necessity must be commenced between the
hours of two and three o'clock. The
men on morning shifts who would like
to enjoy the privilege of witnessing the
play would either have to quit early
or lay off, thus disorganizing the system tn the various departments ln
which they are employed.
Now, we are not in a position to
charge an admission fee to the grounds
on a Sunday, therefore wo have to depend entirely on the goodness of heart
of the friends who attend. We have a
number of downright good sports who
come to see the game. Our definition
of the word "sports" ln this respect is
those who dig down and help us te
carry on. Money is the root of all
evil, but still we would like to see more
of It on the tables at the ball game.
If everybody contributed a sum equal
to the regular admission fee, we would
not be placed under the necessity of
can*jassing thc public for funds. We
need the dough, boys, and need it
darned bad. Our club looks like a
winner again, and If the members feel
that they have the llnancial backing of
the people of Cumberland they'll do
things, you bet.
OBSERVER.
PART OF ROYSTON ROAD
TO BE IMPROVED
As an outcome of the efforts of the Cumberland Board of. Trade,
a small portion of the Royston Road, which is in a very bad state
of repair, will likely be put in a better condition in the near future.
The engineer's reply states that the work contemplated only extends from the Company's Farm to the city. From the farm right
down to Royston the road is in a very bad condition, and for a
road which has such heavy traffic is a disgrace to those responsible. The engineer would be well advised to make a -trip ovcr this
road and get first hand information.
The reply to the Board of Trade's letter is as follows:
District Engineer's Ofiice, Courtenay. B. C, Oct. 16, 1920.
To the Secretary, Cumberland Board of Trade, Cumberland, B. C.
' Sir,—I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of October 14th.
I am making arrangements for repairs on the Royston Road between the
Company's Farm and the City.
With regard to the proposed Headquarters Road, I am not in a position to
give you any authoritive information. This could be obtained from the Department In •Victoria. It Beeins unlikely, however, that this project will be
attempted this year.
Yours obediently, D. A. RICHARDSON,
Asst. District Engineer.
THREE TO ONE FOR
GOVERNMENT CONTROL
Wednesday's vote under the Temperance Plebiscite Act was a
splendid victory for the moderation cause and a sweeping denunciation of the Prohibition Act. By a majority of nearly 30,000 tiie
citizens of this province cast their ballots to put tlie Prohibition
Act into the discard. Probably the greatest surprise of the day
was the generally heavy vote polled, which throughout the pro
vince amounted to over 125,000. The number for Government
Control, in round figures, numbered 75,000, and for the retention
of the Prohibition Act about 49,000, a clear majority of 26,000,
working out at about 3 to 2.
Cumberland was in the high averages, the vote here being over
three to one in favor of Government Control. Out of 528 valid
votes cast no less than 401 were for Government Control, 127
being, for Prohibition.   There wore two spoiled ballots.
While the vote was comparatively light in the morning in Cumberland, during the afternoon and evening the election officials
were kept busy, despite the wet day. The out-of-town vote was
much larger than was anticipated by the officials, and caused considerable delay at times. Provision for a few only had been made,
so when the number increased the form had to be written out in
each case, necessitating considerable delay, and delaying the
counting of the ballot half-an-hour after closing time.
It will probably be some days yet before the final vote is known
in the Comox district, as the boxes have to come from very distant
points in some cases.
The local officials handling the vote were Mr. John J. Wier,
returning officer, Rev. Geo. Kinney, assistant registrar; Mr. A.
McKinnon, election clerk; Miss J. E. Robertson, assistant clerk;
Mr. A. J. Fouracre, scrutineer for the Prohibition Party, and Mr.
Ben H. Gowen, scrutineer for the Liberty League. Mr. H. G.
McKinnon was district agent for the Liberty League.
There were many humorous incidents during the day, not the
least was the voice of Mr. McKinnon, as clerk, announcing "What's
Your Name?" to people he has probably known for a decade. Sometimes he would vary it by saying, "Good day, Mrs. Brown, what's
your name?"
Honors Divided At
South Wellington
Cumberland Boys Journey Down
to South Wellington in Heavy
Rain for a No-Score Game.
Cumberland visited South Wellington on Sunday last and played the
local men to a draw. The ground was
ln bad shape, and good football was
out of the question. Both teams were
at full strength and Referee Burnip
started them off ln a downpour of
rain.
Cumberland were first to be dangerous, Shepherd having to exert himself
ln clearing a shot from James. Play
waB very', very even in the first half,
both teams striving hard to get a goal,
but without success.
Cumberland had the bulk of the play
In the second portion of the game, and
with better luck should have captured
both points. South Wellington were
seldom over centre field, and only a
strong defense and the condition of
the ground kept the B. C. champions
from scoring.
Ilnrrlson Stuck iu the Hud.
Harrison had bard lines several
times. Once he had thc goal at bis
mercy but was unable to pull himself
out of the mud to put the finishing
touch to the ball. The Cumberland
forwards swarmed around the Soutli
Wellington goal but could not score,
and the game ended with both goals
intact.
South Wellington has a strong
team, especially their defense. Green,
Stobbart and Cameron made a good
half-back line, and did not give much
rope to the champions' front rank.
Cumberland was the better team ou
the day's play, and given a decent day
and a good pitch would have little
difficulty ln getting away with their
opponents. The team as a whole
played hard and consistent and deserved n better fate.
Since the commencement ot the
Upper Island League weather conditions have been of Ihe vilest kind, and
from a llnancial point of view It Is
greatly to be regretted. The football
management has got together one of
the best, if not the best, soccer teams
tbat ever represented Cumberland, but
Formal Opening
Memorial Hall
The formal opening of the G. W. V.
A. Memorial Hall will take place on
Tuesday evening, October 26, at 7.30
o'clock.
AlLreturned men. whether they are
members of the G. W. V. A. or not, aro
cordially Invited to be present.
Among the gentlemen who wlll address tbe gathering are Mr. Thos.
Graham. General Superintendent of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd.; Mr. Charles Graham. District
Superintendent, Mayor D. R. McDonald. Mayor Duncan of Courtenay, and
Mr. W. M. Brown, President of the
Cumberland Branch of Ihe G. W. V. A.
A programme of vocal and instrumental selections is drawn up and
should prove Interesting.
The Cumberland City Band has offered to play at the opening ceremony.
Refreshments will be served by the
Women's Auxiliary of the G. W. V. A.
SALE OF WORK BY
HARMONY REBEKAH
LODGE, WEDNESDAY
A Sale of Work under tbe auspices
of the Harmony Rebekah Lodge will
be held In the Anglican Church Hull
on Wednesday next. Afternoon tea,
home cooking and home-made candy
are features.
CUMBERLAND
CONSERVATIVE
ASSOCIATION
A preliminary meeting of tlie Cumberland Conservative Association was
held In The Islander ofllce on Thursday evening last, at wliieh there was
a good attendance.
A meeting for re-organization purposes will be held In the association's
new offices In the King Building, tn
Wednesday evening next at 8 o'clock
prompt.
owing to adverse conditions the gates
have been very disappointing, and it ls
up to the sporting public at the first
opportunity to show their appreciation
of the efforts of players uird manage,
ment.
Super-Special Attractions Coming to
The Ilo-llo Theatre
Saturday,.Oct. 23—"The Miracle Man" Famous Lasky
Saturday, Oct. 30—"Scarlet Days" Famous Lasky
Saturday, Nov. 6—"In Old Kentucky" First National
Saturday, Nov. 13—"The River's End" First National
Saturday, Nov. 20—"Male and Female" Famous Lasky
Saturday, Nov. 27—"Behind the Door" Famous Lasky
British Empire
Relief Campaign
During the (ireat War the nations of
the world wore divided Into two formidable groups. The thoughts and
feelings ot* mankind then sought clearly defined channels through which to
win victory for their respective sides,
each of which strove for domination.
Iu nations where military operations
are ended great masses of men and
women, released from Ihe tension of
war, have given way to their feelings
of unrest and general disturbance has
resulted, Man's hand is against his
fellowmau. class against class, capital
against labor, handicraftsman against
thinker, all seemingly, engaged In
selfish struggle.
But In the midst ot the dark turmoil
one brilliant ray of human kindness
beams. The League ot Red Cross
Societies, some thirty nations strong
has undertaken the beneficent task of
trying to prevent typhus froni breaking loose on the world and to relieve
Uie want and suffering of the millions
of orphan children of Europe. These,
though Innocent of the causes of war,
have been great sufferers from Its results. Ten millions of them are fatherless, and of that number a large proportion hove lost both parents. When
it Is remembered thut during the years
of war a great number of these children have been Insufficiently nourished,
It can be partly realized how great a
task confronts the League of Red
Cross Societies in its endeavor to repair the damage done by the sad years
of war. At present the great'tasks of
helping the children and of stamping
out devastating disease, which is now
ravaging the poorer populations of
Europe, have been but begun. The
British Empire wlll undertake a large
share in this humane work, and under
the patronage of His Majesty the King
a relief fund has been started for which
appeal will be made throughout the
Empire.
In Canada the arrangements for the
receipt of contributions to the fund are
being made by tbe Canadian Red Cross.
Each Province wlll have charge
of the organization in Its own territory und will cover every locality
through Its local branches. AH who
are Interested In this great work
should get In touch with tho local
brunch of Ihe Canadian Red Cross.
All funds donated for this purpose wlll
be ultimately forwarded to the Canadian Red Cross Headquarters, aud afterwards administered by the British
Empire Relief Fund in co-operation
with the League of Red Cross Societies
Contributions may be ear-marked for
any particular country, territory or
object, such as the relief of children.
In this province the appeal will be
held during the two weeks following
November 25. In other provinces the
appeal will be made during Armistice
Week.
PYTHIAN SISTERS*
MASQUERADE BALL
The masquerade ball to be held on
Monday night under Ihe auspices of
the Pythian Sisters promises to he a
very successful affair, judging by the
amount of Interest taken in if by local
dancing folk. Many valuable prizes
ate offered for hest dressed ladies and
gents and characters, comic and otherwise.
Need of Public
Library In City
Request to Grant Use of Traveling. Library Bring Forth
Good Suggestion.
Replying to u gentleman who wrote
the Travelling Libraries Department at
Victoria for a library to be used In
connection with a local club. Mr.
Herbert Killam, Superintendent of
Travelling Libraries, makes a valuable
suggestion In Informing the inquirer
of the Impossibility of complying with
hla request. The letter Is as follows,
In part:
"Victoria, Oct. 16. 1920.
"I regret that II Is Impossible for the
Travelling Library Department to supply books for use ln Cumberland, for
the Public Libraries Act, passed in
191s. states that the travelling libraries
are to be used for "the unorganized
and sparsely populated districts of the
province." As Cumberland Is an Incorporated city, it ls outside our field
of work.
"We used to lend books in Cumberland, and at various times there have
been Inquiries from Individuals as to
the possibilities of getting books. There
Is evidently a reading public In your
city, but no organized action toward
forming a library. Is there no possibility of the people of your city organizing a Public Library Association,
under the provisions of the Public
Libraries Act, raising what money you
can toward a hook fund, and with that
fund buying a certain number of books
a year as the basis of a permanent collection, and with the remainder getting loans of books from the Victoria
Public Library? This would seem the
simplest and best method of forming
a library. The Victoria Public Library has made agreements with a number of places on Vancouver Island
whereby for a certain Bum paid yearly,
periodical loans of books are made to
communities. Miss H. G. Stewart, the
librarian of that library, wlll gladly
give you further Information. And If
I can be of further use In helping you
organize such an association as I have
mentioned, please command me.
"Yours very truly, • •
"HERBERT  KILLAM,
"Supt. of Travelling Libraries."
Suggested Plan
For Boys' Work
Cominittee Agrees Upon Draft
Plan and Calls Meeting for
Tuesday, November 2
A meeting ot the Commute appointed to formulate a plan for Boys' Work
In Cumberland was held on Friday
night at 8 p.m. In the Council Chamber.
A draft plan was agreed upon, same
to be submitted to a publlc meeting,
which will be held in the Anglican
Church Hall on Tuesday evening,
November 2.
Every ma*n and woman Interested In
boyB' work should seek to reserve this
date anil be present at the meeting.
The committee believe that the plan
proposed will commend itself to the
good sense of all right thinking people
and if put into effect will be of material benefit lo the boys of the town.
COMPROMISE BOAT
SERVICE TO VANCOUVER
Captain Troup, manager of the C. P. R. Steamship Service, informs the Cumberland Board of Trade, in answer to tlie board'*,
communication asking for a continuation of the summer service
between Nanaimo and Vancouver, that the Company is unable to
continue the double boat service during the winter months, bill
in order to in part meet the demands of the residents of this die ■
trict, the C. P. R. has put the Princess Patricia on a new schedule.
This steamer now makes one trip a day each way between Nanaimu
and Vancouver, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and twu
trips each way on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
On the single trip days the steamer will leave Nanaimo at 7 a.m ,
and on the double trip days at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m. The boat will
leave Vancouver at 3 p.m. on single trip days, and at 10 a.m. ami
1.15 p.m. on double trip days.
Captain Troup's letter is as follows:    .
Victoria. B. C, October 19th, 1920.
.1. Walton. Esq., Secretary the Board of Trade, Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir,—Your letter of October 14, addressed Superintendent Boat Services, C.P.R.. Vancouver, has been addressed to me.
I regret to Bay we are unable to continue throughout tho winter the sann
schedule that we used during the summer months, but we have made th!
best arrangement possible under the circumstances. .The SS. Princess
Patricia, for the present, will make two trips per day on Tuesdays. ThiirsriH* ,
and Saturdays, and the SS. Charmer will continue to serve your district from
Vancouver on Wednesdays up and Thursdays down, giving the train connection at Nanaimo both ways.
Yours very truly, J. W. XROUP, Manager.
m Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER      •
6ctober 23, 1926.
COMFORT
is what the whole world wants.   There's some people
who won't take it when offered, they're so skeptical.
THERE'S SOLID COMFORT IN HEATERS
SOLI) HERE
We have them with duplex grates. This is the most
modern type of grate Cor coal.
The flrepot is heavy and is corrugated, to give additional strength.
THERE'S A HEATER HERE FOR EVERY HOUSE.
Call and get yours.
P. 0. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31
We  announce   the  arrival   of
MELBA
CHOCOLATES
"CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ELLYkS
MORE NOTCHES ON (JETTING READY
HEARST'S DEATH TALLY FOR THE CENSUS
Toronto Saturday Night.
IT is an enormous task today for manufacturers of
telephone equipment to maintain an adequate output. They are away behind in their orders, owing
to shortage of workers, raw materials, inefficient transportation and other causes. In the meantime, Central
is supplying service with the means at her disposal.
She is working harder than ever, realizing that the
telephone is a great factor in social and business life.
To her belongs the credit of assuming greater burdens
because of shortage of equipment. When you telephone, think of her and what she is doing.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Thrifty People Patronize
The Corner Store
a-^S/Va*^l^VS^W**»irt*»*\aa*^^a'^WS^a«^a»*^^^^^^^^N^^«^«^^(R^^^a«\^^/*^^^^^«^^^^»»\^^»"
Give us a call and see what we are offering in
SWEATER COATS FOR MEN AND BOYS
$3.00     $3.75     $5.00
Better value you cannot get anywhere.
MEN'S LEATHER GLOVES AND GAUNTLETS
$1.00   $1.50   $2.00   $2.50
These are marked below cost.
S-l***>a*'>'>«**a'******'Na,>*»a«*/S/*.->S/VV*'*a^^
SHOES
OA PER CENT* DISCOUNT ON ALL SHOES FOR
tU\) SATURDAY ONLY.
GROCERIES
SPECIAL TO CLEAR
EGG-0 BAKING POWDER, 5-lb. tins  $1.70
NABOB BAKING POWDER, 5-lb. tins $1.75
CLARK'S AND DAV1ES'  PORK AND BEANS, 7
tins for $1.00
'       W. GORDON
Phone 133  CUMBERLAND
Though it would he, no douht, im
possible to Indict him in court for the
offence, there is little doubt that the
bomb outrage in Wall Street which re
suited In the deaths of thirty or more
men and women, was the work of
William Randolph Hearst. That he is
morally guilty of that wholesale
slaughter is as certain as the known
fact that Hearst was responsible for
the assassination of President Mc
Kinley in 1901, On that occasion it
was clear that tbe wretched Czolgocz
who fired the fatal shot was directly
inspired to do so by the "New York
Journal."
The attacks on McKinley, nineteen
years ago, were mild compared with
those which have lately been published
in the leading Hearst journals iu denunciation of J. Pier pout .Morgan.
Henry Pomeroy Davison. Thomas W.
Lamont. Edward StettlnlUS and others
connected with the Morgan flrm. Before us Is a copy of the Chicago "American" of recent date in which all
these men were charged with con
Bpiraey to hand over the United States
of America to tiie control of Great
Britain, and with spending fabulous
sums to accomplish that end. It was
alleged that not only did the Morgan
iirm receive billions from Great Bri*
tain as her purchasing agent iu the
early stages of the war, but that Mr.
.Morgan and his associates, especially
Mr. Stettiuius, became wholesale profiteers at the expense of the American
people after the United States entered
the war.
Another detail of the alleged con
spiracy was that the United States
were to be bought with money borrowed from themselves. The chief object of Great Britain was stated as
that of evading payment of that enormous debt. As in all Hearst editorials
the suggestion that violence was the
remedy   was  cunningly  intimated.
These charges have been repeated
under a hundred variations in the
many Hearst newspapers that disgrace
leading American cities, and debauch
the minds of ignorant and discontented
readers. Nominally these attacks have
been published in tbe interest of Presidential candidature of Senator Harding, but the desire of Hearst to "get'
Mr, Morgan and his partners was oh
vious. In specific terms they have
beeu partners was obvious. In specific
terms they have been denounced as a
"British firm of bankers" engaged in
wholesale pillage.
Iu connection with this campaign
the League of Nations has been
dragged in as one of the chief agencies
in a plot against humanity. In a recent issue of the Los Angeles "Examiner," the League, of which Mr. La-
mont of the Morgan firm is a strong
advocate, was denounced as a "militaristic league of oppression" which
its sponsors were endeavoring to "impose on the overburdened backs of the
American people." Prance was not
spared, either. France needs American wheat and a protest was made
against letting her have any because
she had "wasted her substance in an
unjust war" and also "in a wretched,
immoral intrigue against the inde-
independence of Russia."
The whole recent policy of the
Hearst publications has been to inflame the Bolshevist elements of the
United States against Great Britain
and France and against the Morgan
firm as capitalists who aro in alliance
wilh them. Again and again it has
been emphasized that the money in the
vaults of Morgan had beeu stolen
from the American people. What wonder then that with daily Inflammatory
appeals of this kind to feed their
their venom a group of anarchists
should have endeavored to bomb the
Morgan buildings? The deaths of the
thirty odd victims enable William
Rondolph Hearst to add so many more
deaths to his long tally of personally
promoted slaughter,
In mosl countries of the world, including Canada, the authorities are
yetting the machinery in order for the
decimilal census of 1921. After it is
over we shall know definitely just
how much ke have grown in ten
years, despite the intervening conflict, and whither tbe channels of increase are tending.
"The Christian Science Monitor" remarks anent the international census
preparations that they bring to the
surface once more the latent dislike
of tbe generality of people to be numbered. "Whu the first bill for taking
a census was brought in by Thomas
['otter, ip 175?., it met with such violent opposition tbat it was nearly fifty
years later that the first census was
accomplished. The general idea was,
nt that time, that it was a means of
judging how much more taxation could
be imposed, and even to this day many
people think it is a sign uf great and
mistaken curiosity, and try in every
way to avoid it. At the present time
the Use of such statistics is specially
valuable, in regard to the housing
question, the number of people actually engaged in various industries, the
population of places both in town and
country, and whether people are Hocking to the towns, or tlie tide is turning
to the country. Sometimes these little
simple facts dispel a vast cloud of
nebulous fancies."
In a country of mixed population
like Canada, it is especially necessary
for ethnological reasons that we should
have accurate statistics as to origins
It is for tbat reason that "Canadian"
is not accepted as complete information
with regard to a man's nationality, any
more than is "American" in the United
States.
NO HOPE.
When grandma's minister decreed
The minuet a revel,
Which, if persisted ill, would lead
Directly to the devil,
Although she hastened to obey,
Her feet she didu't letter;
She knew that waltzing would display
Her ankles better.
When mother's parson aired the view
That hugging and embracing,
Which those who waltz are prone to do,
Is utterly debasing,
She vowed that she would dance no
more
A measure so besotting;
And, her decorum to restore,
She took to trotting.
When dominies of yesterday,
In phrases tense and torrid,
Denounced the trot aa too risque
And trotting folks so horrid,
And solemn resolutions drew,
With horrified whereasing,
Girls saw that trotting wouldn't do,
And fell to jazzing.
And though the jazz may be a crime
(As raorela persons view it),
We know thnt until the end of time
The modern maid will do it.
For while we look on her askance,
We know no way to step 'er,
Because we cannot find a dance
That's more Improper.
The moon was full, the summer
night was balmy, the hammock was
built for two, and it seemed a shame
to break It all up.
"Jack," she asked, "was there a girl
in France who was sorry to see you
go?"
"I'd rather you didn't ask me that
question, dear," be said.
But I must know. We're engaged
and you should tell me everything,"
she Insisted.
Dear, I don't like to talk about It I
PASTE THIS IN YOUR HAT
llKAHST PUBLICATIONS
According to "Who's Who in America," Hearst owns nnd also EDITS the
following dally newspapers:
New York "American."
>'cw York "Evening .Iimrniil.**
New York "Itenlnclies Joiirnnl."
Sun Francisco "Examiner.*'
Los Angeles "Examiner."
Chicago "Examiner."
Atlanta "I'corgliin."
Boston "American."
Boston "Advertiser."
And the following periodicals:
Cosmopolitan Magazine.
Ilciii'st's .Maguzluc.
(iood Housekeeping.
Harper's Magazine.
American Motor Magazine.
American Motor Boating Magazine.
"J" Is always   starting   something
naughty—jealous, jig, jazz aud jail.
"Oh. Jack, how could you when all
the time you were engaged to me?"
"Listen a minute nnd I'll tell you the
whole story," he snld in desperation.
"She was "
"Well?"
"She was my laundress. I owed her
twelve francs."
"While returning from the golf links
Mr.   suddenly became ill and
exploded' immediately."—Exchange.
Big Shoe Values
at this store always obtainable.   Don't pass by the
opportunity to procure stylish,  perfect-fittings long-,
wearing shoes at MONEY-SAVING PRICES.
$7.00
will buy GOODYEAR WELTED BOOTS for Men, both
in Tan and Black—any size.   See our window.
Our Leaders
IIIPRESS WHITE RUBBERS, only   $7.50
CANADIAN WHITE RUBBERS $6.75
LECKIE SCHOOL SHOES FOR BOYS AND YOUTHS
at $5.00 to $6.00
LECKIE PIT SHOES, full chrome, only $8.00
STERLING WORK SHOES, just arrived, $5.75 to $7.50
HIP GUM BOOTS, best grade  $9.50
KNEE GUM BOOTS, best grade $7.50
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
(We Sell Boots and Shoes Only)
Next Door to Waverley Hotel CUMBERLAND
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brandsjthat are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water ^tj&? Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION  BREWING CO.,  LTD
NANAIMO, B.C.
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
633 Hastings St., W., Corner of
Cranvillo.     VANCOUVEK, B.C.
Stiff Joints
Sore Muscles
Smoothed Ou?. By Htsmiln's
Wfzffitf Oil
Soreness and stiffness resulting
from unaccustomed use of muscles
or too much exorcise, such as tennis* baseball, golf, hand-ball, etc.,
give way quickly to tlie soothing
effect of Hamlin's Wizard Oil. It
penetrates fast, drives out the soreness, and limbers up stiff, aching
joints and muscles.
Hamlin's Wizard Oil Is a Rami depend-
iiiric preparation to have in tho momcino
Cheat for flr>t ii id and whon ilu doctor
may   be   far  away.     It   lo  nn   absolutely
retioble -antiseptic application for ruts,
burns, bites and attiiKH. Sprain:) .,n<i
brul«es heal rapidly under Its eoothlnfTi
penetrating -qitalitloB.    Keep It on band
Generous Blzo buttle 35c.
If you are troubled with oonallrjtitio .
or eick headache try Hamlin's VVleard
l.lver Whips', Juat pleasant liulo p.tik
pills at druggliU for 30u,
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE HA II,WAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double.load)...$6.00 October 28,1926.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Three
IRELAND'S CRIME LIST
FOR CURRENT YEAR
Statement Points Out That Few
Perpetratow of Murder Have
Been Apprehended
TO HONOR, $2500;
SENSIBILITY, $500;
REPUTATION, $2000
DUBLIN.—Dublin Castle has given
out a list ot outstanding offences from
January 1 to October 2. It was accompanied by the statement tbat it was "a
significant fact that for all the murders and shootings of policemen, the
number of perpetrators apprehended
could be counted on the fingers of one
hand."        '
"In this fact," the statement adds,
"might be found the motive for reprisals. The authorities cannot get
the men responsible, or, if they do,
they get off through hunger striking,
or clemency of the government. No
one can be found to testify agulnst
them, either through Intimidation on
because of political sentiment."
The list of offences follow:
Court houses destroyed, 63; Royal
Irish Constabulary barracks destroyod,
504; Royal Irish Constabulary barracks damaged, 168; raids on malls,
646; raids on coastguard stations and
lighthouses, 38; raids for arms reported, 2075; pollc'e killed, 109; polico
wounded, 174; soldiers killed, 16;
soldiers wounded, 61; civilians killed,
27. These figures do not Include tho
list of casualties in the Ulster riots lu
July and September.
Sinn Fein's Version.
Coincident with this announcement
the Sinn Fein Irish Bulletin publishes
the details of attacks up to September
30, of which It ls said twelve were captured and two destroyed during fighting, while forty-four successfully resisted attacks. In the twelve barracks
captured, eighty-one police were made
prisoner, disarmed and subsequently
released without injury.
"Seven men alleged to have taken
part In attacks," the Bulletin continues, "were captured, tried by court
martial and sentenced to long prison
terms."
The Bulletin adds that ln addition
two civilians were murdered as a reprisal and the town of Trim was
burned. It asserts that the objects of
attacks on barracks was to secure
arms for Ireland to defend herself.
MONTREAL.—After hearing the evidence in the action taken by Ada
Thurmin. spinster .against James Patterson, widower, for breach of promise
of marriage, in the sum of $5000, Judge
Surveyor reserved Judgment. Miss
Thurmin detailed the $5000 damages
as follows:
Damage to her honor, $2500; to her
sensibility, $500; to her reputation,
$2000. , •
A SERIES OF TALKS ON MUSIC
By PROF. C. C. LAUGHER
Mus. Baa, Sarnia, Ont.
Puppy love is the beginning of a
dog's life.
AJIEHHJAN GIFT OF PICTURESQUE
EXAGGERATION ILLISTIIATEB
"It Is said that American conversation among men tends to degenerate
Into a mere exchange of anecdotes,"
writes Mr. William Archer ln "Observations and Reflections."
"I can remember only one party
who was in the least degree open to
this reproach," ho says; "and there
the anecdotes were without exception
ho good and so admirably told that I,
for one, should have been sorry to exchange them oven for the loftiest discourse on Shakespeare und tho musical glasses.
"Here, for Instance, Is an example
of the American gift of picturesque
exaggeration. On board one of the
Florida steamboats, which have to be
built with exceedingly light to get over
the frequent shallows of the rivers, an
Englishman accosted the captain with
the remark, *I understand, captain, that
you think nothing of steaming across
a meadow where there's been a heavy
fall of dew.' 'Well, I don't know about
that,' replied the captain, 'but It ls
true that we sometimes huve to send
a man ahead with a watering-pot!' Or
take again the story of the southern
colonel who was conducted to the
theatre to see Salvlnl's 'Othello.' He
witnessed the performance gravely,
and remarked at the close, 'That was
a mighty good show, and I don't see
but Unit the coon did as well as any
of 'em."
"A third anecdote that charmed me
on this occasion was that of the man
who, being invited to take a drink,
replied, 'No, no; I solemnly promised
my dear dead mother never to touch
a drop; besides, boys, it's too early
in the morning; besides, I've just had
NO. 1-Ml'SICAl IMPRESSIONS
A violinist writes to a music editor
wanting to know how long it is possible for a man to hold a note. The
editor replies, we have one that we
have held for six years and rather expect to hold it six years longer. It
would be quite difficult to hold a musical note that long, particularly in
playing on a bass instrument.
We are told that an English physician advises tho playing ot wind instruments, as a recent Investigation
has brought this summing up: That
a cornetlst's life averages 69 years;
a claronetlst's life ls 64 years, and because flutists do not require the full
exercise of their lungs in playing,
their average is but 61 yours. He
adds that tn play Borne wind Instrument lengthens life, for the steady
and moderate use of the lungs somewhat In excess of breathing Is the
cause.
We sometimes pause iu considering
the drum as a musical instrument and
we step up to thc drummer ami say to
him (after the hand had stopped playing), "You don't make very good music
with that instrument." No," admitted
the pounder of tho drum, "I know 1
don't, but I drown a heap of bad
music."
The Scotch have a proverb, "Where
McGregor sits, there Is the head of the
table." This brings us to an incident
in Sarah Bernhardt's career when touring the U. S. A. Her manager failed
to secure a proper theatre for her In
a certain Texas city in which she had
promised to appear. With groat reluctance and expecting a contemptuous refusal, he suggested that he
might secure a circus tent, but supposed that she would only act in a
first-class theatre. "Go ahead," said
she, "wherever Sarah Bernhardt acts
ls a ilrst-class theatre."
Speaking of singing, we realize that
the singer's essentials are voice, ear
and musical talent. The voice must
pre-exist, it cannot be created, but Its
errors can be corrected. Mere bigness
of voice makes no musical appeal.
History gives to us that the record
for a big voice belongs to Stentor, a
herald of the Greeks In the Trojan
war, whose voice was said to have
been as loud as fifty men shouting to-
.gether. A bass singer, whose name is
' Cheron, of the Paris opera, who lived
toward the end of the eighteenth century, and who in early life had been a
blacksmith, is said that, by his blowing in a drinking glass could crack it,
and by singing into it his mighty upper "D" could burst It. The biggest
and noblest voice that this twentieth
century has listened to was Edouard
de Reszke's.
Tbe musicians of today are usually
exceedingly versatile In their activities, but in former times it was only
too common for them to be confined
to an absurdly narrow and one-sided
outlook on life, and to take little interest In anything outside of their own
particular specialty.
An amusing example of this was
with Puppo, an eccentric violinist, at
one time fashionable teacher In Paris
and London. Living in Paris at the
time of the revolution, although perfectly Inoffensive, he was denounced
as n suspect and brought before the
tribunal for trial. The following dialogue took place between him and the
president of the tribunal. "What Is
your name?" "Puppo." he answered.
1 "What do you do?" "I play a violin."
"What were your activities during the
reign of the tyrant?" "I played the
violin." "And nowadays?" "I play
the violin." "And If tho republic has
need of you what wlll you do?" "I
will play the violin." Puppo was acquitted.
The impression or influence thut
musicians leave behind them Is little
realised by themselves and we certainly do not know to what extent of
trouble, difficulty or short comings
some of these musicians worked under. Think of the beautiful music of
Grelg, much of It written while he had
the use of one lung only. Schubert,
whose artistic career lasted but seven
years, was the most miserably poor of
all musicians, yet he Is regarded as
the greatest song writer, producing
the most beautiful melodic phrasing.
BILL'S GRAVE
Wake up, BUI, old pard, wake up,
And tell of the trail you have followed far.
Did  It lead all  right   to   a   buttery
ledge
And puy-streuks under a shallow bar
On a gold belt crossin' a purple star?
Do they grub-stake miners and take a
share
In the gold camps where you are?
I'll start a lire and make the bread,
From the same old can of sourdough,
And you just cross your legs and
talk,
For there's a lot of things I want to
know;
I'll make the coffee and fry the meat
And you Just wind up and let her go
Till I tell you the mess Is ready to
eat.
For that's the way we did, you bet,
On   tho   stampede   here   whon   the
strike was new,
Ilut nary a claim since you left me,
Hill,
Have I struck that I would divide
with you.
Many a cabin I've built since then.
Many a sluice I've shovelled full;
Many a tunnel I've blasted out
Till pick and brain and drill were
dull.
|    I'm tired. Bill, of the big stampede;
I'm tired of trailing the luck god in;
Strikln' It now ain't what It was,
I    Aud I don't care much since you are
|       gone.
| Wake up. Bill, and tell the truth—
:    And the   truth   you'd   tell   If   you
talked at all—.
; In the big camp on tho other side
Did you strike It rich or lose your
all?
G. F. PHELPS:
He—There's an awful rumbling ln
my stomach—like a cart going over
a cobblestone street.
She—It's probably that truck you
ate for dinner.
"That antagonist of yours says he is
going to leave footprints In the sands
of time"
"He won't," replied the M.P.P. "His
mind is in the clouds. He Is an Intellectual aviator. When he comes
down he will leave a dent, not a footprint."
"What brought you here, my poor
man?" inquired the prison visitor.
"Well, lady," replied the prisoner,
"I guess my trouble started from attending too many weddln's."
"Ah! You learned to drink* there,
or steal, perhapB?"
"No, lady; I was always the bridegroom."
Hub—It seems to me that you come
to this office a good deal more than
'there is any occasion for.
1 Wife—I can't help It, dear. Your
manners ln the office are so much
nicer* than they are at home that I
really enjoy the contrast.
FORESHORE  LEASE
Nelson  District,  Vancouver Island.
TAKE NOTICE tbat the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, of
Victoria, U. I'.. Colliery Owners, intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from tbe South-East corner post
of Lot 11, Nelson District, thence East
ixteen hundred feet (1600 ft.) to the
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along the approximate low
water mark to a point due Eust from
the South-East corner of tho North
Fractional half of the South-West
''Hurler of Section 32, tlienco West to
aforesaid corner of said fractional
part of Section 32, being the original
high water mark, thence Northerly
following original high water mark,
being the Easterly boundary of Section 32 and D. L. 28 In said Nelson
District to point of commencement,
containing in all nlnety-slx (96) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Graham, Agent.
Dated October 4. 1920.
LAND  ACT
NOTICE OK INTENTION TO APPLY
*TO LEASE LAND.
In (he Nelson Lund lllstrlcl, Hecnrdliiit
District Niimilnio, and situate one
mile In a Northerly  direction from
Inliiii Bay on Baylies Sound.*
TAKE   NOTICE   that A. E. Water-
houso, of Port Alberni, Merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post plumed at the
south-east corner ot Lot 11, thence ln
a north-westerly direction following
the shore five thousand eight hundred
(5,800) feet more or less to the northeast corner; thence east five hundred
(500) feet more or less, thence approximate low' water mark; thence ln a
south-easterly direction paralleling the
shore to a point east of the point of
commencement, thence west five hundred (600) feet more or less to the
point of commencement, and containing forty (40) acres more or less.
ARTHUR E. WATERHOUSE.
Name of applicant.
K. B. Fraser, Agent.
Dated 17th August, 1920.
10-47-NV12
A
The Photoplay With An Amazing Soul
Out of the Underworld
Imagine the worst sharks that exist in
New York's Chinatown—a daring cracksman, a beautiful girl as tough and wipked as
a snake, a faker who counterfeits any deformity, a dope-fiend as sly as a weasel.
Imagine such crooks in a little village, invading the lives of other human beings as
good as these are bad—the acid of sin striving to bite into the gold of pure hearts.
Imagine all you've known of good and bad
in this world, and even then you can't imagine the wondrous appeal of "The Miracle
Man."
The whole of life, illumined! The flesh,
the blood, the soul of living men and women
—sinning, struggling, loving.
The reek of the under-world, the lure of
the sea, the breath of the fields in summer.
Fused, with a thousand smiles and tears,
into a great dramatic entertainment that
will live forever in your heart.
Jkxflcwer Photoplay Corporatiou   Presents
GEORGE LOANE
TUCKERS
PRODUCTION
/*? came home to him that
she was Straight
"She—she's a bad girl, Martha. Come
away." ,
"If it weren't for men   like   you—there
would never be any girls like her."
*i
"I was like her once—nice and sweet—just
like her."
"Courage, Honey, a good thought can't die
—and that's what he was—a Good Thought."
She was almost unable to comprehend a
man whose desires were not master of his
soul.
"What's it goin' to profit a man if he gains
all thc coin and loses his girl."
A photoplay with an amazing soul! All
that is fine, all that is sorrowful, all that
allures in the act of living—pictured in vivid
scenes that thrill, startle or inspire. One
screen entertainment you'll never forget.
Come and live a life in an hour!
IL0=IL0
Children
25c.
Adults
^TONIGHT
rj Pour
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
October 23, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE  Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER ,23, 1920.
TEMPERANCE VERSUS PROHIBITION
By a tremendous majority the voters of British Columbia
have declared for "An Act lo Provide for Government Control and Sale in Sealed Packages of Spirituous and Malt
liquors" as against the retention of the present Prohibition Act. Among the high percentage cities In the "Control" column was Cumberland, where no less than 401
votes out of 528 cast were In Its favor. The result ls
just about what the average man, who uses his own brains
and has not allowed the smoke screen of intemperate
oratory or propaganda to obscure his vision, thought would
happen when the entire population had a fair chance to
express their opinion on the present Prohibition Act. This
Act has been a dismal failure from the start—an absolute
farce and thing of contempt in the eyes of fair-minded and
honest citizens.
The Act was put through when the nerves of the people
were highly strung on account of years of war, and when
thousands of our best manhood were overseas, a large
number of whom never hud a chance to vote on the question.
Perhaps the least said of that episode the better; anyway
the Injustice of that time has been amply vindicated by the
present overwhelming majority for Temperance and Justice.
It must be admitted that much good has been done' by the
elimination of the sale of strong drink over the bar. The
unfortunate part of it ls that the spirit of the measure was
not carried to Its full Intention. A strict enforcement of
the present Act by the Provincial Government would have
removed many of the evils at present existing, notably the
use of so-called "near-beer" by young people. Much good
along this line can be accomplished hy the enforcement of
sane moderation laws.
One of the surprises to election officials was the number
of "out-of-town" votes polled, these amounting ln Cum
berland to nearly ten per cent, of the total vote, and was
a cause of much delay at times.
The remark was frequently heard that the women's vote
would go strong for Prohibition. At no time was this
paper aligned to this opinion. Women are usually quicker
than men to notice an injustice and they certainly used
their first vote under the new franchise to good purpose in
this instance. In New Zealand, where women have had
the vote for the past twenty-seven years, they have always
contended strongly for Temperance as against both Intemperance and prohibition. The result is a sober nation
without coercion.
At the time of writing no announcements has been made
by the Government regarding the Provincial election, but
this probably will be decided at the meeting of the Cabinet
to be held this week-end. The Government ls almost sure
to go to the country at once.
Whichever party is returned to power will have no easy
task In creating an Act to carry out the wishes of the
population as expressed In the vote on Wednesday. They
must have the hearty support and co-operation of all classes
ot citizens if the new legislation Is to be effective and In
the cause of true temperance compatible with liberty. As
was said by one of our leading citizens on election night,
if Government Control Is to be n success It depends, ln the
last analysis, on the people themselves—you and I.
The Influence of British Columbia's vote this week should
have results reaching far beyond her borders. On Monday
next other Provinces in the Dominion will vote on the Prohibition question, and the splendid example set by the
Sunset Gateway of the Dominion wlll probably be emulated
hy them.
POSSIBILITIES OF NORTHERN B. C.
Col.W. B. Greeley, chief of the United States Forestry
Service, after a tour of Alaska, returns most enthusiastic
In respect to the production of pulp and paper ln that coun
try. He ls right, in spite of the fact that New York Interests
decry the idea of going so far afield for either pulp or
paper. And by the same token, Canadian forest reserves
northward along the coast line from Vancouver as far as
the International boundary will sooner or later be taken
into consideration by those who are looking for the future
development of the pulp and paper business.
From Vancouver north as far as Skagway, a distance of
approximately a thousand miles, the writer recently saw
Incredible quantities of standing timber ot the very finest
pulp and paper making varieties. This timber is not In
patches nor of small, Interior quality, but stood up there as
It had tor a thousand years, a seemingly endless forest,
ranging from the ocean level, up the mountain sides until
tlmberllne" Is reached and the eternal snows begin. It
s there, readily accessible, by the billions of feet, and never
has a woodsman's axe touched even the edge of this huge
mass of potential wealth.
The natural advantages of pulp and paper making along
the Pacific Coast cannot long be overlooked. Here ls
an Inland waterway, the result of glacier action ages ago,
which extends from Vancouver to Alaska. At no stage of
a steamer's journey ls one subjected to rough handling by
the Pacilic Ocean for more than a few hours, as for Instance when passing through Queen Charlotte Sound, which
s unprotected from the Pacific's billows for a space covered in three hours' steaming time. All along this protected ocean highway there ls water and to spare. It would be
rare, Indeed, to find a location where a large ocean freighter
could not safely navigate within a stone's throw of these
hickly wooded shores.
All along this route are waterpowers, not ln numbers to
count on one's fingers, but literally by the hundreds, that
some day will be harnessed for the use of man. And there
U this to remember in respect to climatic conditions: the
average person ls under the impression that Northern
British Columbia and Southern Alaska is Just one huge
cold storage vault, whose chief crop is glaciers and Icebergs. Nothing could be farther from the truth. On and
near the coast line the warm Japanese current has much
the same effect as has the Gulf Stream in certain portions
of the Atlantic	
With the Panama Canal In working order, the shipment
of either pulp or paper from Northern British Columbia
aud Alaska in cargo lots should be altogether feasible, and
if properly directed, give large returns to those who have
the courage to enter this comparatively unknown field.—
Saturday Night.
OUT OF TOUCH WITH PUBLIC SENTIMENT
When Hon. John Oliver, Premier of the Province, was
Informed Wednesday night ot the result of the Temperance
Plebiscite, he is reported to have said, "I am very much
surprised." After touring the Province for months past,
visiting almost all sections in his speech-making tour, he
returns to Victoria so much out of touch with the people's
affairs that he is taken by surprise on a matter that has
been self-evident for a long time to the average, Intelligent
citizen. Honest John has another surprise coming soon—
when the votes are counted in the Provincial Election,
which is almost sure to be held before Christmas.
AN INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT
Thirty-one thousand representatives of Italy's labor
forces have formed a co-operative shipping association.
They have purchased five ocean freighters, which are
operated by oflicers and men of the Italian mercantile
marine, each an owner in the fleet and Its profits. Their
profits, which are large, and a fraction of their wages go to
pay for the ships and to buy others. It the association
continues to operate profitably It wlll be extended. The
laborers ln this case are also capitalists and will reap a
double reward from their labor and from their capita).
A NEW SPIRIT WANTED
So long as the German people remain ln their present
mind German Industry will continue ln a comatose state.
The Allied nations have no desire to force upon Germany
peace terms that she cannot fulfill. They desire to see
Germany Industrially prosperous, to forget the national
animosities awakened by the war. But they are Inclined
neither to pardon Germany nor permit a release on probe tlon until the German people have made restitutions for
the material damage wrought upon their neighbors. That
s the sine qua non of the restoration of amicable Industrial
elations with Germany.—Los Angeles Times.
NOT DEAD YET
There Is a type of person going about today prophesying
the prompt dissolution of the British Empire. "Look at
Egypt*," he cries. "Look at Ireland! Look at India!" We
are quite prepared to contemplate all these countries not
only with equanimity, but with cheerfulness. Both Egypt
and India are going through a process of change Inevitable
as East and West come more in contact. The pace of this
growth has been immensely stimulated by the world shock
of the war. Naturally there are growing pains—that is all.
This vitality is a sign of life, not of death. It would indeed
be time to despair of the Empire If its Constitution and
governing minds wore so fust set In the old ways that they
did not permit of local native self-government.—London
Daily Kxpress.
APOSTLES OF GLOOM
Between Bolshevism, the Income tax and the rise threatened ln the prlc of coal because of the "vacations" of the
miners everybody nowadays Ib Inclined to be pessimistic.
Time was when men and women were accustomed to look
on the bright side of things, to laugh occasionally and to
enjoy the fleeting moments as they passed, but now a
Cimmerian gloom seems to have settled on the human race
and the world so rarely smiles that the gayety of nations
may he supposed to have gone Into the discard and been
ost In the shuffle.—Washington Post.
Rev. Billy Sunday has gone east "to raise the devil."
The Calgary Eye-Opener says that what the world most
needs at the present moment ls a "non-passable buck'."
AN INEVITABLE TEST
Christian missions to "dark continents" Include medical
us well as religious services. Backward peoples aro shown
both Ihe physcial and the spiritual vulue of the Christian
message.
The conservation of human life Is the distinctive feature
of our civilization which permits its practical supremacy
over that of other lands. "Civilization" with us moans
"health." "Cleanliness ls next to Godliness" is more than
a saying; it Is one of tho great principles on which wc as a
people assume to act.
The heathen horrors of tuberculosis In Its ravages
throughout this country is alien to our boasted manner of
life. It lowers the degree of our civilization. The fact
that more Canadians died of tuberculosis during the war
than were killed at the front blots our history during a
glorious episode.
Christianity stirs a great pity lor human suffering and
untimely death, and also recognizes that the only compassion worth while Is that which leads to remedial action.
Christ healed the sick. Christian civilization cannot persist
while the ravages of preventive disease remain unchecked.
The sum of Injustice perpetrated by the human neglect
which unchains such furies as tuberculosis far surpasses
that of any other folly of our day.
The forms and exercises of civilization are not enough;
men must express the faith that is in them in their dally
lives.  The health of thc people ls an inevitable test.
One of the mysteries of automoblllng ls why men riding
with wives not their own have more mishaps than when
with their martial partners.
A Montreal newspaper contains two city hall advertisements, one for a "senior law clerk, $1020 a year," and the
other for a "furnace man for municipal bath, $1080 a year."
Let school teachers be ot good cheer. A young man who
had followed that profession for four years has just Inherited $50,000,000.
All Oklahoma's prospective bridegroom forgot his fiancee's
first name when he applied for the marriage licence. He'll
remember It all right later ln married life when he gets
over the "dearie" period!
A waggish correspondent of a contemporary who says
he has not noticed cottage pudding on the bill of fare for
ome months, Inquires If Its absence ls due to the shortage
of houses.
A gun-trap In a Kingston orchard went off and shot a
boy who was stealing apples. Had this gun-trap system
prevailed years ago, the world might have lost some of Its
greatest men.
William Jennings Bryan haB taken olllces on the sixth
floor of the new national headquarters building ot the
Methodist Episcopal Church ln Washington. Must want
to be up where It's good and dry.
Next year the federal taxpayer will have the privilege of
paying his Income tax In several Instalments, Instead of alt
at once. This sounds something like the man who cut off
the dog's tail an inch at a time ln order not to hurt him
so much.—Sun.
SPECIALSALE
OF MEN'S PANTS AND
Boys' School Bloomer Pants
ODD LINES IN MEN'S WORSTED AND TWEED PANTS—Values from ti>A  nr
$5.75 to $7.50.   Special Sale Price  <ijrr« I O
A SPECIAL DISCOUNT OF 10 PER CENT. ON OUR NEW FALL STOCK OF MEN'S
PANTS.
50 Pairs BOYS' BROWN STRIPED BLOOMER PANTS—Sizes 22 to 27. (PI   OK
Values to $2.25.   Special Sale Price, pair  <P J.*4U
175 Pairs BOYS' GREY AND BLACK TWEED BLOOMER PANTS— (pO nr
Sizes 27 to 35.   Values to $3.90.   Special Sale price, pair  eJueU. I O
Ladies' Shoes and Oxfords
THE BALANCE OF OUR SPECIAL SHOE SALE STOCK OF LADIES*     dJO QC
SHOES AND OXFORDS—Values to $6.50.  Sale Price  fP&,OD
Boys' Heavy School Shoes
BROKEN LINES IN BOYS' HEAVY SCHOOL SHOES—Sizes 1 to 5'/*.        (StA  TK
Regular price $5.50 to $6.75.   Sale Price    *JJt;« I D
Men's Blucher Calfskin Shoes
THE BALANCE OF OUR SPECIAL SHOE SALE STOCK OF MEN'S BLACK AND
MAHOGANY BLUCHER CALFSKIN SHOES d*/» nr
Special Sale Price, pair    tpU» 11#
SPECIAL-
TEN  PER  CENT. DISCOUNT
on all Men's, Ladies' and Children's Shoes, including our new Fall stock of Slater, Ames
Holden, Williams and Leckie lines.
Complete Stock of Ladies' Misses' and Children's
Fall Underwear just arrived
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B..
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets in preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book*
The experience of veteran motorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
-  complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence ln its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay \<>
October 23, 1920.
■THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Five
j Music and Photoplays
"THE MIRACLE MAN"
RANKS WITH GREAT
FILM MASTERPIECES
Fine Big Story in Paramount-
Artcraft Picture at Ilo-llo
Theatre Today.
Published originally as a novel In
Munsey's Magazine, written by Frank
L>. Packard and later dramatized by
George M. Cohan and presented with
phenomenal success on Broadway, the
Paramount-Artcraft picture, "The Miracle Man," will be shown al the local
theatre to day, both matinee and evening shows.
As a motion picture this absorbing
story haa been hailed by the critics as
one of the Anest productions ever seen
on the screen. With scenes laid lu the
haunts of criminals In New York's
Chinatown, ln a little village on the
side of a roaring ocean, the opportunity for wonderful photographic effects
has been realized to the limit.
But the chief Interest ls ln tbe striking story, which centres about tbe venerable figure of an old patriarch, who
la credited with the power to heal the
alck and make crippled limbs whole
again. To blm come Tom Burke and
his band of crooks from New York's
Chinatown with the Idea of cashing ln
on his powers. But It doesn't work
out as they calculated, tor hidden away
ln each of them Is a leaven of good,
which slowly comes to the surface under the Influence of their wholesome
environment. In a most marvelous
way tbe criminals are reclaimed from
the paths of crime.
CONSTANCE TALMADGE
"THE LOVE EXPERT"
She Analyzed Heart-Throbs and
Romance, Becoming a Specialist in Prescribing Love-Mates
for Touch-Me-Not Females.
Proclaimed by Eastern critics as the
most delightfully original screen comedy of the year, "Th* Love Expert,"
starring Constance Talmadge ln an
original story and adaptation by John
Emerson and Anita Loos will show at
tbe Ilo-llo on Monday evening.
In almost every other EmerBon-Loos
attraction, a theme note based on a
popular conception serves as the Idea
about which the picture Is built. For
Instance, in this day of specialization,
what should be more natural than for
a young, romantic girl to take upon
herself the duty of developing an original science of the heart and emotions.
Thus, you have the secret. Babs Ib a
boarding school girl, utilizing her time
neither on trigonometry nor athletics
—but on the subject of love.
The Big Deduction.
Chemically speaking, Babs arrives
at certain formulas Involving the love-
making science, for wblch she will
talk or fight. One of her pet theories
Is the fact that when a person Is In
love, his cheeks wlll take on a scarlet
blush, his heart will syncopate and
his pulse wlll accelerate.
MAX LINDER CAVORTS
IN PARISIAN COMEDY
A French Comedian Who Knows
How to Make American
Audiences Laugh.
Max Llnder comes to delight his
admirers In "The Little Cafe," a
merry aobmedy laid in a Paris cafe.
Air. Llnder plays the role of a waiter
who falls heir to two million francs,
hut Is unable to give up "waiting"
without paying a forfeit. This he wlll
not do becuuse he realizes he has been
tricked into the contract that calls
for his services for twenty years, or a
(orfelt If he quits.
In order to get some fun out of his
fortune. Max works all day and night,
ills vaiiuus affairs of the heart lead
him a merry dance, hut when they
learn that be is a waiter, they desert
hliu, leaving only Yvonne, the barmaid,
to be true to him—which is just as It
should be.
Max wll cavort iu "The Little Cafe"
at the Uo-llo Theatre ou Wednesday
evening next. It Ib a pathe feature
and an adaptation ot the popular
musical comedy of that name.
*   *   *
"THE THIRD EYE"
Babs ls sent home from boarding
school because she persists lo carrying on her fanciful love researches
Instead ot studying ber lessons. Continuing these experiments at home,
her father, the Influential and stern
Mr. Hardcastle, punishes Babs by
sending her to Aunt Cornelia ln Boston Instead of taking her to Palm
Beach, In Boston, Babs finds a wonderful field for an expert ln affairs of
the heart. Aunt Cornelia has for six
years been engaged to the handsome
Jim WInthrop, Hardcastle's Boston
manager, but a wedding Is remote as
Jim has two unmarried sisters and an
elderly aunt to look out for. Something had to be done, and tt was Babs
who did It by means of a fake telegram which results ln her going to
Palm Beach with ber troupe of Bos-
tonians, to the amazement ot her
father. Romance after romance followed ln the wake ot her experiments.
Then comes tbe news from Boston that
Aunt Cornlls, who had been left behind, had married a college professor.
This news does not break the handsome Jim Wlnthrop's heart, for the
"love expert" uses one of her unfail
Ing remedies.
Episode III.—"In Destruction's Path"
As Rita Moreland leaps from the
roof In her flight from Malcolm Graw,
she swings on the telephone wire
acroBs a narrow courtyard to a fire
escape and enters the opposite building. Graw hurries down to the door
and catches sight of her as she ls
coming out of the door. He pusueB
her through a back alley and she runs
through a stage door to a theatre. The
coat she is wearing becomes caught ln
the heavy door and In her flight she
leaves It there.
Ou reaching the door Graw gets the
coat, in the pocket of which he linds
tbe film which apparently proves Rita
guilty of the murder of Curtlss Steele.
Then he returns to his home where
Zalda Savoy, a member of the "Evil
Eyes," and In love with Graw, has
hidden the photograph of Steele's eye
which proves Rita Innocent of the
murder.
Zalda' plans to get the film, thereby
bringing both Graw and Rita into her
power. She does not tell Graw that
she has the photograph of Steele's eye,
but he shows her the film and bids her
watch him hide It In a cabinet. Any
one attempting to open the cabinet
without first pressing a secret button
wlll be Instantly killed by two long
knives which shoot from the wall.
Zalda, stunned by jealousy, writes a
note to Rita Moreland tn which she
says that the Him Is hidden In a wall
cabinet ln Graw's library. She tells
Rita that the French windows to the
library will be left unlocked that night
and that the theft ot the film will be
simple.
When Graw's household ls asleep
Zalda unlocks the French windows
and retires.
In the darkness two robbers enter
the open windows a few minutes be-
for Rita and Dick, In answer to Zaida's
note, come to the library. The robbers force open the wall cabinet iu
their search for money and are killed
by the knives. In the confusion that
follows Rita gets the film and flees
from the house, but Dick is captured
by Graw's men, some of whom follow
Rita. The girl leaps Into a waiting
automobile and speeds down the road
As she Is crossing the railroad track
the front wheel of the machine breaks
In front of an approaching locomotive.
"The Third Eye" will be Bhown at
the Ilo-llo on Wednesday and Thurs
day of each week.
She—And knowing my sentiments
on the subject, did that odious Harold
Connors insult you by offering you a
drink?
He—That's what he did.
She—And how did you resent It
He—I swallowed the insult.
"SCARLET DAYS" IS A
GRIFFITH PICTURE OF
THE OLD-TIME WEST
It was an unusual masterpiece as
well as a thrilling motion picture that
David Wark Griffith set about creating
when he produced "Scarlet Days," his
new production which Is coming to
the Hollo Theatre on Saturday next,
October 30. He aimed to tell the glowing story of the old California of the
days of '49, portraying on the screen
what Bret Hartc has so entertainingly
told In Action. With this end In view,
Mr. Griffith journeyed with his company to old Tuolumne, a deserted mining town which In Its palmy days was
two miles of miners' huts, saloons and
dance halls. Amid these ruins the
eminent producer recreated the old
village and the characters In "Scarlet
Days" are the red-blooded folk who
used to live there In the days ot the
gold rush.
Rosy Nell, a dance-hall woman, and
Alvarez, the mild-mannered, dashing
bandit, at once the terror of the
sheriff and tbe best friend ot the poor,
are the central Agures, both authentic
personages ot California history, and
a thrilling story Is said to have been
woven about them. Richard Barthel-
mess, the brilliant young actor, Ib the
desperado and a thoroughly competent
cast Interprets the other roles, It ls a
Pararnount-Artcraft picture.
HISTORIANS GIVE LITTLE OF TIIE
DOMESTIC LIFE OF GREAT MEN
Historians give us little of the domestic life of the great figures ot the
world," says Harold MacGrath, discussing the plot of his romantic novel,
A Splendid Hazard," which has been
produced for the screen and is now
being released.
In my novels with an historic background, 1 try to make them conform
as nearly as possible to historical
data, while at the same time Injecting
the human element.
"Napoleon, for example, was not
alone an extraordinary military genius, but u human being of flesh and
blood. He was an Intense lover and
just as Irrational and suspicious as
the more humble lover. His letters
to hla one-time pampered Josephine
bring out clearly that his emotions
swayed him almost as strongly as his
lust for world domination. To her he
wrote at one of the most critical moments of a campaign:
' 'A thousand kisses on your eyes—
your lips.'
'He petulantly upbraided her for
not flying to his arms while he was
tolling over the goat paths of Lom-
bardy. So, while he was a bold-
blooded chastener in the midst of
war's horrors he was susceptible to a
passionate extreme to the mastering
witchery ot a woman.
"The tradition of the existence of a
son born without beneflt of clergy ls
told and accepted as an Indisputable
fact ln the Island of Corsica. A Bavarian serving maid is reputed to
have been the mother. Up to the
period of his downfall, the Little Corporal ls said to have made careful provision for the mother, it being another
of his traits that be never neglected
one who had In any degree won his
friendship.
"With such material to work upon I
wrote 'The Splendid Hazard,' in which
are exploited the ambitions of this
love-child of the man who made the
powers of the world tremble."
NARROW ESCAPE
Who Is that terrible looking woman?
That's my sister.
Oh, that'B all right;  you ought to
see mine.
The black-haired boy had a mighty
contempt for the tow-headed boy.
"Huh," he said, "your mother takes ln
washing."
"Of course she does," the tow-headed satirist retorted. "You don't sup-
pose she would leave it banging out
at night unless your father was In Jail
do you?"
Mr, Borer (on being introduced to
his adored one's mother)—"Pardon
me, but have we not met before? Your
face seems strangely familiar?"
The lady (coldly)—"Yes; 1 am the
woman who stood up before you for
half an hour In a railway carriage the
other day while you sat reading a
paper."
IN VINO AB8ENTIUM
A shot rings out upon the air,
A woman staggers down the stair—
Ye gods! her eyeB are open wider,
The cork's blown out of the family
eider!
Mr. Tllton was surprised one
morning by reading the announcement
of his own death In a newspaper.
He at once called his friend Jones.
"Hello, Jones. Have you seen the announcement of my death In the
paper?"
"Yes," replied Jones. "Where are
you talking from?"
You are lying bo clumsily," said
the observant Judge to a litigant, who
was making a dubious statement of
his case, "that 1 should advise you to
get a lawyer."
PASSION'S KISSES, OR AN ADVENTURE OF A MAN ABOIT TOWN.
"Nora," wheezed the mlddlc-agcd
man about town, "you're the sweetest
thing I've ever hugged."
She lowered her eyelids and pursed
her full red lips, waiting to be kissed.
"Kiss me again," he cried. She
rained kisses upon his face.
Just then his wife appeared ln the
doorway.
"Time for little girls to be in bed,"
she said to her three-year-old daughter.
Drink to me only with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but ln the cup,
And I'll not look tor wine.
There once was a person named Cox,
Who wanted to wear Wilson's box,
But his friends made a boiler
When they found Wilson's collar
Was wrapped ia the very same box.
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, October 23rd
A Paramount Artcraft Picture
George Loane Tucker's
PRODUCTION
"The Miracle Man"
It it weren't for men like you—there would never
be any girls like her.
Monday, October 25th
CONSTANCETALMADGE
IN —
The LOVE EXPERT
She knew her soul mate the moment she clasped hands with him, but to
get him she first had to marry off the entire family. Talk about a miracle
worker, Zowie! Old ones or cold ones, longs or blondes, veterans or
youngsters, she matched 'em all off in short time. "The Virtuous Vamp"
and "In Search of a Sinner" were so very, very good, it wouldn't do to
miss "The Love Expert."
Tuesday, October 26th
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
JOHN BARRYMORE
— IN —
HERE COMES THE BRIDE
Wednesday, October 27th
MAX UNDER
IN —
"THE LITTLE CAFE"
A Spicy Menu of Comedy
From Soup to Nuts—All Comedy Courses—Side Dishes of Smiles—
Laughter Cocktails—Pep, Jazz, Spice—A Banquet of Banter!—A Feast
of Farcical Fun!—Served in Snappy French Style-—Naughty and Nifty.
Wednesday and Thursday, October 27th and 28th
the Third Episode of
"THE THIRD EYE"
"In Destruction's Path"
Coming Saturday, October 30th
Clarine Seymour
-IN-
"SCARLET DAYS"
Probably the most romantic and picturesque period in America's history
was the days of '49. Can you imagine a D. \V. Griflith production with
those times as a background? He's done it. It's called "Scarlet Days,"
and it's a Paramount-Artcraft picture. This big production will be shown
at the Ilo-llo Theatre on Saturday next, October 30. Don't miss it. Six
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
October 23, 1920.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of aflluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
A SOUTH AFRICAN'S
IMPRESSIONS OF CANADA
Member of the Empire Press
Party Writes Interestingly of
What He Saw on Tour of the
Dominion.
Uy N. LEVI, Editor of "Der Volkstciu,'
of Pretoria, South Africa.
| USE
| Electric Appliances
No good housewife wants the little imp? of dirt, bad air,
spoiled food, stifling heat, lost time and waste in her kitchen.
She has only tolerated them because ahe didn't know how to get
rid of them. The Electric Range has shown her the way. The
minute it is installed fn her kitchen, dirt gives way to cleanliness,
bad air lo pure air. The food becomes betfer flavored, all the
cooking more uniformly successful. The kitchen is a cooler place
in which to work, the housewife finds her leisure hours increased,
and the bills grow less. The transformation is really wonderful;
no one who has ever known the convenience and comfort of electric cooking would ever willingly go back to other methods.
You can have this range in your kitchen. The cost is very
moderate in proportion to the service it renders. Once installed,
you will value it more highly than any household convenience
you possess. There is an Electric Range to fit any requirement
of large or small families, big or little kitchens.
■ THE IMP OF BAD AIR
= You know how bad the air can
■= get in your kitchen when the
= range   is   in   operation — how
== distressing the smoke or gas-
55 eous fumes become.   That they
== are   positively   dangerous   you
■§=: may not realize until you notice
== that plants wither and die in
= the     poisonous     atmosphere.
== Where   plants   can   not  live,
== human   being   cannot   thrive.
== Your health demands the ellm-
SB ination of these noxious gases,
= the banishment of the imp of
■•=— bad air.
THE GOOD LITTLE
FAIRY OF PURE AIR
Because it has no flame, the
Electric Range has no poisonous fumes to vitiate the air and
endanger the health. Nor Is
there any smoke to choke the
lungs. The air Is pure—free
from the insidious gases so destructive that even plants cannot survive in air contaminated by them. Plants thrive in a
kitchen equipped with an electric range—a sure test of the
wholesomeness of the atmosphere. Think how much more
comfortable you will find it to
work ln a kitchen that does
not get stuffy.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains ot this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out tliat it Is a serious
offence to tamper with suoh vulves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
"When we landed, I was not quite
stranger to Canada, although my foot
had never been on the soil. I had often sold Canadian Cheddar, and bought
Canadian apples, to say nothing of the
lung, tiling, neck of the Canadian lino
1 had fondled through the clicking
watches of Hansard nights in the
Transvaal capital. 1 hud got near to
Acadia In Zangwill's "The Master,"
where all men may read how people
Bearched for Capt. Kidd's treasure—
'and the deeper they dug, tlie bigger
holes they found." I hud learnt to
admire not only Pierre and his People,
but Jules of thc Great Heart in Lawrence Xlott. Something, too, of the
stupendous north country had quickened my sluggish imagination, for
Stefansson can write as well as march,
and others have written of him.
Sydney was an epitome of it all.
There we were hailed witli the eager,
personal welcome by the Canadian
fellow-journalist. We felt the strong,
eloquent grip of the Canadian hand.
We saw the living lires at those ironworks. We envied tho intellect behind
labor-saving devices, as well as the
rewards paid to plain working men.
We drank the iced water, but we also
ate the candies and the side dishes—
a material earnest of your many-sided
kindness to the strangers from across
the seas.
From Jamaica we had come, from
ihe Australasias, from the Cape of
Storms and the Strip of Mummies, from
.Malta, Honk Kong and from the British Isles, of course. Sometimes (when
the "bonds of blood" talked loudest) I
felt like a fly In the ointment (or shall
I say like the fly In the amber?), wondering how tlle devil I got there! It
is but a few years since the Boer people, whom my paper serves, acquiesced
in the Union Jack. However, the other
delegates treated the ugly, little duckling as If it hud been from the same
pond all the while; and Canadian
friendship shines on the just and unjust alike, for which thanks be rendered, from Nova Scotia as far as Vancouver Island."
At Sydney we noticed that Canadians
no longer dig merely for the pleasure
of making big holes. That night, after
having found a good home In "Grand-
mere" (how comforting the nomenclature of your railway carriages!'
and sampled the finished product of
your railway diners, I saw the Bras
d'Or.
Heaven help me. I thought I had
never in my life seen anything before!
Just what it was I cannot say. Waters
smiled tenderly; little, rocky promontories held out loving arms; masses of
sombre green on the unfamiliar trees
blended with the gentle melancholy of
the falling shades; unseen voices
spoke; all the glories of the palette
were concentrated in that single, brilliant color of a sunset such as comes
but seldom in a lifetime.
A new Continent stirred me. It
clamored in tones so piercing that, for
all their softness, they brooked no denial. My heart gave way before the
onrush of that delicious pain. Ever
since it has been yours. It is good
for man to be alone, sometimes; glad
I felt that, on my initiation into the
solmen mysteries of Canada's great
charm, I was left undisturbed until
the night blotted out the unforgettable
Hcene.
of dainty dinnora( to statistics of what
you huve to offer.
We even conferred a little at Ottawa. For, although in tlie title of this
unrivalled Plc-Tjic, all the emphasis is
on the lirst word, and there is quite a
fair amount of press, the Conference
idea was not entirely swamped. No,
no, uo, as Our Lady Dulegute would
say! In those fine parliament buildings, that look almost too neat for the
use of politicians, wo spent three days,
and part of un evening besides, settling the fate of empires ami of composing-rooms. We very nearly asked lor
a penny-n-word premium on any press
cables wo condescended to hand ln.
We heard the "Greater Britain" on
Partnership. Wo abolished the other
"ship" to which the censor tonus the
prolix. Tho mighty voice of your countryman, Sir Campbell Stuart, rung out.
Newfoundland was almost too shy to
apeak, but Anzac hud a fair Innings. I
wonder what passed through the mind
of the stylish gentleman from Parsee-
land. He said nothing, but no doubt
he thought quite a lot.
Your Ministers came down to do us
honor; your Opposition leader was excelling fluent. He gave us advice, and
severely has he been punished.
The manner of our closing scenes
was something In the nature-of anticlimax, but let that pass. Through it
all, Lord Bumham took the self-denying part of the presiding genius of a
British gathering, ever patient and
with an eye ready to be caught by the
humblest member—diligent in noting
down amendments and helping us to
the last
We revealed in Montreal, the elegant. Did anyone say it was expensive? Many of us, poor folks who
come from backward countries, would
have been utterly ruined on such a
tour at an early stage, if it had not
been for tlie extent to which we have
been taken care of. Be it known, despite a transparent conspiracy on the
part of our brother scribblers, thac wc
visitors are not all either owners or
editors. Several of us have to work
for a living. We are pleased that
Canada is a land of a well-to-do democracy, that everybody here is well
dressed and well fed. But your tariffs must often he a terror to unsuspecting visitors, nnd if you would be
a tourist country to others than your
American cousins, you will have lo
treat us gently on the exchange at
least.
Wo were almost mute at Niagara.
We hear a deal of English spoken,
but tlie great American language was
always with us, and one has recollections of listening to Robert Donald's
discourse in French.
Mr. Southby showed us what can he
done nt a summer residence, and a
forty-mile /concrete road to Toronto
filled us with amazement. The Queen
City itself well, who would mention her charms in so small a compass? At the charming yacht club
pavilion (where Sir Roderick of Rcu-j
ter reminded you of your duty to Central Europe.) there was not the soot
of the Queen's sable locks.
Begin Your '
Trip Right
by selecting the shells that
hunters from coast to coast
have proved dependable'
under alt conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
are a double assurance ci
success for the man who
prefers balHstite powJtr.
We nl«o c-ar.-i- a full li-o r.f
C.inucktuul hovoreiftn Shot-
gun Shells »v.d Dominion
Metallic  Cartridges — each
backed by tlie bin "D" tr..*" >-
mark
Chariie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING CHONO, Or*-* **erland
HONG CHONO ft CO.. Bevud
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Duy anil Night.
AUTO
PAINTING
General Woodwork, Auto Bodies,
Trucks and Wheels built u order
ltcpnirs  l'rciinptlj.   Attended to.-
Jas. C. Allan
Cor, l-rldi'iiux Si Fitzwilliuiii Sts.
NANAIMO, B. C.
m Phone 75
P.O. 314
III
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Who would attempt to describe, or
even briefly to indicate, all that we
have since enjoyed: The strength ol*
your towns; the solid performance and
bright promise ol' your farms; the
delicate witchery of scenes sucli us we
witnessed when those languid canoes
displayed on-.'the Waegwolttc.
We sensed the greedy passion of
your Reversing Fulls at SI. John. We
helped you, by the ever graceful hand
of Lady liuriiham. to reverence an
Idea In the land of Evangeline, while
our thoughts went back to the poor
fellows whom one could only figure as
"pleurunt le pays perdu." We stood
amid laughing orchards and the pomp
of kindly-disposed lieutenant-governors In stately parliament buildings;
sniffing the quaint fragrance of old
Quebec; lighting all over again, with
an eloquent colonel, those battles of
tho brave, old days. We worshipped
In the power-houses of paper mills,
lofty enough to be cathedrals. We
looked the pigmies we are beside the
wonderful piles of wood thnt hail
swum their hundreds ol miles through
enchanting river scenery. We lunched
off gorgeous salmon, performed social
rites at many an afternoon tea, laid
down the law, and listened at dozens
The Intensity of your social life was
nowhere tasted so fully as on that
good ship wliieh carried us across
majestic lakes. In all your huge
hotels, and ln even in the smallest
state-rooms of your, lake leviathans, a
Band of Gideon leaves bibles. These
are useful for a soothing return to
Habakuk after a midnight on the
waves. So that one gets to Port Arthur and more heat, after appreciating
the huge locks and collapsible bridges with which you plot to bring the
Atlantic to your inland waters.
The mountains bordering your hikes
are splendid, and so are motor drives
through dozens of miles ot* prairie
whcalllehls. Hut what has South
Africa done to you that you Simula"
have aiempied to bump ihe head oil'
Ihe Venerable chairman of our ilolo-
gatlon?
.   *   *
In .various dining hnlls (nnd elsewhere!) we listened In your music. 1
am not now listening to your silver-
tongued orators, many oi whom were
so modest, that I could barely understand half of what thoy said. It is
your bands that make me state, quite
truthfully, thnt never in the course of
a chequered career have I ever listened to anything like It. If the
States supplied you with tlie jazzes
and the one-steps as well as witli the
Instrumental combinations that produced them, then blessed be the
States; But at the Laurier they once
ventured on a Bethoven minuet, and
the Edmonton dinner was rendered
more suave by a litle orchestra in
wliieh a saxophone hud no part.
In my country we flatter ourselves
that we know something about mosquitoes. It is flattery, pure and simple. Canada ls superlative In the mosquito   line.     Your   mosquitoes   mean
A. I.. Williams
A. T. Webb
COURTENAY
PLUMBING
COMPANY
SANITARY PLUMBING
— liny) —
GENERAL REPAIR
WORK
Corner Comox Road and ■
Lake Trail
COURTENAY, B. C.
Telephone til
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and  Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
Paolo Monte
Shoemauer
,   Shoe Kepnlrlng a SDecialtj.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
and
Workmanship
('uiiriiiitied
lluuhcr Heels Fixed While II Wait
Phillips' Military Heels and Soles.
S. DAVIS  •  Dunsmuir Avenue
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
W.M.MKHHIr'IKI I),    Proprietor.
GOOD  ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT   CUISINE
We make a specialty of
CHILDREN'S
Photographs
Have a picture of your
children taken now before
they lose their charms of
childhood.
BARTON
THE PHOTOGRAPHER
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, B. C.
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barber has four times
the shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
(Continued on Page Seven)
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. H. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
Fresh Stock of
MOIR'S
Chocolates
In All Flavors.
Large Stock of Nut Bars.
Tobaccos, Cigarettes and
Cigars.
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS 6ctober 2&, 1920.
mt  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
P.
ti
Okanagan Apples
MACKINTOSH    REDS
O.K. Brand No. 1 Stock
Special $4.50 Box
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
Kantleek
Hot Water Bottles
A Rexall Product
It can't leak because it's made in one piece—that's
why we guarantee satisfaction or your money back.
COMPLETE LINE OF KANTLEEK RUBBER
GOODS—Prices 40c up to $4.75
Frosts Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
Cumberland, B.C.
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles:
Chevrolet. Dodge, Chalmers,
Hudson Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize in REPUBLIC TRUCKS and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
Prompt Service
FIRST   CLASS   REPAIRS
Full line of Accessories, including
some choice
AUTO RUGS
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Cumberland Motor Works
A SOUTH AFRICAN'S
IMPRESSIONS OF CANADA
(Contlued from Page Six)   .
Queensland's
Miner Premier
business. They are at It all the time;
so far from sticking to pools, they
swarmed around me as I changed Into
a sweater at the observatory on Sulphur Mountain, 3,000 feet above Banff.
•   .   *
Winnipeg Is great, and greatly
Slavonic. Everybody was most kind,
and the new parliament building ls a
cloak of many colors. At Regina we
saw the Mouutles pick up a handkerchief in passing.
At Calgary, Mr. Bennett was extraordinarily eloquent and refreshingly
candid. The children who sang and
danced for us turned out darlings. It
is well that man Ib kept lu check by
the fear of the police, when kidnapping
begins to enter his thoughts.
The Rockies were a revelation.
Those stark, white masses, bordered
dark below and blue above, overwhelmed me. A thousand pities that
mountain fires obscured some vIcwr
und thickened the air we breathed.
Lake Louise is the place a mountaineer dreams of but seldom sees, and the
drive to Lake Moraine on a heavy
motor bus, an excruciating pleasure
over such a narrow road, with awesome bends. But the Valley of Ten
Peaks gives adequate reward.
Vancouver makes us, middle-aged
men, ashamed of the many things we
neglected to do In thirty-live (ahem)
years of existence. The Capllano Limits are a delight for giants; the run to
Victoria is a sheer Joy. As for that
city itself, and the home of the But-
chart family, all ot us were of one
mind: excellent. In Victoria you wlll
even fJiid big bookshops and Interesting antiques.
Almost a score of local Inhabitants
drank our toast at that dinner, and
the mood might have been most cheerful.
...
We all enjoyed the Brat lap of the
way back. As we reached the end of
the Fraser Canyon, It was hard to believe that we were not In the South
African desert, The Selklrks we
missed both ways, but In the morning
Mount Robson dazzled with Its great
whiteness, and Lucerne looked Indeed
a part of Switzerland. This part of
the country appears to offer great
variety to the ordinary, non-expert
climber. The mountains are more hospitable than the long limestone semi-
slopes near Banff, and so compensate
In large measure for the absence of
striking forms such as those of Mt.
Temple and Cathedral Mountain.
At Jasper tlie two gorges (the
Mallgne and the Barbecue) were immensely enjoyed. That night the moon
was on the waters and the greenish
Northern Lights In the sky. The most
touching day of our tour was at Edmonton, when thousands of young
throats cheered with such sincerity
and spuontanelty as no "tiger" can
ever give. At Waluwrlght we somewhat astonished the kindly natives:
Lady Newnes whistled two solos, and
our two youngest men, Sir A. Hol-
brook and E. Woodhead, accompanied
themselves on the piano. Sir Arthur,
who is a mere septugenarian, la our
record dancer.
...
The finale still lies In the Immediate future. We are to have inter
lala some more Winnipeg, with reminiscences of our young Labor orator,
who does not know what Bolshevism
is, but warns us solemnly agalUBt encouraging It by Insufficient appreciation of him and his.
We have had the time of our lives.
Our indebtedness to the Canadian
(may I specially mention Lord Athol-
stan?) can never be repaid; there are
other hosts, too numerous to mention.
We shall always remember the speed
of the Canadian automobile as It turns
a comer; the liveliness and size of
your newspapers; the imposing dimensions ot all your undertakings; your
unclouded days and unclouded brows;
your elevating Influences, In the enormous grain belt, and less literally
taken, the maple syrup of your welcome and the cream of your fellowship, which after all are but expres
slons of your community spirit. We
forgive you your humorous illustra
tions.   Amen.
None of us can ever he the same
again, after having tasted ot your delights, looked on at your enterprises.
We are bound to take away something
bigger In our compositions. We shall
be the better for It. We shall always
long to come back. We shall be worse
than ungrateful if we fail to invite
you most heartily to all our countries.
We feel more than we can express.
What can we say, but Thanks!
—Montreal Dally Star.
(World's Work)
Mr. Theodore lias a striking personality, and is still what Ihe world calls
young man.' His career has been
both rapid in its development und surprising in its success. For he only arrived in Quensland from South Australia, tits native place, some fifteen
years ago, and he came to his new
home as a working miner.
But that stern attention to work,
that amazing grasp of his surroundings, tliat quick sight of what makes
for success which lind always been
part of Mr. Ernest Theodore's chief
characteristics, stood him ln excellent
stead. His intense interest In local
politics and In sorial questions affecting his neighbors and the community
in general soon made him a conspicuous figure amougst the younger generation of Queensland. He was elected
to a seat In tlle Legislature, and now,
fifteen years after his coming to
Queensland, he finds himself chosen
as its Prime Minister.
The young Premier has a wonderful
and enthusiastic belief iu the great
and successful future awatlng his
province. He will tell you with quiet
peech but with kindling eye and sure
conviction in its tone, that no other
airltisli possession beyond the seas can
olfer the young emigrant more, or
grander opportunities than can Queens
laud. All sons ot farming are suecess-
ul there, he says.
Mr. Theodore will tell you how, apart
(rom his own almost meteoric success
ill QueniislanU, he knows many men
who came there with no more capital
than any ihing betwen iUuu and £200
less than ten years back, who have todays (arms worth anything betweu
£1,600 and £3,00*1', all their owh-wlio
have homes comfortable and happy,
have wives and families all doing well
and living lives such as men and women were really meant to live, in Hod's
own fresh air rather than ln miserable
city slums.
The Premier Insists on the advantages that Queensland offers to all
those healthy, strong and ambitious
settlers, whether men or women, who
come to her young and resolved to win
through. No land Is alienated from the
Crown there, so that no man acquires
a right to take to himself for ever all
the best soli and leave the worst to
others.
BANK
==WITH US=
OPEN
Vour Account Today
If You can afford to spend,
You can afford to save
R0\AL BANK OF
CANADA
f. a. McCarthy, manager Cumberland branch
Mabel—Why doesn't Jack take you
to the theatre any more?
Evallne—Well, you see. one night It
rained and we couldn't go so we sat
in the parlor. But, anyway, I think
theatres "are an awful bore, don't you?
OSTERM00R MATTRESSES
HAVE DROPPED $6.00 EACH
NOW $30.00
BEDS AND BEDDING
SIMMON'S ELECTRO-WELD and RESTMORE STEEL
BEDS—A good assortment and range of prices.
MATTRESSES and SPRINGS—A large assortment for
you to choose from.
BLANKETS—In White, Grey, Red and Brown, ranging from $10.00 to $30.00 a pair.
PILLOWS—A new stock just opened up.
BEDSPREADS—Some very fine spreads, ranging up
to $12.00 each.
Couches
A new line of Couches to hand this week
ALL OUR LINES ARE WELL SELECTED AND
PRICES ARE RIGHT
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SPECIAL
TODAY   ONLY
"I'm going to get a nice little wife.
I'll have a cozy little home, well cooked
meals, my slippers ready for me when
I get Home at night, my pipe always
handy to me and peace and contentment for the rest of my days."
"You never ought to marry."
"Why ever not?"
"Well, when a man has a dream like
that he ought uot to risk waking up,
50 Pairs Boys' All-Wool
Stockings, reg. $1.35 a
pair.   Today only - - -
TWO PAIR FOR
$2.25
RIDEOUT'S
SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
If you have a message to send to a
girl, the Boston Transcript tells you
how to "say It with flowers";
If you consider her a wise girl, say
It with sage.
If you think it cold, say It with
snowdrops.
If you desire to marry her, say It
with a poppy.
If you know she has a sweet tooth,
say it Willi candytuft.
If she Impresses you as a sad girl,
say It with rue.
If she Is of a happy, joyou* nature,
say It with (lladlolas.
If Khe seems u prunes and prisms
sort of girl, say It wtih primula.
If you think her a sour, sharp-
t/mgucd old maid, say It with snapdragons, suliiip and a century plant.
WE "JIIXJE" THIS IS "LIKE"
"I hear Helen has divorced her husband."
"Yes. She thought she wus marrying a 'Woman's Home Companion,'
but she got a 'Cosmopolitan.'"
"He's an awful ladles' man."
"I know It.   I've seen him with some
awful ladles." Eight
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
October 2$, 1&0A
Blankets -- Blankets--Blankets
PENMAN'S GREY BLANKETS are the most desirable you could desire for a reasonable
price.   Size 52 by 72 inches.   Per pair $7.95.
PENMAN'S GREY BLANKETS, nicely finished and well woven.   The name of Penman's
is sufficient guarantee that the blankets are good.   Per pair $11.95.
PENMAN'S GREY BLANKETS, beautifully made; most desirable for good service;
made in large size, 60 by 80 inches.   Per pair $12.50.
REAL HUDSON  BAY RED BLANKETS, three and three and a half point, the acme
in the blanket line.   Guaranteed to give   great  satisfaction  and  the  best  service
desired.   Per pair $26.00.
WHITE WOOL BLANKETS, medium weight.   Per pair $19.50.
REAL YORKSHIRE BLANKETS, in White only; one of the very best grades made; you
will have to see these to appreciate the beauty and soft feel of the wool and finish.
Price, per pair, $31.00.
0
Comforters      Comforters      Comforters
As well as a good pair of Blankets you require a nice Comforter to give you perfect
comfort, for after all you spend a big part of your lifetime between bedclothes.   So why
not be comfortable?
COMFORTERS filled with pure wadding and well made, $8.50 each.
COMFORTERS in sizes 72 by 72 inches, which is the large size; covered with good quality sateen and well filled, at S8.50 each.
WE HAVE A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF REAL EIDERDOWN COMFORTERS,
finished in specially good coverings.  See these.  Prices $16.50, $22.75 and $35.00.
MEN'S COATS
MEN'S HEAVY WINTER TWEED COATS, lined with rubber.   Just the coat you need
for our climate.   We invite comparison.   Price $35.00.
MEN'S MACKINAW COATS in Belted styles.   For service and appearance you will do
well to see these.   One of them will be your best friend during the long cold evenings.
Special price, $19.50.
PHONE 134
DRYGOODS
GENTSFURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mrs.'Scott, ot England, accompanied
by her daughter, Mrs. Brock, Is paying
a visit to Trooper Scott of the Mounted Police.
• •   •
Mr. Godley ot Vancouver waB a visitor in town Thursday, leaving Friday.
• *   •
Mr. W. Marshall, manager  ot  the
Geo. A. Fletcher Music Co. Ltd. ot this
city,  returned   from   Vancouver   on
Thursday.
a    a    a
Mr. Alan Nunns went to Vancouver
Friday morning.
• *   *
Mr. Earl Fletcher returned to town
Thursday.
• *   *
Mr. P. S. Fagan, Assistant Secretary
ot the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., returned to Victoria on Wednesday.
• *   •
Mr. J. H. Stevens, ot the Canadian
Collieries  (Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned
to Victoria on Wednesday.
a    a    a
Mr. and Mrs. Parfitt of Victoria arrived in town on Saturday and returned on Wednesday. While here
they were the guests of Mr. and Mre.
S. Horwood.
• a    a
Mrs. A. R. Stacey returned from
Vancouver on Thursday night.
a    a    a
Nurse Gisborne, who was about to
leave for Calgary, has gone back to
the Cumberland General Hospital on
account ot pressure of work there.
Miss Hassell, sister ot Mr, G. Hassell, arrived from Vancouver on Wednesday.
• •   a
Mr. Henry Devlin, Inspector ot
Mines, arrived ln town Thursday
night.
In Cumberland
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
rand--:
Courtenay, B.C.
The following are the Prize
Winners at' the Semi-Monthly
Drawing of the G. A. Fletcher
Music Company's
October 14—Princess Beatrice, Nanoose, C. P. R. Hulk No. 1OT, Beatrice,
Vancouver; Tuscanstar, New York;
Coquitlam, Faultless, coastwise.
October 15—Oregon and scow, Seattle; Topaz, Active, coastwise.
October 10—Peerless, coastwise;
.Metliven, China; Buster B., coastwls..
October 17—Tarter, Ocean Falls.
October IS—Princess Ena, Skagway;
Merrll Ring and scow, Duncan Bay;
Shamrock, Masset, Dauntless, coastwise.
October 19—Storm King, Prospective No. 2, coastwise.
October 20—Chemainus, Wireless,
coastwise; Valdez, Cordova, Alaska.
$250
Competition:
CUMBERLAND DIVISION
First Prize—R. Adamson, with
ticket No. 1012.
Second Prize—Miss  Bird, with
ticket No. 1002.
Third Prize—Miss  M.  Picketti,
with ticket No, 1016.
REFRESHMENTS FOR
G. W. V. A. OPENING
The Veterans wives and sisters are
requested to send refreshments to the
G. W. V. A. Memorial Hall on Dunsmuir Avenue on Tuesday afternoon, at
2 o'clock, to be used in connection with
the opening of the hall that evening.
Mr.   J.   Hutcheson  returned
Vancouver on Wednesday.
from
SPECIALS
ST. CHARLES MILK—Family size 2 for 25c
VW^WWWV^VW**WV^^W^WV^VW^^\»^'»A«^^^«^^^^^^'*^A«^*»,*«^^a^a«*^^^^^
SQUIRREL PEANUT BUTTER—
1-lb. tins, 35c 5-lb. tins, $1.75
WHITE CREST APRICOTS—1-lb. tins 25c
LIBBY'S   PICKLES
SOUR MIXED
SWEET MIXED
SWEET CHOW
SOUR CHOW
GHERKINS
SWEET RELISH
25c. PER BOTTLE
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
BY ST. JOHN'S FIRST AID
PUNTLEDGE NOTES
COURTENAY DIVISION
First Prize—Mr. T. Cliffe, Comox, with ticket No. 24.
Second Prize—Mr. D. Gatehouse,
Courtenay, with ticket No. 60.
Third Prize—Mrs. R. Duncan,
Courtenay, with ticket No. 42.
$250 in Prizes
:      A TICKET WITH EVERY
DOLLAR PURCHASE.
A delightful dance was held a^ No.
8 Mine School, Puntledge, on Wednesday evening, The Jazz Band from
Courtenay made things "hum" for the
enthusiastic dancers.
a    a    *
Mrs. J. Cornwell arrived home after
visiting friends in loco, Vancouver.
.   .   *
John Bell entertained his school
chums with a party in honor of his
twelfth birthday.
POLICE COURT
Particulars at Our Stores.
************
* *
* "LET THE REST OF THE *
* WORLD GO BY" HAS  *
* ARRIVED     *
***********
LARGE SHIPMENT OF
NEW RECORDS
THE GEO. A.
FLETCHER
MUSIC GO. LTD.
COURTENAY PHONE 22
CUMBERLAND     PHONE 104
Before Magistrate John Baird.
BUI Theros, a licensed jitney driver
of Cumberland, was fined $f,0 and costs
for furious driving, he being charged
witli driving to the danger of the public on the Pacific Highway.
Geo. Nclll of Union Bay was fined
•Sfii) anil costs for assault.
Seven frequenters of a bawdy house
wero each fined $20.
PRIZE WINNERS IN
GEO. A. FLETCHER
MUSIC CO. DRAWING
In the semi-monthly drawing ln connection with the Geo. A. Fletcher Music
Co. $250 Competition, which took place
yesterday under the editors of the
Comox Argus and The Islander, the
following persons secured prizes:
Cumberland Division.
First prize, Mr, R. Adamson, with
ticket No. 1012.
Second, Miss Bird, No. 1002.
Third, Miss M. Picketti, No. 1016.
Courtenay Division.
First, Mr. T. Cliffe, Comox, No. 24.
Second, Mr. D. Gatehouse, No. 60.
Third, Mrs. R. Duncan, No. 42.
The company announces the arrival
of a large shipment of new records.
Mrs. Brown—This dinner is fit fer
a king.
Brown—Mo for a republic.
Don't be like
McSwiney—
goto
KELLY'S
and get a
square
meal
The annual wrist drive and dance
under the auspices of the St. John's
First Aid and Mine Rescue Association
will be held ln the Ilo-llo Dance Hall
on Friday, November 6th. Good prizes
will be given. Admission, gents one
dollar and ladles refreshments. The
whist drive commences at 7.30.
Miss Miller ot Vancouver arrived ln
town Saturday last.
* *   *
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd. left tor Ladysmith on Wednesday.
* •   •
Mr. Charles Reynolds returned from
a visit to Vancouver on Tuesday.
* *    a
The H. T. Peterson Construction Co.
of Vancouver has ben reorganized. It
ls now known as the Phoenix Contracting Co., Ltd., with Mr. H. T. Peterson as president and Mr. Charles
Reynolds as managing director.
* *   •
Guests at the Cumberland Hotel during the past week Included:
Sunday—Carveth Wells, Victoria;
H. Nesbitt, Campbell River; Mr. and
Mrs. Hazelhurst and daughter.
Monday—W. L. Clarkson, Vancouver; W. L. Burns, Vancouver; D. A.
Richards, Vancouver,
TUESDAY—H. W. Goggln; E. R.
Coates; F. Beech; Mr. and Mrs. L. E.
Goe; T. Yasanaka, Vancouver; Geo.
Hymers, Victoria.
WEDNESDAY—T. D. Andrews, Vancouver; B. Poulton; H. H. Lewis, Victoria; J. Cameron, Chicago; F. Bent,
Victoria.
THURSDAY—C. Corso, Nanaimo;
Mrs. E. Cavanagh, Nanaimo; Mrs. T.
T. Hamilton, Endacho; A. Lodge, Bowser; T. Ward, Vancouver; Wm. Green,
Wellington.
FRIDAY—W. E. Campbell; Chas.
Sangster, Vancouver; G. Cortlyou, Ta-
coma; Col. C. J. Ryan, Vancouver;
C. H. Glllis, Vancouver.
Athlete—I'm a little stiff from lacrosse.
Jim—Wisconsin?
""■a
"The Miracle
Man"
has been generally acclaimed as
the greatest photoplay ever produced, not only because It was
cleverly screened and played by
a capable caste, but chiefly because it waB based on a magnificent story.
Frank L. Packard wrote "The
Miracle Man," and Frank L.
Packard Is a Canadian. He is,
in fact, one of the most popular
of the quite large list of Canadian authors. His books—"The
Adventures of Jlmmle Dale,"
"The Wire* Tappers," "The White
Mole," etc., always sell ln hugs
quantities.
"The Miracle Man" is coming
to the Ilo-llo on Saturday, October 23, matinee and evening.
FLOUR
ROYAL STANDARD—49-lb. sacks  $3.80
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD—24-lb. sacks  $1.95
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR—7's  65c
49-lb. sacks $3.50
SMALL WHITE BEANS—Per lb 10c
SPECKLED BAYO BEANS 3 lbs. 25c
(<VVNl'*>^'**"»»***V'*''******>*l*^^
Also A Full Line of Fresh
FRUITS  AND VEGETABLES
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38.
Limited
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
October 24, Twenty-First Sunday after
Trinity.
Sunday School, 2.30.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
ROYSTON—3.30.
BIRTHS
BARBER—At the Cumberland General
Hospital, October 21, to Mr. and MrB.
A. Barber, of Bevan, a daughter,
SORA—At   the   Cumberland   General
Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Sora,
October 17, a son.
OPENING OF FORESTERS'
COURT THIS EVENING
The new Court of the Ancient Order
of Foresters will be Instituted this
evening, and will be designated
"Court Bevan" of Cumberland, B. C.
A strong delegation of P.D.C.R.'s,
D. C. R. and P. C. R.'s from all points
north of Victoria will arrive this afternoon to take part in the formalities.
The Institution of the Court and the
Initiation of candidates will be performed by a degree team selected from
the visiting brethren. Election and
installation of officers wlll be the next
order of business. The evening will
then be spent ln a way known to this
ancient order.
^4     SINCE §1670      **m
Shilo
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHCBCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Mass at Cumberland, 9 a.m.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. 0. B. Kinney, B.A., F.R.G.9.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at 2.30.
Evening Service at 7.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening
at 7.30.
Choir practice Friday evening at
7.30.
ANGLICAN CHURCH NOTES
Girls' Society of Holy Trinity.
The Senior Girls of Holy Trinity
Sunday School have formed a society
for social and educational purposes.
Katie Richardson ls president and
Harriet Gomm is secretary-treasurer
The executive committee consists of
Olive Jones, Mildred Oliver and Margaret Bunbury,   •
The society meets each Thursday
from 3.30 to 5. Mrs. Leversedge and
Miss Dalton are the advisers.
Thanksgiving Service.
The Anglican Church was beautifully decorated with appropriate fruit,
grain, vegetables, flowers, etc., for the
Harvest Thanksgiving services held on
Sunday last. At the evening service,
which was largely attended, the choir
sang Simper's anthem, "All Thy
Works," and at the end of the service
a solemn "Te Deum" was sung to
Jackson's setting.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OP
NANAIMO, HOLDEN AT
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
In the matter of the Estate ot Takl-
shl Fachino (or Takechl), deceased,
and In the matter of the Administration Act.
TAKE NOTICE that by order ot Hla
Honor Judge Barker, made the Ith
day of September, 1920, I was appointed Administrator to the estate ot
the said Takashi Fachino, or Takechl,
deceased, and all parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby required to furnish same properly verified to me on or before the 16th day ot
November, A.D. 1920. And all partita
Indebted to the said estate are required to pay the amount of their Indebtedness to me forthwith.
WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 9th day of October, 1920.
4-44
HELP WANTED
WANTED—GOOD RELIABLE GIRL
or woman for general housework;
no washing; extra help comes ln;
good wages to right person. Apply
Mrs. Geo. K. MacNaughton.
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED IN
private family. Address J. Vernon-
Jones, c-o Islander Office.
FOR SALE
EDISON FACTORY BEING
BUILT IN DOMINION
The Thos. A. Edison Co. has secured
a site and started to build a factory in
St. Thomas, Ontario. The establishment ot an Edison factory ln Canada
should add greatly to the efficiency of
better service to Canadian patrons.
Newfoundland ls the smallest self-
governing dominion ln the Empire.
BUILDING AND LOT ON CORNER
of Fifth Street and Dunsmuir Ave.
Lot 6, Block 15. Building containing 16 rooms, store, cellar, barn, two
garages and other outhouses. For
further particulars apply C. Mussatto
on the premises. 4-46
Cumberland
Conservative
Association
A meeting of the above association
for re-organizatlm purposes will be
held in the association's new offices ln
the King Building on WEDNESDAY
EVENING NEXT at 8 o'clock prompt.
THOS. E. BATE,
President.
JOHN C. BROWN,
Secretary.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0070712/manifest

Comment

Related Items